Snag one of these showy coils before summer patio season is in full swing.

Karla Walsh
April 06, 2021
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Fredericks and Mae Citronella Hanging Coil
Fredericks and Mae
| Credit: Fredericks and Mae

After more than a year apart, many of us are itching to reunite with loved ones and catch up once we're fully vaccinated. We don't know about you, but we're already dreaming of sharing many long, lingering snack sessions or multi-course meals with friends or family on a deck, patio or porch on a warm spring and summer nights.

But little can be as much of a buzzkill on those beautiful evenings as a legion of mosquitoes. While we'd be willing to deal with dozens of bug bites to reconnect with our pals and relatives, we're planning ahead and dressing up our decks to try to fend off the bugs before they arrive in full force.

Research shows that DEET is more effective than citronella products at long-term mosquito protection, but it certainly can't hurt to try the all-natural route first. So we were delighted to see a showy new way to do just that—and it only costs $18 to power through 36 hours of burn time. (Each pack includes two, so you'll be good to go for a full 72 hours or so!)

Citronella Hanging Coil
$36.00
SHOP IT
Food 52

This new citronella coil is a cinch to use: Simply light one end like a candle, and it emits a steady stream of citronella-infused, citrus-scented smoke. The creators say this non-toxic smoke should be strong enough to mask the human odors that cause us to make mosquitoes take notice. Hang the coil high to spread the smoke further, or lower it a bit for a more concentrated coverage—not to mention some pretty patio decor.

We also have our eyes set on these other affordable citronella mosquito-fighting products:

And for multi-pronged protection, it certainly can't hurt to add these mosquito-repelling foods to the menu! Now we're all set to tell bugs to, well, bug off.