Amy Paturel http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/881/all en How Healthy Is Soy Really? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_healthy_is_soy_really <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How Healthy Is Soy Really? </div> </div> </div> <p>Packed with high-quality protein, fiber and other good-for-you phytochemicals, soy seems to be a naturally healthful choice. But despite its healthy halo, some experts say soy isn’t a good choice for every condition. Here, we outline the pros and cons.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The pros and cons of soy for your body. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="625" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/edamame_625.jpg?1294330221" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/edamame_310.jpg?1294330381" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2011 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Information About Soy </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_food_guide/healthy_food_guide_for_soy">Soy Healthy Food Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_soy_breast_cancer_conundrum">The Soy &amp; Breast Cancer Conundrum</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes for Soy </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/easy_edamame_recipes">Easy Edamame Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/quick_tofu_dinner_recipes">Quick Tofu Dinner Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_healthy_is_soy_really#comments Amy Paturel January/February 2011 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Thu, 06 Jan 2011 16:17:47 +0000 Erin McCormick 16813 at http://www.eatingwell.com Foods to Ward Off Garlic Breath http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/foods_to_ward_off_garlic_breath <p>Garlic is delicious, but its dragon-breath aftereffects can last days. New research suggests certain foods may offer a remedy. Studies show that parsley, apples, spinach, basil and other phenolic-rich foods help kick garlic breath. The polyphenols (compounds that act like antioxidants) break down the smelly sulfur compounds in garlic. “But only when they’re mixed with garlic,” says Sheryl Barringer, Ph.D., professor of food science and technology at Ohio State.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> What to eat for fresh breath. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/garlic_cloves_chopped_310_0.jpg?1287775965" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2010 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/8_of_the_worlds_healthiest_spices">8 of the World&#039;s Healthiest Spices</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/health_benefits_of_garlic">Health Benefits of Garlic</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/why_whole_grains_garlic_and_onions_are_better_together">Why Whole Grains, Garlic and Onions are Better Together</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/foods_to_ward_off_garlic_breath#comments Amy Paturel November/December 2010 Fri, 22 Oct 2010 18:50:00 +0000 Penelope Wall 16546 at http://www.eatingwell.com Is a High Protein Diet Bad for Bones? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/bone_health/high_protein_weak_bones <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> High Protein, Weak Bones? </div> </div> </div> <p>Your high-protein diet may help you lose weight, but it could also increase your risk of osteoporosis. Recent research in the <em>Journal of Gerontology</em> found that overweight postmenopausal women on a weight-loss diet who ate meaty, protein-rich diets lost bone density faster than those who consumed moderate-protein vegetarian diets.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Health risks of high protein diets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/steak_cooked_jf09.jpg?1286832919" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2010 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_bean_recipes">Healthy Bean Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_nut_recipes">Healthy Nut Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_vegetarian_recipes">Healthy Vegetarian Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_whole_grains_recipes">Healthy Whole-Grains Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/healthy_cooking_blog/vegetarian_101_3_meatless_alternatives_that_taste_good_are_good_for_y">Vegetarian 101: 3 meatless alternatives that taste good &amp; are good for you</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/bone_health/high_protein_weak_bones#comments Amy Paturel November/December 2010 Bone Health Diet, Nutrition & Health - Bone Health Mon, 11 Oct 2010 19:27:26 +0000 Sarah Hoff 16447 at http://www.eatingwell.com Can Kids Blame Pesticides for ADHD? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_kids/can_kids_blame_pesticides_for_adhd <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Can Kids Blame Pesticides for ADHD? </div> </div> </div> <p>Organophosphate pesticides—commonly used on fruits and vegetables (and also for indoor pest control)—could increase the risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. Using urine samples, researchers tested more than 1,100 children for breakdown products of organophosphate pesticides and found that those with the highest levels of dimethyl thiophosphate (the most common compound) were twice as likely to have ADHD as children with nearly undetectable levels.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How diet affects attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/green_pepper.jpg?1282157717" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/bell_pepper.jpg?1282157908" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2010 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Kids Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_kids_breakfast_recipes">Healthy Kids Breakfast Recipes </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_kids_snacks_recipes">Healthy Kids Snacks Recipes </a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_lunch_recipes_for_kids">Healthy Lunch Recipes for Kids</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_lunch_box_cookies">Healthy Lunchbox Cookies</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_kids_dinner_recipes">Healthy Kids Dinner Recipes </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/food_blog/energy_snacks_for_kid_athletes">Energy snacks for kid athletes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cooking for Kids </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kids_cooking">Kids Cooking</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/organic_natural/dirty_dozen_plus_14_foods_you_should_buy_organic">The Dirty Dozen Plus: 14 Foods You Should Buy Organic</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_kids/healthy_kids_diet_guidelines">Healthy Kids Diet Guidelines</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_kids/healthy_kids_diet_quick_tips">Healthy Kids Diet Quick Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/food_blog/got_kids_add_these_10_healthier_foods_to_your_shopping_list">Got kids? Add these 10 healthier foods to your shopping list</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_kids/can_kids_blame_pesticides_for_adhd#comments Amy Paturel September/October 2010 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Healthy Kids Wed, 18 Aug 2010 18:51:40 +0000 Erin McCormick 16293 at http://www.eatingwell.com Which Packaged Spinach Is Most Nutritious? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/which_packaged_spinach_is_most_nutritious <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Let There Be Light </div> </div> </div> <p>Those unflattering fluorescent supermarket lights do have one benefit, suggests a new study: they help spinach produce more nutrients. The study, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, revealed that spinach stored continuously under the light for as little as three days boasted higher levels of vitamin C and preserved levels of K, E, folate and the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The surprising way to pick spinach with the most nutrients. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="227" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/spinach_630_2.jpg?1276894394" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/spinach_package_310.jpg?1281379226" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2010 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes and Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_spinach_recipes">Healthy Spinach Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/fresh_dinner_salads">Fresh Dinner Salads</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/healthy_cooking_blog/9_great_greens_to_add_to_your_salad_bowl">9 great greens to add to your salad bowl</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_techniques/shopping_cooking_guides">Shopping &amp; Cooking Guides</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/which_packaged_spinach_is_most_nutritious#comments Amy Paturel July/August 2010 Fri, 18 Jun 2010 20:53:40 +0000 Paula Joslin 16026 at http://www.eatingwell.com Have Your Nutrients Expired? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/have_your_nutrients_expired <p>Sometimes there are clues when a food passes its prime: lettuce wilts, bananas turn brown. Other foods will look and smell OK long after their health punch has dramatically declined. “Certain nutrients are unstable when exposed to oxygen (from the air), heat (from cooking) and light,” says Carol Johnston, Ph.D., R.D., chair of the Department of Nutrition at Arizona State University. Keep track of how long you store the following nutrient-rich foods. </p> <p><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/green_tea_150.jpg" /></p> <h4>Green tea: 6 months</h4> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The nutrition benefits of some foods may decrease with time. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrient_library">Nutrient Library</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/olive_oil_buyers_guide">Olive Oil Buyer&#039;s Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrient_library/vitamin_c_rich_recipes">Vitamin C-Rich Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/can_vitamin_c_save_your_skin">Can Vitamin C Save Your Skin?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/healing_with_honey">Healing with Honey</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/can_honey_make_you_healthier">Can honey make you healthier?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/health_benefits_of_tea">Health Benefits of Tea</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/have_your_nutrients_expired#comments Amy Paturel September/October 2009 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Thu, 10 Sep 2009 21:42:07 +0000 Sarah Hoff 14944 at http://www.eatingwell.com Safer Greens http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/safer_greens <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Safer Greens </div> </div> </div> <p>It seems that every month a foodborne-illness outbreak makes the six o’clock news. Leafy greens, such as lettuce and spinach, are some of the biggest culprits—perhaps because they’re usually eaten raw. (Cooking kills most of the bacteria that makes us sick.) From 1996 to 2005, outbreaks of illnesses associated with contaminated leafy greens increased nearly 40 percent (consumption during that period rose 9 percent) and in 2006 E. coli in spinach sickened 205 and caused three deaths.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Understanding irradiation of spinach and iceberg lettuce. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/greens_310.jpg?1251468183" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Food Safety </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/10_commandments_of_food_safety">10 Commandments of Food Safety</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/is_your_supper_safe">Is Your Supper Safe?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/how_do_we_make_our_food_supply_safer">How Do We Make Our Food Supply Safer?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/5_guests_you_never_want_to_have_for_dinner">5 Common Foodborne Bacteria to Avoid</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/food_safety_basics">Food Safety Basics</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/take_our_poll_how_well_do_you_follow_food_safety_rules">Take Our Poll: How Well Do You Follow Food Safety Rules?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/safer_greens#comments Amy Paturel March/April 2009 Food News & Origins - Food News Mon, 24 Aug 2009 19:20:19 +0000 Penelope Wall 10355 at http://www.eatingwell.com 3 Antidotes to Overeating http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/3_antidotes_to_overeating <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 3 Antidotes to Overeating </div> </div> </div> <p>We’re all guilty of overindulging sometimes—an extra helping of potatoes here, a wedge of key lime pie there. But loading up on calories forces your body into overdrive as it tries to deconstruct the damage. “Just metabolizing food—especially fatty and carbohydrate-rich fare—causes the body to produce free radicals, which attack cells and can promote the development of chronic conditions including heart disease, diabetes and cancer,” says Ronald L. Prior, Ph.D., research chemist and nutritionist with the USDA at Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> These 3 foods will help fix the damage of a rich meal. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="270" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/grapes_on_violet_nd07_630.jpg?1289494678" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/grapes_on_purple_310.jpg?1252590640" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/strawberries_bowl_310.jpg?1274306944" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/berries_310.jpg?1274287937" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/kiwi_310.jpg?1261503202" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/grapes_purple_310.jpg?1252590429" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4274key_lime_pie225.jpg?1250696407" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/strawberries_2010cal_310_0.jpg?1274306800" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> May/June 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Diet Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/7_foods_that_do_the_weight_loss_work_for_you">7 Foods That Do the Weight-Loss Work for You</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/8_tips_for_winning_the_food_fight">8 Tips for Winning the Food Fight</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/bad_foods_you_should_be_eating">Bad Foods You Should Be Eating</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/start_your_meal_with_soup_or_salad">Why You Should Start Your Meal with Soup or Salad</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/secrets_to_staying_slim_past_40">Secrets to Staying Slim Past 40</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/always_feeling_hungry_watch_out_for_these_foods_that_will_make_you_">Always feeling hungry? Watch out for these foods that will make you overeat</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_antioxidant_recipes">Healthy Antioxidant Rich Recipes and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_low_calorie_recipes_menus">Quick and Healthy Low-Calorie Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>We’re all guilty of overindulging sometimes—an extra helping of potatoes here, a wedge of key lime pie there. But loading up on calories forces your body into overdrive as it tries to deconstruct the damage. “Just metabolizing food—especially fatty and carbohydrate-rich fare—causes the body to produce free radicals, which attack cells and can promote the development of chronic conditions including heart disease, diabetes and cancer,” says Ronald L. Prior, Ph.D., research chemist and nutritionist with the USDA at Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center. The more you consume, the more free radicals you produce. In fact, that’s one theory why caloric restriction—a practice of cutting calories by 25 to 30 percent—may protect against some disease. But recent research suggests that there are two ways to reduce free radicals: eating fewer calories and consuming more nutrient-rich fare, such as the following. (We suggest you do both.)</p> <p>1. Drink Wine.</p> <p>Antioxidants in red wine, called polyphenols, may reduce the negative impact of high-fat foods, according to a study published in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology in January. In the study, people who ate a turkey cutlet cooked with wine had 75 percent lower levels of malondialdehyde (MDA)—a by-product of fat digestion linked with heart disease—than those who had the cutlet without wine. Other research shows that a compound called resveratrol in red wine mimics the effects of caloric restriction and ­improves health in mice. Cook with red wine or enjoy a glass with dinner. (But remember, moderation is key!)</p> <p>2. Drizzle Vinegar.</p> <p>Having a tablespoon of vinegar with your meal, perhaps drizzled on your salad, may temper the spike in blood sugar (a.k.a. glucose) that occurs after eating a big, carbohydrate-rich meal. This sugar surge is a problem particularly for people with diabetes, who can’t clear glucose effectively; over time, excess glucose in the blood damages tissues. (For the rest of us, a steep rise in glucose triggers an equally rapid drop—which stokes appetite.) But in a 2005 study published in the Journal of the American ­Dietetic Association, consuming about 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar along with a bagel and fruit juice slashed the postmeal rise in glucose in half. It also resulted in subjects eating 200 to 275 fewer calories through the day. “The acid in vinegar may inhibit the digestion of the starch, so the starch is rendered into something like fiber, which can’t be digested well,” says Carol Johnston, Ph.D., R.D., professor and chair of the department of nutrition at Arizona State University. Drizzle a tablespoon of vinegar on your salad.</p> <p>3. Eat Fruit.</p> <p>If you’ve indulged in a decadent meal, consider fruit for dessert. In the Journal of the American College of Nutrition last April, Prior and his colleagues showed that eating antioxidant-rich fruits—including berries, grapes, kiwi and cherries—helps minimize the free-radical damage that occurs after a meal. Eating caloric meals, without antioxidant-rich foods like fruits and vegetables, can have harmful ­effects over time, says Prior. Finish your meal with a generous portion of fruit.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/3_antidotes_to_overeating#comments Amy Paturel May/June 2008 Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Wed, 19 Aug 2009 15:42:10 +0000 Nifer 9769 at http://www.eatingwell.com Earth-friendly Wines http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/wine_beer_spirits_guide/earth_friendly_wines <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Biodynamics: good stewardship yields great flavor </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Read More </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/wine_beer_spirits_guide/6_biodynamic_wines_to_try">6 Biodynamic Wines to Try</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In a ceremony on Sonoma Mountain in spring, the Benziger family buries a cow horn packed with a homeopathic paste of silica (a pale pink compound found in sand and quartz), vineyard soil and water. They unearth the cow horn in the fall, mix the silica from the horn with water, then mist the air at sunrise to enhance photosynthesis.</p> <p>This is just one ritual in the exacting art of biodynamic agriculture. Based on a series of lectures in 1924 by Austrian philosopher Rudolf Steiner, founder of the Waldorf schools, the practice of biodynamics views the vineyard (or farm) as a whole, with the soil, vines, plants, animals—and even the cosmos—all interconnected. Like organic farmers, biodynamic growers avoid artificial fertilizers and pesticides. But biodynamic agriculture goes further, requiring farmers to plant, prune and harvest according to celestial activity, taking advantage of the natural rhythms of the Earth and cosmos, with a final goal of healing their land.</p> <p>While anyone can practice this style of farming, winemakers cannot label their wines “biodynamic” unless they are certified by Demeter, the main association for biodynamic growers. “Biodynamic agriculture had significant recognition as early as 1928 in Europe, when the Demeter certification first appeared,” says Jim Fullmer, director of Demeter. The number of U.S. farms practicing biodynamics has tripled during the past 10 years, and now there are 34 vineyards in the U.S. that are Demeter-certified. “Wine has really been an ambassador for biodynamic agriculture,” he says. “It’s a wonderful fit because wine is a quality-oriented product and biodynamic is a quality-oriented approach to agriculture.”</p> <p>Biodynamic certification requires that farms be free of synthetic pesticides and fertilizers for at least three years and generate at least 80 percent of their fertilizer from the farm itself. So instead of bringing in organic fertilizers and other materials, vineyard waste, such as grape seeds and skins and landscape cuttings, is recycled back into the land through composting, which helps farmers maintain nutrient-rich soil. “This practice involves creating an ecosystem and it requires serious commitment on the part of the producer,” says Fullmer. “It isn’t something that can happen overnight.”</p> <p>“Prior to using this method of farming, we put down chemical fertilizers and fed grapes from the top—without consideration for the vineyard as a whole,” says Chris Benziger, one of the founders of Benziger Family Winery, which was nominated in 2005 for American Winery of the Year by Wine Enthusiast for its pioneering efforts in biodynamic farming. </p> <p>Indeed, before Benziger embraced biodynamics, it was aiming more toward production, not quality—and its wines reflected that. Mike Benziger, another founder and winemaker, began studying biodynamic agriculture in 1994, hoping it might offer a better way of operating the vineyard. “We were putting scars in the land that we weren’t healing, and our wines were far from interesting. With biodynamics, we feed grapes from the soil, so the roots are forced to grow down deep. The deeper the roots go, the more minerals they pick up, giving the wine a certain authenticity and sense of place.”</p> <p>Today 10,000 of the 150,000 cases of wine that Benziger produces annually are certified biodynamic, and they are working toward certification of other vineyards as well. They also provide ongoing natural farming seminars to all growers in their community. And “green” practices, such as water and energy conservation, also protect community resources. Though Benziger has been making wines on the Sonoma Mountain property for 27 years, Chris Benziger says, “It’s only in the last 7 or 8 years that we’ve been able to make wines with the taste of Sonoma Mountain—and it’s all because of biodynamics.”</p> <p><em>—Amy Paturel, M.S., M.P.H., is a freelance writer in Seal Beach, California.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/wine_beer_spirits_guide/earth_friendly_wines#comments Amy Paturel March/April 2008 Healthy Cooking - Wine, Beer & Spirits Guide Wed, 19 Aug 2009 15:00:25 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9759 at http://www.eatingwell.com Could Taking Iron Help Cure Your Cough? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/could_taking_iron_help_cure_your_cough <p>If you’re plagued by a pesky cough, ask your doctor to check your iron levels. Research presented last fall at a meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians suggests that iron deficiency may help explain why some otherwise healthy, nonsmoking women have persistent coughs.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A deficiency in iron may explain that persistent cough. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/chard_variety_310_0.jpg?1318447338" /> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/iron_rich_recipes">Iron Rich Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_recipes_for_cast_iron_skillets">Healthy Recipes for Cast-Iron Skillets</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/fresh_chard_recipes">Fresh Chard Recipes </a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>If you’re plagued by a pesky cough, ask your doctor to check your iron levels. Research presented last fall at a meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians suggests that iron deficiency may help explain why some otherwise healthy, nonsmoking women have persistent coughs.</p> <p>The study followed 16 women who had chronic cough and a mild deficiency of iron, a mineral that transports oxygen and helps regulate inflammatory responses. “We examined the women before and after three to four months of iron supplementation [according to level of deficiency],” says Caterina Bucca, M.D., of the University of Turin. “After iron supplementation, coughs and signs of laryngitis improved or resolved in most of the women.”</p> <p>Women are more likely than men to suffer unexplained coughs. They’re also more likely to have insufficient iron stores because they lose the mineral through menstruation. Bucca says she just put the two together. More research is needed to pinpoint the exact relationship, but Bucca suspects that iron deficiency damages the tissues that line the mouth and nose, back of the throat and trachea, making them more vulnerable to irritants and more prone to ­inflammation. Another reason to eat lean meats and dark leafy greens.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/could_taking_iron_help_cure_your_cough#comments Amy Paturel Healthy Immune System Diet, Nutrition & Health - Immunity Tue, 18 Aug 2009 22:20:54 +0000 Penelope Wall 9747 at http://www.eatingwell.com How the Elite Eat http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_the_elite_eat <p>Four Olympic athletes talk about nutrition, calories and exercise tips to live by.</p> <h3>Erik Vendt</h3> <p>At 27, swimmer Erik Vendt is the first American to break 15 minutes in the mile and a two-time Olympic silver medalist in the 400 individual medley (2000, 2004). Recently coming out of retirement and with his sights now set on Beijing, Erik credits his speedy ­return, in part, to an organic diet.</p> <p><strong>Q: Describe your typical day of training.</strong></p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> <div class="field-item even"> Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Four top athletes share their winning secrets to healthy eating. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Erik Vendt</strong></p> <p>At 27, swimmer Erik Vendt is the first American to break 15 minutes in the mile and a two-time Olympic silver medalist in the 400 individual medley (2000, 2004). Recently coming out of retirement and with his sights now set on Beijing, Erik credits his speedy ­return, in part, to an organic diet.</p> <p><strong>Q: Describe your typical day of training.</strong><br /> A: A normal day consists of two swimming workouts—morning and afternoon, totaling 4 hours—and some sort of dry-land routine, alternating weights one day with running and Pilates on the other. In swimming, speed comes directly from the core so Pilates helps immensely.</p> <p><strong>Q: Favorite power breakfast?</strong><br /> A: Breakfast is my favorite meal of the day so picking a favorite is difficult, but after a hard morning workout I love cooking up a 4-egg omelet with Cheddar, peppers, onions and tomatoes.</p> <p><strong>Q: Favorite snack?</strong><br /> A: Definitely fruit! It’s hard to find fresh organic produce in the winter in Michigan, but Ann Arbor has a lot of co-ops.</p> <p><strong>Q: If you need to grab a quick bite to eat, what do you reach for first?</strong><br /> A: I’ll normally make a tuna sandwich to tide me over. It’s quick, easy and does the job.</p> <p><strong>Q: Is there anything you try to eat more of?</strong><br /> A: Ever since I was a kid I’ve been extremely low on iron so I try to pack my diet with as much of it as I can—red meat, oatmeal, cereal and beans. I normally add a vitamin C-rich food as well to help with iron ­absorption.</p> <p><strong>Q: Do you have an eating mantra you try to live by?</strong><br /> A: I think there’s a direct correlation between what you eat and how you feel. As soon as I began eating organic I felt better, more alive and healthier. </p> <p><strong>Dara Torres</strong><br /> Dara Torres is more than your average Olympic athlete: she has set three World records, holds 13 National titles and owns nine Olympic medals, four of which are gold. Torres is the first U.S. swimmer to compete in four Olympic games and now, at 41 and a mother of a 2-year-old, she’s concentrating on a fifth—in Beijing.</p> <p><strong>Q: Describe your typical day of training.</strong><br /> A: I spend two hours in the pool, five days a week, and I weight train four days a week—two days of lower-body and core and the other two days upper-body and core. I also do resistive stretching three days a week.</p> <p><strong>Q: How many calories would you say you consume in a day?</strong><br /> A: I have no idea. I had an eating disorder in college so I don’t count calories.</p> <p><strong>Q: Favorite power breakfast?</strong><br /> A: Berry-flavored Living Fuel shakes with some milk and fruit are the best!</p> <p><strong>Q: What’s changed—in terms of physical activity and eating—with age?</strong><br /> A: The biggest change is recovery. I don’t recover as quickly as I used to, so now I try to eat more foods—lean protein in particular—that help me recover quicker.</p> <p><strong>Q: Favorite dinner or recipe?</strong><br /> A: A mixed green salad, turkey-spinach lasagna, garlic bread and green beans. My favorite cookbook is one I got in college—Where’s Mom Now That I Need Her?</p> <p><strong>Q: Best piece of nutrition advice you’ve ever gotten?</strong><br /> A: It’s OK to have bites of food that probably aren’t the best for you because that way you won’t deprive yourself and then want more of that food.</p> <p><strong>Q: Do you have an eating mantra you try to live by?</strong><br /> A: I eat what I want, when I want, but I exercise so I can do that.</p> <p><strong>Mary Lou Retton</strong><br /> In 1984, gymnast Mary Lou Retton brought home five Olympic medals from the Summer Olympic Games—including the All Around Gold Medal, a first for an American woman. Now 40, this mother of four girls (ages 6, 8, 11 and 13) “eats just to be healthy.”</p> <p><strong>Q: Describe your exercise routine.</strong><br /> A: I do 45 minutes of cardio—the elliptical is my favorite—then 30 minutes of weights.</p> <p><strong>Q: How many calories would you say you consume in a day?</strong><br /> A: You know, I don’t count calories. I hate those charts because, at 4'9", I should probably weigh 37 pounds. I don’t weigh myself either. I go by my clothes, how they fit and feel and what I look like in the mirror. I hate to get targeted on a number, especially with four girls. We don’t use the words ‘skinny’ or ‘thin’ in the house. We use the words ‘healthy,’ ‘muscular’ and ‘strong’ and we discuss healthy eating.</p> <p><strong>Q: Favorite power breakfast?</strong><br /> A: Egg whites. If I eat protein, it holds me a little longer—egg whites and a whole-wheat bagel or toast hold me until lunch. And of course Wheaties. The breakfast of champions!</p> <p><strong>Q: What’s your typical dinner?</strong><br /> A: I really try to prepare balanced meals. We’ll do a lean piece of protein, a vegetable and a starch. I use a lot of EatingWell recipes; Poached Salmon with Creamy Piccata Sauce and Grilled Chicken Tenders with Cilantro Pesto are two of our favorites. But pasta is my staple food. I’m Italian and, growing up, every Sunday after church the whole, big, large, loud family would get together for a big pasta dinner. Now, I try to do whole-wheat pasta. There are some that look white now so I trick my kids.</p> <p><strong>Q: Best piece of nutrition advice you’ve ever gotten?</strong><br /> A: From my coach, Bela Karolyi: “Eat small portions, and everything in moderation.”</p> <p><strong>Apolo Anton Ohno</strong><br /> Apolo Anton Ohno, 26, has been the reigning U.S. short track speedskating champion since 2001 and has won the U.S. men’s title nine times. In 2007, Ohno gained a whole new fan base when he and dance partner Julianne Hough won season four of the hit ABC series Dancing with the Stars. Ohno’s stamina shows no signs of waning: he plans to compete in his third Olympics at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, Canada.</p> <p><strong>Q: Describe your typical day of training.</strong><br /> A: In the morning, I train on the ice from 7:00 to 11:30. Then from 3:00 to 6:00 in the evening, I lift weights, run and bike sprints, and do technique training on dry land (performing exercises that use the same muscles required to skate).</p> <p><strong>Q: How many calories would you say you consume in a day?</strong><br /> A: It all depends on my activity level. I’ve never really counted calories because when I’m in tune with my nutrition, I can feel when I need to add more grams of fat, protein or carbohydrates.</p> <p><strong>Q: If you need a quick bite, what do you reach for first?</strong><br /> A: An apple and salmon sticks (like beef jerky but made with salmon).</p> <p><strong>Q: Favorite snacks?</strong><br /> A: My “bad” snacks are multicolored Swedish fish and peanut M&amp;Ms. “Good” snacks are fruits and veggies.</p> <p><strong>Q: How has good nutrition made a difference for you?</strong><br /> A: I’m constantly working hard to improve my nutrition knowledge and it’s brought out abs and definition in my body that I’ve never seen before. I feel more energetic and healthy, and my mind is clear.</p> <p><strong>Q: Overall eating mantra?</strong><br /> A: “Not an almond more, not an almond less.” I’m hardcore about nutrition when it’s time to compete. My body needs to be clean—a well-oiled machine works best with top-grade fuel.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_the_elite_eat#comments Amy Paturel Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. July/August 2008 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Tue, 18 Aug 2009 14:26:53 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9667 at http://www.eatingwell.com 4 Natural Fuel Foods for Your Next Workout http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/4_natural_fuel_foods_for_your_next_workout <p>What foods can you count on to go the extra mile, and which foods fall short? See what recent studies reveal before your next workout.</p> <p><strong>1. A Spoonful of Honey</strong></p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Supercharge your workout and get a natural energy boost from foods you have in your kitchen right now. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/woman_jogging_so10_630.jpg?1280876381" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/honey_310_0.jpg?1259100303" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Recipes for a Better Workout </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/breakfasts_that_fight_fat">Breakfasts That Fight Fat</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_blueberry_recipes_for_a_better_workout">Healthy Blueberry Recipes for a Better Workout</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/foods_that_make_your_workout_easier">Foods that make your workout easier</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Exercise Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/how_to_exercise_without_even_knowing_it">6 Ways to Exercise Without Even Knowing It</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/lazy_ways_to_burn_1000_calories">Lazy ways to burn 1,000 calories</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/what_s_the_best_after_workout_drink">What’s the best after-workout drink?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>1. A Spoonful of Honey</strong><br /> Recent research suggests that carb blends (foods containing fructose and glucose) may be superior to straight glucose for boosting energy during endurance activities. But before you reach for a sports drink, consider honey: like sugar, it naturally has equal parts fructose and glucose, but it also contains a handful of antioxidants and vitamins. <strong>Upshot:</strong> While not exactly a “super food,” honey has plenty going for it besides being sweet. The darker the honey, the more disease-fighting compounds it contains.</p> <p> * Health benefits of honey<br /> * Honey recipes</p> <p><strong>2. A Cup of Joe</strong><br /> Studies that demonstrate performance-enhancing benefits of caffeine often imply that drinking coffee will give you a boost. Not so, according to the latest research. Scientists put nine endurance runners through five trials after ingesting either a capsule (caffeine or placebo) or coffee (decaffeinated, decaffeinated with caffeine added or regular coffee). Only the caffeine capsule increased endurance. Researchers think that other compounds in coffee may counteract some of the benefits of caffeine. <strong>Upshot:</strong> Have your cup of coffee if you need it to get moving, and your stomach can tolerate it, but don’t expect it to keep you going through a long workout.</p> <p> * Health benefits of coffee<br /> * Coffee recipes</p> <p><strong>3. A Glass of Chocolate Milk</strong><br /> A small 2006 study (partially funded by the dairy industry) found that chocolate milk might help tired athletes refuel as well or better than popular sports drinks. In the study, nine cyclists rode until exhaustion, rested for four hours, then biked again. During the rest period, they drank either low-fat chocolate milk, Gatorade (a fluid/electrolyte-replacement drink) or Endurox (a carbohydrate-replacement drink). The cyclists who refueled with chocolate milk were able to bike about 50 percent longer during the second bout of exercise than those who drank Endurox and about as long as those who drank Gatorade. <strong>Upshot:</strong> You don’t need a “sports drink” to refuel after a workout. Regular or chocolate milk—both of which contain a mix of carbohydrate and protein—may work just as well. Before or during a workout, however, stick with Gatorade or a similar carb/electrolyte drink.</p> <p> * Got milk? Navigate the choices with this helpful buyer’s guide</p> <p><strong>4. A Bowl of Yogurt</strong><br /> Constant training takes a toll on your immune system, leaving athletes susceptible to upper respiratory tract infections, but new research suggests that probiotics—the live active cultures in yogurt—may help keep you healthy. A 2008 study of 20 endurance athletes (published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine) found that taking daily probiotic capsules enhanced the activity of the athletes’ immune-boosting T-cells and cut the length of time they experienced upper respiratory tract infection symptoms by more than half. Probiotics can also help calm a queasy stomach, which is great for nervous athletes. Upshot: You’d have to eat vats of yogurt to reach the levels of probiotics the athletes in these studies consumed. Still, yogurt has a balanced mix of carbs and protein, so it’s a great post-workout recovery fuel.</p> <p> * Health benefits of yogurt<br /> * Yogurt recipes to keep you young</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/4_natural_fuel_foods_for_your_next_workout#comments Amy Paturel July/August 2008 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Tue, 18 Aug 2009 14:10:14 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9663 at http://www.eatingwell.com Eat to Win http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/eat_to_win <p>Track and field Olympian Marion Jones was America’s darling during the 2000 Olympic games in Sydney, bringing home three gold medals and two bronzes. She ran like a lean, high-powered machine, and credited nutrition supplements—including flaxseed oil and iron—for her superstar performances. Later, she admitted to taking steroids.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Is food the ultimate performance enhancer? More and more, athletes, nutrition experts and fitness buffs are saying yes! </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/energy_bars.jpg?1262799858" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Also of Interest </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/breakfast_of_champions">Breakfast of Champions</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/4_natural_fuel_foods_for_your_next_workout">4 Natural Fuel Foods for Your Next Workout</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/can_exercise_override_bad_genes">Can Exercise Override Bad Genes?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/6_ways_to_sneak_in_your_exercise">6 ways to sneak in your exercise</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/exercise_because_it_feels_good">Exercise Because It Feels Good</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/breakfasts_that_fight_fat">Breakfasts That Fight Fat</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/quick_weeknight_dinners/5_easy_power_dinners_to_fuel_your_week">5 Easy Power Dinners to Fuel Your Week</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Track and field Olympian Marion Jones was America’s darling during the 2000 Olympic games in Sydney, bringing home three gold medals and two bronzes. She ran like a lean, high-powered machine, and credited nutrition supplements—including flaxseed oil and iron—for her superstar performances. Later, she admitted to taking steroids. Since then, accusations of using performance-enhancing drugs have become frequent among elite athletes such as baseball pitcher Roger Clemens (who still denies using steroids and human growth hormone) and American cyclist Floyd Landis (who was stripped of his title as the 2006 Tour de France winner after blood tests suggested he took synthetic testosterone). As a result, most sports nutritionists won’t recommend supplements—or even multivitamins in some cases. They’re afraid that a tainted pill could cause an athlete to fail a drug test.</p> <p>“The risk of product contamination can be as high as one in five or one in six,” says Martin Gibala, Ph.D., associate professor in the department of kinesiology at McMaster University in Canada. Besides, “athletes need to eat real foods to enhance performance—not supplements,” says Gibala. In fact, experts say, getting the right mix of carbohydrate, protein and fat can mean the difference between an Olympic gold medal in Beijing and going home empty-handed.</p> <p><strong>Carbohydrates for Going the Distance</strong></p> <p>Swimmer Erik Vendt took home silver medals in the 2000 and 2004 Olympics for the 400 meter individual medley and then retired, citing the stress of training. At the time, he loved junk food and would often have a midnight snack of candy or chips. Today he’s back, ranked among the top 5 in the world and training for Beijing. “Nutrition has helped me tremendously, mostly by elevating my training level—and that has a direct impact on how much time I drop during my races,” says the 27-year-old, who now eats an all-organic diet focused on whole foods. “Before a workout, I don’t like to stuff myself with a meal; instead, I eat enough to give me the energy I need to attack the workout properly. I eat a bagel, fruit or a bowl of oatmeal.”</p> <p>Like many athletes, Vendt starts with carbohydrates. Since the 1920s, researchers have known that eating carbohydrates enhances performance. “We’re still recommending carbohydrates to athletes and active individuals, but the amount depends on the sports, the individuals, and their weight and health goals,” says Melinda Manore, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Sciences at Oregon State University. Carbohydrates break down easily and quickly raise your blood sugar, which fuels your muscles and your brain.</p> <p>Trouble is, while the body can store large amounts of protein (as muscle) and fat, it has a limited capacity to store carbohydrate. “The typical athlete can store between 400 and 600 grams of carbohydrate [or 1,600 to 2,400 calories] in the muscle as glycogen,” says Nanna Meyer, Ph.D., R.D., a research associate at The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital (TOSH) who has worked with Apolo Anton Ohno and other members of the U.S. Olympic Speedskating Team as well as Olympic cycling champions. Because of this, endurance athletes, such as marathon runners, long-distance cyclists and cross-country skiers, can burn through their glycogen stores after about 90 to 120 minutes of exercise. Once glycogen is depleted, the body mobilizes fat, which muscles cannot burn at the same rate as carbohydrate. The resulting fatigue—also called “bonking” or “hitting the wall”—can be so debilitating, athletes can have difficulty moving.<br /> To prevent bonking, long-distance athletes supplement with carbohydrates during a workout—literally, they eat on the run or the ride. Many athletes go straight for specially formulated sports gels or drinks, which provide easily digested simple carbohydrates and electrolytes, such as sodium and potassium (which are lost through perspiration), minerals that help the body maintain a healthy fluid balance and keep the heart working properly. Gels generally are easier to carry than high-carb “real foods,” such as bananas or raisins (which contain potassium) or pretzels (which provide sodium). However, according to some nutrition experts, these specialized products aren’t necessarily better at maximizing performance. For example, according to a small San Diego State University study (funded by the California Raisin Marketing Board), eating raisins prior to a workout was just as effective as consuming the same number of carbs in a sports gel.</p> <p>That said, fueling up mid-workout is a science. The body can generally absorb only about 60 grams of carbohydrates, or 240 calories, an hour, says Gibala. If you eat too much, the carbohydrates aren’t absorbed into the bloodstream and sent to muscles; they just stay in the digestive tract—so you can end up with a lot of cramping.</p> <p>However, recently a lab in the UK found that a blend of fructose and glucose allows the body to burn up to 108 grams of carbs an hour (compared to 60 grams for straight glucose). Scientists found that when eight trained cyclists consumed glucose and fructose together throughout their workouts, they stored more energy in their muscles and, as a result, completed the course 8 percent faster than when they fueled up on straight glucose and 19 percent faster than when they sipped plain water.</p> <p>“Chemicals in our digestive systems transport sugars from the stomach into the intestines and then into the blood. And those transporters respond differently to different types of sugars,” says Gibala. “So giving multiple types of sugars allows the athlete to get more energy into their muscles to fuel the work.” It’s like having multiple doors to a stadium: with more doors, the stadium sections fill up faster.</p> <p>Historically, carbs were the only nutrient for fueling up, but new research suggests that athletes may benefit from eating protein during a workout too. In fact, the latest craze in sports nutrition is spiking energy drinks with protein. A couple of studies on trained cyclists reported that when athletes consumed a drink containing about 2 percent protein (and the rest carbohydrate) they were able to cycle up to 30 percent longer than when they consumed a sports drink containing only carbohydrates. Despite the promising results, experts claim the research isn’t conclusive, that the benefits may come simply from consuming more calories overall. “Basically they just added protein on top of carbohydrates,” says Gibala. “So is it an effect of protein, or is it the fact that you’re just giving people more calories?” No one knows for sure—and, from a biochemical standpoint, there’s no generally accepted explanation for why consuming protein during exercise would improve performance. </p> <p><strong>Protein For Rebuilding and Repairing</strong></p> <p>What researchers do know about protein is that it’s critical for recovery after intense exercise. Protein consists of 20 different amino acids—nine that are essential (meaning that we have to get them from food) and 11 that the body can produce. When athletes eat foods containing protein within a few hours of working out, their bodies make more protein than they break down. The result? They’re repairing muscles that get torn up during high-intensity exercise, which means that, at the end of the day, they’re maintaining—or even gaining—muscle.</p> <p>“We don’t know which amino acids are best, and there’s certainly no evidence that any one protein-based product is better [for recovery] than another,” says Gibala. “The message for athletes is that eating a food that provides some protein after a workout is going to be beneficial. Does it matter if you get it from a glass of chocolate milk or a tuna fish sandwich or a protein bar? Right now, we can’t say, so our advice is just to eat real food when you can.”</p> <p>Sports nutrition experts recommend spreading small protein meals throughout the day since frequently consuming small doses helps the body convert amino acids from food into protein it can use to build new muscle.</p> <p>“If you look at body builders, some of them intuitively eat every two to three hours to the point of waking up in the middle of the night to eat a small amount of protein,” says Gibala. How small? Benefits come with as little as 6 grams of protein—that’s what you’d get in an egg or a glass of milk. The recommended protein intake is 0.4 gram per pound of body weight for moderately active individuals and about 1 gram per pound if you lift like Arnold Schwarzenegger.</p> <p>“Some of the recovery shakes have 50 grams of protein,” says Meyer. “That’s overkill; the body will not profit from that.” In fact, the body will process excess protein as it does all extra calories: those not used will be stored as fat. Instead of overdoing it on protein, experts tell athletes to add complex carbs, such as vegetables and whole grains, to their post-workout meals. Scientists think that these healthful carbs may help the body absorb protein. Complex carbs also contain many essential vitamins and minerals that aid in recovery and muscle building, and they offer the body an alternate source of energy so it can reserve protein from the diet for muscle repair and growth.</p> <p>Speedskater Chris Needham follows this advice. “I love eating a big juicy steak after a workout,” he says, “But it’s not like I’m going to the Texas Roadhouse and having a 42-ounce slab of meat. I eat a balanced meal with lots of fresh vegetables and some potatoes—something that covers all of the bases.” Needham’s strategy not only prevents protein overkill, it also limits his intake of saturated fat. </p> <p>Healthy Fats to Curb Inflammation</p> <p>Fat was one nutrient João Correia, 33, loved, but when he decided to go back to professional cycling after an 11-year sabbatical, he knew he needed a dramatic lifestyle change. As the associate publisher of Bicycling magazine, Correia’s responsibilities frequently included entertaining clients. He was eating five- or six-course meals a few times a week and washing them down with several glasses of wine. “I come from a family of people in the restaurant business, and I love food. Some people take clients to games or sports events,” says Correia. “I took them to eat.”</p> <p>But when one of Correia’s clients suggested he drop his extra weight and get back into racing, Correia decided to give reaching the pro level a shot. It was a lofty goal, but it was just what Correia needed to get back into shape.</p> <p>“In cycling, the lighter you are and the more power you can produce, the faster you’re going to go,” says Correia, who once rode for Portugal’s national team. But at 5'9" and 185 pounds, he wasn’t going very fast. By working with Meyer, Correia was not only able to drop 40 pounds, but he also learned how to fuel his body for optimal performance.</p> <p>“Most cyclists don’t think about nutrition—they’re just focused on weight,” says Correia. “But I view food as a big part of my competitive advantage. I learned a completely different way of eating that still allowed me to enjoy the foods I like.”</p> <p>Fat itself wasn’t the problem. It was the type of fat Correia was eating. Loading up on steak with béarnaise sauce, fettuccine Alfredo and foie gras weighed him down and exacerbated the inflammation that accompanies high-intensity exercise. So Meyer revamped Correia’s diet to replace inflammation-stoking saturated fats with healthful unsaturated fats. Instead of pasta Bolognese with ground beef and heavy cream, she gave Correia a recipe that uses lean ground turkey and olive oil. He peppered his diet with omega-3s from fish, and heart-healthy fats from avocados, nuts and olive oil. As a result, he lowered his calorie intake and boosted his energy levels.</p> <p>When you measure how much fat and carbohydrates a person uses for energy, an elite-level athlete like Correia will always burn more fat than someone who exercises occasionally. The body naturally adapts to allow athletes to reserve carbohydrates for a quick energy boost at the end of a long workout, says Meyer: “The more trained an athlete becomes, the more fat they are able to store in the muscle and use for fuel. Part of that training adaptation allows them to store fat close to the muscle cell so it can be burned quickly.” These intramuscular triglycerides—or intramuscular fats—enable athletes to use fat for energy as seamlessly as carbohydrates.</p> <p>It worked for Correia. Healthful fats not only provided him with sustained energy in the form of intramuscular triglycerides but also made his food taste good and helped him feel satisfied on a lower-calorie diet. Correia claims his comeback at the pro level has been as much about nutrition as it is about training. Food can make or break your performance, he says—especially if you’re carrying around extra pounds.</p> <p>Correia’s next goal is to win a medal at the National Championships in Portugal this summer. Even though he is one of the very few professional riders who also hold down full-time jobs, Correia knows he has a chance. After all, he stopped racing at the age of 21 and made a comeback a decade later. Now he races for a U.S. professional team (Bissell). Some might say that was an impossible goal.</p> <p><em>—Amy Paturel, M.S., M.P.H., is a freelance writer in Seal Beach, California.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/eat_to_win#comments Amy Paturel July/August 2008 Recipes & Menus - Energy Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Mon, 17 Aug 2009 20:21:09 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9627 at http://www.eatingwell.com Lower Your Cholesterol with Stanols and Sterols http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/cholesterol/lower_your_cholesterol_with_stanols_and_sterols <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Some foods are being fortified with cholesterol-lowering plant chemicals. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When your cholesterol levels run high, many favorite foods are forbidden. Butter, whole milk, full-fat cheese, milk chocolate: all out. But now, some of these same foods—and others, like granola bars and yogurt—are being fortified with cholesterol-lowering plant chemicals called sterols and stanols. (The term “phytosterols” includes both.)</p> <p>Pros: Phytosterols have no taste, odor or negative mouthfeel, so manufacturers have no qualms about fortifying foods with them. “Plant stanols and sterols have the same structure as cholesterol, so they compete for absorption in the intestine with cholesterol produced by the body and that which we get from food,” says Jenna Bell-Wilson, Ph.D., R.D., a nutrition consultant in Arlington, Massachusetts—and they win. Studies confirm these powerful plant substances reduce cholesterol levels by up to 15 percent, a level that could translate into a 20 percent lower risk of heart attack or stroke.<br /> A 2006 report in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition found that consuming spreads fortified with 1.8 to 2.8 grams of sterols/stanols per day for one to three months lowered cholesterol by seven to 11 percent. Other studies have found similar reductions after just two weeks of daily consumption of 2 grams of stanols. </p> <p>Cons: You need to eat foods fortified with sterols or stanols daily—for the rest of your life—to see lasting results. And while sterols/stanols themselves aren’t high in calories, they’re often incorporated into spreads and other high-calorie foods. Even if the phytosterols might mitigate the unhealthy fats in these foods, you can’t ignore high calorie contents, says cardiologist Philip Ades, M.D., author of EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (April 2008). His advice: “If you choose to add sterols and stanols to your diet, get them in the lowest-calorie package possible—particularly since up to 20 percent of people with high cholesterol fail to show improvement with phytosterols.” </p> <p>Bottom line: To get the most cholesterol-lowering impact from phytosterol-spiked foods, eat two to four servings daily. “A plant-sterol-fortified soft margarine is good to try,” says Bell-Wilson. “Cooking with it instead of butter can dramatically reduce your saturated fat intake.” Substituting milk or yogurt products with phytosterol-fortified versions is also a good idea. A 2004 study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that drinking plant sterol-fortified low-fat milk dropped cholesterol almost three times more than eating sterol-enriched bread or cereal. </p> <p>Note: Trace amounts of sterols and stanols are found naturally in corn, rice, apples, bananas, tomatoes and nuts. But you would have to eat about 13 cups of almonds (7,000 calories) to reach the 2 grams a day required to see a cholesterol change.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/cholesterol/lower_your_cholesterol_with_stanols_and_sterols#comments Amy Paturel January/February 2008 High Cholesterol Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Cholesterol Thu, 13 Aug 2009 21:19:40 +0000 Penelope Wall 9504 at http://www.eatingwell.com A Buyer's Guide to Milk http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/a_buyers_guide_to_milk <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-landing-feature"><legend>Feature on landing page</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-feature"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> feature </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Help for consumers in the dairy aisle. </div> </div> </div> <p>With its balanced mix of carbs and protein and rich supply of calcium and other bone-strengthening nutrients, (cow’s) milk certainly does a body good. But with so many choices on grocers’ shelves, how do you know which one you should buy? EatingWell helps you cut through the confusion with this guide.</p> <p>By Amy Paturel, for EatingWell</p> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-label">Standard Image:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/milk300.jpg?1249925798" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guide-item"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <h3>Whole, reduced-fat, low-fat or nonfat?</h3> <p>Consider whole milk—which delivers 150 calories and 8 grams fat (5 grams saturated) per cup—a once-in-a-while treat. Nutrition experts recommend drinking low-fat (1%) milk (100 calories, 2.5 grams fat) or nonfat milk (80 calories, 0.5 grams fat) to limit intake of the saturated fats that boost risk of heart disease*. Don’t be fooled: reduced-fat (2%) milk is not a low-fat food. One cup has 5 grams fat, 3 of them the saturated kind. You won’t miss out on milk’s nutritional boons when you opt for low-fat or nonfat milk (sometimes called “skim”): per cup, all varieties deliver about one-third of the recommended daily value for calcium and at least 20 percent of the daily value for riboflavin, phosphorus and vitamin D.<br /> *Infants under age 2, who need extra fat to support a developing brain, should drink whole milk.</p> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <h3>Organic or not?</h3> <p>According to The Nielsen Company, sales of organic milk jumped from $550 million in 2003 to almost $900 million in the first quarter of 2007. Polls suggest people associate organic milk with superior nutrition, better treatment of animals and a healthier planet. But there’s no evidence that organic milk is more nutritious. While preliminary research has suggested that grass-fed cows produce milk with more vitamin E and omega-3 fats than cows fed grains, organic standards don’t require that cows be solely grass-fed. (Farmers must use organic fertilizers and pesticides and may not give cows preventive antibiotics or supplemental growth hormones; animals must also get some time outdoors.)</p> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <h3>Lactose-free?</h3> <p>This type of milk is basically regular cow’s milk minus lactose, the natural sugar in milk. It provides all of the same healthful nutrients (e.g., protein and calcium), just not the sugar that stokes digestive problems for up to 50 million Americans.</p> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <h3>Raw vs. pasteurized?</h3> <p>During pasteurization, milk is heated to high temperatures (&gt;161°F) then rapidly cooled to kill harmful bacteria, including salmonella, E.coli 0157:H7 and listeria. While raw-milk enthusiasts claim heating milk destroys its natural enzymes and beneficial bacteria, studies show that the nutritional differences between pasteurized and raw milk are slight. What’s more, public health experts warn that drinking raw milk is like playing Russian roulette. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that raw milk accounted for 1,007 illnesses and two deaths between 1998 and 2005.</p> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <h3>RBST-free or not?</h3> <p>The claim “rbST-free” indicates milk produced without using the artificial growth hormone recombinant bovine somatotropin, or rbST. Giving this hormone to a cow boosts its milk production by about five quarts per day. Some consumers believe that treating cows with the supplemental hormone is inhumane, but the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) maintains that treating cows with rbST does not harm the animals—or significantly affect the hormone content of milk. In fact, all milks—even from cows not treated with rbST—contain hormones. Note: All organic milks are rbST-free, but not all rbST-free milks are organic (i.e., farmers may use pesticides, fertilizers, etc.).</p> <p>Some people swear milk tastes better in pretty glass bottles, but it’s best stored in opaque containers to help prevent milk’s riboflavin—an extremely light-sensitive B vitamin—from breaking down.</p> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes and Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/a_buyer_s_guide_to_milk_part_ii">A Buyer&#039;s Guide to Milk Alternatives</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/bone_health_recipes">Healthy Recipes and Menus for Bone Health</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_raw_milk_more_nutritious_than_pasteurized_milk">Is Raw Milk More Nutritious than Pasteurized Milk?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_eating_kids">Healthy Eating for Kids Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/a_buyers_guide_to_milk#comments Amy Paturel Shopping Guides Recipes & Menus - Fresh Healthy Cooking - Healthy Cooking 101: Basics & Techniques Thu, 06 Aug 2009 16:26:21 +0000 Allison 8916 at http://www.eatingwell.com