If you have butter, milk, bread and cinnamon on hand, you’re ready to go. No eggs required.
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French toast with banana slices on it
Credit: Leah Goggins

I have a confession to make: I'm not a big fan of French toast. While I appreciate a sweet breakfast dish as much as anyone, I'd rather have pancakes or waffles than some eggy toasted bread. So when I saw Yumna Jawad (or @feelgoodfoodie on social media) share her take on milk toast, the latest viral breakfast trend on TikTok, I wasn't convinced.

"It's basically French toast with no eggs or sugar, but somehow, my kids loved it," Jawad explains in her post.

The recipe is simple: melt butter in a skillet over medium heat, then add two slices of bread and pour milk into the skillet. Sprinkle in some cinnamon. Cook the slices until golden brown on both sides and the milk has evaporated. (Jawad credits Stefani Horison for inspiring the recipe with her TikTok—tagged #toastmilk—which skips the cinnamon and is more golden than brown.) The end result looks like French toast, but without all the whisking and bread dunking that would normally have me scrambling for dishes and feeling like Dustin Hoffman in Kramer vs. Kramer.

I decided to fire up my stovetop and see if this recipe is as easy and delicious as it looks—and I wasn't disappointed. It took me just 10 minutes to copy Jawad's instructions, and while it was a little touch-and-go for a minute, she was right in saying that this riff on French toast will get nice and crispy if you're patient. I topped my toast with a drizzle of honey and some sliced bananas, but Jawad notes that maple syrup and just about any fruit you have on hand would also be delicious.

I cut Jawad's recipe from two slices to just one and ended up using a tablespoon of unsalted butter to keep the toast from sticking to the pan—two teaspoons to start and one more after I gave it a flip. Typically, that amount of butter will add 102 calories and 7 grams of saturated fat to your plate. That's less saturated fat and calories than you'd get from a substitute like coconut oil, though that might be a good plant-based swap. (You could also trade the milk in this recipe for a plant-based milk to make it vegan.)

While olive oil has less saturated fat than butter—containing only about 2 grams per tablespoon—you probably wouldn't want that flavor in this dish. If you want to cut down on saturated fat, which can be hard on your heart, you could try using cooking spray on your pan before adding the milk and toast, then adding just one teaspoon of butter after flipping to add the buttery flavor.

You could also make this dish a little healthier by opting for a slice or two of whole-grain bread. Whole grains are less processed, so you won't miss out on grains' powerhouse perks, like fiber, protein and vitamins. And since you'll be adding some complex carbs to your plate, your breakfast will keep you full for longer. Try pairing a slice of this milk toast with a fiberful pear or a handful of raspberries for a morning meal that will keep you satisfied until lunch, or add a smear of peanut butter or some almonds for a boost of protein and healthy fat. 

Whatever spin you put on this dish, it's an easy but decadent breakfast that's definitely going into my weekend rotation.