Anna Roufos http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/890/all en The Best Dietary Supplements That Just Might Save Your Life http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_best_dietary_supplements_that_just_might_save_your_life <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> These Supplements May Save Your Life… </div> </div> </div> <p>Danielle Schupp, a registered dietitian who is affiliated with a top fitness club in New York City, works with people who are generally committed to a healthy lifestyle. Her clients eat well, exercise and take the supplements—vitamins and minerals—they think they need. The problem, as Schupp notes, is they often don’t really know what they need. “I had a client in her mid-forties who had recently discovered her bone density was low,” recalls Schupp.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Nicci Micco </div> <div class="field-item even"> Anna Roufos </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The truth about vitamin and mineral diet supplements. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/supplements.jpg?1284412215" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> December 2006 </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_best_dietary_supplements_that_just_might_save_your_life#comments Anna Roufos Nicci Micco December 2006 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Mon, 13 Sep 2010 21:09:21 +0000 Erin McCormick 16364 at http://www.eatingwell.com Foods Made to Satisfy http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/foods_made_to_satisfy <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Anna Roufos </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Science helps create feel-full foods </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/1863feel_full_225.jpg?1250867104" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>It may sound like something invented in Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory but “feel-full foods” are a reality. “Four hours of fullness in just 190 calories,” claims the new Slim-Fast Optima shake. And Slim-Fast’s parent company has the science to back it up. “We can mimic the level of fullness that you’d get from a large meal,” says Pat Groziak, M.S., R.D., senior manager for Unilever, which makes the shakes. How? By manipulating fat molecules to remain intact until they reach the lower part of the small intestine, where they trigger a cascade of hormones that tell the brain you’re satisfied. Kraft is in on the game, too, developing foods that incorporate “resistant starches,” which have the taste and texture of traditional starches but act like fiber, slowing digestion to keep you full longer. The modified starches premiered last year in Kraft’s South Beach Diet cookies and whole-wheat crackers and are now in a handful of other South Beach Diet products.</p> <p>Innovative, yes. Revolutionary? Not really. What decades of studies on satiety (that comfortable feeling of fullness) suggest is that lean proteins and high-fiber foods have the most staying power. In effect, eating lots of fiber-packed produce, legumes and moderate amounts of lean proteins should help keep appetite in check.</p> <p>Still, these high-satiety snacks are backed by sound (if preliminary) science. “All of these products have some evidence to show they can make an incremental difference in reducing food intake over the short term,” says Richard Mattes, Ph.D., professor of food and nutrition at Purdue University. The trick? Not to ignore your body’s “stop eating” signals.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/foods_made_to_satisfy#comments Anna Roufos Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Fri, 21 Aug 2009 15:05:42 +0000 Nifer 10204 at http://www.eatingwell.com Trend on Trial: Detox Diets http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/trend_on_trial_detox_diets <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Detox Diets </div> </div> </div> <p>January is a time when many people are looking to undo the damage caused by weeks of holiday indulgence. For some, a so-called “detoxification diet” seems like a perfect solution. The term “detox diet” is applied to a range of eating plans, from two-day juice fasts and short spans of consuming only vegetables and water to radical regimes that include colonic irrigations (a procedure similar to an enema).</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Anna Roufos </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Can periodic dietary cleansing make you healthier? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/produce_guide_310_0.jpg?1295450857" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/6_easy_steps_to_lose_10_pounds_healthfully">6 Easy Steps to Lose 10 Pounds Healthfully</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/ten_pounds_in_10_days">Ten Pounds in 10 Days?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/trend_on_trial_the_raw_food_diet">Trend on Trial: The Raw-Food Diet</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>January is a time when many people are looking to undo the damage caused by weeks of holiday indulgence. For some, a so-called “detoxification diet” seems like a perfect solution. The term “detox diet” is applied to a range of eating plans, from two-day juice fasts and short spans of consuming only vegetables and water to radical regimes that include colonic irrigations (a procedure similar to an enema). Advocates say periodic dietary cleansing helps clear toxins (originating, they claim, from pollution and junk food) that accumulate in the body’s fat stores and can result in headaches, fatigue and increased risk for chronic diseases, such as cancer.</p> <p>Supporting evidence: “For a week or so, fasting or following a very restrictive diet generally isn’t a problem,” says David Grotto, R.D., a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. “And many people say they feel better after doing it.” Still, says Grotto, there isn’t any scientific evidence to back the benefits ascribed to detoxifying eating plans.<br /> Pros: “Many programs encourage eating lots of fruits and vegetables, which are high in water and fiber and may help move things smoothly through the GI tract, and this tends to make people feel better,” says Grotto. Taking a temporary break from caffeine, alcohol and refined sugars—as is prescribed by most of these plans—may not only eliminate energy crashes sometimes associated with these ingredients but also could help people realize just how much “junk” they normally consume, says Dawn Jackson Blatner, R.D., at Northwestern Memorial Hospital Wellness Institute in Chicago. In this way, detox periods may inspire longer-term healthy changes.</p> <p>CONS: Colonic irrigations done improperly can seriously injure the large intestine, so avoid them, says Grotto. Even “safer” plans (those that promote eating only select, nutritious foods) may cause fatigue or dizziness if they don’t supply adequate calories. If severe calorie restriction is sustained for more than a few days, the body may sense impending starvation and release stress hormones that cause fat stores to break down rapidly—a response that, ironically, may increase circulating toxins. “When fat is metabolized very quickly, the process may free up toxins at a rate that overwhelms the body’s capacity for dealing with them,” says Peter Pressman, M.D., an internal-medicine specialist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Finally, the enhanced energy that detox dieters often report may be the result of surging stress hormones too. (Evolutionarily, it makes sense: a “fight or flight” response drives hungry animals to seek out food aggressively.) An adrenaline-charged drive is short-lived, and with prolonged calorie restriction, the body powers down to conserve energy, ultimately slowing the metabolism.</p> <p>OUR Verdict: If you’re a healthy adult, living on vegetables and water for a few days isn’t likely to do you harm—or much good. “People who operate on the mode of ‘live today, detox tomorrow’ are fooling themselves,” says Grotto. Optimizing your body’s natural detoxification systems, he says, is best achieved by consistently practicing healthy behaviors: consuming nutrient-rich foods, drinking plenty of fluids, getting adequate sleep and exercising regularly.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/trend_on_trial_detox_diets#comments Anna Roufos January/February 2007 Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Fri, 21 Aug 2009 15:01:01 +0000 Nifer 10200 at http://www.eatingwell.com Trend on Trial: Eating Less to Live Longer http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/trend_on_trial_eating_less_to_live_longer <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Anna Roufos </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell takes on the case of Calorie Restriction </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Compelling nutrition trends make headlines daily. But how solid is the science behind them? Why might they matter to you?</p> <p>The charge: Cutting calories by 25 to 30% could add years to your life.</p> <p>Testimony: “Calorie restriction isn’t about starvation; it’s about maximizing nutrients on fewer calories,” says Bob Cavanaugh, 58, a landscape contractor in Morehead, North Carolina and member of the Calorie Restriction Society, a nonprofit group that promotes the “CR” lifestyle. Cavanaugh eats 1,800 calories a day—about 75% of what’s recommended for a moderately active man his age—mostly from vegetables and whole grains.</p> <p>Supporting evidence: Research long has shown that CR increases lifespan in animals. Preliminary results of a human trial, published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association, are encouraging: After six months of 25% calorie restriction (achieved through diet alone or diet plus exercise), 48 overweight adults registered lower levels of DNA damage, which experts believe to be an important factor in the aging process. What’s the likely connection? Free radicals, which damage DNA, are a by-product of normal food metabolism, so eating less food results in a lower metabolic rate and, consequently, decreased production of free radicals. (While weight loss initially occurs with CR, continuing to lose weight isn’t the goal.)</p> <p>Expert witness #1: “Calorie restriction is very promising, though it’s not easy when food is so abundant,” says Eric Ravussin, Ph.D., one of the study’s investigators. “But if the full study reveals significant health advantages, I think some people will say, ‘Yeah, I’d like to live 5 or 10 years longer.’”</p> <p>Expert witness #2: “It’s generally healthy and likely to extend lifespan—by 3 to 5% (vs. 50 to 70% in rodents),” says Jay Phelan, Ph.D., a UCLA evolutionary biologist who has studied CR. “After a decade of depriving yourself, you might get a couple of extra years.”</p> <p>OUR verdict: Meeting—not exceeding—your energy needs with nutrient-dense foods is an excellent idea. But even if longer-term studies pan out, restricting calories doesn’t guarantee that you will live longer. And think of it this way: does making every calorie count (and removing the joy of eating!) present the possibility of a longer life—or just an extended existence?</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/trend_on_trial_eating_less_to_live_longer#comments Anna Roufos August/September 2006 Healthy Aging Diet, Nutrition & Health - Healthy Aging Mon, 17 Aug 2009 21:20:31 +0000 Penelope Wall 9645 at http://www.eatingwell.com Flaxseed for Hot Flashes? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/flaxseed_for_hot_flashes <p>New research suggests that lignans, estrogen-like compounds in flaxseeds, may help relieve hot flashes. In the pilot study, 28 women consumed four tablespoons of ground flaxseed daily—two in the morning, two at night. After six weeks, the frequency of their hot flashes dropped, on average, from 7.3 to 3.6 a day. Intensity of the hot flashes decreased too.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Anna Roufos </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Recent research suggests it might just help. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/flaxseeds_jf08_630.jpg?1285861685" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/flax_seeds_310.jpg?1251749964" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_recipes_with_flax_seed">Healthy Recipes with Flax Seed</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/a_natural_solution_for_hot_flashes">A Natural Solution for Hot Flashes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/are_store_bought_pre_ground_flaxseeds_as_nutritionally_e">Are store-bought pre-ground flaxseeds as nutritionally effective as buying whole seeds and grinding yourself?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>New research suggests that lignans, estrogen-like compounds in flaxseeds, may help relieve hot flashes. In the pilot study, 28 women consumed four tablespoons of ground flaxseed daily—two in the morning, two at night. After six weeks, the frequency of their hot flashes dropped, on average, from 7.3 to 3.6 a day. Intensity of the hot flashes decreased too. “[Lignans in] flax offer a ‘natural,’ less potent estrogen effect on hot flashes than synthetic hormone therapy,” says the study’s lead author, Sandhya Pruthi, M.D., of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who is planning a larger study to confirm the findings. Pruthi recommends starting with two tablespoons daily and working up to four. (Note: 4 tablespoons = 190 calories.) Flaxseeds are rich in fiber—2.5 grams per tablespoon—so increasing intake too quickly can cause bloating. Grind whole flax—a coffee grinder works great—and sprinkle it on yogurt, cereal, fruit and salads.</p> <p>[pagebreak]</p> <p><strong>Flax Cooking and Storage Tips</strong></p> <p>One of the best plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids, flaxseeds provide both soluble fiber, linked to reduced risk of heart disease, and insoluble fiber, which provides valuable roughage. They must be ground for your body to absorb the benefits. Whole flaxseeds have a longer shelf life (grind them in a clean coffee grinder or dry blender). Once ground, flaxseeds are highly perishable, so store them in a tightly covered container in the refrigerator or freezer. You can purchase whole seeds and ground flaxmeal in natural-foods markets.</p> <p>Flaxseed oil, pressed from flaxseeds, is a valuable source of omega-3 fatty acids. It is highly perishable, so store in the refrigerator and use as soon as possible. Available at natural-foods stores.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/flaxseed_for_hot_flashes#comments Anna Roufos January/February 2008 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:20:58 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9578 at http://www.eatingwell.com