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Chinese cooks typically stir-fry shrimp in their shells for a more flavorful dish. You can do the same, but we recommend first removing the tiny legs. While rice may seem like the logical side, braised greens, such as chard or spinach, are actually just as traditional.

Source: EatingWell Magazine, February/March 2005

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Recipe Summary test

total:
30 mins
Servings:
4
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Ingredients

Sichuan Sauce
Shrimp

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • To prepare sauce: Whisk broth, tomato paste, vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, sesame oil, cornstarch and crushed red pepper in a small bowl. Set the sauce near the stove.

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  • To prepare shrimp: Place shrimp in a colander and rinse under cold water. Drain and pat dry with paper towels.

  • Heat a 14-inch flat-bottomed wok or large skillet over high heat until a bead of water vaporizes within 1 to 2 seconds of contact. Swirl in 1 tablespoon oil; add garlic and ginger and stir-fry for 10 seconds. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil and the shrimp and stir-fry until the shrimp just begin to turn color, 1 minute. Add bell pepper and salt and stir-fry for 30 seconds. Swirl in the reserved sauce and stir-fry until the shrimp is just cooked, 1 to 2 minutes. Serve immediately.

Tips

Make Ahead Tip: To make ahead: Prepare the shrimp through Step 2, cover with paper towels and refrigerate for several hours before cooking.

Tips:
Chinkiang vinegar is a dark, slightly sweet rice vinegar with a smoky flavor available in many Asian specialty markets. Balsamic vinegar is an acceptable substitute.

Shrimp is usually sold by the number needed to make one pound. For example, “21-25 count” means there will be 21 to 25 shrimp in a pound. Size names, such as “large” or “extra large,” are not standardized, so to get the size you want, order by the count per pound. Both wild-caught and farm-raised shrimp can damage the surrounding ecosystems when not managed properly. Fortunately, it is possible to buy shrimp that have been raised or caught with sound environmental practices. Look for fresh or frozen shrimp certified by an independent agency, such as the Marine Stewardship Council. If you can't find certified shrimp, choose wild-caught shrimp from North America--it's more likely to be sustainably caught.

People with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity should use soy sauces that are labeled "gluten-free," as soy sauce may contain wheat or other gluten-containing sweeteners and flavors.

Nutrition Facts

about 3/4 cup
170 calories; protein 16.4g; carbohydrates 6.1g; dietary fiber 1g; sugars 2.6g; fat 8.8g; saturated fat 0.8g; cholesterol 142.9mg; vitamin a iu 463.8IU; vitamin c 34.7mg; folate 26.8mcg; calcium 71.4mg; iron 0.6mg; magnesium 32.7mg; potassium 269.5mg; sodium 387.8mg; thiamin 0.1mg; added sugar 1g.

2 1/2 lean meat, 1 fat

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