Liana Krissoff
Liana Krissoff

Liana Krissoff

Title: Contributor

Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Education: B.A. in English, College of William & Mary

Expertise: Regional American foodways, modern home cooking, whole ingredients

- Author of six cookbooks and is working on a seventh
- Her Canning for a New Generation made the online New York Times notable books list

Experience

Liana Krissoff is a cookbook author with six published cookbooks, owner of a publishing services business and contributor to EatingWell. She also takes on ghostwriting and recipe-testing and recipe-development projects.

Aside from a brief stint as a line cook in a small Italian restaurant in northern Virginia, Liana has been working in the publishing industry her entire adult life. She started out at Rizzoli International Publications as an editorial assistant, helping the cookbook editor and then the art book editor acquire and develop the lusciously illustrated books the house is known for.

After Rizzoli, she worked on adult trade books at HarperCollins and then took a job as a production editor at Routledge. In 2000 she took the plunge and started her own editing and project management company.

Her first two cookbooks, Hot Drinks for Cold Nights and Secrets of Slow Cooking, were published in 2005, and she's been writing about food ever since, publishing a trilogy of cookbooks that approached old-school techniques from a fresh perspective: Canning for a New Generation, Whole Grains for a New Generation and Vegetarian for a New Generation.

Her most recent book is Slow Cook Modern, featuring true eight-hour slow-cooker main dishes plus quick fresh sides and accompaniments. Her next book, an ode to home cooking and helping young cooks learn to cook well through micro-essays and approachable recipes, will be released in spring 2023.

About EatingWell

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This soup would be equally satisfying if you took it in a vegetarian direction and skipped the sausage and used no-chicken broth. 
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This simple homey dish is exactly what you need after a day of playing in the snow. Enjoy in front of a fire, with a hearty black lager alongside.
Taking inspiration from egg drop, this chicken-and-egg soup is enriched by drizzling in eggs whisked with fragrant sesame oil at the end of the cooking time.
These pork tacos get a nuanced flavor from the combo of ancho and chipotle chiles. Topping them with the bright cucumber and mango is a refreshing touch.
Black-Vinegar-Braised Beef
Rating: Unrated
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The fragrant aroma of star anise will welcome you home after this braise cooks throughout the day. Serve with rice or rice noodles.
Lamb Curry with Winter Squash
Rating: Unrated
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Serve this flavorful and filling lamb curry with a steamed grain like brown rice, millet or whole-wheat couscous for soaking up the sauce.
The Ethiopian spice blend berbere adds heat and loads of flavor to this satisfying green lentil soup.
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This satisfying dish has a depth of flavor that belies its short ingredient list.
The key to the incredible flavor here is roasting until the onion slices are charred at the edges and the juices from the tomatoes have cooked into a syrupy consistency on the baking sheet.
The Ethiopian spice blend berbere adds heat and loads of flavor to this satisfying green lentil soup.
This satisfying dish has a depth of flavor that belies its short ingredient list.
The key to the incredible flavor here is roasting until the onion slices are charred at the edges and the juices from the tomatoes have cooked into a syrupy consistency on the baking sheet.
Instead of getting flavor from a ham hock, this mess of black-eyed peas and collards gets its smokiness from canned chipotles and caramelized shallots, thereby keeping it vegetarian.
This dish gets its name from the Mexican cowboys (charros) who cooked these soupy beans over campfires as they traveled the open range. The kale slaw is a bright foil for this earthy dish. Enjoy a bowl as is or scoop it up with warm tortillas. Look for Mexican-style chorizo near other sausage in well-stocked supermarkets or Latin American markets.
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These vegetarian sliders are filling, flavorful and make for a great protein-packed main dish. Take your time patting the beans dry: it keeps the sliders from falling apart. You can make 8 larger patties, to fit regular-size buns, but try to keep them about 1/2 inch thick so they'll heat through under the broiler without burning. 
Potatoes and beans make this tomato-based crock-pot vegetable stew super-hearty. You could also add briefly sautéed chunks of zucchini or fresh corn kernels just before serving, or add another can of cannellini beans for more substance. A dollop of pesto on top is also super-delicious. Adding homemade garlic croutons is an easy way to elevate this healthy dinner.