Rachael Moeller Gorman
Rachael Moeller Gorman

Rachael Moeller Gorman

Title: Contributor

Location: Boston, Massachusetts

Education: Bachelor's degree in Biology with a concentration in Neuroscience, Williams College; Master's degree in Environmental Studies, Brown University

Expertise: Nutrition, biology, environmental science, neuroscience, food science and policy

- Winner of four James Beard Journalism Awards for EatingWell articles
- Experienced food and science writer

Experience

Rachael Moeller Gorman is an award-winning food and science writer with almost 20 years of experience. Her work has appeared in The Scientist, EatingWell, Good Housekeeping, Scientific American, Shape, Fitness, Men's Health and many other publications.

She has won four James Beard Journalism awards for her in-depth articles that dig into the research and tell the stories behind the science. All four were for articles she wrote for EatingWell.

Rachael has a bachelor's degree in biology and neuroscience from Williams College and a master's degree in environmental studies from Brown University. She has worked in several laboratories, including Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard University and the University of Vermont, and developed a deep understanding of how scientists conduct experiments, as well as an ability to read and understand research papers on nutrition, food policy and the environment. She writes the stories behind the science, enabling people to improve their health, lives and community.

In addition to the James Beard Journalism Awards, Rachael's work has been recognized extensively. Other awards include Winner, 2019 National Federation of Press Women Award; Winner, 2015 American Society of Journalists and Authors award; Winner, 2013 Endocrine Society Award of Excellence in Science and Medical Journalism; and many other recognitions.

About EatingWell

EatingWell has been publishing award-winning journalism about food, nutrition and sustainability since 1990. Learn more about us.
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