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In this installment of our series on foods of the African Diaspora, Jessica B. Harris offers her version of an historic creole nut cake from New Orleans.
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New Orleans Nut Cake
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Molasses-flavored whipped cream connects the past and the present in this New Orleans cake.
In this installment of our series on foods of the African Diaspora, Jessica B. Harris offers her version of Morocco's favorite beverage.
Ataya Maghrebi nana, as this tea is known in parts of Northwest Africa (Maghreb) and West Africa, is a cultural culinary totem. Made with green tea, dried lemon verbena and fresh spearmint, the aromatic mix is refreshing and transporting. In Morocco, the tea is poured from a pot that is held in the air so that the tea is aerated; the sound of the pouring tea is thought to add to the pleasure of drinking. Also, the pot is refilled with boiling water three times to give three different strengths of the beverage. This is a simplified version of the traditional recipe. Read more about this tea and its significance here.
Gingerbread Cake
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Full of warming spices like ginger and cinnamon, this gingerbread cake recipe is perfect for the holidays. Serve topped with whipped cream for an extra-festive treat. Read more about this cake and its surprising connection to Malcolm X here.
In this installment of our series on foods of the African diaspora, Jessica B. Harris shares a delicious recipe for gingerbread that's perfect for year's end.
In this installment of our series on foods of the African diaspora, Jessica B. Harris, Ph.D., shares four delicious recipes for the 6th night of Kwanzaa.
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Garlic-Pecan Green Beans
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The addition of toasted pecans gives this French way with string beans a bit of crunch and sweetness as well as a touch of the American South. Try using slender haricots verts for a different twist. This recipe is perfect for a Kwanzaa celebration; read more in "Why the Karamu Feast Is My Favorite Part of Kwanzaa—and a Simple Menu to Celebrate".
Inspired by a traditional Moroccan salad, which consists of oranges and radishes, this version adds romaine lettuce and a classic vinaigrette. Fresh orange juice adds acidity and brightness to the vinaigrette. Pomegranate seeds bring color and crunch. This recipe is perfect for a Kwanzaa celebration; read more in "Why the Karamu Feast Is My Favorite Part of Kwanzaa—and a Simple Menu to Celebrate".
In this installment of our series on foods of the African diaspora, Jessica B. Harris, Ph.D., shares four delicious recipes for the 6th night of Kwanzaa.
Garlic-Pecan Green Beans
Rating: Unrated
New!
The addition of toasted pecans gives this French way with string beans a bit of crunch and sweetness as well as a touch of the American South. Try using slender haricots verts for a different twist. This recipe is perfect for a Kwanzaa celebration; read more in "Why the Karamu Feast Is My Favorite Part of Kwanzaa—and a Simple Menu to Celebrate".
Inspired by a traditional Moroccan salad, which consists of oranges and radishes, this version adds romaine lettuce and a classic vinaigrette. Fresh orange juice adds acidity and brightness to the vinaigrette. Pomegranate seeds bring color and crunch. This recipe is perfect for a Kwanzaa celebration; read more in "Why the Karamu Feast Is My Favorite Part of Kwanzaa—and a Simple Menu to Celebrate".
Herbed Chicken Thighs
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Whether it's fried, boiled, roasted, baked or sautéed, chicken is eaten throughout Africa and the diaspora. In this recipe, chicken thighs are marinated in lemon juice and olive oil before being coated in herbs and broiled. The herbs will take on a slightly blackened color, so don't fret about the appearance. This recipe is perfect for a Kwanzaa celebration; read more in "Why the Karamu Feast Is My Favorite Part of Kwanzaa—and a Simple Menu to Celebrate".