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Angel Biscuits
Rating: Unrated
2
Angel biscuits are lighter than traditional buttermilk ones because they contain yeast as well as the usual baking powder and/or baking soda. Making the dough in advance is not only convenient, but also gives the yeasty flavor time to develop and shine.
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This buttermilk pie is a stunner—and perfect for the holidays—with its creamy, golden custard marbled with a crimson cranberry swirl.
Pear Upside-Down Cake
Rating: Unrated
New!
In this update of a retro dessert, a judicious amount of caramel coats the bottom of the pan before the fruit and batter are added. If you have a melon baller, pull it out—it's the perfect tool for coring pears.
Turkey Stock & Gravy
Rating: Unrated
1
We tend to think of gravy as a last-minute holiday hassle, whisking like mad over a hot stove right before dinner is served. But there's absolutely no reason not to make it ahead of time using turkey parts.
Creamy Smoked Trout Spread
Rating: Unrated
New!
Here the smoky flavor of the fish pairs exceptionally well with the robust bite of horseradish and onion. Serve with crackers, apple slices or cucumber slices for an easy appetizer.
Sage Cornbread Dressing
Rating: Unrated
1
This sage cornbread dressing can be made ahead of time for Thanksgiving. If you have it, leftover turkey stock can be used to moisten the cornbread.
This Brussels sprout slaw is the perfect complement to any dish. The bright lemon dressing adds acidity and freshness, while nuts and dried fruit add texture.
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For this old-fashioned Southern cucumber and onion salad, thin slices of cucumber and onion marinate just long enough to develop a touch of tanginess without any sharp bite. Serve with sweet dishes like barbecue to lend a refreshing balance.
This satisfyingly moist and dense cake uses a tried-and-true technique for baking. Most cakes go right into a hot oven so all the rising happens fast and the cake firms up before any batter overflows out of the pan. With pound cake the batter is so dense that a speedy rise isn't necessary. So here we start the cake in a cold oven and then bake at a relatively low temp. Besides the convenience of no preheating, the cake rises slowly as the heat increases, resulting in a wonderful crust and tender, moist crumb. Serve drizzled with orange curd (see Associated Recipe) for a touch of seasonal citrus.
This Brussels sprout slaw is the perfect complement to any dish. The bright lemon dressing adds acidity and freshness, while nuts and dried fruit add texture.
For this old-fashioned Southern cucumber and onion salad, thin slices of cucumber and onion marinate just long enough to develop a touch of tanginess without any sharp bite. Serve with sweet dishes like barbecue to lend a refreshing balance.
This satisfyingly moist and dense cake uses a tried-and-true technique for baking. Most cakes go right into a hot oven so all the rising happens fast and the cake firms up before any batter overflows out of the pan. With pound cake the batter is so dense that a speedy rise isn't necessary. So here we start the cake in a cold oven and then bake at a relatively low temp. Besides the convenience of no preheating, the cake rises slowly as the heat increases, resulting in a wonderful crust and tender, moist crumb. Serve drizzled with orange curd (see Associated Recipe) for a touch of seasonal citrus.
Orange Curd
Rating: Unrated
New!
This decadent orange curd recipe provides a blast of citrus that will make citrus lovers pucker with joy. This technique is slightly different than a traditional curd in that the butter is whisked into the egg-sugar mixture as it's heating rather than being creamed with the sugar first. It is a bit more fussy than just mixing it all up in the pot, but the velvety results are well worth it. Spoon it over Buttermilk Poundcake (see Associated Recipe) or over scoops of vanilla ice cream.