Adeena Sussman

Here we swap in roasted cauliflower steaks for the typical English muffins to pack veggie servings into your morning meal. Turmeric's sunny hue gives the sauce hollandaise vibes—yet is much simpler to make.
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Make these hearty ricotta toasts year-round by switching out the fruit. Try apples or figs in the fall, pomegranate arils or pears come winter or fresh berries in the spring.
Sesame seeds add another layer of flavor to the coating on these crispy eggplant slices. If plums aren't in season, try another stone fruit for sweetness. Tomatoes are another good alternative.
We love how using a purchased spice blend allows you to incorporate multiple flavors into a dish with just one ingredient. Here we season salmon with ras el hanout, which often features cinnamon, cumin, turmeric, ginger, cardamom and ground black and red pepper. The spinach side is very versatile—try it with grilled tofu or steak another time.
This chopped salad recipe has great crunch, thanks to plenty of bell pepper, cucumbers and radishes. Preserved lemon adds more nuance to the dressing—look for it on the olive bar of your supermarket or in jars near other global ingredients at well-stocked supermarkets.
Serve these vegetables and super-lemony hummus with warm pita bread and a sprinkle of fruity za'atar, and you'll be transported to the hustle and bustle of Tel Aviv, Israel's iconic Mediterranean coastal city. This is the perfect healthy appetizer or element of a party board for any gathering.
The inspiration for this green shakshuka recipe comes from HaBasta, a popular restaurant on the edge of Carmel Market in Tel Aviv, where the shakshuka is packed with green chard and spinach and a little hot pepper provides just a touch of spice. Serve with pita or crusty bread to sop up the sauce for a quick dinner or for brunch.
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The inspiration for this green shakshuka recipe comes from HaBasta, a popular restaurant on the edge of Carmel Market in Tel Aviv, where the shakshuka is packed with green chard and spinach and a little hot pepper provides just a touch of spice. Serve with pita or crusty bread to sop up the sauce for a quick dinner or for brunch.