Victoria Shanta Retelny, R.D. http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/888/all en The Soy & Breast Cancer Conundrum http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_soy_breast_cancer_conundrum <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Soy Conundrum </div> </div> </div> <p>Soy is touted as a food that can prevent breast cancer—and also implicated as one that might promote it. It all comes down to compounds in soy, called isoflavones, that act as weak estrogens in the body. Researchers still don’t know whether isoflavones spur the growth of tumors by acting like estrogen or prevent breast cancer by competing with the breast’s natural estrogen. Scientists who looked at the effect of individual isoflavones from soy on breast cancer cells in test tubes have found both results.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Victoria Shanta Retelny, R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Does eating soyfood prevent or promote breast cancer? Or both? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/soybean_in_shells_nd09_630.jpg?1283464850" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/soybean_in_shells_310.jpg?1254757899" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/quick_tofu_dinner_recipes">Quick Tofu Dinner Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_tofu_recipes">Healthy Tofu Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_food_guide/edamame">Edamame Healthy Food Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_food_guide/soy">Soy Healthy Food Guide</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Breast Health </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/does_eating_red_meat_increase_a_woman_s_risk_of_breast_cancer">Does Eating Red Meat Increase a Woman’s Risk of Breast Cancer?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/eat_to_beat_the_odds_of_breast_cancer">Eat to Beat the Odds of Breast Cancer</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/what_to_eat_right_now_for_better_breast_health">What to eat right now for better breast health</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_soy_breast_cancer_conundrum#comments Victoria Shanta Retelny, R.D. November/December 2009 Healthy Immune System Recipes & Menus - Cancer Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Mon, 05 Oct 2009 15:48:27 +0000 Penelope Wall 15006 at http://www.eatingwell.com New Reasons to Love Eggs http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/new_reasons_to_love_eggs <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Victoria Shanta Retelny, R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Research shows links to reduced risk for age-related macular degeneration. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Those brightly dyed Easter eggs look pretty—and may help you see better, too, suggests new research in the Journal of Nutrition. Egg yolks contain lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoid compounds that mounting research links with reduced risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Characterized by the deterioration of the central retina, or macula, AMD is the leading cause of blindness in people over 50.</p> <p>Green and yellow vegetables, including spinach and corn, are also rich in lutein and zeaxanthin. Hens absorb the carotenoids from their feed (often corn) and the nutrients concentrate in their eggs’ yolks. From vegetables and eggs, we, in turn, absorb these compounds. Some deposit in our eyes, where they are referred to as “macular pigment.” </p> <p>“Macular pigment appears to protect the retina by absorbing potentially harmful wavelengths of light, and by quenching free radicals that can damage tissues,” says Adam Wenzel, Ph.D., who conducted the recently published research at the University of New Hampshire. While previous research has shown that eating spinach increases macular pigment density (presumably boosting protection against AMD), scientists had never studied whether eating eggs—which contain only a fraction of the carotenoids found in vegetables—might have a similar effect. </p> <p>To find out, Wenzel and his colleagues (partly funded by the American Egg Board) randomly assigned 24 women to consume six eggs per week or a placebo pill daily. After 12 weeks, macular pigment density had increased in the women eating eggs but not in those taking the placebo. “This suggests that the relatively low concentration of carotenoids in egg yolks may be highly bioavailable to the retina,” says Wenzel, explaining that the fatty yolk is a perfect delivery vehicle for fat-soluble carotenoids. </p> <p>But how do those fatty yolks affect cholesterol? In otherwise healthy people, they don’t, according to Wenzel’s research and another study in the journal, which found that eating an egg daily for five weeks boosted levels of lutein and zeaxanthin, but did not significantly impact cholesterol or triglyceride levels. </p> <p>Bottom line: “Our data show that eating an egg a day isn’t a factor for raising cholesterol,” says Robert Nicolosi, Ph.D., one of the study’s authors and director of the Center for Health &amp; Disease Prevention at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. “In fact, people who avoid eggs may be missing an opportunity to consume vital nutrients that can help prevent age-related macular degeneration.”</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/new_reasons_to_love_eggs#comments Victoria Shanta Retelny, R.D. March/April 2007 Healthy Aging Diet, Nutrition & Health - Healthy Aging Mon, 17 Aug 2009 21:15:43 +0000 Penelope Wall 9643 at http://www.eatingwell.com Savoring the New Weight-Loss Secret http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/savoring_the_new_weight_loss_secret <p>Can fully tuning in to the experience of eating help you shed pounds? “Most people eat on automatic pilot,” says Jean Kristeller, Ph.D., professor of psychology at Indiana State University in Terre Haute. For over 15 years, Kristeller has been studying Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training (MB-EAT)—a system that uses meditation and insightful eating exercises, such as chewing food slowly and assessing feelings of hunger or fullness with every bite, to teach people to pay attention to satiety cues.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Victoria Shanta Retelny, R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Thinking about the food you eat might make your program more successful. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/trail_mix.jpg?1262723933" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> August/September 2006 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_diet_recipes">Healthy Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_low_calorie_recipes_menus">Quick and Healthy Low-Calorie Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/eatingwell_diet_challenge_recipes">EatingWell Diet Challenge Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans">Diet Meal Plans</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More EatingWell Diet Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/change_the_way_you_think_about_food">Change the Way You Think About Food</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/the_eatingwell_diet/7_steps_to_permanent_weight_loss">7 Steps to Permanent Weight Loss</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/3_antidotes_to_overeating">3 Antidotes to Overeating</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Can fully tuning in to the experience of eating help you shed pounds? “Most people eat on automatic pilot,” says Jean Kristeller, Ph.D., professor of psychology at Indiana State University in Terre Haute. For over 15 years, Kristeller has been studying Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training (MB-EAT)—a system that uses meditation and insightful eating exercises, such as chewing food slowly and assessing feelings of hunger or fullness with every bite, to teach people to pay attention to satiety cues. In 1999, Kristeller published a pilot study showing that MB-EAT resulted in women reducing binge-eating episodes from an average of four times a week to one and a half. Her latest research suggests that mindful eating could also aid in weight loss. Read our full story about Kristeller’s “enlightened” eating approach in the August/September issue. But, first, try the following mindfulness-based exercise.</p> <p>What to eat? Make up your mind… fully.</p> <p>Learning to identify the point at which one feels full is fundamental to eating mindfully, but training yourself to choose foods purposefully is equally important. To that end, Kristeller offers this exercise:</p> <p>Fill a bowl with trail mix. Thoughtfully, select two different pieces (say, a cashew and a chocolate candy). Why did you choose these two particular pieces? Choose one of the two pieces to eat mindfully. Notice its taste and texture—as well as thoughts that surface as you’re chewing. Now eat the other piece mindfully. How did your experience of eating the first piece affect your enjoyment of the second? There are no right answers; the point is to begin to cultivate an awareness of how you choose foods, which ultimately may make it easier to derive satisfaction from smaller portions. For example, that you tend to label some foods as “healthy” and others as “fattening” may explain why you can’t stop at a small portion of, say, ice cream: if after one bite, you think “I’ve already blown it,” you might just keep eating. And once you understand the behavior, you can start to change it.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/savoring_the_new_weight_loss_secret#comments Victoria Shanta Retelny, R.D. August/September 2006 Weight Loss/Diet Fri, 07 Aug 2009 15:08:56 +0000 Mallory 8969 at http://www.eatingwell.com