Cheryl Sternman Rule http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/891/all en A Humorous Look at Hot Food Trends for 2012 http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/a_humorous_look_at_hot_food_trends_for_2012 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 17 Trends for 2012 </div> </div> </div> <p>Be honest: How many lists of top food trends have you already read? Five? Ten? Fifty? Forget them all. This one, right here, is the only one you’ll need.</p> <p><strong>1.</strong> Bananas will be yellow.</p> <p><strong>2. </strong>People will eat cupcakes. People will eat bacon. People will eat pie. People will breathe air, drink water and get pregnant, though not necessarily in that order.</p> <p><strong>3. </strong>Kombucha will remain wildly popular, so get used to rolling that word around on your tongue. Of course, only six people know what it actually is.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheryl Sternman Rule </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Author Cheryl Sternman Rule shares her 17 hilarious picks for not-to-miss food trends of 2012. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/22414_iStock_308.jpg?1324583406" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2012 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Don&#039;t Miss </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/10_food_rules_you_should_follow">10 Food Rules You Should Follow</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/organic_natural/dirty_dozen_plus_14_foods_you_should_buy_organic">The Dirty Dozen Plus: 14 Foods You Should Buy Organic</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/a_humorous_look_at_hot_food_trends_for_2012#comments Cheryl Sternman Rule January/February 2012 Thu, 22 Dec 2011 19:50:07 +0000 Paula Joslin-Web Producer 45614 at http://www.eatingwell.com Do You Know Where Your Food Comes From? http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/do_you_know_where_your_food_comes_from <p>Have you noticed how easy it is to identify what country the fish at your market came from? In 2005, retailers began labeling seafood to comply with a Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) law passed with the 2002 Farm Bill. As soon as next fall, you could start seeing such labels (e.g., “product of Chile”) on meat, produce and peanuts too.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheryl Sternman Rule </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> COOL regulations coming to a supermarket near you. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2007 </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Have you noticed how easy it is to identify what country the fish at your market came from? In 2005, retailers began labeling seafood to comply with a Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) law passed with the 2002 Farm Bill. As soon as next fall, you could start seeing such labels (e.g., “product of Chile”) on meat, produce and peanuts too.</p> <p>According to a Consumer Reports poll, 92 percent of Americans want to know where their food comes from and, in fact, the COOL regulations, as originally conceived, were to apply to meat, fruits, vegetables and peanuts. But legislative battles and political wrangling derailed full implementation of COOL. For example, groups like the National Farmers Union—a coalition of family farmers and ranchers—fought for COOL labeling, believing Americans would support locally grown and raised products. But alliances of food processors and meat packers, such as the American Meat Institute and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, balked at the burden and expense of complying with such compulsory labeling.</p> <p>This past summer, however, the House passed new compromise legislation that will make COOL mandatory. At press time, full implementation was scheduled for September 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/do_you_know_where_your_food_comes_from#comments Cheryl Sternman Rule November/December 2007 Thu, 20 Aug 2009 19:54:55 +0000 Penelope Wall 10144 at http://www.eatingwell.com Can Your Dog Really Help You Lose Weight? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/can_your_dog_really_help_you_lose_weight <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Dog-Gone Those Pounds! </div> </div> </div> <p>Just as Americans have become increasingly overweight, so too have their pooches packed on pounds: roughly 40 percent of dogs in the U.S. now are considered overweight. So when Topeka-based Hill’s Pet Nutrition (a pet-food company) contacted Robert F. Kushner, M.D., obesity expert and professor of medicine at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, to brainstorm ways to address the pet and people obesity epidemics simultaneously, he was intrigued. “The cause of pet obesity is the same as human obesity: overeating plus under-exertion,” says Kushner.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheryl Sternman Rule </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Your pup may be the perfect partner in weight loss. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/dog_jog_illo_ma07_310.jpg?1267719534" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/5_ways_to_walk_more">5 Ways to Walk More</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Just as Americans have become increasingly overweight, so too have their pooches packed on pounds: roughly 40 percent of dogs in the U.S. now are considered overweight. So when Topeka-based Hill’s Pet Nutrition (a pet-food company) contacted Robert F. Kushner, M.D., obesity expert and professor of medicine at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, to brainstorm ways to address the pet and people obesity epidemics simultaneously, he was intrigued. “The cause of pet obesity is the same as human obesity: overeating plus under-exertion,” says Kushner. But there’s one difference, he says: “People cause pets’ obesity.” Ignoring portion sizes, offering copious treats and skimping on dog walks all contribute to pets’ added girth.</p> <p>Research shows that when people embark on weight-loss programs with supportive friends, they do better. Would it matter if the friends happened to be furry and walk on four legs? Kushner wondered.</p> <p>In a study published last October in the journal Obesity, Kushner and his colleagues followed 36 people paired with their dogs and 36 people without pets through a year-long weight-loss program. Both groups met regularly with a dietitian, who counseled participants on healthy eating, setting calorie goals and ways to increase physical activity. A veterinarian taught pet owners about dog health and suggested activities to foster bonding with their pets. (The dogs also consumed a calorie-controlled diet.)</p> <p>Turned out, the dog owners didn’t lose more weight than their “petless” peers. They did, however, say that the dogs made exercise more enjoyable. Seeing their pets slim down also inspired them to stick with their own healthy habits.</p> <p>Bottom line: “If you don’t have someone to walk with, get a dog,” says Kushner, the proud owner of Cooper, a spotted Havanese. Or borrow one: walk an elderly neighbor’s pet or exercise rescued dogs at a shelter.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/can_your_dog_really_help_you_lose_weight#comments Cheryl Sternman Rule March/April 2007 Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Wed, 19 Aug 2009 15:23:32 +0000 Nifer 9762 at http://www.eatingwell.com How to Cook for People with Special Diets http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_cook_for_people_with_special_diets <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Who Else is Coming to Dinner? </div> </div> </div> <p>You may never host a guest with food allergies, which affect one in 25 Americans. But it’s likely that someday you will be in the position of serving someone who avoids certain foods for a medical condition, such as celiac disease, or for personal beliefs (e.g., veganism). Here’s help in understanding your guests’ reasons for not eating “everything” and advice on how to accommodate their needs, deliciously.</p> <p><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/node/9678?page=2">Next: Lactose-Intolerance &raquo;</a></p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheryl Sternman Rule </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Understanding the dietary needs of your guests. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/bread_1.jpg?1319656765" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Allergies and Special Diets </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/are_food_allergies_on_the_rise">Are Food Allergies on the Rise?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_eat_around_allergies">How to Eat Around Allergies</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_vegan_recipes">Healthy Vegan Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_vegetarian_recipes">Healthy Vegetarian Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/gluten_free_recipes">Gluten-Free Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_food_guide/yogurt">Yogurt Healthy Food Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/a_buyer_s_guide_to_milk_part_ii">A Buyer&#039;s Guide to Milk Alternatives</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>You may never host a guest with food allergies, which affect one in 25 Americans. But it’s likely that someday you will be in the position of serving someone who avoids certain foods for a medical condition, such as celiac disease, or for personal beliefs (e.g., veganism). Here’s help in understanding your guests’ reasons for not eating “everything” and advice on how to accommodate their needs, deliciously.</p> <p><strong>“I’m lactose-intolerant.”</strong><br /> Translation: This person doesn’t make enough of the enzyme needed to digest lactose, the sugar in milk. Consuming dairy causes gastrointestinal discomfort (e.g., bloating, diarrhea) within 30 minutes to two hours. Odds: 1 in 6 people. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), up to 50 million Americans are lactose-intolerant. Also consider: Using lactose-free milk. People with lactose intolerance can safely digest the proteins in milk, just not the sugars. Some can tolerate aged cheeses and yogurts with live active cultures. Learn more: digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/lactoseintolerance/.</p> <p><strong>“I have celiac disease.”</strong><br /> Translation: This person cannot digest gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Untreated, the disease can damage the small intestine, interfering with the body’s ability to absorb nutrients. This can lead to anemia and osteoporosis. There’s a genetic component to the disorder. The only effective treatment is a gluten-free diet for life. Odds: 1 in 133 people, suggest NIH stats. Also consider: Your guest also must avoid rye and barley. Even trace amounts of gluten can cause health problems, so when using packaged products look not only for wheat-free foods but also a “gluten-free” label. Learn more: celiac.org.</p> <p><strong>“I’m a vegan.”</strong><br /> Translation: This person chooses not to eat (or use) animal-derived products or products tested on animals. Odds: 1 in 72 people. A 2006 poll conducted by the Vegetarian Resource Group found that 1.4 percent of American adults consider themselves vegan. Also consider: Vegan diets exclude all foods of animal origin, including meats, poultry, dairy and gelatin (some avoid honey too). Learn more: vegan.org.</p> <p><em>—Cheryl Sternman Rule</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_cook_for_people_with_special_diets#comments Cheryl Sternman Rule September/October 2007 Recipes & Menus - Gluten Free Tue, 18 Aug 2009 15:09:19 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9678 at http://www.eatingwell.com Less Screen Time, Leaner Kids http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_kids/less_screen_time_leaner_kids <p>A $3 bag of spinach may hardly seem revolutionary—unless SpongeBob SquarePants grins from the package. Kid-friendly icons are far better known for hawking sugary snacks and processed foods. But with recent studies shedding new light on the relationship between television and the soaring rate of childhood obesity, a gap-toothed sponge promoting leafy greens signals a welcome change. Additional efforts by educators, public-health experts and even insurers give more reason for hope.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheryl Sternman Rule </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Breaking the TV-junk food link. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A$3 bag of spinach may hardly seem revolutionary—unless SpongeBob SquarePants grins from the package. Kid-friendly icons are far better known for hawking sugary snacks and processed foods. But with recent studies shedding new light on the relationship between television and the soaring rate of childhood obesity, a gap-toothed sponge promoting leafy greens signals a welcome change. Additional efforts by educators, public-health experts and even insurers give more reason for hope.</p> <p>According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, American schoolchildren spend more than 1,000 hours watching TV each year—more than they do in the classroom. And those hours have taken their toll: according to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the independent scientific advisory board on the nation’s health, 31 percent of American children are obese or at risk for becoming so. These rates have more than tripled since the 1960s. Whereas the relationship between TV viewing and obesity was once thought to be anecdotal, recent research reveals that TV is a critical contributing factor to the problem. Last year, a 15-year study published in the International Journal of Obesity concluded that the amount of time kids spend watching television is a powerful predictor of later obesity, rivaling diet and physical-activity levels in importance.</p> <h3>What they’re watching</h3> <p>That television viewing is sedentary is only one part of the problem; advertising is another. Ads for high-sugar, low-nutrient foods and beverages dominate the commercials that 6- to 11-year-olds watch most, says Kristen Harrison, assistant professor of speech communication at the University of Illinois. “If kids eat the diet advertised,” she says, “one-third of their daily calories will come from added sugars—and their fiber, calcium and iron needs will go unmet. We’re dealing with a broad public-health issue here.”</p> <p>The IOM agreed, releasing a comprehensive, highly critical report last December on the marketing of food to children. It advocates a multipronged approach to curbing junk-food advertising to kids, recommending, for example, that the government provide incentives for the food and beverage industry to develop and promote healthier foods. That’s just the first step. Mary Story, professor of epidemiology at the University of Minnesota and an IOM committee member, adds, “We then have to make parents want to buy these foods and kids want to eat them.”</p> <h3>Who’s reacting</h3> <p>Enter companies like Boskovich Farms, producers of SpongeBob Spinach. Vice President of Sales and Marketing Don Hobson hopes SpongeBob’s face will help his product appeal as much to children as to their parents. “I got the idea of using SpongeBob from my own kids,” he says. Other companies are banking on the same idea, with Dora the Explorer showing up on peeled carrots from Grimmway Farms and Elmo promoting Earth’s Best organic cereal. Even food giant Kraft announced it will no longer advertise Oreos, regular Kool-Aid and other nutritionally challenged products during kids’ programs.</p> <p>Educators are pitching in too. Jean Wiecha of the Harvard School of Public Health co-created a middle-school curriculum called Planet Health that teaches nutrition principles to kids and emphasizes the twin virtues of physical activity and reduced TV time. The program, funded by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Massachusetts, is taught in 120 Massachusetts public middle schools, including most of those in Boston. One study showed that after participating in Planet Health, kids watched less television—and that among girls, obesity rates declined and fruit and vegetable intake increased. “Our curriculum doesn’t tell kids what to do,” says Wiecha. “It gives them tools to make healthier choices.”</p> <p>Planet Health teacher Christine Holmes of Mildred Avenue Middle School in Mattapan, Massachusetts, takes some of her most fitness-averse kids to the gym after school. “We do kickboxing, spinning. They love it. One of the kids had never eaten an apple before this program.”</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_kids/less_screen_time_leaner_kids#comments Cheryl Sternman Rule Healthy Eating for Kids Diet, Nutrition & Health - Healthy Kids Mon, 17 Aug 2009 21:56:40 +0000 Penelope Wall 9654 at http://www.eatingwell.com How to Eat Around Allergies http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_eat_around_allergies <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How to Eat Around Allergies </div> </div> </div> <p>Earlier this year, my 5-year-old son, Alex, joined the growing ranks of Americans who have tested positive for food allergies. Alex had been sick to his stomach, off and on, for weeks. Tests revealed allergic responses to a large number of foods and an abnormally high white blood cell count. An allergist advised us to temporarily eliminate wheat, dairy, chicken, fish, pork, beef and eggs from Alex’s diet. My husband and I were stunned.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheryl Sternman Rule </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cooking for people with food allergies and special diets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Allergies and Special Diets </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/are_food_allergies_on_the_rise">Are Food Allergies on the Rise?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/guide_to_food_allergies_and_special_eating_needs">Guide to Food Allergies and Special Eating Needs</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_cook_for_people_with_special_diets">How to Cook for People with Special Diets</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/gluten_free_diet/should_you_go_gluten_free">Should You Go Gluten-Free?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/gluten_free_recipes">Gluten-Free Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Earlier this year, my 5-year-old son, Alex, joined the growing ranks of Americans who have tested positive for food allergies. Alex had been sick to his stomach, off and on, for weeks. Tests revealed allergic responses to a large number of foods and an abnormally high white blood cell count. An allergist advised us to temporarily eliminate wheat, dairy, chicken, fish, pork, beef and eggs from Alex’s diet. My husband and I were stunned.</p> <p>I ran through his favorite foods in my head, mentally ticking off those that were suddenly forbidden. Milk? Gone. Regular pasta? Nope. Bread, brownies, crackers, pizza? History. Cheese sticks, squeezable yogurts, hamburgers? Sorry.</p> <p>For a while, it was tough going. Try explaining to a kid why you’re suddenly serving his sandwiches on crackly brown-rice tortillas with egg-free mayo, and you’ll know what I mean.</p> <p>But we adjusted. Turns out, oat flour makes terrific cookies and pancakes. Quinoa spaghetti holds up well to marinara. Fortified rice milk and soymilk work beautifully in many recipes. And whoever invented dairy-free chocolate chips earned a place of honor in our home.</p> <p>Perhaps what surprised me most during the early weeks of Alex’s ordeal was how many people told me they, too, had to avoid certain foods, or knew of someone else with a food restriction. According to the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network, about 12 million Americans have food allergies. A true food allergy causes the body’s immune system to attack the proteins in a particular food, releasing chemicals (histamines) that cause symptoms like hives, gastrointestinal or respiratory distress. Symptoms, whether mild or severe, occur quickly: within a few minutes to two hours of eating. In the most severe cases, they progress to anaphylaxis, a potentially fatal condition in which the allergic reaction overtakes the entire body.</p> <p>Any food can cause an allergic reaction, but 90 percent of the time one of the “Big Eight” foods—milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, fish or shellfish—is the trigger. Allergists and immunologists don’t understand why these foods cause a reaction, nor do they know exactly what leads someone to develop a food allergy. There does, however, appear to be a genetic component, as studies show those who suffer from hay fever, or asthma, or who have family members with allergies, are more likely to develop food allergies. </p> <p>Still, anyone can develop a food allergy, at any time, says Scott Sicherer, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics at the Jaffe Food Allergy Institute at Mount Sinai in New York and author of Understanding and Managing Your Child’s Food Allergies (Johns Hopkins Press, 2006). Some allergies—including milk, eggs, soy and wheat allergies—appear more often during childhood, and many kids outgrow them. Others, like shellfish allergies, tend to develop during adulthood. Such is the highly individual (and unpredictable) nature of the food-allergy beast.</p> <p>Many people mistake localized discomfort, say a rumbling tummy after eating certain foods, as a food allergy, but it’s generally not. In fact, according to Dr. Sicherer, “Roughly 20 percent of people think they have food allergies, but the majority of them don’t.” They may, for example, have suffered a single bout of food poisoning or have trouble digesting certain sugars, but these don’t fall under the food-allergy umbrella. Knowing the difference is often tricky, which is why consulting a doctor is so important.</p> <p>For instance, milk is one food to which people can either be allergic or intolerant (or both), so it’s useful for highlighting the difference between the two terms. When the milk’s protein triggers an immune reaction like hives or breathing problems, this is usually a milk allergy. But when a person can’t digest the milk’s sugars (often causing loose stools), this is usually lactose intolerance.</p> <p>According to Annie Khuntia, M.D., clinical associate of allergy and immunology at the University of Chicago, two main tests can help determine the presence of a food allergy. One involves putting a small amount of the suspected allergen underneath the skin and looking for a raised bump, or wheal. “This method provides quick, easy results within 15 or 20 minutes,” Dr. Khuntia says. Another, the RAST blood test, “gives you a quantitative number to follow over time.” (Both tests have high rates of false positives, so follow-up testing is sometimes necessary.) Once allergies are identified and foods are eliminated, patients may need advice on maintaining proper nutrition. It’s unwise to self-diagnose and avoid foods haphazardly, since you risk depriving your body of important nutrients.</p> <p>Avoiding known triggers is the only surefire way to prevent reactions—which can be life-threatening, particularly with peanuts, tree nuts and shellfish. So people with allergies must be on high alert at all times, fastidiously reading labels and avoiding cross-contamination. Even trace amounts of peanut protein lingering on a utensil can cause trouble for someone with a peanut allergy.</p> <p>Fortunately, in the last couple of years, living with food allergies has become a little easier. Thanks to the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA), which took effect in January 2006, reading food labels is no longer an exercise in deciphering secret code. For example, before the law passed, those allergic to eggs had to memorize a laundry list of terms (e.g., albumin) that implied “egg inside.” Now that food manufacturers must disclose in plain language the top eight allergens, those same people can look for a single word: “egg.”</p> <p>Also, the number of allergy-friendly products has grown surprisingly large. In fact, a 2007 report from Chicago-based market research firm Mintel shows that the number of new dairy-free products more than tripled between 2005 and 2006 due to an increased awareness of dairy allergies.</p> <p>Eating with food restrictions (or cooking for someone with them) is far from easy, as I learned firsthand. Still, as I also discovered in the early weeks of Alex’s allergy ordeal, many people do it every day, or at least know someone who does. I have a new appreciation for their challenges. I’ve also come to view acquaintances who keep kosher or follow vegan diets with new respect. After all, it’s hard enough to restrict your diet when forced to by medical necessity, but they choose to do so for religious and personal beliefs.</p> <p>Following Alex’s initial diagnosis, I learned to cook creatively with the staples of an allergy-friendly diet—less-familiar grains, like quinoa, plenty of fruits and vegetables, fewer processed foods. The exercise was both eye-opening and a good lesson in nutrition.</p> <p>As it turns out, we were among the lucky ones. Alex’s symptoms were never life-threatening and we eventually got the green light to reintroduce many foods under careful supervision. Today, his diet is close to normal—a surprisingly quick turnaround that’s hardly typical among food-allergy sufferers. This whole ordeal even had a silver lining: together, Alex and I discovered a wide variety of new, healthful foods we might not have encountered otherwise. In fact, his favorite breakfast is still banana-oat pancakes, which are wheat-, egg- and dairy-free. And his dinners include more nutrient-rich grains and vegetables than ever before.</p> <p>In the days when Alex’s eating was most restrictive, I came up with what I call “One Dinner Everyone Will Love,” a menu of three recipes that contain none of the Big Eight foods, so they’re appropriate for many allergy sufferers (as well as vegans and people with celiac disease). Even better, those without food restrictions can enjoy the same meal without ever suspecting that anything’s “missing.”</p> <p><em>—Cheryl Sternman Rule</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_eat_around_allergies#comments Cheryl Sternman Rule September/October 2007 Recipes & Menus - Gluten Free Mon, 17 Aug 2009 20:58:56 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9638 at http://www.eatingwell.com Are Food Allergies on the Rise? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/are_food_allergies_on_the_rise <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Are Allergies on the Rise? </div> </div> </div> <p>The Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN), a nonprofit group dedicated to raising awareness of food allergies, conducted a telephone survey of 13,000 households (in which 5,000 participated) and determined that peanut allergies doubled in children between 1997 and 2002. But that’s not all. “Anecdotally,” says FAAN’s CEO and founder Anne Muñoz-Furlong, “we know from physicians and school nurses that other food allergies, and allergies in general, have increased as well.”</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheryl Sternman Rule </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Some theories on the increased prevalence of allergies. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Allergies and Special Diets </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_eat_around_allergies">How to Eat Around Allergies</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/guide_to_food_allergies_and_special_eating_needs">Guide to Food Allergies and Special Eating Needs</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_cook_for_people_with_special_diets">How to Cook for People with Special Diets</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/gluten_free_diet/should_you_go_gluten_free">Should You Go Gluten-Free?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/gluten_free_recipes">Gluten-Free Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN), a nonprofit group dedicated to raising awareness of food allergies, conducted a telephone survey of 13,000 households (in which 5,000 participated) and determined that peanut allergies doubled in children between 1997 and 2002. But that’s not all. “Anecdotally,” says FAAN’s CEO and founder Anne Muñoz-Furlong, “we know from physicians and school nurses that other food allergies, and allergies in general, have increased as well.”</p> <p>Identifying what’s responsible for the increased prevalence of allergies is difficult—but several theories abound. One is the so-called “hygiene hypothesis,” which posits that we’ve done such a good job eradicating diseases and sanitizing our environment that our immune systems are looking for something to do. Another theory is that we’re introducing potentially allergenic foods too early, or too late, into young children’s diets.</p> <p>Could it be that we’re all exposed to more and more of the “Big Eight” allergens through processed foods and this might be contributing to the rising rates? “Possibly,” says Annie Khuntia, M.D., clinical associate of allergy and immunology at the University of Chicago. “But it’s really difficult to come to this conclusion because there isn’t any evidence to support it. This issue hasn’t been studied.” At this point, say experts, most hypotheses tend to be, well, educated guesses. “Even the big players tend to disagree,” says Khuntia. “It’s an evolving science.”<br /> <em>—Cheryl Sternman Rule</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/are_food_allergies_on_the_rise#comments Cheryl Sternman Rule September/October 2007 Recipes & Menus - Gluten Free Mon, 17 Aug 2009 20:55:28 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9637 at http://www.eatingwell.com