Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/900/all en Family Meal Makeover: Pizza Night http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kids_cooking/family_meal_makeover_pizza_night <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Family Table: “Please Rejuvenate Our Dinners” </div> </div> </div> <p>“Tell her that we don’t eat any hydrogenated oils,” said the note Sam Hemphill, 10, of Newton, Massachusetts, slipped to his mother while she and I chatted on the phone. Sam wanted me, an EatingWell nutritionist, to know about his family’s healthy diet. He even, his mother says, spelled “hydrogenated” correctly.</p> <p>“Next on his hit list is high-fructose corn syrup,” said Sarah. “We’re all trying to eliminate that from our diet.” </p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Learn how we cut the fat out of a family favorite. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/pizza_night_makeover.jpg?1266437943" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> August/September 2006 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Menu </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/eatingwells_pepperoni_pizza.html">EatingWell&#039;s Pepperoni Pizza</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/ranch_dip_crunchy_vegetables.html">Ranch Dip &amp; Crunchy Vegetables</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/roasted_peach_sundaes.html">Roasted Peach Sundaes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Family Dinner Makeovers </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kids_cooking/the_family_table_mexican_casserole_makeover">The Family Table: Mexican Casserole Makeover</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kids_cooking/meal_makeover_riding_high_on_world_cuisine">Meal Makeover: Riding High on World Cuisine</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kids_cooking/family_meal_makeover_pizza_night#comments Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. August/September 2006 Healthy Eating for Kids Healthy Cooking - Recipe Makeovers Wed, 17 Feb 2010 20:06:22 +0000 Penelope Wall 15543 at http://www.eatingwell.com What’s the Healthy Aging Secret in Cocoa, Tea and Red Wine? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/what_s_the_healthy_aging_secret_in_cocoa_tea_and_red_wine <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/epicatechin2_310.jpg?1259880516" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/hot_chocolate_310.jpg?1260396158" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>What’s the Healthy Aging Secret in Cocoa, Tea and Red Wine?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Epicatechin. This specific type of flavonoid (antioxidant)—in cocoa, tea and red wine—helps blood vessels maintain a healthy elasticity, which lowers blood pressure and increases blood flow to the heart and other organs, including the skin. In a study of 24 women, published last year in the <em>Journal of Nutrition</em>, drinking an epicatechin-rich cocoa beverage daily for 12 weeks improved skin texture and protected against sunburn. The authors explained that epicatechin increased blood flow to the skin, boosting nutrient and oxygen supply—both factors essential for keeping skin healthy. It likely also absorbed UV light that otherwise might react with and damage skin cells, and swept up tissue-damaging free radicals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Healthy Aging </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/foods_for_beautiful_skin">Foods for Beautiful Skin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/7_anti_aging_superfoods">7 Anti-Aging Superfoods</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/3_ways_to_beat_your_age">3 Ways to Beat Your Age</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_aging_recipes">Healthy Aging Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2007 </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/what_s_the_healthy_aging_secret_in_cocoa_tea_and_red_wine#comments Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. November/December 2007 Healthy Aging Recipes & Menus - Wrinkles Thu, 03 Dec 2009 22:37:54 +0000 Penelope Wall 15279 at http://www.eatingwell.com Great Job: Healthy Workplaces http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/local_heroes/healthy_workplaces_great_job <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Great Job </div> </div> </div> <p>When it comes to work’s impact on healthy living, the associations tend to be negative: 60-hour workweeks that translate into 10-pound weight gains. End-of-day meetings that overtake your exercise hour and drain the energy you needed to make dinner. Team projects that push through lunch, leaving you with no other option at 3 p.m. than to scavenge snacks from the vending machine. </p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Lambeth Hochwald </div> <div class="field-item even"> Joyce Hendley </div> <div class="field-item odd"> Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Eating well at work has never been so easy or delicious, thanks to innovative employers like these. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/healthy_workplace.jpg?1305653378" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> May/June 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/local_heroes/7_great_ideas_for_healthier_workplaces">7 Great Ideas for Healthier Workplaces</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/5_ways_to_eat_green_at_work">5 Ways to Eat Green at Work </a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/cheap_healthy_lunch_ideas_for_work">Cheap Healthy Lunch Ideas for Work</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When it comes to work’s impact on healthy living, the associations tend to be negative: 60-hour workweeks that translate into 10-pound weight gains. End-of-day meetings that overtake your exercise hour and drain the energy you needed to make dinner. Team projects that push through lunch, leaving you with no other option at 3 p.m. than to scavenge snacks from the vending machine.</p> <p> <strong>Increasingly, employers are encouraging and rewarding healthy behaviors.”</strong></p> <p>But times are changing. Increasingly, employers are encouraging and rewarding healthy behaviors. Research shows that nearly 60 percent of all U.S. companies and 95 percent of larger companies offer some incentive to encourage employees to lead healthier lifestyles, says Jacqlynne Hart, president of HealthWealth, Inc., a wellness consulting company in Austin, Texas. Financially, it makes sense: annually, obesity costs American businesses $13 billion (in health insurance, sick leave, etc.), and for every dollar a company invests into wellness programs, it saves an average of $3.14, according to one study.</p> <p>How are employers—all kinds, sizes, in various settings—helping their staffers to eat and live well? We wanted to know. To that end, we polled workplace-wellness experts, consulted our nutrition advisors and invited corporations to brag about their “delicious” benefits. We also asked you, our readers, to tell us about your own on-the-job environments. What we found: at worksites nationwide, there’s a healthy-eating revolution under way. <strong>We hope that these stories of creative solutions and great ideas will inspire you to initiate positive change in your own work world.</strong></p> <p><em>by Lambeth Hochwald, Joyce Hendley &amp; Sylvia Geiger</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/local_heroes/healthy_workplaces_great_job#comments Joyce Hendley Lambeth Hochwald Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. May/June 2007 Food News & Origins - People & Perspectives Fri, 21 Aug 2009 16:07:34 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10244 at http://www.eatingwell.com Tackling a Weight Problem with Game-Day Favorites http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/tackling_a_weight_problem_with_game <p>Nacho chips smothered in cheese sauce. Spicy chicken wings begging to be dunked in creamy blue cheese dressing—those were Anthony Davis’ favorite. “Mmm… they were so good that I could never resist them,” says Davis, former NFL player and legendary University of Southern California running back. But too many football Sundays spent in the VIP box noshing on fattening appetizers didn’t do much for his health.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Football legend Anthony Davis shares his weight-loss story. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/2469boneless_wings225.jpg?1250866215" /> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/boneless_buffalo_wings.html">Boneless Buffalo Wings</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/spicy_blue_cheese_dip.html">Spicy Blue Cheese Dip</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/southwestern_layered_bean_dip.html">Southwestern Layered Bean Dip</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/super_bowl_1">Healthy Super Bowl Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Nacho chips smothered in cheese sauce. Spicy chicken wings begging to be dunked in creamy blue cheese dressing—those were Anthony Davis’ favorite. “Mmm… they were so good that I could never resist them,” says Davis, former NFL player and legendary University of Southern California running back. But too many football Sundays spent in the VIP box noshing on fattening appetizers didn’t do much for his health.</p> <p>In 2006, he got a wake-up call. The same year he was “enshrined” into the College Football Hall of Fame, he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. He suffered from painful flare-ups of gout (an inflammatory disease linked with obesity). Davis also struggled with sleep apnea, an obesity-related condition in which one stops breathing several times a night. When months of dieting proved unsuccessful, he and his doctors concluded that changing his life would require drastic measures. He scheduled gastric bypass surgery for March 11, 2006.</p> <p>Now, Davis is 90 pounds lighter and he feels better than ever. “I have so much energy,” he says. “My diabetes, gout and sleep apnea are gone.” While the surgery jump-started his weight loss, only regular exercise and a healthy diet will keep the pounds from creeping back. Physical exercise is again part of his daily routine. “I walk everywhere now,” says Davis. “And I’ve started working out at the gym again too.”</p> <p>Come this football season, Davis will opt for leaner snacks, like Boneless Buffalo Wings—with less than half the calories and 80 percent less sodium than traditional versions—and Southwestern Layered Bean Dip. With plenty of the good stuff—tomato, lettuce and protein-rich beans—and few ingredients high in calories or fat, our dip comes in with less than half the calories and one-quarter the saturated fat of the original. So go ahead and chow down with these healthy appetizers.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/tackling_a_weight_problem_with_game#comments Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. January/February 2007 Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:50:32 +0000 Nifer 10196 at http://www.eatingwell.com Sugar Substitute: Sucralose http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/sugar_substitute_sucralose <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Sugar Substitute: Sucralose<br /> Is Sucralose safe?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>We’ve received several letters expressing dismay at our occasional use of sucralose (Splenda®) as an alternative sweetening ingredient in some of our recipes. That’s understandable: ever since cyclamates (artificial sweeteners) were taken off the U.S. market in the 1970s, the history of sugar substitutes has hardly been a sweet one. For some substitutes the issue is a lingering concern about safety; for others it is poor performance in the kitchen. Sucralose, however, is the exception. Health experts and cooks agree, this substitute is safe and performs well in cooking and, when blended with sugar, in baking.</p> <p>“After a critical review of the evidence presented in toxicological studies, we concluded that the research exonerated and confirmed the safety of sucralose. We find it to be the safest alternative to sugar out there,” says David Schardt, senior nutritionist at Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), a consumer nutrition and food policy advocacy organization based in Washington, D.C., and a long-time critic of other artificial sweeteners, such as acesulfame-K and aspartame.</p> <p>Yet Internet sites dedicated to disputing and questioning sucralose safety abound, often citing small studies where rodents fed large doses of sucralose (over 450 times the amount an average person would get by substituting sucralose for all other sweeteners, including sugar) developed shrunken thymus glands, and enlarged livers and kidneys. However, these are the same studies the scientific community, the Food and Drug Administration and consumer advocacy groups considered before concluding in 1998 that the sweetener did not pose a public-health risk. Since that time, no new studies have contradicted those findings.</p> <p>The real issue is that people distrust, often with good reason, any food additive that is artificial. This fact is not lost on the marketers of Splenda, who claim the sweetener is “made from sugar so it tastes like sugar.” Consumer groups including CSPI argue that this slogan deliberately misleads. In a recent CSPI poll, 47 percent of people questioned incorrectly identified sucralose as a “natural food product.” Even though sucralose may start out as sugar, it is still the result of a laboratory intervention that replaces one group of atoms on the sugar molecule with another.</p> <p>At EatingWell, our approach is to use wholesome natural ingredients and any sweetener in moderation; we don’t regularly include sucralose in our recipes. However, we recognize its useful place as a tool for those who want to moderate their sugar intake, including people with diabetes. Our approach is to offer directions for substituting sucralose for sugar where appropriate, so readers can make the choice themselves.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/sugar_substitute_sucralose#comments Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:39:12 +0000 Nifer 10189 at http://www.eatingwell.com Is your doctor a better cook than you? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_your_doctor_a_better_cook_than_you <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A new perspective on healthy eating is changing the way some doctors practice medicine. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/54302426healthy_cooking2_225.jpg?1250793172" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>For John Principe, M.D., entering the kitchen of the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) conjured up memories of his first time in the operating room during medical school. “It was like having a nurse standing over your shoulder…Wash your hands! Use the knife this way,” says Principe, an internist. “I was so unnerved and felt completely out of my element.” Principe is one of more than 1,000 medical professionals who, to date, have attended a Healthy Kitchens, Healthy Lives conference at the CIA campus in California (healthykitchens.org). During the four-day events held twice a year, participants first listen to nutrition lectures—to learn more about links between diet and diseases—and then hone their culinary skills in hands-on cooking sessions.</p> <p>The brainchild of David Eisenberg, M.D., director of Osher Research Center at Harvard Medical School, and Mark Erickson, vice president of continuing education at the CIA, the conference aims to address the problem that many doctors receive little training in nutrition or in selecting and cooking healthy foods. The course emphasizes that doctors are more likely to advise their patients on healthy lifestyles if they practice what they preach. “Our goal is to inspire physicians to change their own behaviors and to serve as role models and champions in the healthy-eating, healthy-lifestyle campaign,” says Eisenberg.</p> <p>The conference seems to be working. “It changed the way I practice medicine,” says Principe, who has lost 15 pounds since attending last April. With a renewed sense of well-being, he now writes fewer prescriptions and spends more time discussing lifestyle and dietary changes with patients.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_your_doctor_a_better_cook_than_you#comments Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. November/December 2008 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:33:49 +0000 Nifer 9954 at http://www.eatingwell.com Is Stevia Safe? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_stevia_safe <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/stevia_310_0.jpg?1253629414" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Is Stevia Safe?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This year, a few noncaloric sweeteners made from an extract of the Stevia rebaudiana plant arrived on grocery-store shelves. The stevia plant has a long history of use as a sweetener in South America. These new sweeteners—sold under brand names like Truvia and PureVia—include a highly purified extract of stevia called Rebaudioside A (a.k.a. Rebiana or Reb A). Reb A is 200 times sweeter than sugar and does not raise blood sugar. </p> <p>Until December 2008, stevia and its derivatives could be sold in the U.S. only as dietary supplements, due to safety concerns. In the 1980s, animal studies linked stevia with adverse effects on fertility and reproductive development and possible genetic mutations. But in 2008, the makers of Truvia and PureVia submitted research to the Food and Drug Administration regarding Reb A’s safety and petitioned for it to become a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) ingredient. </p> <p>The FDA affirmed the GRAS status, but did not change the previous ruling on stevia. “Reb A is different than whole-leaf stevia or [other] stevia extracts, which can only be sold as dietary supplements,” says FDA spokesperson Michael Herndon. “Nobody has provided the FDA with evidence that whole-leaf stevia is safe.”</p> <p>The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), a consumer advocacy group, believes that the Reb A’s GRAS status was granted prematurely. “In the past, FDA protocol required repeated testing in two separate animal species prior to approval, but in this case it didn’t,” says David Schardt, nutrition expert with CSPI. “We are not warning people to avoid Reb A, but the public should be aware that the FDA did not follow all the usual safeguards.” </p> <p><strong>Bottom Line:</strong> The FDA considers Reb A a safe sugar substitute, but has not approved other forms of stevia. If you want to use stevia, we suggest sticking with Reb A (look for it on the ingredient label).</p> <h3><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/free_downloads/best_healthy_dessert_recipes">Download a Free Cookbook with Our Best Healthy Dessert Recipes!</a></h3> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/a_buyers_guide_to_sugar_substitutes">A Buyer&#039;s Guide to Sugar Substitutes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/whats_so_bad_about_high_fructose_corn_syrup">What&#039;s So Bad About High Fructose Corn Syrup?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/is_high_fructose_corn_syrup_making_you_fat">Is high-fructose corn syrup making you fat?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/is_agave_nectar_healthier_than_sugar_or_other_sweeteners">Is agave nectar healthier than sugar or other sweeteners?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_stevia_safe#comments Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. September/October 2009 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Thu, 20 Aug 2009 16:34:21 +0000 Penelope Wall 9909 at http://www.eatingwell.com EatingWell Taste Test: Healthy Snack Bars http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_healthy_snack_bars <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Raising the (Snack) Bar </div> </div> </div> <p>When you’re looking for a quick and satisfying pick-me-up, you want more than empty calories. You grab a snack bar, the hybrid between a cookie and a candy bar. But is it really any better for you? The answer is a qualified yes: some (but not all) are great alternatives that can make a positive contribution to your daily nutrition.</p> <p>Most people can enjoy a tasty 225-calorie snack without tipping the calorie scale, especially if the bar is made of wholesome ingredients, such as whole grains, nuts and dried fruit.<br /> Look for bars with:<br /> • less than 225 calories</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Carolyn Malcoun </div> <div class="field-item even"> Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Raising the (Snack) Bar: Finding nutrition and taste within the same wrapper </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/energy_bar_taste_test_310.jpg?1274368704" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> February/March 2006 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/peanut_energy_bars.html">Peanut Energy Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/apricot_walnut_cereal_bars.html">Apricot-Walnut Cereal Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/fruit_pecan_granola_bars.html">Fruit &amp; Pecan Granola Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/low_fat_granola_bars.html">Low-Fat Granola Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_snack_recipes">Quick and Healthy Snack Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When you’re looking for a quick and satisfying pick-me-up, you want more than empty calories. You grab a snack bar, the hybrid between a cookie and a candy bar. But is it really any better for you? The answer is a qualified yes: some (but not all) are great alternatives that can make a positive contribution to your daily nutrition.</p> <p>Most people can enjoy a tasty 225-calorie snack without tipping the calorie scale, especially if the bar is made of wholesome ingredients, such as whole grains, nuts and dried fruit.<br /> Look for bars with:<br /> • less than 225 calories<br /> • less than 3 grams saturated fat<br /> • more than 5 grams protein<br /> • at least 3 grams of fiber.</p> <p><strong>Label scrutiny is essential</strong>; many bars are high in calories—those labeled as “energy bars” are better suited for sustenance on a hike rather than a snack at your desk, even if the ingredients are wholesome. And others, usually those labeled “high protein,” are also chock-full of calories and saturated fat with little or no fiber. The ingredient lists are often similar to those of candy bars: plenty of corn syrup, sugars and partially hydrogenated oils. Lastly, steer clear of meal-replacement bars for specific weight-loss plans; these expensive concoctions often taste terrible and are surprisingly high in calories, while including undesirable ingredients and questionable health and diet claims.</p> <p>What Snickers and Hershey bars did for past generations, snack bars are doing today. They’re trailside pick-me-ups, pre-exercise energy boosters, afternoon snacks. Consumers assume they are getting better forms of energy than those delivered by mere candy, but with all the new bars crowding the supermarket, it’s hard to know which ones are healthy and worth the calories.</p> <p><strong>The EatingWell Taste Test</strong></p> <p>We set out to find a nutritionally sound snack bar that tasted great. We chose bars with a specific nutrient profile: 225 calories or less, less than 3 grams saturated fat and (for satiety) at least 5 grams of protein and 3 grams of fiber. We then did a blind tasting with a diverse panel that included two active teenagers who often eat bars while participating in sports and a fly-fishing guide who will take three or four bars on a trip for lunch.</p> <p>As we all discovered, it pays to read the label when buying any sort of snack bar. One taster reported that she used to eat power bars as a meal replacement, until she realized that the right sandwich could be lower in calories—and more satisfying.</p> <p><strong>BALANCE BAR Trail Mix Chocolate Chip</strong><br /> This bar garnered a first place rating from four of our tasters (including the two teenagers). Nathan, who often eats a few power bars for lunch while guiding fly-fishing trips, said he could “easily eat 4 or 5 of these a day.” Stephanie noted its crunchiness and said she liked it best because it seemed “like a healthier candy bar.” Cully thought it had “the right amount of chocolate.”</p> <p><strong>LUNA Bar Chai Tea</strong><br /> Earning praise for its taste, appearance and texture, this rich and spicy alternative is marketed toward the female slice of the power-bar-purchasing pie. Robert noted its “moist texture and spicy flavor,” while Elizabeth loved “the frosting-like bottom and texture.” Cully thought the flavor was a bit too spicy, while Nathan thought the Chai spice was “authentic.” Maria frowned at its aftertaste.</p> <p><strong>Kashi GOLEAN Crunchy! Chocolate Caramel Karma</strong><br /> This lower-calorie and low-fat bar also drew rave reviews from our tasting panel. Robert enjoyed its “subtle suggestion of caramel and warm amber color.” Nathan thought it looked great but likened the taste to Rice Krispies snacks he once made in kindergarten. Cully thought it would be better without popcorn in it.</p> <p><strong>Mojo Bar Mixed Nuts</strong><br /> Clif Bar developed the Mojo line for “people on the move who want something salty when sweet just won’t cut it.” Elizabeth cited this as her favorite for that very same reason: “it’s not too sweet—like a salty Rice Krispies treat!” Stephanie liked the nuts and pretzels but wasn’t sure how filling it would be. Maria and Cully thought it had too many nuts.</p> <p>Other power bars EW liked:<br /> LäraBar Banana Cookie<br /> Odwalla Bar! Berries GoMega</p> <p>The Tasting Panel:<br /> Robert Bloch, entrepreneur<br /> Stephanie Lylis, fair-weather outdoor enthusiast<br /> Cully Millikin, hockey-playing 8th-grader<br /> Nathan Moreau, fly-fishing guide<br /> Elizabeth Sengle, White Sox fan<br /> Maria Sengle, 9th-grader<br /> <em>—Carolyn Malcoun and Sylvia M. Geiger, M.S., R.D.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_healthy_snack_bars#comments Carolyn Malcoun Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. February/March 2006 Healthy Cooking - Kitchen Product Reviews Fri, 14 Aug 2009 15:16:50 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9518 at http://www.eatingwell.com Bagged Prewashed Produce http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/bagged_prewashed_produce <p>Prewashed, ready-to-eat salad kits and their ilk are terrific ways to get us closer to our goals of eating more fruits and vegetables, virtually eliminating prep time. As with any produce, however, eating them raw is never completely risk-free, since it’s the heat of cooking that kills disease-causing bacteria, such as E. coli and Salmonella. Does that mean you shouldn’t enjoy their convenience? We vote to keep them in your basket.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Easy and convenient, but is it safe to eat right out of the bag? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Prewashed, ready-to-eat salad kits and their ilk are terrific ways to get us closer to our goals of eating more fruits and vegetables, virtually eliminating prep time. As with any produce, however, eating them raw is never completely risk-free, since it’s the heat of cooking that kills disease-causing bacteria, such as E. coli and Salmonella. Does that mean you shouldn’t enjoy their convenience? We vote to keep them in your basket.</p> <p>Foodborne-illness outbreaks caused by produce have been increasing—and lettuce is the vegetable most frequently named, including pre-washed, bagged types. However, “there is no evidence to suggest that washing lettuce or any produce in your own kitchen is any safer than buying it already prewashed,” says Stephen Swanson, M.D., an epidemic intelligence service officer with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The risk of pathogens, he adds, “may even be smaller.”</p> <p>Why? Bagged precut vegetables are washed multiple times in chlorinated water to kill pathogens. Such a washing is often more thorough than the quick rinse typical of your average household kitchen, notes Swanson. “Cross-contamination, where bacteria are transferred from one food to another during food preparation, can also occur in home kitchens.” (Washing the sink, cutting boards, utensils, countertops and your hands with hot soapy water between handling different foods can help prevent this, as well as keeping raw meat and poultry separate from fresh produce; more tips at <a href="http://www.foodsafety.gov" title="www.foodsafety.gov">www.foodsafety.gov</a>.)</p> <p>We believe the many benefits of eating fresh fruits and vegetables far outweigh the minimal risk of exposure to foodborne pathogens, and so does Swanson. “A diet high in fresh fruits and vegetables is vital to a healthy lifestyle,” he says. “Eat and enjoy the health benefits of fresh produce, whether it’s ready to eat out of the bag, or prepared in your own kitchen.”</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/bagged_prewashed_produce#comments Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. Food News & Origins - Food News Wed, 12 Aug 2009 18:47:38 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9424 at http://www.eatingwell.com Olive Oil Buyer's Guide http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/olive_oil_buyers_guide <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-landing-feature"><legend>Feature on landing page</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-feature"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> feature </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Everything you need to know to choose the healthiest, tastiest oil and find delicious recipes using olive oil. </div> </div> </div> <p>There are lots of good reasons to stock your pantry with olive oil. Long the most commonly used oil in the Mediterranean (as much as 25 to 40 percent of calories consumed in this region come from olive oil), extra-virgin olive oil’s healthful properties come from rich levels of monounsaturated fat, which promote “good” cholesterol, as well as abundant polyphenols, powerful antioxidants that may help prevent cardiovascular disease and lower blood pressure.</p> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-label">Standard Image:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/olive_oil_guide.jpg?1249583675" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guide-item"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <h3>What the Labels Mean</h3> <ul> <li>Extra-virgin and virgin olive oils are processed by crushing olives into a mash, which is pressed to extract the oil (this is called the first press) without the use of heat (called cold pressing). Extra-virgin oils are of higher quality, as the olives used to make them are processed within 24 hours of picking—the longer olives go between picking and processing, the higher their free fatty acid content (extra-virgin olive oil can have up to 0.8 percent, virgin oils 2 percent). Extra-virgin oils also have more polyphenols than virgin oils.</li> <li>Oils can be filtered—or not. Unfiltered oils have tiny particles of olive flesh in them, which reduces shelf life, and may appear cloudy if those particles haven’t settled at the bottom of the bottle.</li> <li>Pure olive oil or simply olive oil are below extra-virgin and virgin standards and are heavily processed to remove off flavors and aromas. Though the oil still is a source of monounsaturated fat, its been stripped of healthful polyphenols.</li> <li>“Light,” “lite” and “extra-light” are purely marketing terms used on highly refined oils that refer to mild flavor and/or color, not reduced calorie content.</li> <li>“Product of Italy” means the oil was processed in Italy, not necessarily that the olives were grown there.</li> <li>You can find oils that use solely Italian olives—or olives from Greece or California. Often made from olives from single estates or particular growing regions, these high-quality artisan oils have more distinct flavors—and are more expensive. When seeking out these oils, look for seals and designations as helpful indications of quality. Denominazione d’Origine Protetta (DOP) in Italy, Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée (AOC) in France and Denomination of Origin (DOP) throughout the European Union (EU) identify products produced, processed and prepared in regions known for expertise in that particular product. The California Olive Oil Council (COOC) and International Olive Council (IOC) certify and give their mark to quality extra-virgin olives oils, from California and the EU respectively, based on taste and quality.</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <h3>Olive Oil Shopping Tips</h3> <ul> <li>Light exposure causes the oil to become rancid and lose its healthful properties—buy extra-virgin olive oil in dark glass bottles and metal cans and store it in a cool, dark place.</li> <li>Bottling and/or expiration dates provide guidance on how long the oil will keep.</li> <li>If you don’t use extra-virgin olive oil regularly, buy small bottles—polyphenols and flavor can diminish as the oil is exposed to air.</li> <li>The color of the oil doesn’t indicate its quality—rather the variety and ripeness of olives used to make it.</li> </ul> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <h3>What We Like at EatingWell</h3> <p>In the EatingWell Test Kitchen, we like to use extra-virgin olive oil for both its healthful properties (we often use it to replace butter or other fats) and its flavor. Consider keeping two types on hand: a less expensive variety for cooking and an artisanal oil for dipping. We recently held a blind tasting of 10 different inexpensive oils. Four of the six tasters preferred Spectrum Organic Extra-Virgin Olive Oil ($11/12.7 oz.) for its fruity olive flavor and well-balanced finish. We also tried a variety of artisanal oils. Comments on the flavors and aromas of the artisanal oils ran the gamut from “grassy, green and bitter” to “buttery with a green-apple ­finish.” There were two that we liked best. L’Estornell Organic Spanish Extra Virgin Olive Oil ($33/25.3 oz.) is a well-balanced oil made from Arbequina olives, the variety used to make most oils from California and Northeast Spain. A lovely single-estate oil from Tuscany, Altomena Extra-Virgin Olive Oil ($18/8.45 oz.) is grassy and peppery with loads of olive flavor.</p> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <h3>The Smoke Point Controversy</h3> <p>You might have heard that you can’t cook with extra-virgin olive oil because it breaks down when heated, creating harmful substances and destroying its beneficial properties. But all oils break down when they are heated to their smoke point or reheated repeatedly. However, an oil’s smoke point is really a temperature range (olive oil’s is between 365-420°F), not an absolute number because many factors affect the chemical properties of oil. You can safely and healthfully cook with any oil by not ­heating it until it’s smoking—to get your oil hot enough to cook with, just heat it until it shimmers.</p> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/butter_or_margarine_is_there_a_healthy_butter_substitute">Butter or Margarine? Is There a Healthy Butter Substitute?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/3_healthy_cooking_oil_alternatives_to_olive_oil">3 Healthy Cooking Oil Alternatives to Olive Oil</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_healthy_is_canola_oil_really">How Healthy Is Canola Oil Really? </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_and_techniques/why_you_shouldn_t_always_cook_with_olive_oil">Why You Shouldn’t Always Cook With Olive Oil</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/10_healthy_baking_recipes_with_olive_oil">10 Healthy Baking Recipes with Olive Oil</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/is_coconut_oil_healthier_than_butter">Is Coconut Oil Healthier Than Butter?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-2"><legend>Related Content Group 2</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Healthy Olive Oil Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/herbed_extra_virgin_olive_oil.html">Herbed Extra-Virgin Olive Oil</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/olive_oil_herb_mashed_potatoes.html">Olive Oil &amp; Herb Mashed Potatoes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/kale_squash_galette_olive_oil_crust.html">Kale &amp; Squash Galette with Olive Oil Crust </a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/olive_oil_buyers_guide#comments Carolyn Malcoun Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. Shopping Guides Recipes & Menus - Cancer Thu, 06 Aug 2009 18:39:41 +0000 Allison 8934 at http://www.eatingwell.com Egg Buyer's Guide http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/the_egg_buyers_guide <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-landing-feature"><legend>Feature on landing page</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-feature"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> feature </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Shopping tips and information for buying fresh eggs </div> </div> </div> <p>What do all those claims that are crowded onto egg cartons these days—really mean? And how do you know how to buy good eggs? Here’s help:</p> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-label">Standard Image:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/egg_buyers_guide.jpg?1249503968" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guide-item"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <h3>"Cage free" and "Free range"</h3> <p>Living conditions of 'cage free' and 'free range' hens usually are considerably better than those of hens confined to the tiny battery cages (where each bird gets a space smaller than a sheet of notebook paper) traditionally used by egg producers, says Paul Shapiro of the Humane Society of the United States. But these terms are not regulated, so they don't guarantee humane treatment.</p> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <h3>"Certified Organic"</h3> <p>The eggs come from producers that follow the USDA's strict<br /> "certified organic" standards. Hens live in pens big enough that the<br /> birds are able to engage in natural behaviors and they have access to<br /> the outdoors for part of the day. The birds must be fed an organic diet<br /> free of antibiotics and pesticides.</p> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <h3>"Certified Humane"</h3> <p>This label is regulated by Humane Farm Animal Care, a nonprofit organization that verifies that hens' living conditions meet welfare standards approved by groups including the Humane Society of the United States. Hens are kept in pens that allow them to engage in natural behaviors.</p> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <h3>"High in omega-3s"</h3> <p>People shelling out extra cash for omega-3-enhanced eggs should be aware that most of the omega-3s are ALA (an omega-3 fat found in flax, walnuts and canola), not the EPA and DHA found in fatty fish, the type that most nutrition experts emphasize for heart health.</p> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <h3>"United Egg Producers Certified"</h3> <p>United Egg Producers, a trade group that includes over 80% of U.S.<br /> egg producers, regulates this label. The mark simply reflects that the<br /> producer followed industry practices set to keep hens healthy and<br /> productive.</p> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <h3>More Shopping Tips for Fresh Eggs </h3> <h4>How Fresh Are My Eggs?</h4> <p>Eggs lose water through their shells during storage. When moisture leaves the egg, the air space within the shell enlarges. To test for freshness, place whole eggs in a bowl of water. A fresher egg will hover closer to the bottom of the bowl. If the egg floats to the top, discard it. It’s past its prime. Or you can just go by the expiration date on the carton.</p> <h4>What Size and Color?</h4> <p>Eggs range in size from Jumbo to Pee Wee. Size depends on the breed and age of the hen. The color of the eggshell varies with the bird’s feathers and earlobes. White eggs come from white hens with white earlobes, brown eggs come from red hens with red earlobes. The color of the eggshell does not affect nutrition.</p> <h4>Know Your Egg Nutrition</h4> <p>One large egg contains 72 calories, 5 grams of fat and 6 grams of protein. Egg yolks are an excellent source of choline—an essential nutrient that is important for brain and nerve function and may help prevent memory loss associated with aging.</p> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Recipes to Try: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_egg_recipes">Healthy Egg Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/two_dozen_easy_egg_recipes">Two Dozen Easy Egg Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/poached_eggs.html">Poached Eggs</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/artichoke_scrambled_eggs_benedict.html">Artichoke-Scrambled Eggs Benedict</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/green_eggs_ham_frittata.html">Green Eggs &amp; Ham Frittata</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/healthy_cooking_blog/devilishly_delicious_eggs_made_healthy">Devilishly delicious eggs made healthy</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-2"><legend>Related Content Group 2</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/healthy_eating_on_a_budget">Healthy Eating on a Budget</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/kitchen_tips_techniques/making_an_omelet">Making an Omelet</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/the_egg_buyers_guide#comments Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. Shopping Guides Healthy Cooking - Healthy Cooking 101: Basics & Techniques Wed, 05 Aug 2009 20:27:26 +0000 Allison 8907 at http://www.eatingwell.com