Jessie Price
Jessie Price

Jessie Price

Jessie Price was editor-in-chief of EatingWell magazine from 2013 until its last issue in April 2022. She began working with EatingWell in 2003 as a freelance recipe tester and soon after joined the team full time. She worked on 13 EatingWell cookbooks and authored the James Beard Award-winning The Simple Art of EatingWell. One of her favorite aspects of the job: tasting recipes in the EatingWell Test Kitchen. (She tasted more than 3,500 over the years!) Jessie also represented EatingWell across national and local media, appearing on NBC's Today show, TV Land's Best Night In and video news network Cheddar.

After graduating from Williams College with a bachelor's degree in art history, Jessie cooked in restaurants in California and Colorado. She went on to work in advertising in San Francisco before joining EatingWell. But food was always a major part of her life. She grew up outside of Philadelphia in a family fanatical about food, where the kitchen was the focus of all activity in the house. She spent summers with grandparents in Vermont, falling in love with the state from an early age. She now lives in Charlotte, Vermont, with her husband.
This version of sunomono uses more readily available English or slicing cucumbers, but if you live near an Asian market you could substitute Japanese cucumbers. Some recipes call for salting the cucumbers first, but we found that squeezing them in paper towels removed enough excess moisture without adding additional sodium. This Japanese-inspired salad is cool, crisp and simply delicious.
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Grilled Artichokes
Rating: Unrated
4
Learn how to grill artichokes with this healthy recipe. Artichokes are most often served steamed, but grilling them adds a smoky dimension to their flavor. If you can get them, first-of-the-season baby artichokes will yield extra-tender results—double the number of artichokes and reduce the cooking time as needed.
Buffalo Chicken Casserole
Rating: Unrated
27
We took the classic flavors of Buffalo wings--hot sauce, blue cheese, carrots and celery--and created a finger-licking-good casserole. Serve this dish during football season to a hungry crowd and it's sure to be a hit. We don't typically recommend ingredients by brand name, but in this case we make an exception for Frank's RedHot Sauce. It has the perfect balance of spice and tang for this casserole. Texas Pete and Crystal hot sauces are suitable alternatives if you can't find Frank's.
In Minnesota, chicken, mushrooms and wild rice are often bound together in a casserole with cream of mushroom soup. We forgo the sodium-rich canned soup and make a light, creamy sauce that gets depth of flavor from dry sherry and Parmesan cheese. If you already have cooked chicken, use 4 cups and skip Step 2.
Learn how to make your favorite chili recipe even tastier—and healthier—with our tricks for the best chili you've ever tasted.
Herb-Roasted Turkey
Rating: Unrated
8
This easy method produces all the good looks and moist flavor you dream of in an oven-roasted turkey. Make sure you show this beauty off at the table before you carve it. Garnish your serving platter with fresh herb sprigs and citrus wedges for a show-stopping Thanksgiving turkey.
From keeping your knives sharp to tips for roasting vegetables, this advice will help you become a more confident cook.
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This lightened-up take on the classic Thanksgiving sweet potato casserole is spiked with crushed pineapple and toasted pecans. We top it with an airy, slightly sweet meringue. You can pipe the meringue to make it look fancy or simply spread it neatly with a rubber spatula.
From keeping your knives sharp to tips for roasting vegetables, this advice will help you become a more confident cook.
American Food Heroes is our annual list of people making food in America better right now. Help us choose next year's winners!
This lightened-up take on the classic Thanksgiving sweet potato casserole is spiked with crushed pineapple and toasted pecans. We top it with an airy, slightly sweet meringue. You can pipe the meringue to make it look fancy or simply spread it neatly with a rubber spatula.
Chili Cornbread Casserole
Rating: Unrated
13
Here's a fun way to serve chili and cornbread together. Don't let the ingredient list intimidate you--this casserole is easy to make and a real crowd pleaser.
Quinoa's health benefits make it stand out as a super whole grain—packed with fiber, protein and vitamins.
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Chicken Mulligatawny
Rating: Unrated
5
Mulligatawny, which literally means “pepper water,” is an English interpretation of an Indian dish. It has seemingly limitless versions, but most have curry and a bit of chicken. We've added tart Granny Smith apples, plenty of spice and a touch of coconut milk.
Parsley Tabbouleh
Rating: Unrated
5
Serve this tart, parsley-dominated tabbouleh at your next backyard gathering.
This dish is simply luxurious: grilled beef tenderloin smothered in a vibrant herb butter served on top of a garlicky slab of whole-grain toast. And yes, with only about 303 calories and 14 grams of fat total, this steakhouse-worthy entree can be part of a healthy diet. If you like, make extra herb butter to top chicken, fish or even a grilled pork chop.
Flank Steak Pinwheels
Rating: Unrated
5
These festive wheels of steak, Boursin cheese, spinach and sun-dried tomatoes look fancy, but they're quite easy to make. For a party, arrange them on a platter atop a bed of spinach.
Seafood Chowder Casserole
Rating: Unrated
10
New England seafood chowder inspired the flavors here, but we've enhanced them further with Gruyère cheese and a crispy crumb topping. We like the combination of shrimp, cod and crab, but feel free to experiment with other types of seafood--scallops, clams and mahi-mahi would also work well.
This easy casserole, full of ground beef, roasted broccoli and topped with hash browns, was inspired by the classic Minnesota Tater Tot hotdish. Roasting the broccoli before adding it to the casserole gives the whole dish a much more complex and exciting flavor, but it's by no means necessary. If you want to keep it simple, skip roasting the broccoli (Step 2) and use 6 cups frozen broccoli, thawed, in its place (omit 1 tablespoon oil, as well).
This sophisticated take on creamy mushroom soup is rich with earthy porcini mushrooms and has the added goodness of whole-grain barley.
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Turkey Albondigas Soup
Rating: Unrated
3
Albondigas, Spanish for “meatballs,” star in the traditional broth-based Mexican soup. Our version uses turkey rather than beef or pork for the meatballs, and we've pumped up the volume of fresh vegetables in the mix.
Chimichurri Sauce
Rating: Unrated
1
Chimichurri sauce is a tangy herbal accompaniment that can liven up any meat or poultry dish.