Maya Feller, M.S., R.D., C.D.N.

Other than food, these are the 5 sneaky reasons why your blood sugars are high—plus, what to do about it.
Advertisement
We tested over 50 sauces to find the healthiest and tastiest options. Here's what came out on top.
This slow-cooker porridge recipe features quinoa. Quinoa is a gluten-free pseudocereal (it's a seed!) that is a nutritional powerhouse and a complete protein. It contains a wide array of vitamins and minerals, including phosphorus, manganese, zinc and iron, many of which Americans don't get enough of.
Originally from Mesopotamia, farro is a type of wheat with a wonderful nutty flavor and toothsome texture. It's packed with plant-based protein, niacin, magnesium and zinc. Ancient wheat strains have also been found to have higher levels of antioxidants and carotenoids, important for eye health.
Fast-growing and drought-resistant, this ancient grain is an important crop in West Africa. It's a type of millet, making it gluten-free. Fonio's light and fluffy texture and mild favor make it work equally well with sweet and savory toppings.
At 6 grams per 1-cup serving, barley is high in fiber compared to many other whole grains. And it has high levels of prebiotic fiber, making it great for promoting healthy gut bacteria. Like oats, barley contains beta-glucans, a type of soluble fiber that's been shown to improve blood pressure and cholesterol levels.
Using a slow cooker makes it easy to cook up almost any whole-grain porridge while you sleep. Short-grain brown rice slow-cooks to a soft and sticky texture reminiscent of rice pudding. Brown rice stands up to the long cooking time better than white, plus this whole grain contains some magnesium, phosphorus, thiamine and niacin (which get stripped from white rice).
Advertisement
Tuna Casserole with Peas
Rating: Unrated
New!
Maya Feller, M.S., RD, CDN, of Brooklyn-based Maya Feller Nutrition, has worked with many low-income families and is well-versed in the realities of putting food on the table that is healthy, tastes good, isn't time-prohibitive and is affordable. "A traditional tuna casserole provides both protein and carbohydrates to keep you full, and is kid-friendly and easy to make," she says about this tuna casserole recipe. (This recipe was part of a feature story, "The Real Cost of Healthy Food," in EatingWell magazine and has not been tested by our Test Kitchen.)
Maya Feller, M.S., RD, CDN, of Brooklyn-based Maya Feller Nutrition, recommends this cost-conscious recipe to clients looking to prepare satisfying, nutritious meals at home. "Pelau is a hearty dish that can be prepared in big batches and enjoyed over time," she says. (This recipe was part of a feature story, "The Real Cost of Healthy Food," in EatingWell magazine and has not been tested by our Test Kitchen.)
Using a slow cooker makes it easy to cook up almost any whole-grain porridge while you sleep. Short-grain brown rice slow-cooks to a soft and sticky texture reminiscent of rice pudding. Brown rice stands up to the long cooking time better than white, plus this whole grain contains some magnesium, phosphorus, thiamine and niacin (which get stripped from white rice).
Tuna Casserole with Peas
Rating: Unrated
New!
Maya Feller, M.S., RD, CDN, of Brooklyn-based Maya Feller Nutrition, has worked with many low-income families and is well-versed in the realities of putting food on the table that is healthy, tastes good, isn't time-prohibitive and is affordable. "A traditional tuna casserole provides both protein and carbohydrates to keep you full, and is kid-friendly and easy to make," she says about this tuna casserole recipe. (This recipe was part of a feature story, "The Real Cost of Healthy Food," in EatingWell magazine and has not been tested by our Test Kitchen.)
Maya Feller, M.S., RD, CDN, of Brooklyn-based Maya Feller Nutrition, recommends this cost-conscious recipe to clients looking to prepare satisfying, nutritious meals at home. "Pelau is a hearty dish that can be prepared in big batches and enjoyed over time," she says. (This recipe was part of a feature story, "The Real Cost of Healthy Food," in EatingWell magazine and has not been tested by our Test Kitchen.)
Maya Feller, M.S., RD, CDN, of Brooklyn-based Maya Feller Nutrition, upgrades this popular budget-friendly combo. "Adding veggies to a classic sandwich—in this case, broccoli, zucchini and red bell pepper—boosts the nutrient-density of the meal," she says. This recipe was part of a feature story, "The Real Cost of Healthy Food."
It's not easy putting food on the table that is healthy, tastes good, isn't time-prohibitive and is affordable. We break down some common go-to meals, along with cost-conscious homemade options.
Advertisement
Get your daily quota of veg by swapping your a.m. oatmeal for a big bowl of greens. This gorgeous breakfast salad is from Maya Feller, M.S., RD, CDN. In her Brooklyn, New York, nutrition practice, Feller works with patients to reduce their risk of chronic diseases by implementing a whole-foods diet. "When layered with a variety of ingredients, heart-healthy fats and proteins, breakfast salads are the perfect way to start the day," she says.
Big changes in blood sugars over time increase the risk of complications such as heart disease, retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy. Being informed and taking part in your health care can help lower the chances of complications.
Everything you need to know about managing your blood sugars when you have diabetes.
A grocery shopping guide noting what to look out for when you have diabetes
Newly diagnosed or need a refresher? This will help ease into a balanced eating plan that supports healthy blood sugar.