Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/847/all/RK%3D0/RS%3DES4ro7oOqZ8BIGB5TUKUMEdV498- en How to Eat Lower on the Glycemic Index http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/how_to_eat_lower_on_the_glycemic_index <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5 Rules of Thumb for Lowering the Glycemic Index </div> </div> </div> <p>All the carbohydrate foods we eat cause a release of glucose into the bloodstream—and a corresponding rise in insulin—but some raise glucose more than others. The glycemic index (GI) is a system of ranking foods containing equal amounts of carbohydrate according to how much they raise blood-glucose levels. Foods with a high GI value tend to cause a higher spike in blood sugar, and because high-GI foods are so quickly metabolized, they tend to make you hungry again sooner. By contrast, lower-GI foods are metabolized more slowly and are believed to keep your appetite on a more even keel.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Dr. Jean Harvey-Berino, Ph.D., R.D. </div> <div class="field-item even"> Joyce Hendley </div> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5 tips for low-glycemic eating (and how it can help you lose weight). </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="625" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/oil_0.jpg?1314111136" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/oil_2.jpg?1314111223" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The EatingWell Diet (2007) </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Health and Diet Information </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/diabetes/easy_tips_for_eating_low_on_the_glycemic_index">4 Easy Tips for Eating Low on the Glycemic Index</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/bad_foods_you_should_be_eating">Bad Foods You Should Be Eating</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/clean_up_your_diet_and_lose_weight">Clean Up Your Diet and Lose Weight</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/how_to_eat_lower_on_the_glycemic_index#comments Dr. Jean Harvey-Berino, Ph.D., R.D. Joyce Hendley Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. The EatingWell Diet (2007) Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Tue, 23 Aug 2011 13:13:05 +0000 Erin McCormick 17624 at http://www.eatingwell.com Soda and Health: Is Soda Bad for My Blood Pressure? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/blood_pressure/soda_and_health_is_soda_bad_for_my_blood_pressure <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Ask Our Expert </div> </div> </div> <p>You know that drinking too many sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), such as teas and flavored drinks, is bad for your waistline. New research shows that it may be bad for something else, too—your blood pressure. A new study of nearly 3,000 people published in the journal Hypertension reported that those who drank more than one serving a day of SSBs had significantly higher blood pressure than participants who drank one serving (about 12 ounces) or less daily. </p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> New research on soda and health reveals whether soda is bad for blood pressure. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/soda_cola_mj09.jpg?1310649271" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2011 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Information on Soda and Your Health </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/bone_health/can_drinking_seltzers_sodas_or_other_carbonated_drinks_harm_bones">Can Drinking Seltzers, Sodas or Other Carbonated Drinks Harm Bones?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/regular_soda_or_diet_soda_which_is_worse_for_your_healt">Regular Soda or Diet Soda: Which is Worse For Your Health?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/food_news_blog/should_you_stop_drinking_soda_a_food_expert_weighs_in">Should you stop drinking soda? A food expert weighs in</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Drink Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/easy_mocktails">Easy Mocktails</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_coffee_shop_drinks">Healthy Coffee Shop Drinks</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/see_it_make_it_healthy_drinks">See It, Make It: Healthy Drinks</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/blood_pressure/soda_and_health_is_soda_bad_for_my_blood_pressure#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. July/August 2011 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Blood Pressure Thu, 14 Jul 2011 13:22:14 +0000 Sarah Hoff 17528 at http://www.eatingwell.com Kitchen Cures http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/kitchen_cures <p>All my life I’ve been prone to motion sickness—not a good thing when your husband has a passion for sailing. </p> <p>My mother, a nurse, used to give me ginger ale to settle my belly when I complained of nausea. Now I use ginger to calm my churning stomach when I’m sailing rough waters or flying on a bumpy plane. </p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5 home remedies for common ailments—do they work? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/kitchen_cures_310.jpg?1252517563" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/rachel_johnson_310_0.jpg?1260202859" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/juice_cranberry_so09_310.jpg?1285714252" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/immune_boosting_superfoods">Immune-Boosting Superfoods</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/feed_a_cold">Feed a Cold</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_immunity_center">Healthy Immunity Center</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/could_taking_iron_help_cure_your_cough">Could Taking Iron Help Cure Your Cough?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_food_guide/cranberries">Cranberries Healthy Food Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/calcium_rich_recipes_with_yogurt">Calcium-Rich Recipes with Yogurt</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/iron_rich_recipes">Iron Rich Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/3_of_the_simplest_ways_to_not_get_sick">3 of the simplest ways to not get sick</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/8_of_the_worlds_healthiest_spices">8 of the World&#039;s Healthiest Spices</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/kitchen_cures#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. September/October 2009 Healthy Immune System Diet, Nutrition & Health - Arthritis Diet, Nutrition & Health - Immunity Wed, 09 Sep 2009 17:34:12 +0000 Penelope Wall 14931 at http://www.eatingwell.com The New Vitamin D Debate http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_new_vitamin_d_debate <p>How much vitamin D should you get? That question has been a source of controversy ever since 1997 when the Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board introduced the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) for the vitamin, ranging from 200 to 600 international units (IU) per day. Even then, many leading researchers believed the DRI should be set much higher—and now, their ranks are growing substantially.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Experts discuss how much vitamin D we should be getting. </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_benefits_of_vitamin_d">The Benefits of Vitamin D</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/vitamin_d_fortified_mushrooms">Vitamin D Fortified Mushrooms </a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_new_vitamin_d_debate#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. Bone Health Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Mon, 31 Aug 2009 14:48:12 +0000 Penelope Wall 14876 at http://www.eatingwell.com Eating in the Safe Zone http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_techniques/healthy_cooking_basics/eating_in_the_safe_zone <p>We’ve all had those awkward moments when we aren’t sure whether to offend the cook or risk spending several days sick in bed. Say you’re at a summer picnic and Aunt Barbara asks you to try her famous deviled eggs—from a plate that’s been sitting in the hot sun. You love Aunt Barb, but the eggs are looking awfully crusty.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Simple ways to avoid a cook&#039;s nightmare. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="160" height="160" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/1334safe_zone.jpg?1250879137" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>We’ve all had those awkward moments when we aren’t sure whether to offend the cook or risk spending several days sick in bed. Say you’re at a summer picnic and Aunt Barbara asks you to try her famous deviled eggs—from a plate that’s been sitting in the hot sun. You love Aunt Barb, but the eggs are looking awfully crusty.</p> <p>What’s a gracious guest to do? You might consider slipping your egg to the dog under the picnic table when nobody is looking. But food safety doesn’t always have a clear-cut answer. I have two very smart friends with two very different approaches to the backyard barbecue. One, trained as a chef but now in nutrition academia, will gladly sink her teeth into a juicy burger, as long as she knows that the meat came from a reputable, local farmer. The other, an internationally renowned food microbiologist, steers her children far away from the hamburgers sizzling on the grill. In fact, the only place she lets her kids eat hamburgers is at fast-food restaurants. What gives?</p> <p>You probably remember the Jack in the Box fiasco when E. coli bacteria wreaked havoc on hundreds of lives and caused the deaths of three children. It turned out that fast-food employees were ignoring standards that hamburgers be cooked to an internal temperature of 155°F because they thought this made the burgers tough. I hear the same argument at backyard barbecues when I insist on a well-done burger. Yet millions of dollars in lawsuits later, most fast-food chains are now models when it comes to meeting food-safety standards for hamburgers.</p> <p>As someone who once carried a thermometer in her lab coat to check the temperature of patients’ food, I am only too aware of the risks that foodborne pathogens present. An estimated 76 million Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses every year. But I love to eat, so I follow a few rules that have become as routine as putting on a seat belt, and it doesn’t hamper my food enjoyment in the least.</p> <p>Beware of Raw Dairy, Fish and Meat<br /> When my kids were little we often visited my friend’s dairy farm where fresh-from-the-cow unpasteurized milk was always on hand. It was hard, but my boys learned to say “no thank you.” Sure, my friend grew up drinking it and never got sick. But that was 40 years ago, before the arrival of new virulent, antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. Likewise, I love the taste of chilled raw oysters dipped in spicy cocktail sauce, but I stopped eating them when a new strain of the bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus appeared, sickening hundreds of people. Some studies show that hot sauce has antibacterial properties, but it’s not enough to count on.</p> <p>Clean with Hot Soapy Water<br /> I temper my food-safety zeal with a little diplomacy when a dinner guest offers to do the grilling. To prevent cross-contamination, I send the raw meat out on one platter, then return myself with a clean platter and take away the dirty one. I also wash my hands with soap and water and wash cooking surfaces before and after handling raw meat, poultry and fish.</p> <p>Use Pasteurized Eggs When in Doubt<br /> Who doesn’t have happy memories of licking the beater when Mom baked cakes? Unfortunately about 40,000 cases of salmonellosis are reported every year in the United States. So that delicious frothy frosting made with raw egg whites is a bad idea for the birthday cake of my soon-to-be 89-year-old father. When you can’t thoroughly cook a recipe before tasters dig in, use liquid pasteurized eggs, found in the dairy case.</p> <p>Take Risks with Open Eyes<br /> There are times when I send caution to the wind. Although raw fish is on the list of foods we should avoid, I take my chances once a year and indulge in a few slices of sashimi. I know it was purchased that morning at a local fish market and kept on ice until it reached my mouth. When I mentioned this to my microbiologist friend, her response was, “You do know that the Japanese have the highest incidence of foodborne illness in the world—don’t you?” Gulp.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_techniques/healthy_cooking_basics/eating_in_the_safe_zone#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Healthy Cooking - Healthy Cooking 101: Basics & Techniques Fri, 21 Aug 2009 18:25:44 +0000 Nifer 10277 at http://www.eatingwell.com 5 Simple Ways to Stay Slim http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/five_small_steps <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Five Small Steps </div> </div> </div> <p>We all know and secretly resent them. They’re fit and thin and slip effortlessly into clothes in the tiniest sizes. Unfortunately, I’m not one of them. For me, staying fit and at a healthy weight in middle age is an act of constant vigilance. I suspect it’s the same for most of us, no matter how easy it may appear to others. But this doesn’t mean we have to be marathon runners or live on celery sticks. Small things we do every day can go a long way toward staying healthy. Once they’re part of an everyday routine, they may indeed feel effortless. Here are a few things that work for me.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Daily decisions that make healthy changes stick. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/scale_for_person_2_630.jpg?1284414486" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5steps_illo_am06.jpg?1263418313" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> April/May 2006 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Healthy Tips and Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/secrets_to_staying_slim_past_40">Secrets to Staying Slim Past 40</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/8_secret_weapon_foods_for_weight_loss">8 Secret-Weapon Foods for Weight Loss</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/breakfasts_that_fight_fat">Breakfasts That Fight Fat</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_13_biggest_nutrition_and_food_myths_busted">The 13 Biggest Nutrition and Food Myths Busted</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_techniques/healthy_cooking_basics/10_secrets_to_cooking_healthier">10 Secrets to Cooking Healthier</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_blueberry_recipes_for_a_better_workout">Healthy Blueberry Recipes for a Better Workout</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>We all know and secretly resent them. They’re fit and thin and slip effortlessly into clothes in the tiniest sizes. Unfortunately, I’m not one of them. For me, staying fit and at a healthy weight in middle age is an act of constant vigilance. I suspect it’s the same for most of us, no matter how easy it may appear to others. But this doesn’t mean we have to be marathon runners or live on celery sticks. Small things we do every day can go a long way toward staying healthy. Once they’re part of an everyday routine, they may indeed feel effortless. Here are a few things that work for me.</p> <p>1. Take advantage of healthy convenience foods<br /> I admit it: I pay extra for convenience foods when I know they’ll help me eat nutritiously. I used to feel guilty when I bought those outrageously priced packages of vegetables that are washed, sliced and ready to go. No longer. When I get home from the office at 6 p.m., having these packages in the fridge can mean the difference between a healthy or not-so-healthy meal. What’s more, by staying home and cooking rather than eating out, I’ve still saved money.</p> <p>2. Schedule exercise and make it nonnegotiable<br /> I’m amazed when high-powered, well-paid executives tell me they have no time for exercise. Who controls their lives? For years, I’ve set aside noon to 1:15 p.m. on my weekday calendar for exercise. Sure, things come up, but by scheduling it I consistently get in three to four days of noontime workouts every week. I’m also part of a group of women who have been exercising together for years. We have fun, and we keep each other motivated. We sometimes muse about what we’d all look like if we hadn’t been sweating together all these years. I vary what I do to keep it interesting. Lately I’m spinning to music on a stationary bike, practicing yoga and running on the days I can’t make it to the gym. I know I’m more productive, better able to handle stress and more content when I exercise.</p> <p>3. Don’t waste calories on bad food<br /> Think about what you are eating. I was on an early-morning flight to Chicago not long ago and was served a croissant breakfast sandwich. Knowing it was loaded with calories, my first thought was to just eat half. I took a bite. The croissant was greasy and tough, the egg was tasteless and the ham was still frozen. Yuck. I decided to eat the honeydew and cantaloupe and skip the sandwich.<br /> I saved the tasteless calories for something more enjoyable later. Turned out that night<br /> I had a fabulous meal in a great restaurant and knew I could indulge a bit because of the choice I made earlier in the day.</p> <p>4. Never travel without workout clothes<br /> When I pack for a trip, business or pleasure, the first things that go in my suitcase are sneakers and workout clothes. Yes, this means I can’t cram everything into a carry-on, but I rarely have to wait more than a few minutes at baggage claim anyway. Having my workout clothes means that if the weather cooperates and the area is safe, I head out for a morning run. I travel to Washington, D.C., regularly and look forward to a run past the Washington Monument before my workday begins. If I can’t get outside, I use the treadmill in the hotel gym. It’s not my first choice, but the exercise helps keep me alert during long meeting-filled days.</p> <p>5. Weigh yourself often<br /> Research shows that people who weigh themselves regularly are more likely to be at a healthy weight. I weigh myself just about every morning. I try to use the scale at the same time every day for consistency (and besides, I weigh less in the morning). I know if I weigh myself often I can get on top of a two- or three-pound weight gain. But if three pounds turns into five or more, it becomes overwhelming. By the way, according to obesity experts, daily weighing does not promote eating disorders. Yes, people with anorexia weigh themselves obsessively—but the disease came first, not the weighing.</p> <p>We all have tricks that work for us. My son Nicholas tries not to eat a serving of any one food that is larger than his fist. My husband’s mantra is “Don’t let your waist size get larger than your inseam”—easy for him to say at 6'4" tall. My beautiful friend Susan tries hard to eat only when she’s truly hungry, knowing that’s when food tastes best. The trick is establishing those small steps that work for you. Once they become routine, people might just start accusing you of being one of those people who are naturally fit and thin.<br /> -Rachel Johnson is senior nutrition advisor to EatingWell and dean of the University of Vermont College of Agriculture &amp; Life Sciences.</p> <p>Illustration by: Michael J. Balzano</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/five_small_steps#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. April/May 2006 Weight Loss/Diet Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Fri, 21 Aug 2009 15:14:20 +0000 Nifer 10208 at http://www.eatingwell.com Beat Winter Weight Gain http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/beat_winter_weight_gain <p>’Tis the season of eggnog and hot chocolate, mulled cider and sparkling wine. ’Tis also the season when Americans put on half of our annual weight gain. Granted, that’s just two pounds a year, and a pound or two between Thanksgiving and New Year’s doesn’t seem all that bad. But if it happens year after year after year…well, you can do the math.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Eat, drink and be merry—just be mindful of those drinks! </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/coffee_sugary_cup_310.jpg?1259014335" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/champagne_310.jpg?1258644232" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/1888pom_champagne_punch_225.jpg?1250867392" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5494hot_chocolate_225.jpg?1250867438" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5495spiced_hot_cider_225.jpg?1250867466" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> December 2006 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Winter Drink Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/eggnog.html">Eggnog</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/hot_chocolate.html">Hot Chocolate</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/mulled_wine.html">Mulled Wine</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/pomegranate_champagne_punch.html">Pomegranate Champagne Punch</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/spiced_hot_cider.html">Spiced Hot Cider</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_winter_beverages_recipes">Healthy Winter Beverage Recipes and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/holiday_collection_1">Healthy Holidays Recipes, Menus and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_appetizer_recipes">Quick and Healthy Appetizer Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/coffee_recipes">Easy Coffee Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Weight Loss Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/breakfast_recipes_to_beat_weight_gain">Breakfast Recipes to Beat Weight Gain</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/3_antidotes_to_overeating">3 Antidotes to Overeating</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/7_ways_to_stay_in_your_skinny_jeans_during_the_holidays">7 ways to stay in your “skinny jeans” during the holidays</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/exercise_escape_plan">Exercise Escape Plan</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/diabetes/healthy_holiday_eating_for_diabetes">Healthy Holiday Eating for Diabetes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>’Tis the season of eggnog and hot chocolate, mulled cider and sparkling wine. ’Tis also the season when Americans put on half of our annual weight gain. Granted, that’s just two pounds a year, and a pound or two between Thanksgiving and New Year’s doesn’t seem all that bad. But if it happens year after year after year…well, you can do the math.</p> <p>It’s easy to blame the holiday cookies, but festive foods and rich desserts aren’t the only culprits. At 500 calories, a Starbucks 16-ounce eggnog latte has almost twice the calories of a regular-size (2-ounce) Snickers bar. A cup of rich hot chocolate can add up to 13 Hershey’s Kisses.</p> <p>Sugar-sweetened beverages (soft drinks, sports drinks, sweetened teas, etc.) are a key contributor to excessive weight gain and obesity. That was the conclusion a team of Harvard researchers reached last August after analyzing 30 beverage studies. And their analysis did not take into account holiday drinks that are even higher in calories.</p> <p>Not to be a Scrooge—I love a glass of wine or a cup of hot cocoa when it’s cold out—but I recognize that if I don’t want to gain weight, I’ll need to count the calories I drink. However, I am an exception. Most of us don’t consider the calories we get from beverages in the same way we think of those we get from foods. And those calories do count: in fact, soft drinks are now the number one source of calories in Americans’ diets.</p> <p>One reason for this, as Purdue’s Richard Mattes, Ph.D., R.D., discovered in a series of rigorous studies, is that we don’t compensate for calories we take in from beverages the same way we do for those from solid foods.</p> <p>Mattes found that subjects who snacked on a large handful of peanuts (500 calories) were likely to eat less at their next meal. This compensation didn’t happen in other studies where he provided the calories as a beverage instead. Not surprising when you consider that peanuts have 8 grams of protein and almost 3 grams of fiber per ounce—both of which help you feel satisfied. Even an apple, which has 5 grams of dietary fiber, will satisfy you longer than drinking the same number of calories in an 8-ounce glass of apple juice, with no fiber.</p> <p>Fiber and protein don’t fully explain why drinks aren’t as satisfying as solid food. Some scientists hypothesize that the simple act of chewing may be an important influence as well. Preliminary studies on chewing and satiety look so promising that Wrigley, the chewing gum company, has launched the Wrigley Science Institute to study whether gum-chewing might help people manage their weight. According to Institute Director Gil Leveille, Ph.D., research on monkeys has demonstrated that chewing helps release cholecystokinin, a powerful hormone that helps make you feel full. </p> <p>But who wants to pass on the party drinks and just chew gum during the holidays? My solution is to think about what I drink so I can leave room for my favorite holiday foods. Most of the time I choose beverages with no calories. These include coffee, herbal teas and water. I make exceptions, though. One is skim milk, which I drink a couple of times a day. An 8-ounce glass has just 90 calories and provides 316 mg of calcium, about a quarter of the 1,200 mg I need daily.</p> <p>I remember how great Mom’s hot chocolate tasted after I’d come in from an hour or two of ice skating. Now I make hot cocoa with skim milk and often sweeten it with Splenda to keep the calories down. The other exception I make is wine. I’d rather run an extra mile on the treadmill than give up the joy of a glass of great Chardonnay with dinner (just 100 calories).</p> <p>The good news is we don’t drink holiday beverages every day. So as long as you think of them as occasional treats and work them into your overall eating and exercise scheme, you should be fine. And if you do want that eggnog, here's EatingWell’s fabulous, lower-cal recipe.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/beat_winter_weight_gain#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. December 2006 Weight Loss/Diet Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Fri, 21 Aug 2009 15:11:56 +0000 Nifer 10207 at http://www.eatingwell.com Ten Pounds in 10 Days? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/ten_pounds_in_10_days <p>“Lose 10 pounds in 10 days!” As a nutrition professor, I know better than to believe the ultra-fast weight-loss claims that proliferate as bathing-suit season peaks. I admit, some of the ads sure sound compelling. I’ve long wondered if any of the products that promise to “zap fat like magic” might have a kernel of truth. My friend Jane nips weight gain in the bud with a once-a-year three-day juice fast; it seems to work for her—but what does the science say? Full of hopeful skepticism, I recently sorted through the more enticing claims.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Can you safely fast-track weight loss? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4797scale_225.jpg?1250866427" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/scale_for_person_310_0.jpg?1279133699" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_diet_recipes">Healthy Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_low_calorie_recipes_menus">Quick and Healthy Low-Calorie Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/fiber_rich_recipes_to_help_you_lose_weight">Fiber-Rich Recipes to Help You Lose Weight</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/breakfast_recipes_to_beat_weight_gain">Breakfast Recipes to Beat Weight Gain</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans/eatingwell_s_500_calorie_dinners">EatingWell&#039;s 500-Calorie Dinners</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans/weight_loss_diet_meal_plan">Weight-Loss Diet Meal Plan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More EatingWell Diet Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/eatingwell_diet_challenge">EatingWell Diet Challenge</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/boost_fiber_to_slim_down">Boost Fiber to Slim Down</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/6_secrets_to_losing_weight">6 Secrets to Losing Weight</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/the_eatingwell_diet/7_steps_to_permanent_weight_loss">7 Steps to Permanent Weight Loss</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/3_antidotes_to_overeating">3 Antidotes to Overeating</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/secrets_to_staying_slim_past_40">Secrets to Staying Slim Past 40</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>“Lose 10 pounds in 10 days!” As a nutrition professor, I know better than to believe the ultra-fast weight-loss claims that proliferate as bathing-suit season peaks. I admit, some of the ads sure sound compelling. I’ve long wondered if any of the products that promise to “zap fat like magic” might have a kernel of truth. My friend Jane nips weight gain in the bud with a once-a-year three-day juice fast; it seems to work for her—but what does the science say? Full of hopeful skepticism, I recently sorted through the more enticing claims.<br /> Fasting: “The perfect jump-start!”</p> <p>People have fasted for centuries, mostly for religious reasons. But these days, short-term fasting to lose weight is much more common.</p> <p>At first blush it sounds like a good strategy: in a 2002 study by ­scientists at the Rowett Research Institute in Aberdeen, Scotland, healthy adults lost 1 to 2 percent of their body weight during a 36-hour fast (during which they consumed nothing but water) and up to 5 percent in six days. The subjects’ feelings of hunger and fatigue increased with the length of the fast—contradicting the argument often heard that hunger fades with prolonged fasting. Most discouraging, though, was that the fasters lost mostly muscle, not fat.</p> <p>Juice fasts like Jane’s may be better at curbing hunger since they ­provide some calories: most juice fasts recommend four 12-ounce glasses of fruit and/or vegetable juice in addition to water—better but hardly a nutritious menu by any standard. You should only fast if you are otherwise healthy and any prolonged fast should be medically supervised.</p> <p>More "quick fixes." Plus: what really works arrow </p> <p>Fat Burners: “Rev up your metabolic rate to ‘burn’ stored fat!”</p> <p>We’ve all seen the claims that fat burners—which usually include some sort of stimulant—raise your metabolic rate so you burn fat faster. But when you stoke metabolism you also risk straining the heart—a lesson we learned in 2003 when studies found that ephedra, one of the most popular fat burners, has dangerous side effects including heart attacks, strokes and even death. The Food and Drug Administration subsequently prohibited its sale.</p> <p>Today’s fat burners usually contain milder stimulants. One, Citrus aurantium (bitter orange), is touted as a safer alternative to ephedra, but a recent review by researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine concluded that more and larger studies are needed to determine the herb’s effectiveness and safety. Caffeine, another common addition to fat-burner formulas, boosts metabolism only minimally. In a 2007 study, 50 mg of caffeine (the amount in 1⁄2 cup of coffee) increased subjects’ calorie-burning rate by about 6 percent. That comes to about 17 extra calories burned off during the four hours the subjects were tracked. But those ­results may be misleading, since the subjects’ usual intake of coffee was low. As any Starbucks regular can tell you, people with a regular caffeine habit are less stimulated by caffeine.</p> <p>Fucoxanthin, a compound found in brown seaweed, is reported to act differently from the stimulant-type fat burners, although its precise mechanism is still unclear. Animal research from Hokkaido University, Japan, found that abdominal fat was slightly reduced in rodents after they were fed fucoxanthin. Although this sounds promising, it’s too early to tell if humans will benefit too. </p> <p>Appetite Suppressants: "Trick the brain into thinking you’ve eaten!"</p> <p>Whether they claim to make you feel fuller or help you forget your hunger, many products promise to curb your urge to eat. One that’s getting a lot of attention is Hoodia gordonii, a milkweed relative native to South Africa and Namibia. African Bushmen reportedly chew on hoodia stalks to ward off hunger during long hunting trips. Preliminary clinical research is intriguing; mice given injections of P57, a steroid compound identified as hoodia’s active ingredient, suppressed their food intake significantly. But for us humans, hoodia’s weight-loss effects “are not strongly substantiated by significant large clinical trials,” says Roberta A. Lee, M.D., medical director at the Continuum Center for Health and Healing at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. “That makes the ­evidence weak for weight loss at this time.”<br /> The Bottom Line</p> <p>As I expected, none of the quick fixes had strong scientific backing. So I turned to my friend Jean Harvey-Berino, Ph.D., chair of the University of Vermont’s Nutrition &amp; Food Sciences Department and author of The EatingWell Diet (The Countryman Press, 2007). “The best way to give yourself a jump-start,” she said, “is to create rules that add structure to your diet.” Jean suggested dialing down calories but still eating a balanced diet of real foods. Normally she would say not to drop below 1,200 calories per day, but for a quick fix, you could shave off a few more—going absolutely no lower than 800—for up to 3 days (no longer). She also recommends getting enough protein to prevent muscle loss and curb hunger. (That’s easy: most adults need about a third of a gram of protein per pound of body weight each day. For a 150-pound person that’s 50 grams—the amount, roughly, in 10 ounces of chicken breast.)</p> <p>Now when I need to lose a few pounds, I cut my calorie intake to about 1,000, well below my usual. I also add a two-mile morning jog (in addition to my usual noontime exercise class). These changes help me feel more in control and, before I know it, the unwanted pounds come off. It ’s not “10 pounds in 10 days” but it does the trick for me.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/ten_pounds_in_10_days#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. July/August 2008 Weight Loss/Diet Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:54:47 +0000 Nifer 10198 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Whole-Grain Truth http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_whole_grain_truth <p>The other morning, my husband joined me at the kitchen table and poured himself a bowl of cereal. He added milk, took a bite, looked at me incredulously and said, “You’ve got to be kidding! This stuff tastes like cardboard.” Mark is the kind of guy who will eat just about anything, so I knew this was trouble. The box sitting between us, with its description of the “fiber twigs” within, should have given me an inkling that he would object.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Confusion in the cereal aisle? You’re not alone </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="160" height="160" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/224whole_grain_truth_160.jpg?1250863996" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The other morning, my husband joined me at the kitchen table and poured himself a bowl of cereal. He added milk, took a bite, looked at me incredulously and said, “You’ve got to be kidding! This stuff tastes like cardboard.” Mark is the kind of guy who will eat just about anything, so I knew this was trouble. The box sitting between us, with its description of the “fiber twigs” within, should have given me an inkling that he would object.</p> <p>I rely on cereal to help incorporate plenty of whole grains and fiber into my diet, and I was sure I had hit nutritional gold with this one: whole grains, 10 grams of fiber and a fine taste (at least to me), especially when mixed with yogurt and fruit. Clearly, Mark disagreed.</p> <p>So it was back to the cereal aisle. Finding a healthy cereal these days that we both can enjoy is no easy task. And sometimes the health claims themselves can be confusing. Recently I grabbed a popular brand with the words “Whole Grain” boldly splashed across the box. But the nutrition label listed only one pitiful gram of fiber per serving. How could a cereal touting whole grain have so little dietary fiber? Whole grains, it turns out, can vary tremendously in their fiber content.</p> <p>The 2005 USDA Dietary Guidelines recommend that adults consume around six ounces of grains daily, and that we make half those grains whole. That means about three ounces of whole grains a day. Depending on the grains we choose, that could be between 1 1/2 and 3 cups.</p> <p>A whole-grain kernel starts with three parts: the bran, the germ and the endosperm. When these kernels are heavily processed or refined, they no longer remain whole. Most of the bran and some of the germ is removed, resulting in the loss of fiber as well as a multitude of vitamins, minerals and other health-promoting phytonutrients. Although manufacturers “enrich” refined grains by adding back iron and three B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin and niacin), this does not add back all of the whole-grain benefits.</p> <p>We have good reason to be on the prowl for those benefits. People who eat plenty of whole grains tend to be leaner and have a lower risk of heart disease than those who don’t. This is probably because whole grains contain antioxidants, phytoestrogens and phytosterols that are protective against coronary disease. The fiber in whole grains also has its benefits, and most of us fail to get the amount of fiber recommended for a healthy diet: 38 grams per day for men, 25 for women. Fiber promotes regularity and lowers the risk of developing diabetes and heart disease. But the whole-grain/fiber connection isn’t perfect. While most whole grains are high in fiber, some, like the whole-grain corn in the cereal that baffled me, are not. For maximum health, a cereal with both whole grain and high fiber makes the best sense.</p> <p>How do you know when you’ve found the right cereal?<br /> First, check the ingredients to make sure that the word “whole” describes the grains that come first in the list. Then move up to the nutrition facts label and look for at least five grams of fiber per serving. Next come calories. One popular granola, although a decent source of whole grains and fiber, has an exorbitant 528 calories per cup, most from added fats and sugars. I opt for cereals with around 200 or less calories per serving and a sugar content less than 12 grams. As for taste, you’ll have to try them.</p> <p>My husband recently rebelled and went shopping on his own. Darn proud of himself, he came home with a cereal with eight grams of fiber per serving whose first ingredient was wheat bran and declared that it tasted a lot better than mine. I didn’t have the heart to tell him that although wheat bran is a good source of fiber, it’s not a whole grain, and with 18 grams of sugar per serving, he still has a ways to go. But at least he’s given up the chocolate-frosted sugar bombs.<br /> -Rachel Johnson is senior nutrition advisor to EatingWell and dean of the University of Vermont College of Agriculture &amp; Life Sciences.</p> <p>Illustration by Richard A. Goldberg</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_whole_grain_truth#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Recipes & Menus - Whole Grains Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:13:44 +0000 Nifer 10171 at http://www.eatingwell.com Men and Women: Differences in How Men Eat and How Women Eat http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/his_hers_eating <p>Restaurants are made for people-watching—where anyone with an interest in contemporary eating trends can keep an eye on the plates arriving at nearby tables. Engaged in a bit of this professional nosiness, I recently observed a server bringing a middle-aged couple their dinners. Not sure who had ordered what, he looked at the plates, then offered the woman the vegetarian entrée and placed the beef dish in front of her male companion. What sort of gender profiling was going on here?</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Does gender make a difference when it comes to the way we eat? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/restaurant_310_0.jpg?1263828502" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="160" height="160" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/202his_hers_eating_160.jpg?1250863773" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> February/March 2006 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes for Two </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_fish_recipes_for_two">Healthy Fish Recipes for Two</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_low_calorie_dinner_recipes_for_two">Healthy Low-Calorie Dinner Recipes for Two</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/heart_healthy_recipes_for_two">Heart Healthy Recipes for Two</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_low_calorie_dinner_recipes_for_two">Healthy Low-Calorie Dinner Recipes for Two</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/one_pot_recipes_for_two">One-Pot Recipes for Two</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Restaurants are made for people-watching—where anyone with an interest in contemporary eating trends can keep an eye on the plates arriving at nearby tables. Engaged in a bit of this professional nosiness, I recently observed a server bringing a middle-aged couple their dinners. Not sure who had ordered what, he looked at the plates, then offered the woman the vegetarian entrée and placed the beef dish in front of her male companion. What sort of gender profiling was going on here?</p> <p>As it turned out, the waiter had it right: there are gender differences in food selection. Men eat more meat and bread, while women consume more fruit, yogurt and diet soda. There are also gender differences in eating styles. Women take smaller bites and take longer to eat than men. When psychologists asked male and female volunteers to read sample food diaries and then make judgments about the diary writers—sight unseen, women who reported eating smaller meals were considered (by both male and female readers) to be more feminine, more concerned about their appearance and better looking than women who recorded larger meals.</p> <p>Women, generally, have also been shown to eat less when they are with a desirable male partner than when they are with other women. I think I’ve moved past that. I would have spent three hungry decades if I tried to limit my intake when eating with my husband.</p> <p>It’s no surprise that women are more likely than men to be on diets and are more dissatisfied with their body weight and shape. One large survey found that, of those people who were a healthy weight, 23 percent of the women perceived themselves as overweight, while only 9 percent of the men did. At the same time, of those who were actually overweight, 41 percent of the men versus 13 percent of the women thought their weight was about right. Men are obviously more accepting of their bodies and as a result seem to have a more relaxed approach about their food choices. To compound this, studies show that women think men favor much thinner women than the men in fact say they prefer.</p> <p>One biological fact is inescapable: most women have lower calorie needs than men, and that means we have fewer extra calories to play with. The new USDA MyPyramid labels the extra calories that are leftover after our nutrient needs are met as “discretionary calories.” For my age, gender and activity level, I have 195 calories for the extras after I’ve gotten my recommended whole grains, fruits and vegetables, low-fat dairy and lean meats. My husband has 425. So while I may have to choose between dessert or a glass of wine, he gets to have both. What’s fair about that? I think because men grow up having this added flexibility, they are often more cavalier about what they eat. Does that make a difference to their health overall? Perhaps—American women do outlive men by about five years, but women also outlive men in virtually every country in the world, suggesting the influence of many factors other than diet.</p> <p>Still, I think we can learn from each other. While as women we can be tough on ourselves, it probably means we tend to be more attentive to our health. And with 87 percent of American women saying they are the person most responsible for their household’s meals, we’re the primary gatekeepers for the food that comes into our family kitchens. I think the men in our lives often benefit from our vigilance. But at the same time, women’s diets can improve when they share meals with men. A friend goes the extra mile to serve healthy foods at home because her physician husband makes unhealthy choices when he’s on the run at the hospital. Another friend eats fewer sweet treats than she might because of her husband’s aversion to sugar.</p> <p>My husband and sons, like a lot of men, put a high value on convenience when it comes to eating. I try to make it easier for them to make good food choices. I usually keep washed grapes on the counter, knowing they’ll be gone in no time. (If I leave them packaged up in the fridge, they often sit there and rot.) I try to keep individually packaged string cheese, baby carrots, apples and yogurt in the front of the fridge where my guys can grab them.</p> <p>Some of our happiest times as a family are spent over a great meal accompanied by lively conversation and lots of good-natured teasing. I’ve been razzed over the years about<br /> my plate-watching habits and my sometimes overzealous approach to good nutrition. The men in my life help me appreciate that great food is much more than just nutrients and calories.</p> <p>Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. is senior nutrition advisor to EatingWell Magazine and dean of the University of Vermont College of Agriculture &amp; Life Sciences.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/his_hers_eating#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. February/March 2006 Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:10:58 +0000 Nifer 10169 at http://www.eatingwell.com Good Fats, Bad Fats http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/good_fats_bad_fats <p>When it comes to breaking science, I try to keep an open mind. But when I read statements like “It’s become clear that natural saturated fats are good for you” (in a major food magazine last year), I blink. In the professional groups I’m involved with—including the American Heart Association—the idea that saturated fats increase the risk of heart disease is an unquestioned, fundamental principle.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Exposing the myths—and truths—about saturated fat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/avocado_half310.jpg?1256763314" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5557avocado_half_225.jpg?1250791375" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="239" height="239" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5558salmon_steak225.jpg?1250791407" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-image-content"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Fast Fat Swaps</strong> Cut back on saturated fat with these easy switches.</p> <p> <img src="/upload/photos/5558salmon_steak.jpg" alt=" salmon for steak" border="0" width="165" /><br /> <strong> Salmon for Steak</strong> 1.1 g sat fat (3 oz) vs 9.1 g (3 oz)</p> <p> <img src="/upload/photos/5558avocado_brie.jpg" alt=" avocado for brie" border="0" width="165" /><br /> <strong>Avocado for Brie</strong> 1.1 g sat fat (1⁄4 avocado) vs 4.9 g (1 oz)</p> <p> <img src="/upload/photos/5558oil_butter.jpg" alt=" oil for butter" border="0" width="165" /><br /> <strong>Olive Oil for Butter</strong> 1.9 g sat fat (1 Tbsp) vs 7.3 g (1 Tbsp)<strong>Fast Fat Swaps</strong> Cut back on saturated fat with these easy switches. <img src="/upload/photos/5558salmon_steak.jpg" alt=" salmon for steak" border="0" width="165" /> <strong> Salmon for Steak</strong> 1.1 g sat fat (3 oz) vs 9.1 g (3 oz) <img src="/upload/photos/5558avocado_brie.jpg" alt=" avocado for brie" border="0" width="165" /> <strong>Avocado for Brie</strong> 1.1 g sat fat (1⁄4 avocado) vs 4.9 g (1 oz) <img src="/upload/photos/5558oil_butter.jpg" alt=" oil for butter" border="0" width="165" /> <strong>Olive Oil for Butter</strong> 1.9 g sat fat (1 Tbsp) vs 7.3 g (1 Tbsp)</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/creamy_avocado_white_bean_wrap.html">Creamy Avocado &amp; White Bean Wrap</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/avocado_grapefruit_relish.html">Avocado-Grapefruit Relish</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/blackened_salmon_sandwich.html">Blackened Salmon Sandwich</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/honey_soy_salmon.html">Honey-Soy Broiled Salmon</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/herbed_extra_virgin_olive_oil.html">Herbed Extra-Virgin Olive Oil</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/citrus_ginger_cake_with_spiced_orange_compote.html">Citrus Ginger Cake with Spiced Orange Compote</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_low_fat_recipes">Healthy Low Fat Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Healthy Fats </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/videos/getting_good_fats_video">Getting Good Fats Video</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/are_all_fats_bad_for_you">Are all fats bad for you?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/omega_3_fats_and_adhd">Omega-3 Fats and ADHD</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When it comes to breaking science, I try to keep an open mind. But when I read statements like “It’s become clear that natural saturated fats are good for you” (in a major food magazine last year), I blink. In the professional groups I’m involved with—including the American Heart Association—the idea that saturated fats increase the risk of heart disease is an unquestioned, fundamental principle.</p> <p>Saturated fats—found mainly in fatty meats, butter, cheese and whole milk—are “saturated” with hydrogen atoms, which gives them a rigid structure and makes them solid at room temperature. (Unsaturated fats—those in nuts, olives, fish and vegetable oils—are fluid at room temperature.) Most experts agree that saturated fats raise levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol in the blood. That’s damaging to the heart and arteries, we believe, since excessive LDL accumulates in artery walls and can trigger inflammation, eventually leading to a heart attack or stroke. That would seem to be the end of the story—or is it? I decided to evaluate some common assumptions.<br /> “All saturated fats are bad.”</p> <p>It’s easy just to lump all saturated fats into one “heart-threatening” group, but the reality is that there are many different kinds of saturated fats in foods. Some research suggests that certain types are more harmful than others. For example, a handful of studies show that while coconut oil, rich in lauric acid, raises blood levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, it also raises HDL (“good”) cholesterol slightly. Stearic acid, a type of saturated fat that makes up about half the fat in dark chocolate and accounts for 15 percent of the fat in beef, doesn’t raise LDL at all. Experts consider stearic acid “neutral” when it comes to cardiovascular risk: it doesn’t help, but it doesn’t hurt either.</p> <p>On the flip side, some saturated fats appear more likely than others to cause the buildup of fatty plaque in arteries. Palmitic acid, which is the main fat in palm oil and another saturated fat present in beef, is one such fat. But the fact that beef contains both “bad” palmitic acid and “neutral” stearic acid underscores the point that foods rich in saturated fats contain a mixture of different types.</p> <p>And, of course, despite a widespread trend to eliminate trans fats from our food supply, many packaged snacks still contain these man-made fats that act like saturated fats. And trans fats, or “partially hydrogenated” fats, are the unhealthiest of all: they increase (“bad”) LDL and decrease (“good”) HDL.</p> <p>Bottom Line: Saturated fats are not all created equal. Foods contain a variety of saturated fats, and a “neutral” one won’t negate the impact of a “bad” one. To minimize intake of “bad” saturated fats, choose lean sources of protein and low-fat or nonfat dairy products. Read labels on packaged foods, such as cookies, crackers and microwave popcorn, to avoid palm and coconut oils and trans fats. (While coconut oil may be marginally better than palm, you’re still better off avoiding both.)<br /> “Saturated fats are the worst offenders in our diets.”</p> <p>As more research uncovers the role diet plays in cardiovascular disease, it’s becoming obvious that fats aren’t the only villains in the picture. Increasingly, scientists are recognizing that you should also watch out for some carbohydrates—specifically, sugars and refined grains. “I believe that a diet containing moderate amounts of saturated fat is OK, and possibly better, than a low-saturated-fat diet that is rich in sugars and refined carbohydrates,” says Ronald Krauss, M.D., director of atherosclerosis research at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute and a past chair of the American Heart Association’s Nutrition Committee. “Although saturated fats raise [“bad”] LDL cholesterol, sugars decrease [“good”] HDL cholesterol and raise triglycerides [another harmful fat in the blood],” he explains. Those findings are confirmed by studies conducted at Harvard in more than 80,000 women.</p> <p>Bottom Line: Refined carbohydrates, such as white bread and sugary sweets, may be just as bad for your heart and arteries as cream and butter—one more reason to limit them.</p> <p>“A low-carb diet is always bad for your heart.”</p> <p>When most people hear “low-carb diet,” they usually think of an eating plan that virtually eliminates carbohydrates and allows unlimited amounts of high-protein, high-saturated-fat foods, such as bacon. But today’s low-carb diets have evolved from those popular in the 1970s. Plans like South Beach and even Atkins do not promote marbled steaks and other saturated-fat-laden foods; instead, they emphasize eating fewer refined carbohydrates, such as white bread. A low-carb diet that emphasizes lean proteins, such as fish and beans, and vegetables, as well as “good” carbohydrates (e.g., brown rice), can actually look pretty good to a cardiologist. In fact, last summer an Israeli study published in the New England Journal of Medicine reported that people following a low-carb (Atkins) diet lost more weight and ended up with bigger improvements in blood-cholesterol numbers than those who followed a reduced-calorie, low-fat diet. </p> <p>In this study, subjects were told to select vegetarian sources of fat and protein, which means it was likely that they were eating more unsaturated fats than saturated ones. In some ways they were following the current guidelines of the American Heart Association, which no longer advocates strictly limiting total fat but rather advises people to replace saturated fats with healthier unsaturated ones (e.g., olive oil for butter).</p> <p>Bottom Line: A “low-carb” diet based on lean sources of protein, vegetables, unsaturated fats and a judicious amount of whole grains is heart-healthy.</p> <p>So what now?</p> <p>I doubt we’ll ever have all the facts about saturated fat. But I’m not going to start eating a half-pound of bacon for breakfast anytime soon. We know that when it comes to heart health, unsaturated fats, such as those in oils and salmon, nuts and avocados, are better choices than the saturated fats in fatty meats and butter. I’ll also continue to choose whole grains over refined carbohydrates as much as I can—and exercise most days of the week. That incorporates most of the heart-healthy thinking I need.</p> <p>Rachel K. Johnson, EatingWell’s senior nutrition advisor, is a professor of nutrition at the University of Vermont.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/good_fats_bad_fats#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. January/February 2009 Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:05:10 +0000 Nifer 9942 at http://www.eatingwell.com Eat for Your Eyes http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/eat_for_your_eyes <p><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/five_tips_for_eye_health">View slideshow of 5 foods for eye health »</a></p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Five foods to help you see more clearly. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/eyeglasses_produce_310.jpg?1266439370" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/eye_310.jpg?1266439379" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/five_tips_for_eye_health">Five Tips For Eye Health</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/dry_eyes_traced_to_oils_in_diet">Dry Eyes Traced to Oils in Diet</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>View slideshow of 5 foods for eye health »</p> <p>When I was 7, I longed for bright blue eyeglasses with wings like the ones my neighbor Sue wore. (She was 9, and ultra-cool.) Much to my disappointment at the time, my vision was perfect. With age, that’s changed: When I hit my forties I reluctantly purchased drugstore reading glasses. Now I need bifocals. Frankly, I’m lucky that, so far, that’s all I’ve had to deal with: more than 8 million Americans—including people I know—are facing a vision problem that can’t be corrected so easily: age-related macular degeneration (AMD).</p> <p>AMD begins when the macula—the center of the retina, and the part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail—starts to break down. This causes cloudy “blind spots” in the center of your vision, which, over time, grow in number and in size, making it difficult to read, drive a car or even recognize faces. AMD is a leading cause of blindness in people over age 60.</p> <p>Getting older is, in fact, the biggest risk factor for developing AMD; one study found that while the disease is relatively rare in middle age, risk jumps to around 30 percent by age 75. Being female, white or having a family history of AMD also boosts your risk. While some people seem to develop the condition no matter what they do, there are a few lifestyle choices that may help to protect against the disease. For example, smoking appears to increase risk fivefold, so quitting, if you’re a smoker, may reduce your risk. Wearing sunglasses can also help, as light rays from the sun can penetrate the retina and damage its cells—which may explain why a study published last fall found that people who live in sunny areas are more susceptible to AMD. But I’m most interested in the emerging research that suggests eating a nutrient-rich diet may help to prevent the development, or delay the progression, of AMD.</p> <p>While the signs of AMD may not show up until late in life, much of the damage occurs decades earlier. So what can I eat today to protect my eyes? I did some digging into the research, and here’s what I found. Five foods to help you see more clearly.</p> <p>1. Up your antioxidant intake.</p> <p>Studies show that people with low levels of antioxidants are more likely to develop AMD than those with higher levels. Antioxidants that seem to be especially protective against the disease include vitamin C (in citrus fruits, kiwi and broccoli), vitamin E (in vegetable oils, nuts and avocados) and lutein and zeaxanthin—nutrients that abound in dark leafy greens, such as spinach, kale and collards. While it’s not completely clear how these antioxidants protect your eyes, it seems that they accumulate in the retina where they can mop up free radicals, compounds that damage cells by starving them of oxygen. Lutein and zeaxanthin may also act like natural sunglasses, helping to form macular pigment that filters out some of the sun’s damaging rays. Get antioxidant rich recipes.</p> <p>2. Eat (whole) eggs.</p> <p>Egg yolks are also rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, but many of us avoid eggs because we’re worried about their cholesterol content. Research led by Thomas Wilson, Ph.D., associate professor with the Center for Health and Disease Research at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell, suggests that we shouldn’t be so concerned. He found that when people ate eggs regularly—as many as two daily—they significantly increased the levels of lutein and zeaxanthin circulating in their bodies without boosting LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels. Unless your doctor advises otherwise, go ahead and enjoy eggs regularly. (Just don’t go crazy: the American Heart Association still advises limiting cholesterol intake to less than 300 milligrams [mg] daily, and one large egg yolk has about 213 mg.) Take a tip from Dr. Wilson and scramble your eggs with spinach for an even bigger nutrient boost. Try some healthy egg recipes.</p> <p>3. Help yourself to more “see” food.</p> <p>A recent analysis of nine studies that included more than 88,000 participants suggested that people who ate at least two servings of fatty fish (such as salmon, sardines, mackerel, herring or trout) per week were about one-third less likely to develop advanced AMD than those who didn’t. Lead scientist Elaine Chong, Ph.D., a research fellow at the Centre for Eye Research at the University of Melbourne, Australia, explains that omega-3 fatty acids—particularly DHA—in fish are key components of the nerve cells in the retina. “DHA is found in much higher concentrations in the retina than in other parts of the body,” she notes, “thus, a deficiency may trigger AMD.” So commit to eating more fatty fish, and don’t stop there: shellfish, such as oysters and crab, provide good amounts of zinc, another nutrient that’s found in the retina and may also help protect against AMD. Get healthy fish recipes.</p> <p>4. Consider a supplement.</p> <p>Although it’s always best to get nutrients from food first, supplements are showing a lot of promise in combating AMD. Reports from large-scale clinical trials suggest that, in high-dose supplement form, several nutrients may help to reduce the risk of AMD significantly. If you have any AMD risk factors, talk with your eye-care professional about taking an “eye health formula” supplement. The current supplement formula being studied in major research trials includes 10 mg of lutein (the equivalent of about 3 cups of spinach), 2 milligrams of zeaxanthin and 1 gram total of EPA and DHA (approximately what you get in a 3-ounce serving of salmon). Until further research is in, there’s no advantage to exceeding those amounts. Remember to take it only under medical supervision; even though these supplements are available over the counter, taking megadoses of any nutrient should always be approached cautiously. </p> <p>5. Keep your blood pressure—and your weight—in check.</p> <p>People with high blood pressure are more likely to develop AMD, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The theory is that increased pressure damages blood vessels. This hinders blood flow to the eyes, making it harder for protective nutrients to reach the retina and for damaging free-radical debris to be carried away. Losing extra pounds if you’re overweight or obese might also help. Body fat is a major storage depot for fat-soluble nutrients, and excess fat tissue can act as a “sink” for some eye-protective nutrients, making them less available to the macula. Try some healthy recipes for high blood pressure.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/eat_for_your_eyes#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. March/April 2009 Healthy Aging Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Recipes & Menus - Antioxidants Diet, Nutrition & Health - Healthy Aging Thu, 20 Aug 2009 17:25:18 +0000 Nifer 9922 at http://www.eatingwell.com Metabolic Myths http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/metabolic_myths <p>Over a cup of tea recently, a 40-something friend confided that she’d had a glimpse of the future and she didn’t like it. She had decided to weigh herself that morning, something she hadn’t done in a while. When she stepped on the scale, the needle climbed to a point where it hadn’t gone since her pregnancy nine years before. “What’s happening to me?” she lamented. “My metabolism must be starting its middle-age slowdown.”</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Age-defying ways to rev the engine. Understanding our metabolism </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="160" height="160" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/2479metabolic_myths_160.jpg?1250703598" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Over a cup of tea recently, a 40-something friend confided that she’d had a glimpse of the future and she didn’t like it. She had decided to weigh herself that morning, something she hadn’t done in a while. When she stepped on the scale, the needle climbed to a point where it hadn’t gone since her pregnancy nine years before. “What’s happening to me?” she lamented. “My metabolism must be starting its middle-age slowdown.”</p> <p>Metabolism, a greatly misunderstood process of the human body, takes the brunt of many a middle-age whine. People conclude that a slower metabolism is an inevitable part of aging and beyond their control. The truth, however, is more reassuring. Our bodies do change as we age, and metabolism can take a dive as a result, but we hold the key to avert this decline.</p> <p>Metabolism, the process by which our bodies burn calories (food energy), has three components: resting metabolic rate, the thermic effect of food, and physical activity. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) is the energy we use at rest to perform basic body functions like breathing and sleeping. In most people, this accounts for about 60 to 70 percent of their total daily energy expenditure (about 1,450 calories a day for a 140-pound woman). Because muscle is the body’s metabolically active tissue, RMR is almost totally determined by the amount of lean body (muscle) mass a person has. For the most part, we all have the same metabolism per amount of lean body mass. Most women have more body fat in proportion to muscle mass than men, and thus women generally have metabolic rates that are 5 to 10 percent lower than men of the same height and weight. Unfair as it may be, that means most men use up more calories just sitting on the couch than the women sitting next to them do.</p> <p>The RMR of most people goes down by 2 to 3 percent with each decade once we reach our thirties, a direct result of the loss of muscle mass that often accompanies aging. Luckily, we can prevent this loss with regular strength-training exercises, which are designed to build or preserve muscle.</p> <p>The thermic effect of food (TEF) is the energy we use to burn calories or, more explicitly, to digest, absorb and metabolize our food. When you eat a 110-calorie snack, for example, 10 of those calories are used for TEF. It is a relatively small portion of our total metabolism: about 10 percent, or 240 daily calories, for a 140-pound woman.</p> <p>Our greatest control over metabolism lies with physical activity. It’s also the most easily thwarted, living as we do in a world of drive-through banks, escalators, leaf blowers and the omnipresent computer. Unless you are one of the rare people whose job requires you to be moving throughout the day, you probably need to work deliberately at increasing your physical-activity level. The less time you have for exercise, the more vigorously you should move. I can jog 21⁄2 miles in 30 minutes or I can burn the same number of calories on a leisurely hourlong walk. I frequently wear a step-counter to monitor my goal of 10,000 steps a day, the equivalent of 5 miles. After untold hours in front of my computer, if I don’t spend at least 45 minutes running or in an exercise class, I don’t come anywhere close to my goal. If I exercise enough I can indulge my love of good food and savor a scrumptious dessert or great glass of wine several times a week without adding pounds.</p> <p>Even fidgeting, which comes naturally to some people, can increase energy expenditure above resting levels by 300 to 600 calories per day. My oldest son is one of those people who seem to be blessed with “thin” genes. But after being around him for more than two decades I think I have a good idea what’s going on: he’s a fidgeter. He is constantly tapping his foot and shifting in his seat. (When he was little it seemed we were always pleading with him to sit still at the dinner table.) Compared to sitting still, browsing in a store takes twice the energy, while a slow walk (2 to 3 mph) can triple energy expenditure.</p> <p>I have no doubt my friend will get her weight back to where she’d like it. She may have to invest in some free weights and a little more time running, but that’s all under her control. We certainly can’t stop the years ticking by, but keeping our metabolism youthful and burning calories at a healthful rate is well within our grasp.<br /> —Rachel Johnson, PhD, M.P.H., R.D. is senior nutrition advisor to EatingWell and dean of the University of Vermont College of Agriculture &amp; Life Sciences.</p> <p>Calories Burned in Action (over 1 hour)<br /> (not counting the 77 calories burned at rest)</p> <p>Chewing Gum 11<br /> Fidgeting 70<br /> Walking 1 mph 119<br /> Walking 2 mph 158<br /> Walking 3 mph 228</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/metabolic_myths#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. Weight Loss/Diet Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Wed, 19 Aug 2009 17:40:35 +0000 Nifer 9811 at http://www.eatingwell.com Ivory-Tower Eating: How to Avoid the Freshman 15 http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/ivory_tower_eating_how_to_avoid_the <p><a name="top"></a><br /> * <a href="#1">Say "no" to seconds</a>.<br /> * <a href="#2">Avoid late-night snacking</a>.<br /> * <a href="#3">Don't drink your calories</a>.<br /> * <a href="#4">Get some exercise</a>.<br /> * <a href="#5">Awareness is key</a>.<br /> * <a href="#6">Know your portions sizes</a>.</p> <p>You can hear the lament across college campuses everywhere: “My pants barely fit now.” “I can’t believe how much weight I’ve gained.” “What’s happening to my body?”</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 6 secrets for keeping college weight gain at bay. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/2474scale_for_person.jpg?1250702884" /> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/quick_weeknight_dinners/how_to_eat_more_fruits_and_vegetables">How to Eat More Fruits &amp; Vegetables</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/the_eatingwell_diet/think_small_portion_control_savvy">Think Small - Portion-Control Savvy</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>* Say "no" to seconds.<br /> * Avoid late-night snacking.<br /> * Don't drink your calories.<br /> * Get some exercise.<br /> * Awareness is key.<br /> * Know your portions sizes.</p> <p>You can hear the lament across college campuses everywhere: “My pants barely fit now.” “I can’t believe how much weight I’ve gained.” “What’s happening to my body?”</p> <p>I remember the Freshman 15 all too well from my own student days. During my first week as a student at Penn State, I realized that I could eat as many glazed doughnuts as I wanted and nobody, including my mother, could tell me no. The independence was liberating. The consequence of my poor choices, however, was not.</p> <p>So I wasn’t surprised when the subject of campus weight gain came up in a talk with my son Ben and his girlfriend, Heidi, setting off to Montana for college. A runner with healthy food habits, she sighed, “I’m resigned to it. From everything I’ve read, putting on weight my first semester is inevitable.”</p> <p>She may be right: a report from Washington University found that, during the first two years of college, 70 percent of students studied gained an average of nine pounds. Although the “15” may be an exaggeration, most new students do gain weight.</p> <p>Why? What’s going on in the utopian world of the ivory towers?</p> <p>Making the transition from home to college is a dramatic shift of environment and circumstances. Such large life changes (marriage, having a baby, quitting smoking, going through menopause) often include the unwelcome side effect of added pounds.</p> <p>Contemplating this whole phenomenon, I made a call to David Levitsky, professor of nutrition and psychology at Cornell University, who has tracked the amount of weight students gain during their first semester. He finds it astounding, considering how unusual it is over a person’s lifespan to put on so many pounds over such a short period of time. Some of the blame may lie in unlimited offerings in dining halls, he says. In order to compete for the best and brightest, most colleges and universities provide all-you-can-eat buffets with serve-yourself soda fountains and make-your-own sundae bars. Payment is painless: just swipe your I.D. card.<br /> Say "no" to seconds.</p> <p>Studies show that the availability of all-you-can-eat food at a fixed price results in the “buffet syndrome”: the more variety of food we are presented with, the less likely we are to tire of the taste and curb our eating. In one study, people ate 15 percent more when offered three shapes of pasta compared to when they had only one.</p> <p>Back to top<br /> Avoid late-night snacking.</p> <p>Levitsky adds that frequent late-night snacking is one of the major predictors of weight gain in Cornell freshmen—midnight pizza and subs are the traditional downfall. Refuel with these easy, quick and healthy snack recipes.</p> <p>Back to top<br /> Don't drink your calories.</p> <p>Alcohol also likely plays a role, although because the research relies on students’ self-reported data, its contribution is difficult to quantify. (When I asked my college-age sons about student weight issues, they quickly agreed on the culprit: beer.)</p> <p>Back to top<br /> Get some exercise.</p> <p>On top of all this, many students become less active. Most high school athletes won’t qualify for elite college teams, and few universities require physical education. Try these exercise tips for getting motivated.</p> <p>Back to top<br /> Awareness is key.</p> <p>Levitsky has conducted two studies that produced early promising results for college students. In one he used the fact that people who weigh themselves regularly are often more successful at losing weight or maintaining a healthy weight. A group of freshman students weighed themselves every morning and entered the results on a website run by Levitsky’s research group. The students received immediate feedback in the form of a weight-trend graph (but no coaching), giving them a sense of whether they were gaining or losing. Amazingly, the students who weighed themselves regularly had zero weight gain, while the control group with no intervention gained four to seven pounds.</p> <p>Back to top<br /> Know your portions sizes.</p> <p>The other successful technique was straightforward nutrition education. Students who attended two lessons on portion sizes gained zero pounds while the group with no lessons gained four to seven.</p> <p>EatingWell Video Find out what a reasonable portion size looks like</p> <p>Back to top</p> <p>Weight gain happens to most of us at some time over our lives. But it’s important to remember that we have control over whether those pounds stick. If Heidi comes home in December lamenting a few added pounds, I’ll suggest that she weigh herself regularly, get enough sleep, cut back on some extras in her diet and enjoy lots of time outdoors in the mountains of Montana.</p> <p>Rachel Johnson is senior nutrition advisor to EatingWell and dean of the University of Vermont College of Agriculture &amp; Life Sciences.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/ivory_tower_eating_how_to_avoid_the#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. Weight Loss/Diet Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Wed, 19 Aug 2009 17:29:18 +0000 Nifer 9803 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Honesty Conundrum: What do people really eat? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/the_honesty_conundrum_what_do_peopl <p>One reality of life as a university dean is a never-ending schedule of receptions with generous amounts of tempting food and drink. While standing near a sumptuous hors d’oeuvres table recently, I overheard a fellow faculty member being grilled by his spouse about what he had eaten so far that day. This colleague struggles with his weight, and his wife has clearly assumed a policing role. He dutifully reported fruit and yogurt for breakfast and a turkey wrap with water for lunch.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Keeping an accurate record of your daily intake is key to successful weight loss. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="160" height="160" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/2467scale_160.jpg?1250702531" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>One reality of life as a university dean is a never-ending schedule of receptions with generous amounts of tempting food and drink. While standing near a sumptuous hors d’oeuvres table recently, I overheard a fellow faculty member being grilled by his spouse about what he had eaten so far that day. This colleague struggles with his weight, and his wife has clearly assumed a policing role. He dutifully reported fruit and yogurt for breakfast and a turkey wrap with water for lunch.</p> <p>As his placated wife walked away, he whispered to me that he hadn’t mentioned three after-lunch cookies. Moments later, I saw him down four bacon-wrapped pastries, and I mentally calculated the 300 calories he had just added while his wife wasn’t looking. I figured he would also “forget” to include these snacks in his next report.</p> <p>This common behavior vexes nutritionists as we try to establish the links between diet and health. We know that many people, even highly intelligent and articulate professionals, don’t accurately report what they eat and drink. Some people list food intakes so low that even if they spent all their time sleeping, they would be losing weight or even emaciated. For example, a 5-foot 9-inch 30-year-old woman who weighs 143 pounds and has an active lifestyle needs about 2,550 calories a day to maintain her weight. If she reports eating only 2,000 calories a day, she should be losing about a pound a week. If she’s not losing weight, there’s a good chance she is what nutritionists label an “underreporter.”</p> <p>I suspect that most of us have been guilty of this at one time or another, and it’s likely that most underreporting comes from a desire to say what seems acceptable to the person asking. We know that overweight people are worse reporters than lean people, women are worse than men, and as children age they get worse too. Women tend to say they weigh less, while men tend to make themselves taller. People especially underreport the “sin” foods that they “don’t remember” eating: cakes and pies, salty snack foods, soft drinks and fatty spreads. On the other hand, they are quite good at describing their intakes of vegetables and fruits.</p> <p>Why does this matter?<br /> It can dramatically distort what we think we know about the diet-health connection. A few years ago, a widely publicized study using self-reported food intakes of more than 80,000 women found no link between total fat intake and the development of heart disease. But if the overweight women were more likely than the lean to underreport their intakes of high-fat foods, diet researchers could miss a valid association.</p> <p>To help with this conundrum in my own research, we speculated that participants might be put off by the size 2, 100-pound graduate students interviewing them. Who would want to fess up about the eight cookies or pint of ice cream in one sitting to such questioners? So we tried phone interviews with an unfamiliar interviewer. People still underreported. We tried an empathetic interviewer of similar size and age to the interviewees. Underreporting remained the same. We’re now in the midst of a study in which our volunteers are using PDAs (personal digital assistants) to record their food intake. We’ll see if this technology helps.</p> <p>The one question I hear constantly is: “Why can’t I lose weight?” What I say is: “Perhaps you’re not really counting everything you eat. One of the most powerful tools you can use is a food diary. I promise—if you keep an honest diary, it will help!”</p> <p>We know that people who weigh themselves regularly and record what they eat are more successful at losing weight and maintaining the loss compared with those who don’t perform these tasks. But honesty and awareness count: don’t forget the handful of nuts you grabbed on the run, the milkshake you shared with a friend, the last few bites of dinner you savored while cleaning up the dishes. Most people are surprised at how much unconscious eating they do. At the end of the day, look up the calorie content of everything in your diary (see box). Even if you don’t get it exactly right, you’ll be way ahead of the game. I’m thrilled when people are honest with their dietitian, because they have reached the crucial point of just being honest with themselves.</p> <p>—Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D.</p> <p>Tool Box<br /> The Doctor’s Pocket Calorie, Fat &amp; Carb Counter, 2005 Edition (Allan Borushek)<br /> On the Internet: <a href="http://www.nutritiondata.com" title="www.nutritiondata.com">www.nutritiondata.com</a> or <a href="http://www.calorieking.com" title="www.calorieking.com">www.calorieking.com</a></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/the_honesty_conundrum_what_do_peopl#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. Weight Loss/Diet Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Wed, 19 Aug 2009 17:22:43 +0000 Nifer 9801 at http://www.eatingwell.com