"Good or bad I want to politely let you know it's not helpful," Jonah Hill shared on Instagram on Wednesday.

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Jonah Hill on a designed background
Credit: Getty Images / Gabriel Olsen

Jonah Hill is setting a boundary with his friends and followers.

The 22 Jump Street star, 37, asked that people not make comments about his body in a brief message posted on Instagram Wednesday. He shared the simple black text to his feed with no caption.

"I know you mean well but I kindly ask that you not comment on my body ❤️" he wrote. "good or bad I want to politely let you know it's not helpful and doesn't feel good. Much respect."

The comments of the post were filled with friends and supporters of Hill's message, including comedian Aidy Bryant, who left a green checkmark emoji. Actor Daniel Franzese commented with a single fist emoji.

Model Tess Holliday wrote, "THIS 💯💯💯💯💯💯." In another comment, she added: "LOUDER"

Last month, Hill shared another message of self-love in the form of a new tattoo.

Hill's new body art features a yellow circle on his shoulder with the words 'Body Love' and a geometric hand in the middle, which appears to be his own take on the Body Glove brand logo.

In a snap shared to Instagram, Hill looks over his shoulder and grins at the camera as he flaunts his new tattoo. "BODY LOVE 🤘❤️," he captioned the post.

The two-time Oscar nominee has previously spoken about feeling insecure and being body-shamed in his early life.

"I became famous in my late teens and then spent most of my young-adult life listening to people say that I was fat and gross and unattractive," he wrote in his magazine, Inner Children, in 2018.

Earlier this year, Hill said he was "finally" able to "love and accept myself" after years of struggling with self-esteem. After The Daily Mail published photos of Hill surfing and shirtless in February, he shut down critics on Instagram.

"I don't think I ever took my shirt off in a pool until I was in my mid 30s even in front of family and friends," the Moneyball actor wrote. "Probably would have happened sooner if my childhood insecurities weren't exacerbated by years of public mockery about my body by press and interviewers."

Hill added, "So the idea that the media tries to play me by stalking me while surfing and printing photos like this and it can't phase [sic] me anymore is dope. I'm 37 and finally love and accept myself."

This story originally appeared on people.com