Shaun Dreisbach
Shaun Dreisbach

Shaun Dreisbach

Award-winning writer and editor, Shaun Dreisbach was executive editor of EatingWell until its last issue in 2022. In addition to overseeing the editorial content of the magazine, she also handled features on nutrition and health, sustainability, the environment, industry trends and food policy. Shaun has more than 20 years of experience working at and contributing to leading print and digital publications including Glamour, Self, Parents, Real Simple, Working Mother, Dr. Oz The Good Life, Teen Vogue, American Baby, FamilyFun and USA Weekend. She has also authored several nutrition, cooking and weight-loss books for bestselling authors and celebrity nutritionists.
We took a look at popular protein myths to see if there was any truth behind them.
Advertisement
Find out which foods hinder your ability to sleep.
Our executive editor, Shaun Dreisbach, took daily diet and lifestyle advice from sleep experts for one week to see if it would lead to more restful shut-eye at night. Here's what she learned.
While the science on diet's impact on slumber is still emerging, these nutrients and hormones have risen to the top as better-rest superstars.
We look at types of sleep disorders and common symptoms.
When it comes to getting more fiber, these easy high-fiber food swaps deliver maximum bang for your buck. Trade up to these fiber powerhouses to get your fiber fill for the day.
When do you think of fiber as exciting? Yeah, that would be never. But this research will help change your mind.
Advertisement
You know this trend has reached epic proportions when you spot protein in everything from pancake mix to bottled water. We break down how much is enough, the best sources, how it powers muscles and its link to weight loss.
Our annual American Food Heroes list honors 12 people doing extraordinary things to make food better in our country.
When do you think of fiber as exciting? Yeah, that would be never. But this research will help change your mind.
You know this trend has reached epic proportions when you spot protein in everything from pancake mix to bottled water. We break down how much is enough, the best sources, how it powers muscles and its link to weight loss.
Our annual American Food Heroes list honors 12 people doing extraordinary things to make food better in our country.
Walter Willett, M.D., Dr. P.H. professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard University, has been crusading against harmful trans fats for two decades. As of June, trans fats are officially out of our food supply.
Larry Clemens, director of North America's Agricultural Program at The Nature Conservancy, has been working with farmers and ranchers to improve the health of their soil.
Advertisement
Pingree is pushing to up organic standards and get more funding for organic programs in the farm bill.
Joann Lo & Jose Oliva, co-directors of the Food Chain Workers Alliance, advocate for causes such as supporting immigrant food workers, fair wages for restaurant staff, better working conditions on farms, and sexual harassment outreach and education.
Marc Oshima is co-founder and chief marketing officer of AeroFarms, the world's largest indoor vertical farm company that grows produce on a large scale, using fewer resources.
Wholesome Wave Founder Michel Nischan is working to provide healthy fruits and vegetables to underserved families through the creation of a produce prescription program called FVRx (Fruit and Vegetable Rx).
Julie Packard, executive director of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, helped launch a Slavery Risk Tool to help seafood buyers avoid fish from areas where forced labor, human trafficking or child labor may be occurring.
Katie Forrest & Taylor Collins are championing regenerative agriculture and the nose-to-tail movement in an epic way.
The Top Chef judge is putting D.C. politicians "on notice" about hunger in the U.S., advocating for food safety, nutrition and hunger issues—particularly school lunch programs and hunger among veterans.
Advertisement
A vocal champion of sustainability, CEO Paul Polman has pledged that 100 percent of Unilever's plastic packaging will be reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025.
For a long time, the connection between cholesterol and cardiovascular health was seemingly clear. Saturated fats, the guidelines said, led to heart disease.
These foods and exercises will help you defy sarcopenia and stay strong and lean.