The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/529/node/food_news_origins en Cooking Up a Healthier Lifestyle http://www.eatingwell.com/diet_health/diabetes/cooking_up_a_healthier_lifestyle <p>In his 17-year career as a professional chef, Dan M. was used to high pressure. Working seven-day weeks, and even 22-hour days, was par for the course—and he was known for his speedy knife skills. But when he was sidelined in 2000 with a workplace injury, the stresses began to mount. Unable to use his right arm (the one that had always held his knife), he wondered how he would provide for his wife and 1-year-old son; a year later, another son was born.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> <div class="field-item even"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A real-life profile. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/diet_health/diabetes/cooking_up_a_healthier_lifestyle#comments EatingWell Editors Joyce Hendley The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Wed, 06 Jun 2012 14:12:53 +0000 Penelope Wall 104646 at http://www.eatingwell.com Low- and No-Calorie Sweeteners http://www.eatingwell.com/diet_health/diabetes/low_and_no_calorie_sweeteners <p>The debates in the nutrition world about the value of low- and no-calorie sweeteners are often loud and raucous, but when the discussion turns to their role in diabetes, the conversations become much more harmonious. Let’s face it, the availability of something that makes food taste sweet, without contributing carbohydrate grams, can sometimes make life with diabetes a little easier. That said, there are still some important issues to keep in mind. </p> <p>Safety</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> <div class="field-item even"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> An EatingWell guide for diabetes. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/diet_health/diabetes/low_and_no_calorie_sweeteners#comments EatingWell Editors Joyce Hendley The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Wed, 06 Jun 2012 14:10:24 +0000 Penelope Wall 104645 at http://www.eatingwell.com Staying Healthy is a Family Affair http://www.eatingwell.com/diet_health/diabetes/staying_healthy_is_a_family_affair <p>When Dan was diagnosed three years ago with type 2 diabetes, he didn’t need to be educated much about the disease. He was already something of an expert, since both parents and a sister also had type 2. More important, he’d long had an ideal role model of how to live with diabetes—his wife, Sharlyn, who has had type 1 since she was 18 years old. “Following Sharlyn’s excellent lead makes it easier for me to follow my doctor’s suggestions,” says Dan.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> <div class="field-item even"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A real-life profile. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/diet_health/diabetes/staying_healthy_is_a_family_affair#comments EatingWell Editors Joyce Hendley The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Wed, 06 Jun 2012 14:06:04 +0000 Penelope Wall 104642 at http://www.eatingwell.com How to Say No to Food Pushers http://www.eatingwell.com/diet_health/diabetes/diabetes_how_to_say_no_to_food_pushers <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Tips for Real Life: How to spot—and deal with—saboteurs </div> </div> </div> <p>When you’re working hard to make healthy lifestyle changes, sometimes the people around you are a huge source of support and motivation. Sometimes, not so much. Maybe you have an aunt who brings you her famous banana bread when she visits—or a spouse who gets annoyed when you’d rather walk than watch TV after dinner. Food pushers probably aren't deliberately sabotaging you, so take a minute to help them understand your needs. Here are some ideas about how to talk about being a person with diabetes, and what that means for how you eat.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> <div class="field-item even"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Spotting and dealing with diet saboteurs. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="300" height="300" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/20456.jpg?1368542998" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/diet_health/diabetes/diabetes_how_to_say_no_to_food_pushers#comments EatingWell Editors Joyce Hendley The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Wed, 06 Jun 2012 14:01:59 +0000 Penelope Wall 104641 at http://www.eatingwell.com Divide and Conquer http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/divide_and_conquer <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="115" height="115" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/2482divided_plate_115.jpg?1250701342" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Getting started on eating better would be much easier if there were a simple, “big picture” image of what a sensible eating pattern looks like. One method is winning converts and praise across the board—perhaps because of its utter simplicity. Call it the “Divide Your Plate” strategy.</p> <p> * Imagine a dinner plate and divide it in half. Fill one half with vegetables and divide the other half into two quarters.<br /> * Fill one quarter with lean protein, such as fish, skinless poultry, lean beef, beans or tofu.<br /> * Fill the other quarter with a grain-based or starchy side dish, preferably a whole grain like brown rice, whole-wheat pasta or a slice of whole-grain bread.</p> <p>What this method lacks in precision it more than makes up for in good sense. If you focus on making most of your meals look this way, you’ll automatically be following sound nutrition guidelines and choosing appropriate portions—without having to pull out a nutrition guide or a measuring cup every time.</p> <p>Text adapted from The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (The Countryman Press, 2005)</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/divide_and_conquer#comments The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Wed, 19 Aug 2009 17:03:07 +0000 Nifer 9796 at http://www.eatingwell.com What a Portion Looks Like http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/what_a_portion_looks_like <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> <div class="field-item even"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Measure your intake for accuracy. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>* 1 teaspoon oil = Tip of your thumb<br /> * 1 tablespoon salad dressing = Your whole thumb<br /> * 2 tablespoons peanut butter = Ping-Pong ball<br /> * 1-2 ounces nuts = Your cupped hand<br /> * 11⁄2 ounces cheese = 9-volt battery<br /> * 1⁄2 cup cottage cheese = Tennis ball<br /> * 1 cup cereal = Baseball<br /> * 1 small baked potato = Computer mouse<br /> * 3-ounce serving of meat, fish or poultry = Cassette tape<br /> * 1 standard pancake or waffle = 4-inch DVD</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/what_a_portion_looks_like#comments EatingWell Editors Joyce Hendley The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Diabetic Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Diabetes Mon, 17 Aug 2009 20:22:59 +0000 Penelope Wall 9629 at http://www.eatingwell.com What About Sugar? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/what_about_sugar <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> <div class="field-item even"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A change in the guidelines for diabetes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Not so long ago, people with diabetes were told they had to avoid eating sugar altogether. If they wanted treats, they could only have artificially sweetened “diet” foods that often didn’t taste very good. Today’s guidelines let sugar be counted just like any other carbohydrate, acknowledging that it is the total carbohydrate that usually matters most in a meal plan, not the source.</p> <p>Keep in mind, though, that most foods containing sugar are usually low in other nutrients, so getting all your daily carbohydrate from, say, a can of regular soda or a brownie would be self-defeating. Moreover, most people with diabetes are watching their calories, and don’t have many to squander on something that isn’t going to give them any other nutritional “bang for the buck.” Better to consider sweets an occasional treat rather than a daily staple—and that goes for everyone, whether or not they have diabetes.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/what_about_sugar#comments EatingWell Editors Joyce Hendley The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Diabetic Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Diabetes Mon, 17 Aug 2009 20:20:37 +0000 Penelope Wall 9626 at http://www.eatingwell.com Types of Diabetes http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/types_of_diabetes <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> <div class="field-item even"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> What they are and the 5 risk factors to keep in mind. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <h3>Type 1</h3> <p>Five to 10 percent of people with diabetes fall into this category, which used to be called “juvenile diabetes” because it is most often diagnosed before age 30. However, type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, even in the elderly. People with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce their own insulin, so they must take insulin daily in order to survive. Given in injections or through a pump, the insulin doses are timed to correspond with food intake, so an eating plan is an essential part of treatment.</p> <h3>Type 2</h3> <p>Type 2 diabetes—by far the most common kind, accounting for nine out of ten American cases—is caused by a combination of problems. It usually begins as body cells become insulin resistant—less able to process insulin’s signals. But as long as the body can make enough insulin to overcome the resistance, blood-glucose levels remain normal. Eventually, however, the pancreas can’t produce enough insulin to overcome this resistance, and the problem becomes a deficiency in insulin. Even though insulin levels may still be higher than normal, the amount just isn’t enough to keep blood-glucose levels within a normal range. The longer a person has diabetes, the more likely it is that insufficient insulin is the cause of high blood-glucose levels.</p> <p>When type 2 diabetes is first diagnosed, many people can control their glucose by making and maintaining changes in their eating and physical activity. But diabetes is a progressive disease; over time, lifestyle changes need to be combined with medications, such as diabetes pills—and, eventually for many, insulin. When some people with diabetes reach this point, they may blame themselves, or feel as if they’ve “failed.” In fact, diabetes progression isn’t anyone’s fault, but rather the result of inheriting beta cells that fail over time. To keep the beta cells working longer, it’s important to keep blood-glucose levels as normal as possible by whatever means necessary.</p> <h3>Gestational Diabetes</h3> <p>This form of diabetes affects about 7 percent of all pregnant women in the U.S. It usually develops during the last part of a pregnancy, when hormonal changes can increase the body’s demand for insulin. It is generally treated with an eating plan and careful blood-glucose monitoring, to make sure both mother and infant are getting the nutrients they need. Most cases resolve once the baby is born, but women who have had gestational diabetes are at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Close to 40 percent of women who have had gestational diabetes eventually develop type 2 diabetes.</p> <h3>Prediabetes</h3> <p>Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they often have higher-than-normal blood-glucose levels, but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. An estimated 41 million people fit this “prediabetes” category. They have attracted lots of attention from diabetes researchers, and not just because of their numbers. Studies show that people with prediabetes can cut their risk of progressing to full-blown diabetes by at least half. How? By making small lifestyle changes, such as exercising regularly and losing just 5 to 10 percent of their body weight (for a 150-pound person, that’s 71⁄2 to 15 pounds). In one study, such changes were more powerful in lowering diabetes risk than a widely used diabetes drug!</p> <h3>5 Risk Factors for Diabetes</h3> <p>• Having a family history of diabetes<br /> • Being overweight<br /> • Being inactive<br /> • Having African, Native American, Hispanic or Asian/Pacific Islander heritage<br /> • Having a history of gestational diabetes, or having given birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/types_of_diabetes#comments EatingWell Editors Joyce Hendley The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Diabetic Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Diabetes Mon, 17 Aug 2009 20:17:12 +0000 Penelope Wall 9625 at http://www.eatingwell.com Profiles in Real Life: Dan M., New York, NY http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/profiles_in_real_life_dan_m_new_york_ny <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> <div class="field-item even"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cooking up a healthier lifestyle </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In his 17-year career as a professional chef, Dan M. was used to high pressure. Working seven-day weeks, and even 22-hour days, was par for the course—and he was known for his speedy knife skills. But when he was sidelined in 2000 with a workplace injury, the stresses began to mount. Unable to use his right arm (the one that had always held his knife), he wondered how he would provide for his wife and 1-year-old son; a year later, another son was born. In the meantime, he was diagnosed with Regional Stress Disorder, requiring several surgeries, including the insertion of a titanium rod in his right arm. “I was in a lot of pain and taking all kinds of medications,” he remembers.</p> <p>Throughout this stressful period, Dan turned to his one reliable source for comfort: food, in ample portions. “Fried foods, fast foods, and just big amounts of everything,” he recalls. “I’d go to a restaurant and have three slices of pizza, then an order of wings.” Soon, his weight rose to 235 pounds, on a 5-foot-8-inch frame.</p> <p>Then, on New Year’s Day 2002, Dan’s wife announced she was filing for divorce. In February, he found out he had type 2 diabetes. That double-punch, however, turned out to be a turning point.</p> <p>“It was my wake-up call,” says Dan. “My diabetes was definitely triggered by the stress in my life, but I couldn’t turn to food to help me anymore, because it was the problem. I had to embrace a healthier way of eating.” Working with a dietitian, he began what he calls a “relearning” process. “I had to learn how to eat just until I was comfortable and satisfied, but not full. I learned I could eat things in moderation.” And, though limited by his injuries in his ability to exercise, Dan also began regular workouts with an occupational therapist to restore his muscular and cardiovascular fitness. Today, he is closing in on his weight goal of 180 pounds and, at least for now, has been able to stop taking metformin.</p> <p>Dan’s outlook has changed, too. Instead of feeling frustrated that he can no longer do the lightning-fast slicing and dicing that used to be his trademark, he has refocused his creative energies on advising other chefs. “I help them create the highest-quality, healthier versions of their recipes,” he explains. Whether he’s grinding portobello mushrooms to give “meaty” richness to marinara sauce, or pureeing a microwaved apple to moisten a peerless banana bread, he summons his many years in restaurant kitchens as well as his experience as someone with diabetes.</p> <p>Dan also relishes his role as custodial parent of his two young boys, who benefit from their dad’s nutrition and culinary expertise. They’re also learning a powerful life lesson from someone who didn’t let diabetes stop him from doing the work he loves. “With diabetes, you’re only limited by your imagination,” says Dan. “You don’t have to give up on your goals, you just have to take charge.”</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/profiles_in_real_life_dan_m_new_york_ny#comments EatingWell Editors Joyce Hendley The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Diabetic Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Diabetes Mon, 17 Aug 2009 20:14:32 +0000 Penelope Wall 9624 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Myth of the Diabetic Diet http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/the_myth_of_the_diabetic_diet <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> <div class="field-item even"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Recipes for success. </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/diabetic_diet">Diabetic Diet Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>It’s time to debunk, once and for all, the myth of the “diabetic diet.” If you have diabetes or if you want to avoid getting it, you don’t have to eat special foods, and you don’t have to be excluded from what “everyone else” is eating. The truth is, everyone else should be taking their cue from what’s on your plate.</p> <p>Eating well, from a diabetes perspective, means:</p> <p> * selecting a variety of foods in sensible portions<br /> * considering no food either a magic bullet or a forbidden fruit<br /> * choosing whole foods over processed ones as often as possible<br /> * embracing plant foods like vegetables, fruits, beans and whole grains<br /> * including low-fat dairy products, fish and shellfish, lean meats and poultry, with optional lean red meat and sweet treats in moderation<br /> * relying on seasoning and cooking dishes with olive oil and the other “good fats” that make food tastier and more satisfying, while at the same time keeping a watchful eye on saturated fat and trans fat.</p> <p>But most of all, eating well means eating with pleasure—in a relaxed and friendly environment whenever possible. As delicious as that way of eating sounds, it is also one of the most powerful weapons in the diabetes-fighting arsenal. Eating wisely and well can help bring diabetes under control, even as effectively as diabetes drugs. That’s why eating guidelines are an essential part—and occasionally, the only part—of any initial diabetes treatment plan.</p> <p>As the <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/collections/diabetic_diet">recipes designated for diabetes</a> illustrate, enlightened cooks concerned about diabetes can serve dishes their friends and anyone in their family will wholeheartedly enjoy, dishes they can bring to potluck dinners and present with confidence at holiday celebrations. Today, anyone expecting strict rules and special meals for a “diabetic diet” will be disappointed—then delighted. Enjoy every bite.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/the_myth_of_the_diabetic_diet#comments EatingWell Editors Joyce Hendley The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Diabetic Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Diabetes Mon, 17 Aug 2009 20:05:03 +0000 Penelope Wall 9622 at http://www.eatingwell.com Divide and Conquer http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/divide_and_conquer <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> <div class="field-item even"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The &quot;Divide Your Plate&quot; strategy </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Getting started on eating better would be much easier if there were a simple, “big picture” image of what a sensible eating pattern looks like. One method is winning converts and praise across the board—perhaps because of its utter simplicity. Call it the “Divide Your Plate” strategy.</p> <ul> <li>Imagine a dinner plate and divide it in half. Fill one half with vegetables and divide the other half into two quarters.</li> <li>Fill one quarter with lean protein, such as fish, skinless poultry, lean beef, beans or tofu.</li> <li> Fill the other quarter with a grain-based or starchy side dish, preferably a whole grain like brown rice, whole-wheat pasta or a slice of whole-grain bread.</li> </ul> <p>What this method lacks in precision it more than makes up for in good sense. If you focus on making most of your meals look this way, you’ll automatically be following sound nutrition guidelines and choosing appropriate portions—without having to pull out a nutrition guide or a measuring cup every time.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/divide_and_conquer#comments EatingWell Editors Joyce Hendley The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Diabetic Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Diabetes Mon, 17 Aug 2009 19:59:25 +0000 Penelope Wall 9621 at http://www.eatingwell.com Diabetes 101: Essential Facts http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/diabetes_101_essential_facts <p>To get an understanding of diabetes, it’s helpful to know what happens when you eat, say, an apple. Through digestion, your body breaks down the apple into usable components that travel in your blood. One of these components is glucose, a form of sugar your body’s cells need for fuel. But to get into most of your cells, glucose requires an escort: insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas. Think of insulin as the “key” that unlocks the door to your cells to allow glucose inside.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> <div class="field-item even"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How insulin regulates glucose. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More from EatingWell: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/diabetic_diet_center">Diabetic Diet Center</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans/7_day_diabetes_meal_plan">7-Day Diabetes Meal Plan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>To get an understanding of diabetes, it’s helpful to know what happens when you eat, say, an apple. Through digestion, your body breaks down the apple into usable components that travel in your blood. One of these components is glucose, a form of sugar your body’s cells need for fuel. But to get into most of your cells, glucose requires an escort: insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas. Think of insulin as the “key” that unlocks the door to your cells to allow glucose inside.</p> <p>When all is well, beta cells in your pancreas make the correct amount of insulin whenever your blood-glucose level rises—usually after a meal—so that the glucose can get to where it’s needed. But with diabetes, your body can’t make enough insulin, or becomes less able to use the insulin you do make. The result? Glucose stays in the bloodstream rather than getting into the cells where it belongs, and the glucose level builds up in your blood. This condition is known as hyperglycemia, or high blood glucose.</p> <h3>The Immediate Effects</h3> <p>When there’s too much glucose in your blood, your body tries to compensate by drawing fluid into the blood from the tissues to dilute the concentration. This loss of fluid can cause you to become dehydrated and to feel extremely thirsty—one of the hallmark symptoms of diabetes. You might also feel terribly hungry, as your body isn’t able to get enough fuel from what it eats; unplanned weight loss is a frequent result.</p> <p>The problems multiply when the glucose-rich blood reaches your kidneys, whose job it is to filter out waste products and produce urine. With a higher volume of blood—and so much glucose to process—the kidneys become overwhelmed and the excess glucose “spills out” into your urine. This series of events explains why diabetes can cause you to urinate more often, and why your urine will contain excess sugar. (The phenomenon of sweet urine, in fact, is what gives diabetes its full name, diabetes mellitus—Latin for “honey.”)</p> <p>All these symptoms are more pronounced if you have type 1 diabetes (often called “juvenile diabetes”), since the beta cells in your pancreas make little or no insulin. If you have type 2 diabetes (often called “adult-onset diabetes”), the symptoms may be more subtle, since you still have some insulin available—but that means diabetes is more likely to be causing problems without you being aware of them. That’s why as many as one-third of people with diabetes may not even know they have it.</p> <h3>Longer-Term Effects</h3> <p>If diabetes isn’t diagnosed and treated to bring blood-glucose levels under control, the long-term consequences can be serious indeed. Many of these problems are related to the body’s circulation system, as glucose-heavy blood moves through blood vessels, damaging them. Most troubling is a significant increase in the risk of heart disease—already the country’s number one killer—as well as a higher chance of developing high blood pressure or strokes. Other eventualities of uncontrolled diabetes include blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and such poor circulation that limb amputation may be necessary.</p> <p>These possibilities are frightening, but there are positive actions you can take. If you stay on top of your diabetes treatment plan to manage your blood glucose as well as your blood fat and blood-pressure levels, you can cut your risks of many complications—or even avoid them altogether. And, with today’s many treatment options, that’s a reasonable goal.</p> <p>If you are following a weight-loss program, a small amount of ketones in your blood or urine might be okay, since your body is burning up some of its fat stores. Slightly elevated ketones may simply mean you’ve gone too long without eating something. But high blood glucose and high ketones are a warning sign that your diabetes isn’t under good control. If not treated immediately with insulin, the ketone buildup can progress to a dangerous condition called diabetic ketoacidosis, and even diabetic coma. Your diabetes care plan should include guidelines for monitoring your ketones—either by testing your blood for ketones or by dipping a test strip into your urine.</p> <h3>What Causes Diabetes?</h3> <p>It’s certainly true that you can inherit a tendency toward developing diabetes—that’s one reason why it tends to run in families. Type 2 diabetes is also more common in people who belong to certain ethnic groups. But genetics apparently aren’t the whole story, since many people who are predisposed to developing diabetes never do. And the incidence of type 2 diabetes, once considered a disease of adults, has climbed dramatically in the last 30 years among adults and children, even though our collective gene pool hasn’t changed. Clearly, the environment in which we live plays a critical role—and that environment, experts say, has made it much easier to develop diabetes by making it all too easy to become overweight.</p> <p>Call it the flip side of affluence: in recent decades food has become cheaper, more abundant and always within reach, while at the same time, computerization of our work and leisure time gives us fewer reasons to move our bodies. As a result, we’re eating more, and moving less, than ever: at last count, Americans’ average food intake had increased by about 150 calories per day, and around one in five adults reported getting little or no physical activity. At 3,500 calories per pound, these extra daily calories can result in a gain of 15 pounds per year! Many experts fault this so-called “obesigenic” environment for the finding that nearly two-thirds of American adults are now classified as overweight or obese.</p> <p>Since both overweight and lack of exercise are key risk factors for developing diabetes, it’s not surprising that the prevalence of diabetes has grown alarmingly, along with the obesity rate. Both have become epidemics.</p> <h3>Bottom Line: It’s a Way of Life</h3> <p>If lifestyles can pave the way to developing diabetes, they are also some of our best means for fighting back. For many people with diabetes, lifestyle changes make all the difference. Eating better and being more physically active can have major effects on your blood-glucose levels. Staying on top of diabetes, then, is all about living well. By following healthy eating guidelines and making regular activity a part of your life, by taking medications or insulin as prescribed and by staying in touch with your diabetes care team, you are taking an active role in managing your diabetes, rather than letting it manage you.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/diabetes_101_essential_facts#comments EatingWell Editors Joyce Hendley The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Diabetic Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Diabetes Mon, 17 Aug 2009 19:56:25 +0000 Penelope Wall 9620 at http://www.eatingwell.com 5 Simple Ways to Eat More Fiber http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/5_simple_ways_to_eat_more_fiber <p>Eating enough fiber is important for helping to prevent chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease and certain types of cancer. Research also suggests that consuming fiber-rich foods might boost weight loss by helping you to feel fuller after you eat. But most of us eat only about half as much fiber as we should. Nutrition guidelines recommend 25 to 38 grams per day; the average American consumes only about 14 grams. It’s not hard to boost your fiber intake. Do it easily with these 5 simple tips. </p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Try these easy tips for getting more fiber into your diet. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/bowl_of_fruit_630.jpg?1281377312" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/fruit_bowl_310_1.jpg?1261068191" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy High Fiber Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/grab_go_high_fiber_breakfasts">Grab &amp; Go High-Fiber Breakfasts</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/high_fiber_whole_grain_recipes">High-Fiber Whole-Grain Recipes </a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/fiber_rich_recipes_to_help_you_lose_weight">Fiber-Rich Recipes to Help You Lose Weight</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Read nutrition labels</strong> and choose foods with the highest dietary-fiber numbers.</p> <p><strong>Eat your vegetables, and then some.</strong> Forget “five-a-day”; many nutrition experts suggest aiming much higher. Aim for making vegetables—preferably fiber-rich types like greens and broccoli— a part of every meal and snack.</p> <p><strong>Eat, rather than drink, your fruits and vegetables.</strong> When either are processed to make juice, most of the beneficial fiber is left behind.</p> <p><strong>Don’t peel edible skins from fruits and vegetables</strong>, when possible. To avoid pesticide residues, wash skins thoroughly before eating, and opt for organic varieties when you can.</p> <p><strong>Become a frequent eater of beans, lentils and split peas.</strong> They’re filling, fiber-rich and cheap—and, if canned, convenient (just rinse them in a colander before using, to wash away excess sodium).</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/5_simple_ways_to_eat_more_fiber#comments EatingWell Editors The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Diabetic Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Diabetes Mon, 17 Aug 2009 18:22:09 +0000 Penelope Wall 9611 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Divided Plate http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_techniques/the_divided_plate <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> What does a healthy eating pattern look like? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>One simple formula is the "Divide Your Plate" strategy:</p> <ul> <li>Imagine a dinner plate and divide it in half.</li> <li>Fill one half with vegetables.</li> <li>Fill one quarter with lean protein, such as fish, skinless poultry, lean beef, beans or tofu.</li> <li>Fill the other quarter with a grain-based or starchy side dish, preferably a whole grain like brown rice, whole-wheat pasta or a slice of whole-grain bread.</li> </ul> <p>What this method lacks in precision, it more than makes up for in good sense. If you focus on making most of your meals look this way, you’ll automatically follow sound nutrition guidelines and choose appropriate portions without having to pull out a nutrition guide or a measuring cup.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_techniques/the_divided_plate#comments EatingWell Editors The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Healthy Cooking - Healthy Cooking 101: Basics & Techniques Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:34:13 +0000 Paula Joslin 9584 at http://www.eatingwell.com Eating to Manage Diabetes http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/eating_to_manage_diabetes <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Basics of Carbohydrate Counting and Exchanges </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>We all eat to live (and, indeed, live to eat), but for someone with diabetes, that adage isn’t just academic. It’s a matter of staying well and living longer. Because diabetes is a disorder in how your body processes foods, every choice you make to eat or drink is important. The benefits of eating well are powerful, helping to keep your blood glucose, blood fats and blood-pressure levels under control and helping prevent complications of diabetes. Most of all, eating right helps you feel in control.</p> <p>But that doesn’t mean eating has to be like taking medicine. Eating is one of life’s most fundamental pleasures, and it’s part of our social fabric. Food plays a central role in family celebrations, holidays and business deals; special foods are part of the traditions that define us. Food shouldn’t lose all that importance just because you have diabetes.</p> <p>For the most part, eating to manage diabetes means eating with your eyes open—knowing what’s going into your body and when. That means planning for, and keeping track of, your meals.</p> <p>Ideally, you’ll work with a dietitian or diabetes educator to determine an eating plan that works with your schedule and your needs. You’ll likely use one of two methods: Carbohydrate Counting or the Exchange System.</p> <h3>The Exchange System</h3> <p>Used in diabetes management for over 50 years, this method groups together foods that have roughly the same amounts of calories, carbohydrate, fat and protein into “Exchange” groups, so that one may be exchanged for another. One exchange in the “Starch” group, for instance, could be a 6-inch corn tortilla or 1⁄2 cup of green peas or 1⁄3 cup of pasta; an exchange in the “Lean Meats” group could be an ounce of tuna or lean pork. If you’re following the Exchange System, you’ll work with a dietitian to plan out your daily meal pattern: which exchanges to include in each meal and how many.<br /> Carbohydrate Counting</p> <p>For most people with diabetes, Carbohydrate Counting is a more flexible and simple alternative to the Exchange System. It centers on keeping a count of the carbohydrate you take in at each meal, aiming to stay within a predetermined daily range. Carbohydrate is measured in terms of Carbohydrate Servings (see below), or in grams.</p> <p>No matter which system you use to plan and track your eating, you’ll be staying on top of the amount of carbohydrate you consume, trying to keep it consistent throughout the day, and from one day to the next. That’s because of all the nutrients we eat—protein, carbohydrate and fat—carbohydrate affects blood-glucose levels the most.</p> <p>But that doesn’t mean you must avoid carbohydrate altogether. That’s nearly impossible—and dangerous. Even with diabetes, some carbohydrate is vital to maintain a steady supply of glucose to cells in the body, particularly to the brain, for fuel. The brain needs about 130 grams of glucose from carbohydrate each day (about 9 Carbohydrate Servings) to function well. And carbohydrate-containing foods are important sources of vitamins, minerals and fiber. Today’s nutrition guidelines recognize that people with diabetes need a wide variety of foods to stay healthy, and most recommend that people get about half their daily calories from carbohydrate.</p> <p>There are two different forms of carbohydrate—sugars and starches—but both are made up of the same building blocks: sugar molecules. What we call “sugars” are simply short chains of sugar molecules, while “starches” are longer chains of sugar molecules. When you eat a carbohydrate-containing food, no matter where it comes from, the process of digestion breaks down those sugar molecules into glucose—the form your body can use.</p> <p>Carbohydrate is found chiefly in plant-based foods, such as grains, fruits and vegetables, and in sweets, as well as in dairy foods like milk and yogurt. These are the kinds of foods you’ll be monitoring closely if you are Carbohydrate Counting.</p> <h3>Basics of Carbohydrate Counting</h3> <p>The goal of Carbohydrate Counting is to make sure you’re eating a fairly consistent amount of carbohydrate each day, in a similar pattern. You can do this in either of the following ways:</p> <p><strong>Count Carbohydrate Grams.</strong> You aim for a specific amount of carbohydrate grams at each meal—say, 30 grams at breakfast, 45 grams at lunch and 60 grams at dinner. You track your carbohydrate through the day by keeping a running total.</p> <p><strong>Count Carbohydrate Servings.</strong> You track carbohydrate by thinking of it in terms of portions of foods. One Carbohydrate Serving, sometimes called a “Carbohydrate Choice,” is a portion of food that contains 15 grams of carbohydrate—about the amount in a small potato, a slice of bread or a medium apple. You aim for a predetermined amount of Carbohydrate Servings at each meal, typically, 3 to 5 Carbohydrate Servings at main meals and 1 to 2 Carbohydrate Servings for snacks. For most people, the daily total number of Carbohydrate Servings will be about 12 (for a 1,500 calorie/day plan) or 16 (for a 2,000 calorie/day plan).</p> <p>With either system, you’ll need to know the carbohydrate content of a food first. Your diabetes specialist can provide you with food lists to get you started. As you become more familiar with standard portions, you’ll be able to estimate the carbohydrate of more complex foods, like pizza. Recipes with nutrition information, like those in this book, are a good source of carbohydrate amounts. On packaged foods, such information is on the nutrition label: First, check the food’s “Serving Size,” then look for the “Total Carbohydrate” value in grams. The “Dietary Fiber” listing is also important. The higher the better, as explained with the <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/carbohydrate_servings_calculator">Carbohydrate-Servings Calculator</a>.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/eating_to_manage_diabetes#comments EatingWell Editors The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005) Diabetic Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Diabetes Thu, 13 Aug 2009 21:36:27 +0000 Penelope Wall 9508 at http://www.eatingwell.com