Becky Duffett

These incredibly easy-to-make cake bars get a touch of sparkle and crunch from a sprinkle of turbinado sugar over the top. If you use frozen berries, thaw and pat them dry before topping the batter with them.
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Ready, set, chew: Here's a step-by-step guide to dry-it-yourself fruits and vegetables.
Black beans, black rice and black sesame seeds all contain anthocyanins, potent antioxidant compounds that have been shown to reduce inflammation. So "forbidden" rice isn't just striking, it's also a serious nutrition upgrade. Simmering it in coconut milk adds rich aroma and flavor.
Cauliflower has gone full technicolor, leaping from white to bright orange, neon green and--you guessed it--purple. The roast chicken in this recipe gets its hue from a marinade that's seasoned with tangy sumac.
Combining a trio of purple vegetables--cabbage, carrots and daikon--makes for a stunning slaw recipe. It would be equally delicious tossed with a classic creamy dressing.
Steamed potatoes are usually the base of this warm German potato salad, but here the roasted potatoes add another layer of flavor.
We love how the Egyptian nut, seed and spice blend dukkah adds aroma, flavor and texture to this otherwise simple purple carrot recipe.
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Lemon and pecorino top off this delicious and easy homemade pizza that gets vibrant color from asparagus and artichoke. Shiso is a fuzzy-leafed herb in the mint family that's used in a variety of Asian cuisines. Devoted fans grow it in their gardens; look for it at Asian and farmers' markets. Note: Baby artichokes hardly have chokes, so you can use a paring knife to extricate any fluff.
We love how the Egyptian nut, seed and spice blend dukkah adds aroma, flavor and texture to this otherwise simple purple carrot recipe.
Lemon and pecorino top off this delicious and easy homemade pizza that gets vibrant color from asparagus and artichoke. Shiso is a fuzzy-leafed herb in the mint family that's used in a variety of Asian cuisines. Devoted fans grow it in their gardens; look for it at Asian and farmers' markets. Note: Baby artichokes hardly have chokes, so you can use a paring knife to extricate any fluff.