Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/862/all en America's Top Farmers' Markets http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/americas_top_farmers_markets <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> America&#039;s Top Farmers&#039; Markets </div> </div> </div> <p>The markets are booming. No, not the Dow or Nasdaq. Farmers’ markets. According to the USDA, there were 4,385 organized, local markets across the country in 2006, a dramatic 18 percent rise since 2004. That’s a heartening statistic, especially since the Tufts Food Awareness Project claims that “the average mouthful of food in the United States travels 1,300 miles before it is finally eaten.”</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell readers vote for the best of the bunch. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/farmers_market_stand_310.jpg?1271961446" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell&#039;s Favorite Farmers&#039; Markets </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/americas_top_farmers_markets_dane_county_farmers_ma">America&#039;s Top Farmer&#039;s Markets: Dane County Farmer&#039;s Market</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/americas_top_farmers_markets_ferry_plaza_farmers_ma">America&#039;s Top Farmer&#039;s Markets: Ferry Plaza Farmers Market</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/americas_top_farmers_markets_portland_farmers_marke">America&#039;s Top Farmer&#039;s Markets: Portland Farmers Market</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/americas_top_farmers_markets_barton_creek_farmers_market">America&#039;s Top Farmer&#039;s Markets: Barton Creek Farmer&#039;s Market</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/americas_top_farmers_markets_union_square_greenmark">America&#039;s Top Farmer&#039;s Markets: Union Square Greenmarket</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/americas_top_farmers_markets_five_more_favorites">America&#039;s Top Farmer&#039;s Markets: Five More Favorites</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/americas_top_farmers_markets_full_list_of_readers_p">America&#039;s Top Farmers&#039; Markets: Full List of Readers&#039; Picks</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 10 Garden-Fresh Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/bean_tomato_salad_with_honey_vinaigrette.html">Bean &amp; Tomato Salad with Honey Vinaigrette</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/blueberry_tart_with_walnut_crust.html">Blueberry Tart with Walnut Crust</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/corn_with_bacon_mushrooms.html">Corn with Bacon &amp; Mushrooms</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/greek_orzo_stuffed_peppers.html">Greek Orzo Stuffed Peppers</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/grilled_salmon_zucchini_with_red_pepper_sauce.html">Grilled Salmon &amp; Zucchini with Red Pepper Sauce</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/lemon_dill_green_beans.html">Lemon-Dill Green Beans</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/pecan_crusted_turkey_tenderloin_with_grilled_peach_salsa.html">Pecan-Crusted Turkey Tenderloin with Grilled Peach Salsa</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/quick_pickles.html">Quick Pickles</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/raspberry_bars.html">Raspberry Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/strawberry_sherbet.html">Strawberry Sherbet</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/americas_top_farmers_markets#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough July/August 2007 Recipes & Menus - Fresh Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Tue, 25 Aug 2009 16:46:17 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10379 at http://www.eatingwell.com Fair Trade Chocolate http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/fair_trade_chocolate <p>Chocolate is a strange product, frankly: a fussy bean, harvested with great difficulty, roasted and fermented at some cost, blended with sugar, then specially stored for fear of melting. Chocolate is temperamental, exotic and highly treasured. No wonder European royalty and their hangers-on took to it with such a mania during the so-called Age of Reason.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Help for growers and better tasting beans. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5461fair_trade_chocolate.jpg?1251485753" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Fall 2003 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Chocolate Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chai_chocolate_pots_de_creme.html">Chai Chocolate Pots de Creme</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/chocolate_fondue.html">Chocolate Fondue</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chocolate_banana.html">Chocolate &amp; Banana</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/bittersweet_chocolate_orange_truffles.html">Bittersweet Chocolate-Orange Truffles</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_chocolate_recipes">Healthy Chocolate Recipes and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/instant_chocolate_desserts">Instant Chocolate Desserts</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Sustainable Eating </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/fair_trade_fruit">Fair Trade Fruit</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/the_best_coffees">The Best Coffees</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/5_ways_to_eat_green_at_work">5 Ways to Eat Green at Work </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/food_news_blog/should_you_join_the_fish_boycott">Should you join the fish boycott?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Chocolate is a strange product, frankly: a fussy bean, harvested with great difficulty, roasted and fermented at some cost, blended with sugar, then specially stored for fear of melting. Chocolate is temperamental, exotic and highly treasured. No wonder European royalty and their hangers-on took to it with such a mania during the so-called Age of Reason.</p> <p>It remains a fevered luxury even today, but there is a bittersweet character to all the new interest in the beans of the Obrana cacao tree. Prices to consumers are up, industry profits are up, new chocolate products are proliferating—but the profits of cocoa farmers in the tropics are down. The average producer makes less than one penny per retail bar sold.</p> <p>And there is an even darker side to the story. The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) reports that over a quarter of a million children are put to work each year in west Africa’s cocoa groves, groves that account for almost two-thirds of the world’s production. Both the U.S. State Department and UNICEF have drawn the conclusion that many of these children, particularly in Ivory Coast, are not working on family farms, but most likely sold as slave laborers to huge plantations.</p> <p>So does this mean that with every bite of chocolate we’re supporting horrific conditions around the world? Not so. There are companies helping individual growers better their conditions and improve their roasting and fermentation practices. The notion of consumers supporting ethical treatment of small farmers and sustainable farming is called Fair Trade, and it is coming to chocolate just as it has made a difference for coffee growers. In short, chocolate that has been properly grown, harvested and traded will carry certification labels to let the consumer know the origin of his or her purchase. Enthusiasts say that it is going to mean better—much better—chocolate for all of us who care about such things.</p> <p>Robert Steinberg of Scharffen Berger Chocolate Maker in Berkeley claims it’s not simply a question of which beans are from which farm in which country. “It’s all about tending the cacao trees,” he says. “It’s about avoiding pesticides and using proper fermentation techniques.” A properly harvested and fermented bean will taste nothing like one improperly produced right next door. To that end, he’s been experimenting with varietals, such as winy porcelana beans, and instigating better agricultural practices among the growers who supply his company. By doing so, Steinberg is increasing awareness of specific beans—and giving a provenance to chocolate, like that given to wine.</p> <p>Of course, there’s no guarantee that buying these bars translates into good returns for cocoa growers, the elusive goal of all fair-trade hopes. But it does establish the notion that one cacao bean is not like another. Two decades ago, this happened with coffee: consumers became aware of differences between Sumatran and Jamaican and Colombian beans. Demand is now blossoming for coffees of known origin, along with specialty coffees carrying organic, fair-trade, shade-grown or “bird-friendly” labels.</p> <p>The current champion of provenance is Paris-born Pierrick Marie Chouard. Having worked in the candy industry, he’s seen the abuses in the third-world system firsthand. Chouard sells varietals through his New Jersey company, echocolates.com, a member of the Rain Forest Alliance. If cocoa growers make more money, he argues, the social structure will be improved—with less need for people to turn to the prostitution and drug trade rampant in cocoa-producing countries.</p> <p>Consumers can get involved by looking for chocolate or cocoa marked with a “fair-trade certified” label, mostly found in natural-foods stores. Finally, speak up if you care. Ask chefs and chocolate sellers where their chocolate comes from and if they have fair-trade chocolate. It is almost guaranteed to taste better and it surely enriches our appreciation of a wonderful indulgence.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/fair_trade_chocolate#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough Fall 2003 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Fri, 21 Aug 2009 17:40:41 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10261 at http://www.eatingwell.com Strawberries and Rhubarb: Perfect Together http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/strawberries_and_rhubarb_perfect_together <p>Last year about this time, we were so excited about putting in a new garden at the side of the house. We’d even done our homework! Or most of it. We had the whole thing laid out, including the three rhubarb plants at the back, a boon to any gardener both ­because they provide a nice backdrop and because, well, the stems cook up so darn delicious. Strawberry-rhubarb pie has always been one of our favorite indulgences.</p> <p>Proud of our plans to plant, we brought it up in passing to a friend. Well, specifically, to Jessie Price, the food editor at EatingWell.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Recipes for two starring this classic pair. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/DS6514.JPG?1301928977" /> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Strawberry-Rhubarb Recipes and Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/duck_strawberry_salad_with_rhubarb_dressing.html">Duck &amp; Strawberry Salad with Rhubarb Dressing</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/strawberry_rhubarb_strudel.html">Strawberry-Rhubarb Strudel</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/rhubarb_crisp.html">Rhubarb Crisp</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/strawberry_rhubarb_bread_pudding.html">Strawberry-Rhubarb Bread Pudding</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/strawberry_rhubarb_cobbler.html">Strawberry-Rhubarb Cobbler</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/rhubarb_strawberry_summer_pudding.html">Rhubarb-Strawberry Summer Pudding</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/meringue_topped_strawberries_rhubarb.html">Meringue-Topped Strawberries &amp; Rhubarb</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_strawberry_recipes">Healthy Strawberry Recipes and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/healthy_cooking_blog/rhubarb_101_tips_and_recipes_to_master_this_sweet_summer_fruit">Rhubarb 101: tips and recipes to master this sweet summer fruit</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Last year about this time, we were so excited about putting in a new garden at the side of the house. We’d even done our homework! Or most of it. We had the whole thing laid out, including the three rhubarb plants at the back, a boon to any gardener both ­because they provide a nice backdrop and because, well, the stems cook up so darn delicious. Strawberry-rhubarb pie has always been one of our favorite indulgences.</p> <p>Proud of our plans to plant, we brought it up in passing to a friend. Well, specifically, to Jessie Price, the food editor at EatingWell.</p> <p>Expecting gushing approval for our self-sustaining rhubarb habit, we were instead met with gasps and guffaws. “You’re not actually planting that stuff, are you?” she laughed. “It’s a weed in New England.” Undaunted, we plugged on.</p> <p>Yes, those three plants did grow very well, but that turned out to be the least of it. As the weather warmed we started to notice the woods around our house were infested with the stuff. Hundreds of rhubarb plants sprang up among the ferns, under the trees, along the creek bed. Over the years, people had planted them everywhere. Our town is precolonial, you know. So we’re dealing with the detritus of centuries of big-eyed gardeners. We were surrounded by some sort of nightmarish rhubarb jungle.</p> <p>By June, we’d canned, cooked, baked and braised our way through the underbrush. Then we started mowing it down.</p> <p>Even though nothing tames the stuff in the wilds of Connecticut, the same can’t be said in the kitchen. Strawberries are the natural, classic mellow-inducer. They tone down that prized sourness—especially in these recipes for a summer salad and a strudel, each just for two.</p> <p>Strawberries and rhubarb: it’s still a match made in heaven. That’s why we’re planting strawberries this season. Lots of strawberries. And we defy Jessie to tell us they grow wild in the woods. Because if they do, we’re never leaving New England.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/strawberries_and_rhubarb_perfect_together#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough Healthy Cooking - Quick & Healthy Cooking Wed, 19 Aug 2009 17:57:22 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9823 at http://www.eatingwell.com Satisfying Fall Suppers for 2 http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/satisfying_fall_suppers_for_2 <p>Holidays can be tricky for blended families. In our case, the Christian side of the family offers to bring the bread for a Passover Seder, and the Jewish side doesn’t understand why dinner has to be after the Christmas Eve service.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> These easy takes on traditional Jewish holiday dishes are perfect for any crisp fall evening. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/sweet_savory_bf_stew.JPG?1251734090" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/sweet_savory_beef_stew.html">Sweet &amp; Savory Beef Stew</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/smoked_trout_salad.html">Smoked Trout Salad</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_cooking_two_recipes">Healthy Cooking for Two Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Holidays can be tricky for blended families. In our case, the Christian side of the family offers to bring the bread for a Passover Seder, and the Jewish side doesn’t understand why dinner has to be after the Christmas Eve service.</p> <p>It’s a problem best solved with a little humility and grace. That said, it sometimes falls together naturally. The first holiday we spent together with our families was Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement in the Jewish calendar—a kind of once-a-year “you’re forgiven” moment. As such, it’s a solemn day, usually marked by a fast until sundown. After that, most families serve up a simple meal of smoked fish and bagels, because there are prohibitions against working on a high holy day.</p> <p>It could have been fraught with tension: meeting families, packed with about a hundred years’ worth of baggage. Not knowing the customs, not knowing you don’t bring flowers to a solemn moment of repentance. But it wasn’t. We settled in, dug into the platters of cold salads and smoked fish. We honored traditions and gently educated ignorance.</p> <p>These days, our families are spread across the country. On all sides, we live a plane-flight from each other. So we two often spend many of the holidays together: holidays that are quieter, less fraught—but no less traditional.</p> <p>Rosh Hashanah always seems the most sensible holiday because it falls exactly where it should. It’s in mid- to late September and it marks the New Year in the Jewish calendar. January 1? No way. For most of us sometime right after Labor Day, we’re back in the saddle, back at work, back at school, starting anew, once the summer heat breaks. The French call this time of year la rentrée (the re-entry), but New Year seems an even better word for it: full of hope and rebirth. The meal for Rosh Hashanah most often includes something sweet, to symbolize a wish and a prayer for a sweet and happy new year.</p> <p>For these Jewish fall holidays we have worked up delicious recipes for two that honor all the traditions. Our beef stew for Rosh Hashanah is full of butternut squash and dried cherries, an homage to the sweet new year. And for Yom Kippur, we keep it easy with trout salad that’s just a little bit of work. You can make it the day before—or anytime, really, a nice dinner for an early fall evening when you’d rather not turn on the stove.</p> <p><em>Contributing editors Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough’s most recent book is The Ultimate Cook Book (William Morrow).</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/satisfying_fall_suppers_for_2#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough September/October 2008 Healthy Cooking - Quick & Healthy Cooking Wed, 19 Aug 2009 17:52:26 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9822 at http://www.eatingwell.com Free-Range Chicken Dinners for Two http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/free_range_chicken_dinners_for_two <p>It’s hard to be a locavore this time of year in Connecticut. We can usually last through the winter on squash and the like. But in early spring, our garden’s still fully underground. Even the two older ladies on the mountain behind us, along with most of the birds (and other better thinkers) are still in Florida.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy spring chicken dinners just for the two of you. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4081chicken_br_mushroom_crm_sauce_225.jpg?1251483628" /> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Chicken Recipes and Cooking for Two Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_chicken_recipes">Healthy Chicken Recipes, Menus and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_cooking_two_recipes">Healthy Cooking for Two Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/mushroom_cream_chicken.html">Chicken Breasts with Mushroom Cream Sauce</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/roast_chicken_fennel.html">Roast Chicken &amp; Fennel</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chopped_greek_salad_with_chicken_for_two.html">Chopped Greek Salad with Chicken for Two</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/marmalade_chicken_for_two.html">Marmalade Chicken for Two</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/quick_chicken_cordon_bleu_for_2.html">Quick Chicken Cordon Bleu for Two</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Learn more </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/green_choices_meat_poultry_buyer_s_guide">Green Choices: Meat &amp; Poultry Buyer’s Guide</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>It’s hard to be a locavore this time of year in Connecticut. We can usually last through the winter on squash and the like. But in early spring, our garden’s still fully underground. Even the two older ladies on the mountain behind us, along with most of the birds (and other better thinkers) are still in Florida.</p> <p>But there are ways to eat locally even in the late winter and early spring. The Jasmins, a family down the road and around the valley bend from us, raise chickens. No, not certified organic; but the chickens do get free run of a large yard on sunny days—when they have to scurry out of the way to avoid the kids on bikes peeling down the rutted driveway. The Jasmins’ daughter Ashley shares table scraps with the chickens, along with seed and hay. The hens roost in wide nests set along one wall of a heated barn. (It’s lit in there, too, because the layers won’t comply in the New England winters without a little sun-lamp treatment.)</p> <p>The meat is definitely less fatty, leaner for sure—and more tasty. More like, well, “chicken,” with a slight, sweet, musky tang of game.</p> <p>We pack up the dog and drive down the road to the Jasmins’ farm. We serve their chicken up in hearty dishes, roasts and sautés.</p> <p>If you’re interested in purchasing fresh chicken just down the road from your home visit localharvest.org to find local farms. Then hunker down until spring’s in full swing with our roasted chicken drumsticks or this surprisingly light chicken sauté with a simple cream sauce.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/free_range_chicken_dinners_for_two#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough Healthy Cooking - Quick & Healthy Cooking Wed, 19 Aug 2009 17:40:09 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9810 at http://www.eatingwell.com Guilt-Free Chocolate http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/guilt_free_chocolate <p>After 11 years as a couple, we’ve come to this conclusion: shared tasks do not make for domestic bliss. Oh, sure, we love those romantic movies, people doing household chores together. But we can just imagine how it’d go around here. “You’re going to put the ladder there?” “You clean the fireplace out that way?”</p> <p>So we’ve developed this strategy: “He who does it gets to decide how to do it.” And that strategy includes cooking. Whoever cooks dinner gets to decide what’s for dinner.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> These fair-trade delights are just right for two. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/fondue.JPG?1263499676" /> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chocolate_souffl.html">Chocolate Soufflé</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/chocolate_fondue.html">Chocolate Fondue</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/menus/healthy_valentines_day_for_two">Valentine&#039;s Day Menu for Two</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_valentines_day_recipes">Healthy Valentine&#039;s Day Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>After 11 years as a couple, we’ve come to this conclusion: shared tasks do not make for domestic bliss. Oh, sure, we love those romantic movies, people doing household chores together. But we can just imagine how it’d go around here. “You’re going to put the ladder there?” “You clean the fireplace out that way?”</p> <p>So we’ve developed this strategy: “He who does it gets to decide how to do it.” And that strategy includes cooking. Whoever cooks dinner gets to decide what’s for dinner.</p> <p>Fortunately, there are no turf wars on Valentine’s Day. We both want chocolate—and in manageable portions. Neither of us wants a three-layer cake that serves 16. Instead, two small <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chocolate_souffl.html">chocolate soufflés</a> do the trick: rich but airy, light but so satisfying. Or a small pot of <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chocolate_fondue.html_0">chocolate fondue</a> with some fresh fruit, a velvety treat on a special night.</p> <p>So in the spirit of camaraderie brought on by the promise of chocolate, we actually make dinner together on Valentine’s Day. We head for the store and both know right where the chocolate’s kept. We make a beeline from the front door to the shelf, no cart necessary.</p> <p>There’s also no disagreement on the type of chocolate. No, not dark or milk, mind you. We buy Fair Trade Certified chocolate. Why? Well, for starters, 70 percent of the world’s cocoa supply is produced in West Africa largely by enslaved children.</p> <p>Steps have been taken to rectify the global problem. In 2001, Iowa Senator Tom Harkin and New York Congressman Eliot Engel created the Harkin-Engel Protocol to establish an international cocoa certification system to guarantee that chocolate has not been produced with forced child labor. The Harkin-Engel certification system is still a work in progress, so for now, Fair Trade Certified is the best option to look for. Fair Trade guarantees cocoa producers minimum prices. In return, producers must provide fair conditions to their workers. They must pay a fair wage, have safe working conditions and not use child labor.</p> <p>Once we’re home, we open a bottle of red wine and set to cooking, a shared task made better by both the holiday and our commitment to both healthy and politically responsible cooking. Oh sure, there might be a bone to pick with the fish. (“You coat it in what before it goes in the oven?”) But with a rich chocolate dessert ahead, it’s merely a bump in the road to bliss.</p> <p><em>Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough are frequent contributing editors to EatingWell. </em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/guilt_free_chocolate#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough Healthy Cooking - Quick & Healthy Cooking Wed, 19 Aug 2009 17:37:20 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9809 at http://www.eatingwell.com Cranberry Breakfasts for Two http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/cranberry_breakfasts_for_two <p>For months, it’s been sheets in the washer, dishes in the sink and lavish breakfast buffets, too—eggs, bacon, waffles, you name it. You see, we’ve had a steady stream of company since we moved to rural Connecticut from Manhattan. Our friends, left behind in small apartments, have discovered we have a spare bedroom and seem to settle in almost as comfortably as the neighborhood bear, who likes to bunk down in our driveway.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> New ways to relish the berries of fall. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/cranberry_pancake.jpg?1251733967" /> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/cranberry_muesli.html">Cranberry Muesli</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/cranberry_pancakes.html">Cranberry Pancakes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>For months, it’s been sheets in the washer, dishes in the sink and lavish breakfast buffets, too—eggs, bacon, waffles, you name it. You see, we’ve had a steady stream of company since we moved to rural Connecticut from Manhattan. Our friends, left behind in small apartments, have discovered we have a spare bedroom and seem to settle in almost as comfortably as the neighborhood bear, who likes to bunk down in our driveway.</p> <p>Until recently, we’d find the bear there about midafternoon, just as the light started to angle through the maple and birch boughs. One friend gawked out the window at that big black mass in the driveway and said, “But we can still go antiquing, right?” No, we have to hunker down and wait. “Oh,” he said, “like when the doorman in my building is away at lunch and I’m waiting for my mail.” Yeah, except only rarely can the doorman maul you.</p> <p>But all this drama subsides on Monday mornings and the house quiets back down. The bear? Gone for the winter now. And no breakfast buffets for bleary-eyed city-dwellers. Our morning routine falls back into place: a cup of coffee and a simple two-serving breakfast. We’re alone with the morning paper, ready to eat healthy again and then take on the morning’s tasks.</p> <p>It’s chilly most mornings now, the doors closed tight but the light brighter somehow, wintry and clean. The holidays are on their way with all the trimmings—including the one fruit you can count on as winter sets in: cranberries. They’re grown across our part of New England and most of the northern United States, particularly in Wisconsin, all places with plenty of water. At harvest, most bogs are flooded and the cranberries float off the low-growing, woody vines to rise to the top of the water where they’re corralled and scooped up.</p> <p>Recently, researchers at the University of Wisconsin showed that flavonoid compounds in cranberries may help arteries remain healthfully elastic and stave off un-necessary clotting. One too many breakfasts with company and we’re certainly in need of something that promotes good arterial health.</p> <p>What’s more, cranberries can keep your urinary tract healthy; they may also inhibit dental plaque and prevent some stomach ulcers (many caused by overnight houseguests).</p> <p>With their tart flavor and all those health benefits, it’s no wonder we want to wake up to <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cranberry_muesli.html">cranberry muesli</a> that’s soaked overnight with yogurt, as it’s made in Switzerland, or to these delicious whole-grain <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cranberry_pancakes.html">pancakes</a>, studded with fresh cranberries.<br /> <em>—Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/cranberry_breakfasts_for_two#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough Healthy Cooking - Quick & Healthy Cooking Wed, 19 Aug 2009 17:30:45 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9804 at http://www.eatingwell.com Easy Shellfish Dinners for Two http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/cooking_for_two/easy_shellfish_dinners_for_two <p>Every August, you’ll find us on Prince Edward Island. We go for the seafood. Well, that and swimming in the surprisingly warm waters of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, 11 hours by car from Boston, 14 from New York, and actually worlds away from anywhere.</p> <p>Our first time, eight years ago, we pulled into our inn around 3:00 p.m. on a breezy summer day, unpacked quickly, slipped into our swim trunks, and walked across the road to the national park beach, miles of pink sand in both directions. We walked for hours, dug crabs, and saw only a handful of people, all up to about the same thing.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Simple and delicious ways to prepare mussels and scallops. </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Seafood for Two Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/mussels_south_of_two_borders.html">Mussels South of Two Borders</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/scallops_yakitori.html">Scallops Yakitori</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Every August, you’ll find us on Prince Edward Island. We go for the seafood. Well, that and swimming in the surprisingly warm waters of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, 11 hours by car from Boston, 14 from New York, and actually worlds away from anywhere.</p> <p>Our first time, eight years ago, we pulled into our inn around 3:00 p.m. on a breezy summer day, unpacked quickly, slipped into our swim trunks, and walked across the road to the national park beach, miles of pink sand in both directions. We walked for hours, dug crabs, and saw only a handful of people, all up to about the same thing.</p> <p>We came back to the inn for dinner and told the owner about our day. "There were half a dozen people on the beach!" we said.</p> <p>He shook his head. "I know. You should really see it in the off season."</p> <p>For lunch we head for one of two local places, both little clapboard restaurants in danger of falling down. At Richard’s restaurant, when we order the scallops, someone goes into the pound where the local fishermen store their catch in saltwater tanks, pulls out a basketful still in their shells, and cooks them. They are so fresh, the orange roe is still attached.</p> <p>Our other favorite spot, farther east, is Rick’s. (No relation between the places, we hear.) As we sit at a picnic table outside, enjoying a bowl of steamed mussels, we can see hundreds of buoys in the bay, each marking a rope on which mussels grow. Practically every shallow bay is filled with these farms, a boon for the local economy. The mussel beds are seeded every spring in serried clusters, a hallmark of the island’s commitment to sustainability. Mussel farming started in earnest on the island just a little over 30 years ago. Today, PEI produces about 37 million pounds a year, nearly ten times the Maine harvest.</p> <p>Back in the U.S., we always search out scallops and mussels at the fish counter, a little taste of PEI paradise anytime. Although it sometimes seems as if the islanders fry everything in sight, we like to keep things healthier at home, using global flavors, readily available in our markets, as inspiration.</p> <p>Here are two of our favorite summer recipes. The only real danger? Overcooking. If you let mussels or scallops hang over the heat too long, they’ll turn tough. So you spend less time cooking, which leaves more time for doing nothing together on a lazy summer evening. That sounds like the whole reason we go to PEI in the first place.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/cooking_for_two/easy_shellfish_dinners_for_two#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough Recipes & Menus - Recipes for Two Tue, 18 Aug 2009 20:45:17 +0000 Paula Joslin 9736 at http://www.eatingwell.com Easy Grill Roasting http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/easy_grilling <p>Does anything inspire more “oohs” and “ahs” than golden, juicy cuts of meat hot off a grill? Hardly. We wanted in on this game, so, never ones to be shy, we bought a testosterone-doped grill that arrived at our house in Connecticut on a flatbed truck and had to be off-loaded with a forklift.</p> <p>For a time, we lived in grill bliss: seared steaks, jerk-rubbed pork chops, oohs and ahs aplenty.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Enjoy succulent beef tenderloin, roast chicken and more without ever turning on your oven. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/jerk_pork_0.JPG?1264538348" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> May/June 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Grilling Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/smoked_turkey_breast.html">Smoked Turkey Breast</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/beer_barbecued_chicken.html">Beer-Barbecued Chicken</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/middle_eastern_roast_lamb_with_tahini_sauce.html">Middle Eastern Roast Lamb with Tahini Sauce</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/peppercorn_crusted_beef_tenderloin.html">Peppercorn-Crusted Beef Tenderloin</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/jerk_pork_loin.html">Jerk Pork Loin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/lime_honey_glazed_chicken.html">Lime-Honey Glazed Chicken</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Healthy Grilling Recipes &amp; Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_techniques/kitchen_tips_techniques/8_tips_for_foolproof_roasting_on_the_grill">8 Tips for Foolproof Roasting on the Grill</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_techniques/kitchen_tips_techniques/13_best_grilling_tips">13 Best Grilling Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/marinating_and_grilling_chart">Marinating and Grilling Chart</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/grilling_the_ultimate_guide">Grilling: The Ultimate Guide </a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Does anything inspire more “oohs” and “ahs” than golden, juicy cuts of meat hot off a grill? Hardly. We wanted in on this game, so, never ones to be shy, we bought a testosterone-doped grill that arrived at our house in Connecticut on a flatbed truck and had to be off-loaded with a forklift.</p> <p>For a time, we lived in grill bliss: seared steaks, jerk-rubbed pork chops, oohs and ahs aplenty.</p> <p>Then we realized we were going to have to haul that behemoth in and out of the garage at the beginning and end of every grill season. Getting it indoors last winter was no problem. It was all downstairs. Yeah, somebody’s back bore the brunt of it, but two Advil and the job was done.</p> <p>For months, we missed the grill fare, but summer comes inevitably, even in New England. And then came the epic struggle. Upstairs to the deck, six steps that might as well be six flights—the two of us struggling under the grill like the middle-aged oafs we are, the dog barking, the rail bulging as the thing knocked against it.</p> <p>What we’ll do to get back to those oohs and ahs. Yes, we’re now ensconced in the usual fare from the grate: chicken and chops, caramelized right over the heat. But to bring out the best in the grill—and the most admiration from an audience—we like to break out the big cuts of meat: the pork loins, the legs of lamb. Cut into a crispy, brown turkey breast and get ready for your big bow!</p> <p>Those big cuts of meat that we love happen to be incredibly easy to grill, once you know the secret of indirect heat. A grill’s ambient but intense heat roasts these larger cuts to perfection. What’s more, it produces an even better crust than an indoor oven affords. And that great, smoky flavor!</p> <p>Listen, no one wants to turn on the oven in the summer. But that’s no reason to stop roasting. You’ve already got an oven out on the deck. So with less trouble than you think, you can grill-roast perfectly caramelized chicken thighs, spice-rubbed pork loins and smoky turkey breasts in no time.</p> <p>So here’s how it works: You set the cuts to the side of the heat, not directly over it. If you’ve got a gas grill like ours, you preheat it then turn off the left or right side, or just the back burners if you have a front-to-back system. If you’ve got a charcoal grill, you build a hot, well-ashed coal bed in the center of the grill, then rake the coals to the side, leaving one side without any direct heat. In either case, you set the meat on the portion of the grill grate without any direct heat under it. Cover the grill and away you go.</p> <p>Once you’ve got the technique down, you, too, can get the most out of your grill in the summer. And best of all, you’ll have used it well and truly by the time you have to lug it back down the stairs. Unless, of course, you live in a place where no lugging is necessary. But if that’s the case we don’t even want to hear about it.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/easy_grilling#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough May/June 2009 Healthy Cooking - Quick & Healthy Cooking Tue, 18 Aug 2009 20:04:55 +0000 Paula Joslin 9717 at http://www.eatingwell.com 7 Tips for Easy Holiday Entertaining http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/holiday_entertaining/7_tips_for_easy_holiday_entertaining <p>A holiday party. Were ever three nicer or more frightening words written! Who doesn’t love to get an invitation? But who doesn’t pause at the thought of throwing one? Oh, the prep, the cleanup, not to mention the inevitable bloat from too many salted nuts, and Aunt Matilda’s obscure grievances with Woodrow Wilson.</p> <p>It needn’t be so. Here are seven EatingWell tips to make your party a success. (We make no promises about Aunt Matilda.)</p> <p><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/node/9708?page=2"><strong>Tip 1: </strong>Keep your guests awake. &raquo;</a></p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Plus: Great healthy cocktails and appetizer recipes. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/AP6273.jpg?1257611137" /> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/pomegranate_cosmos.html">Pomegranate Cosmos</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/potato_salad_in_radicchio_cups.html">Potato Salad in Radicchio Cups</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/vegetable_satay.html">Vegetable Satay</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/mini_greek_pizza_muffins.html">Mini Greek Pizza Muffins</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/caramelized_onion_shrimp_bruschetta.html">Caramelized Onion &amp; Shrimp Bruschetta</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/smoked_salmon_bites.html">Smoked Salmon Bites</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/pear_ginger_shooters.html">Pear-Ginger Shooters</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/new_year">Healthy New Year&#039;s Eve Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Entertaining Ideas </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/easy_entertaining_15_minute_appetizers_and_drinks">Easy Entertaining: 15-Minute Appetizers and Drinks</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_appetizer_recipes">Quick and Healthy Appetizer Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/see_it_make_it_cocktails_mocktails">See It, Make It: Cocktails &amp; Mocktails</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A holiday party. Were ever three nicer or more frightening words written! Who doesn’t love to get an invitation? But who doesn’t pause at the thought of throwing one? Oh, the prep, the cleanup, not to mention the inevitable bloat from too many salted nuts, and Aunt Matilda’s obscure grievances with Woodrow Wilson.</p> <p>It needn’t be so. Here are seven EatingWell tips to make your party a success. (We make no promises about Aunt Matilda.)</p> <p><strong>1. Keep your guests awake.</strong> Once, we served an enchilada buffet: six kinds, chips too. By 8:30, everyone was in a carb coma. Did someone really unbutton their pants? Researchers at the University of Manchester have found that some brain cells are actually sluggish after too much food. Fluctuating glucose apparently affects those cells’ production of proteins called orexins, which regulate levels of consciousness. Perhaps that explains why unlikely romantic matches occur at holiday parties. Not paying attention, are we? Solve the problem of drowsy brains by serving lighter fare and plenty of vegetables so your guests can enjoy the party—and not pair up in socially awkward ways.</p> <p><strong>2. Shop quickly.</strong> Grocery stores are madhouses at the holidays. There’s no sense in traveling to several to find vindaloo paste, organic blue-foot mushrooms and snails from a muddy pond east of Poughkeepsie. Plan on menu items that take standard, easy-to-find, but still healthy ingredients. Our party food always sneaks in several convenience products: cooked cocktail shrimp, the meat from a rotisserie chicken, prepared pizza dough. Who can clean, make everything from scratch and set the table in one afternoon? Well, who besides some celebrity with a battalion of sous-chefs and production assistants?</p> <p><strong>3. Plan on something for everyone.</strong> Once, we threw a party and made all seafood: steamed shrimp, crab cakes. One guest walked in and turned green. Not the best how-do-you-do. Hand on mouth, she mumbled that she’d grown up across the street from a fish cannery. Make sure you check with your guests about possible allergies and phobias, then plan a well-rounded menu that keeps everyone in the pink: vegetarians, carnivores and fish-phobes alike.</p> <p><strong>4. Serve all night.</strong> If you put everything out at 8:00 p.m. and pour the Cosmos, the food’s going to run out and someone’s going to be donning a lampshade by 9:30. Researchers long ago reached the conclusion—known by the rest of us in praxis—that food in the stomach slows alcohol on its trip to the small intestine, where it is most efficiently absorbed. So put food out all night to balance the wine, beer and cocktails. Keep some food back, a surprise to come—and better for your guests’ health anyway.</p> <p><strong>5. Refill platters often.</strong> For food-safety reasons, as well, you should hold back some food in the refrigerator. Nothing’s ickier than a platter of shrimp left at room temperature for five hours. You don’t want your guests to get food poisoning. One bathroom downstairs and 20 invitees? You do the math.</p> <p><strong>6. The dishes can wait.</strong> We have a friend who makes a lovely meal, takes one bite and runs for the kitchen to start cleaning. Not exactly scintillating dinner conversation. Those dishes will be there later anyway—and you’ll be fortified to attack them after an evening of grazing on cocktail-party treats like <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/potato_salad_in_radicchio_cups.html">radicchio cups filled with chicken-and-potato salad</a>.</p> <p><strong>7. Celebrate at your own party.</strong> If you’re in the kitchen at 9:00 folding phyllo dough into bolero jackets and fezzes, stuffed with a 19-spice Moroccan fandango, you’re ruining your own party. Make most things ahead; have just a little last-minute assembly. That way, you can be a guest at your own shindig. That’s a modern miracle: good friends, good food and time to enjoy them.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/holiday_entertaining/7_tips_for_easy_holiday_entertaining#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough Healthy Cooking - Holiday & Entertaining Tue, 18 Aug 2009 18:37:14 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9708 at http://www.eatingwell.com Roasted Birds for the Holidays http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/holiday_entertaining/roasted_birds_for_the_holidays <p>It’s that time of year when we get overwhelmed. Not with cooking and cleaning duties, mind you—but with wacky suggestions for getting the bird to the holiday table.</p> <p>We’ve got one friend who’s disconsolate year after year because we refuse to make her turducken-on-steroids recipe: a quail inside a game hen inside a chicken inside a duck inside a turkey, all coated with thick rounds of mushroom this and liver pâté that. It’s hard to even know where to start with what’s wrong with that—but there is definitely something unappealing about trying to shove four birds into one turkey.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> From traditional turkey or chicken to pheasant, Cornish game hens, quail and duck, golden roasted birds are a simple, delicious way to celebrate. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/MP6692.jpg?1291817022" /> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Holiday Bird Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/game_hens_with_brussels_sprouts_chestnuts.html">Game Hens with Brussels Sprouts &amp; Chestnuts</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/chicken_baked_over_mushroom_dressing.html">Chicken Baked over Mushroom Dressing</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/lemon_garlic_roast_turkey_white_wine_gravy.html">Lemon-Garlic Roast Turkey &amp; White-Wine Gravy</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/orange_roasted_duck.html">Orange-Roasted Duck</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/quail_with_ginger_cranberry_pilaf.html">Quail with Ginger-Cranberry Pilaf</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/roasted_pheasant_with_wheat_berry_salad.html">Roasted Pheasant with Wheat Berry Salad</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Holiday Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/holiday_collection_1">Healthy Holidays Recipes, Menus and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/festive_holiday_main_dish_recipes">Festive Holiday Main-Dish Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/holiday_side_dishes">Holiday Side Dish Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/festive_christmas_cookie_recipes">Festive Christmas Cookie Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>It’s that time of year when we get overwhelmed. Not with cooking and cleaning duties, mind you—but with wacky suggestions for getting the bird to the holiday table.</p> <p>We’ve got one friend who’s disconsolate year after year because we refuse to make her turducken-on-steroids recipe: a quail inside a game hen inside a chicken inside a duck inside a turkey, all coated with thick rounds of mushroom this and liver pâté that. It’s hard to even know where to start with what’s wrong with that—but there is definitely something unappealing about trying to shove four birds into one turkey.</p> <p>And our other friend insists we try her turkey-in-a-slow-cooker marvel. She plops a boneless breast inside, adds a jar of plum preserves and a can of cream of asparagus soup, and voila: eight hours later, the white meat is so tender it’s more like glazed sand.</p> <p>Really, there’s no need for all this nonsense. Roasting birds is one of the kitchen’s easiest and most simple pleasures. </p> <p>Maybe that’s why a turkey is customary for the holidays: the mere sight of a golden, juicy bird is enough to put anybody in a celebratory mood. Plus, succulent and tender birds are exquisitely easy to prepare.</p> <p>Although most of us think about turkey this time of year, there’s no reason to stand on ceremony. Yes, a roasted chicken is a thing of beauty any night; but set atop a rich stuffing and roasted until crispy brown, it’s darn near irresistible at any holiday meal. But why stop there?</p> <p>A roasted duck for Christmas Eve fills your house with tantalizing smells, offers a creative change from the usual and guarantees succulent meat every time. Or how about quail with a brown-rice pilaf? Quail is easy to cook and surprisingly rich, all dark meat with lots of deep flavors; it also pairs well with beverages from champagne to beer. There are other birds to consider as well. </p> <p>We all know chicken and turkey are low in saturated fat but Cornish game hens are too. Their flavor is like ultra-rich chicken, thanks in part to the way the roasting bones permeate the meat with their taste. Pheasants are richer-tasting than game hens and since you rarely see them except at fancy restaurants you’ll definitely surprise and impress guests when you bring one out. And a single pheasant roasted with vegetables makes for a beautiful holiday meal for four without mind-boggling amounts of leftovers.</p> <p>Keep this in mind when you’re planning your holiday menu: in general, the bigger the bird, the longer the time in the oven. So if you’re up for an all-afternoon cooking event, go for the turkey, but when you have an hour to get a festive meal on the table, smaller quail or pheasant is a better option.</p> <p>Birds are a part of our holiday tradition—and we hope yours too. Put away those crazy recipes with every gimmick in the book. Come back to the basics and roast these birds.<br /> <em>Contributing editors Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough’s most recent book is The Ultimate Cook Book (William Morrow, 2007).</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/holiday_entertaining/roasted_birds_for_the_holidays#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough Healthy Cooking - Holiday & Entertaining Tue, 18 Aug 2009 18:15:00 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9704 at http://www.eatingwell.com Where the Elk (and the Buffalo) Roam http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/where_the_elk_and_the_buffalo_roam <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Beef isn&#039;t your only option for healthy grass-fed meat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Dave Whittlesey learned early on that if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em. When a 1986 drought drove wild elk to denude the irrigated pastures of his bison ranch near Steamboat Springs, Colorado, he decided to start raising elk too.</p> <p>Now, Dave and his wife, Sue, raise both bison and elk on their 320-acre High Wire Ranch, set in the mountains near Hotchkiss in western Colorado. Dave’s still learning to let nature take its course. “I used to wean and cull my herds,” he says in his friendly drawl. Now, they roam freely, pretty much the way they do in the wild.</p> <p>Elk is delicious. It has an earthy, mineral taste reminiscent of aged beef—but it’s significantly lower in calories and saturated fat than beef. And because Dave’s elk are grass-fed, they contain more heart-healthy omega-3s to boot.</p> <p>The Whittleseys sell the meat at farmer’s markets in Colorado. They also ship frozen cuts ordered via the Internet and by phone (highwireranch.com, 970-835-7600).</p> <p>Dave’s favorite recipe? Elk steaks on the grill, of course. A little olive oil, some crushed garlic, and about 3 minutes per side over high heat. Frankly, we can’t imagine a better dinner.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/where_the_elk_and_the_buffalo_roam#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough March/April 2007 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Thu, 13 Aug 2009 15:02:46 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9485 at http://www.eatingwell.com New Waves of Grain http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/new_waves_of_grain <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How the Lundberg family farm went organic and helped change the rice America eats. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Harvest was in full swing when I arrived last fall at the Lundbergs’ rice fields north of Sacramento. Everyone was preoccupied: quotas, yields, organic checks. They wanted to keep me busy, and out of the way.</p> <p>The 17,000-acre Lundberg Family Farms is one of the largest producers of organic rice in the country and an innovator in developing many of the new whole-grain varieties available across the U.S. today. It started back in 1937 with a 40-acre plot Albert and Frances Lundberg bought as they fled the Dust Bowl in Nebraska. In the late ’50s, the farm was passed to their sons—Eldon, Wendell, Homer and Harlan—who bought up more land in the valley.</p> <p>Today, this successful operation has passed to the third generation, overseen by Jessica Lundberg, the soft-spoken, pragmatic board chair and nursery manager, and her more untamed, Aristotle-spouting cousin, Grant, the CEO.</p> <p>“Would you like to see the fields from the air?” Jessica asked me. “We have an experienced pilot.”</p> <p>I should have asked, “How experienced?” as she was referring to her father, affable but laconic Wendell Lundberg, age 77, one of those four brothers.</p> <p>Wendell taxied the plane onto a potholed runway with threshing machines going full-tilt alongside us. As we banked into the throb of afternoon light, I saw what modern rice production does to the land. It wasn’t the traditional paddies, wetlands or idyllic bit of fairy-tale Asia that I had expected.</p> <p>Instead, the valley all around the Lundbergs’ fields was on fire. At harvest, the threshers strip the rice stalks of their seeds, leaving the stalks (the chaff) behind in the field. After harvest, most farmers burn a portion of the chaff. On this clear October day, it looked like the Tuesday after Armageddon, heavy clouds of gray smoke rising off the valley floor.</p> <p>But down the center of the valley in the midst of the burning landscape were clear green patches, amazingly free of smoke: the Lundbergs’ fields. I pointed to them. “No burning?” I asked into the roar of my headset.</p> <p>Wendell eyed me a moment. “Why waste mulch?” he asked back.</p> <p>Most farmers see the chaff as a source of disease. The easiest and cheapest way to get rid of it and help protect next year’s crop from disease: burning. In response to air-quality concerns, California passed a law in 1991 limiting the amount of chaff rice farmers can burn to no more than about 25 percent of their crop. That legislation has decreased air pollution from burning rice fields, but in a valley with as much rice production as the Sacramento, it’s still enough to create the heavy clouds I saw all around us.</p> <p>The Lundbergs take a different route, and see chaff as fertilizer for next year, an organic source of nutrients that also helps, by its decomposition, keep the top layer of soil from turning into cement in the California sun. So rather than burning, after harvest they turn that chaff right back into the soil and then plant cover crops for the winter.</p> <p>Wendell banked the Cessna again. “Had enough?” he asked.</p> <p>I nodded.</p> <p>After landing—no, I didn’t keep my eyes open—we pushed the plane into its hangar and I had a chance to ask Wendell about what had changed in the 50 years he and his brothers have farmed this land.</p> <p>“Organic,” he said, dusting off his hands.</p> <p>Back in the ’30s Dust Bowl, his parents, Albert and Frances Lundberg had been lured to California by unscrupulous salesmen who offered free tickets out west and promised Eden in a valley of poor clay. The soil was poor and, for the roots of trees and most vegetables, virtually impenetrable. After several false starts, they did as so many others were doing around them: they planted the only thing that would work—rice. Today, the valley weighs in at over 2 million tons of rice production a year. The Lundbergs account for roughly 2 percent of that, with 40,000 tons of rice a year.</p> <p>Originally the Lundbergs didn’t grow organically. That had to wait for the ’60s, until some progressive, hippie types from Chico came down and asked Wendell and his brothers if they’d be willing to grow something called “pesticide-free” rice. The brothers obliged and soon realized that these hippies were tie-dyed entrepreneurs: they were selling that stuff for a profit back in town.</p> <p>“My Dad thought, maybe these guys from up in Chico were onto something,” Jessica later told me, the business always first and foremost in her mind. </p> <p>But it wasn’t easy figuring out how to grow rice on a large scale without herbicides to control weeds. Weeds are a particular problem in rice farming not only because they can choke a crop but also because when left in the field, weed seeds can end up in the harvest along with rice seeds. And no one wants bitter weed seeds in their pot of rice.</p> <p>So eventually the Lundbergs developed a risky game of letting water control the weeds. Yes, rice flourishes in a wet environment. But it must also dry out to create healthy grains. That’s where the Lundbergs’ game lies. After planting, they flood the fields for about three weeks so the grass weeds die off. Problem is, the rice plants will die if submerged over 25 days. In other words, it’s a matter of timing—release the water too soon and the weeds won’t die; release it too late and the rice will die. And to complicate matters, they only get one harvest a year in the northern Sacramento Valley.</p> <p>Once they mastered the complicated rhythm of letting the water take care of the weeds there still was the issue of distribution networks: the Lundbergs, like all rice farmers, sold their crop to big cooperatives, which mixed it with all the other rice from the region. There was no point in growing organic if the rice was to be mixed with conventional rice. And so the brothers took the unthinkable step of cutting themselves off from the distribution networks and stepping out on their own.</p> <p>It worked beautifully. Years later, the Lundbergs have gone whole hog into organic farming. There are about 11,000 acres in organic production and another 6,000 that are “eco-farmed”: treated to a combination of organic and conventional methods. There are now solar panels in the fields near the storage facilities to produce energy. And the family has invested in wind energy, enough to offset their own electrical use on the farm.</p> <p>In addition, the Lundbergs started a program called Egg Aid to get elementary school children involved in helping rescue bird eggs. Rice fields are attractive natural nesting grounds for all sorts of aquatic birds, especially in the spring when the fields are green with cover crops. When it comes time to turn those cover crops into the soil, the Lundbergs take it upon themselves to rescue the birds’ eggs, delivering them to state hatcheries. No wonder they have received numerous awards including the first-ever “Greenie” from California State University, Chico, at last year’s “This Way to Sustainability” conference and were recognized by the Conservation Security Program which was developed by the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service to promote stewardship of the land.</p> <p>As we headed for the car, Wendell offered another answer, out of the blue. “Brown,” he said. “That’s changed too.”</p> <p>He meant brown rice, the whole-grain version of rice itself and almost unknown back in the ’50s when Wendell and his brothers were first planting. Brown rice has become the core of their business, so much so that the family has developed its own proprietary brands, including Wehani (named as a pseudo-acronym for the four brothers plus their father: Wendell, Eldon, Homer, Albert, Harlan), a red rice that’s nutty and a little crunchy. Today, Jessica Lundberg leads the efforts at the seed nursery where they work to develop new varieties that will stand up to organic production without depleting the soil and damaging their most important resource.</p> <p>The next day, I flew back to Connecticut to meet Bruce, my partner, full of inspiration. I was convinced that we could get more whole-grain rice into our diets. All rice grains have four basic components: the protective outer hull (which must be removed), the bran and the germ (both of which are removed to create white rice), and the creamy endosperm. With the bran and germ intact, high-fiber brown rice has good amounts of vitamins, minerals and beneficial phytochemicals. Plus it counts toward the three 1⁄2-cup servings of whole grains we’re supposed to eat each day according to the USDA.</p> <p>We got to work on some delicious new rice recipes, starting with meatloaf that blends Black Japonica and aromatic curry into the meat. Then we moved on to croquettes made with medium-grain brown rice complemented by creamy goat cheese. We were on a roll, rounding out our batch of recipes using earthy Wehani instead of white rice to update dirty rice, a New Orleans favorite. In the end we discovered there are tons of tasty ways to get whole-grain rice into our diet.</p> <p>We can only imagine that Wendell would be proud of our efforts. If he could work himself up to say it, of course.</p> <p><em>—Contributing editors Mark Scarbrough and Bruce Weinstein’s most recent book is The Ultimate Cook Book (William Morrow, 2007).<em></em></em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/new_waves_of_grain#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough March/April 2008 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:57:32 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9484 at http://www.eatingwell.com Grill-Fired Pizza http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/holiday_entertaining/grill_fired_pizza <p>Grilled pizza has become our summer staple. Friends come over on a warm afternoon and there’s sure to be a pie on the grate.</p> <p>The grill melts the cheese evenly and quickly, and gets the crust mottled with those dark bits everyone fights over. Because you grill the crust on both sides, first alone and then topped, it gets crunchy, like a baguette from a really hot oven. What’s more, there’s that characteristic smoky taste from the grill.</p> <p>Of course, some people are still troubled by the whole process. “Won’t it fall through the slats?” they ask.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Take dinner outdoors with 5 fabulous recipes for pizza on the grill. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/black_bean_pizza_310.jpg?1249939178" /> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Grilled Pizza Recipes and Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/black_bean_nacho_pizza.html">Black Bean Nacho Pizza</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/eggplant_parmesan_pizza.html">Eggplant Parmesan Pizza</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/menus/garden_pizza">Garden Pizza Menu</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/lahmahjoon_pizza.html">Lahmahjoon Pizza</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/nectarine_prosciutto_pizza.html">Nectarine &amp; Prosciutto Pizza</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_pizza_recipes">Healthy Pizza Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> See Slideshow </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/wine_beer_spirits_guide/hot_pizza_cold_beer">Hot Pizza, Cold Beer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Grilled pizza has become our summer staple. Friends come over on a warm afternoon and there’s sure to be a pie on the grate.</p> <p>The grill melts the cheese evenly and quickly, and gets the crust mottled with those dark bits everyone fights over. Because you grill the crust on both sides, first alone and then topped, it gets crunchy, like a baguette from a really hot oven. What’s more, there’s that characteristic smoky taste from the grill.</p> <p>Of course, some people are still troubled by the whole process. “Won’t it fall through the slats?” they ask.</p> <p>Have no fear. The whole-wheat dough we’ve developed is easy to work with: light and tender but also surprisingly sturdy.</p> <p>To shape it into the right size, we never worry about tossing it in the air in some I Love Lucy-induced pizza parlor comedy. (Drama is always overrated when people are hungry.) We simply put the dough on a lightly floured surface, dust the top with a little more flour and dimple it with our fingertips to shape it into a thick, flattened circle. After that, it’s just a quick job with a rolling pin to shape it into a rough, rustic circle.</p> <p>We’ve discovered one secret through trial and error: we always sprinkle more cornmeal on the pizza peel or baking sheet than we think is necessary before transferring the dough to it. We give the dough a shake to make sure it will come free when it’s time to slide it onto the grill—and sneak a little more cornmeal underneath any spots that stick. We’ve gotten a good laugh from friends when we’ve tipped the pizza peel to slide the dough off onto the grill, only to find that it’s stuck. Better safe than, well, not sorry, but embarrassed.</p> <p>After a successful slide, it’s just a waiting game. We close the lid and let the crust get brown on one side before we flip it and top the pie to suit everyone’s tastes. There’s plenty of time to pour a beer, sit back and take in the clear evening light. </p> <p>Talk about easy entertaining. We’re more than able to accommodate everyone’s likes and needs. Some people demand only cheese, some swoon over anchovies and some go for our newer twists on classic pies. It’s all possible because pizzas are endlessly versatile, endlessly customizable. There’s really only one other consideration: because the pie gets topped right on the grill after the crust has been flipped, the ingredients must be prepped in advance. But that’s what friends are for. The minute they arrive, we get one person to grate the cheese, another to chop the onion. Do as we do: hold back the drinks until the chores are done. It works every time.</p> <p>We take the ingredients out to the grill in little bowls on a cutting board or tray. And preparing different toppings in advance means we can make different pies for different tastes. Or we make a host of personal pies: one to suit each person.</p> <p>Here are some of our favorite pizza combinations. Fire up the grill and get that dough ready. You’ll have the best pizzas in a matter of minutes.</p> <p>Contributing editors Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough’s most recent book is The Ultimate Cook Book (William Morrow).</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/holiday_entertaining/grill_fired_pizza#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough Healthy Cooking - Holiday & Entertaining Fri, 07 Aug 2009 13:46:27 +0000 Mallory 8961 at http://www.eatingwell.com