Healthy Korean Recipes

Find healthy, delicious Korean recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Staff Picks

Sweet & Spicy Soy-Braised Short Ribs

The sticky sauce on these ribs, made with tamari (or soy sauce), gochujang, grated pear and honey, is inspired by bulgogi, a staple of Korean barbecue. Don’t skip the step of running them under the broiler before serving—it gives the ribs the crisp edges you’d get from grilling. Serve with stir-fried baby bok choy and brown rice to sop up the delicious sauce.
By Breana Killeen

Quick Cucumber Kimchi

Rating: Unrated
6
While slowly fermented cabbage and pungent garlic are the ingredients most people associate with kimchi, there are dozens and dozens of other versions of Korea's national dish, featuring all manner of vegetables, such as these quickly pickled cucumbers with just a trace of garlic.

Korean Chicken Soup

Rating: Unrated
4
This quick and easy spicy chicken soup recipe is made with leftover cooked chicken and is spiked with garlic, ginger and hot sauce.

Gochujang Stir-Fry Sauce

Rating: Unrated
1
Get Korean street-food flavor with this quick and healthy homemade stir-fry sauce. Use it for stir-fries, as a marinade for chicken, beef or pork or for tossing with Asian noodles.

Korean Grilled Mackerel

Rating: Unrated
3
Oily fish, such as mackerel, are strong-flavored and pair well with boldly seasoned glazes made from gochujang chile paste. The red, rich paste is so common in Korea that it is sold in virtually every supermarket in plastic containers ranging in size from about 2 cups to about 2 quarts. Normally the main ingredients are fermented soybeans ground with red chiles and powdered rice, plus a little salt and sweetener.

Slow-Cooker Korean Beef & Cabbage Stew

Brown sugar makes this slow-cooker beef stew a tad sweet, which beautifully complements the spicy kimchi. You can make this soup ahead and refrigerate it until ready to eat. If you opt to make it ahead, wait until you reheat the soup to add the cabbage.

Seaweed & Tofu Soup

Rating: Unrated
2
Korean meals always include soups--like this mild one based on vitamin-rich wakame seaweed, the same kind often used in miso soup.

Kimchi Shrimp Cup of Noodles

Make your own cup of instant soup at home with this Korean noodle recipe. Pack several jars at once to take to work for easy lunches throughout the week.

Broccoli, Mushroom & Beef Stir-Fry

Rating: Unrated
6
This healthy beef and broccoli stir-fry recipe has a Korean-inspired gochujang sauce. Because stir-fries cook up quickly, have all the ingredients prepped and next to the stove before you turn on the heat. Serve over brown rice or rice noodles.

Soy Sauce Eggs

Rating: Unrated
2
Try this salty-sweet hard-boiled egg recipe as a swap for deviled eggs at your next party or as a midday snack. Or serve on top of your next ramen noodle bowl.

Korean BBQ Tempeh Grain Bowl

If you're a tempeh skeptic, you've probably never had the firm soy-based slabs slathered with a sweet-and-spicy barbecue sauce. We give this easy BBQ tempeh combo a punch of umami with tamari and add a little heat courtesy of gochujang. It's easy to put your own spin on this recipe; see Variations (below) for some riffs.

Homemade Kimchi

If you are looking to start fermenting your own vegetables, the Korean dish kimchi is a great place to start. It's easy to make, and fermentation takes just a few days. Once you have kimchi on hand, serve this healthy dish along with any meal, as an ingredient in stir-fries, stews, savory pancakes and more, or as a condiment to liven up grain bowls, tacos, sandwiches--and the list goes on!

Inspiration and Ideas

21 Korean-Inspired Recipes for Sunday Dinner

For Sunday dinner, these Korean-inspired recipes are a delicious and healthy choice. These recipes feature popular Korean flavors and ingredients like gochujang, kimchi and beef. Whether it’s Korean Steak, Kimchi & Cauliflower Rice Bowls or Korean Chicken Skewers (Dak Ggochi), these dinners are a hearty and filling way to end your weekend.

Sesame-Seasoned Spinach

Rating: Unrated
4

In Korea there is an entire category of side dishes called namul. These are boldly seasoned vegetables from the land and the sea. This particular recipe reflects Korea's love of both spinach and sesame seeds. The seeds are always toasted before serving for a boost of flavor. This namul can be served alone or as one of the colorful elements in bibimbap.