EatingWell In Season: The Farmers&#039; Market Cookbook (2009) http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/522/all en 3 Easy Ways to Balance Your Diet http://www.eatingwell.com/diet_nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/3_easy_ways_to_balance_your_di <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Balance Your Diet </div> </div> </div> <p>Vegetables and fruits form the foundation of a healthy diet. But you can&rsquo;t live on produce alone. To get all your essential nutrients, you&rsquo;ll also need to eat whole grains, lean protein (fish, lean meat, beans or low-fat dairy foods) and healthy fats, including nuts and olive oil. How much do you need? Balance your diet in three easy steps.</p> <h3>1. Divide your plate.</h3> <p>Does your plate look more like A or B? </p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Simple tips for healthy eating every day. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/divided_plate_630.jpg?1275937436" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/divided_plate_310_1.jpg?1275937449" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell In Season: The Farmers&#039; Market Cookbook (2009) </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Healthy Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/recipes_fresh_from_the_farmers_market">Recipes Fresh from the Farmers’ Market</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/recipes_from_the_mediterranean_diet">Recipes from the Mediterranean Diet </a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/side_dish_recipes_for_whole_grains">Side Dish Recipes for Whole Grains</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/low_calorie_dinners_packed_with_produce">Low-Calorie Dinners Packed with Produce </a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/seasonal_recipes">Seasonal Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans">Diet Meal Plans</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/green_choices_produce_buyer_s_guide">Green Choices: Produce Buyer’s Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/the_eatingwell_diet/7_ways_to_size_down_your_portions">7 Ways to Size Down Your Portions</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/eatingwell_in_season">EatingWell in Season</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/diet_nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/3_easy_ways_to_balance_your_di#comments EatingWell Editors EatingWell In Season: The Farmers' Market Cookbook (2009) Recipes & Menus - Eat More Vegetables Challenge Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Mon, 07 Jun 2010 18:59:32 +0000 Penelope Wall 15920 at http://www.eatingwell.com Eating Well by Color http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/eatingwell_in_season/eating_well_by_color <p>Did you know that you can get what your body needs just by eating a colorful variety of fruits and vegetables? Nature has found a clever way to highlight the nutrients in foods: different nutrients actually impart different colors to the foods they’re in.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A simple way to load up on nature’s superfoods. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/color_wheel_2_630.jpg?1278533072" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/color_wheel_cropped.jpg?1299004602" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/color_wheel_310.jpg?1252961929" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell In Season: The Farmers&#039; Market Cookbook (2009) </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes &amp; Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/recipes_fresh_from_the_farmers_market">Recipes Fresh from the Farmers’ Market</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/foods_for_beautiful_skin">Foods for Beautiful Skin</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/recipes_for_better_vision">Recipes for Better Vision</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/7_anti_aging_superfoods">7 Anti-Aging Superfoods</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_antioxidant_recipes">Healthy Antioxidant Rich Recipes and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/organic_natural/dirty_dozen_plus_14_foods_you_should_buy_organic">The Dirty Dozen Plus: 14 Foods You Should Buy Organic</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/eatingwell_in_season/eating_well_by_color#comments EatingWell Editors EatingWell In Season: The Farmers' Market Cookbook (2009) Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Mon, 14 Sep 2009 20:49:55 +0000 Penelope Wall 14953 at http://www.eatingwell.com Meet the Farmers http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/meet_the_farmers <h3><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/meet_the_farmer_california_asparagus_farmer_fairvie">Spring: California asparagus farmer Fairview Gardens</a></h3> <h4> One of California’s oldest organic farms raises a traditional crop of white asparagus.</h4> <p>Fifty years ago, the rich seaside plains west of Goleta, 10 miles outside Santa Barbara, were planted with fields, orange and avocado groves. Today, much of the surrounding landscape has been paved or built upon.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Four seasons, four farmers you need to know. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell In Season: The Farmers&#039; Market Cookbook (2009) </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/meet_the_farmer_vermont_greens_grower_pete_johnson">Meet the farmer: Vermont greens grower Pete Johnson</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/meet_the_farmer_california_asparagus_farmer_fairvie">Outstanding Asparagus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/meet_the_farmer_hawaii_pineapple_farmer_ken_love">Meet the Farmer: Hawaii Pineapple Farmer Ken Love</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_travel/sweet_georgia_peaches">Sweet Georgia Peaches</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Spring: California asparagus farmer Fairview Gardens</strong><br /> One of California’s oldest organic farms raises a traditional crop of white asparagus.</p> <p>Fifty years ago, the rich seaside plains west of Goleta, 10 miles outside Santa Barbara, were planted with fields, orange and avocado groves. Today, much of the surrounding landscape has been paved or built upon.</p> <p>But a 12-acre oasis remains. Established in 1895, Fairview Gardens is one of California’s oldest organic farms and serves as a reminder of the way things were and an example of what’s still possible. Read More »</p> <p><strong>Summer: Georgia peach grower Pearson Farm</strong><br /> Picked fresh, this luscious fruit brings a taste of summer to the table.</p> <p>You have never been hot until you’ve been peach picking in the middle of a Georgia summer. Rumor has it that hell is cooler. Still, in the midst of picking, we’d take a break, rub the downy fuzz off on our shirts and bite into the ripest peaches, the sweet juices running down our arms, each mouthful more precious than gold.</p> <p>I grew up in the heart of Georgia’s peach country and my favorite farmers are the Pearsons, a family that has grown peaches around Fort Valley since Moses Winlock Pearson planted the first trees over a century ago. Read More »</p> <p><strong>Fall: Vermont greens grower Pete Johnson</strong><br /> In northern Vermont, Pete Johnson has figured out how to work with the seasons.</p> <p>At an age when most toddlers were playing with blocks, Pete Johnson was pushing around earth in his parents’ plot in Vermont. “I always picked up soil,” he remembers, “and smelled it, felt it, rolled it in my hands.” As a teenager, he experimented with hand-made greenhouses, watching most of them blow away or collapse under snow. “By the time I was 14,” he says, “I remember thinking that I was going to be a farmer.” Read More »</p> <p><strong>Winter: Hawaii pineapple farmer Ken Love</strong><br /> Ken Love cultivates his passion for pineapple on Hawaii’s Big Island.</p> <p>At Love Family Farms, on the Big Island of Hawaii, Ken Love has been growing pineapple and other tropical fruit for nearly 30 years. Middle-aged, tall, with thinning hair, he wears big aloha shirts and an even bigger grin. Read More »</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/meet_the_farmers#comments EatingWell Editors EatingWell In Season: The Farmers' Market Cookbook (2009) Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:38:42 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9957 at http://www.eatingwell.com Meet the farmer: Vermont greens grower Pete Johnson http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/meet_the_farmer_vermont_greens_grower_pete_johnson <p>At an age when most toddlers were playing with blocks, Pete Johnson was pushing around earth in his parents’ plot in Vermont. “I always picked up soil,” he remembers, “and smelled it, felt it, rolled it in my hands.” As a teenager, he experimented with hand-made greenhouses, watching most of them blow away or collapse under snow. “By the time I was 14,” he says, “I remember thinking that I was going to be a farmer.”</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Mark Aiken </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> In northern Vermont, Pete Johnson has figured out how to work with the seasons. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/petes_greens_310_0.jpg?1251400414" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell In Season: The Farmers&#039; Market Cookbook (2009) </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>At an age when most toddlers were playing with blocks, Pete Johnson was pushing around earth in his parents’ plot in Vermont. “I always picked up soil,” he remembers, “and smelled it, felt it, rolled it in my hands.” As a teenager, he experimented with hand-made greenhouses, watching most of them blow away or collapse under snow. “By the time I was 14,” he says, “I remember thinking that I was going to be a farmer.”</p> <p>Fast-forward two decades—Pete Johnson’s hands are still in the dirt. Johnson, now 36, owns and operates Pete’s Greens, a 230-acre farm in rural northern Vermont. He sells organic produce at a seasonal farmstand and through a CSA program to over 250 members. His greens are featured on the menus of acclaimed restaurants from Vermont to Boston to New York City.</p> <p>“So much,” says Johnson, “depends on your soil.” He extensively composts his fields to build a base of nutrients. He cover crops—that is, he rotates nutrient-recycling and soil-protecting crops in with his actively producing plants—as a sustainable way to increase and maintain his soil’s fertility. Why the emphasis on his soil? Because produce from small organic farms should be more flavorful and more packed with nutrients. “When I eat food that was grown in lively soil—soil with nutrients that really feed the plants—I can taste the difference,” he says. Most of all, says Johnson, “I can care for every foot of soil in a way that just isn’t possible on a large operation.”</p> <p>Johnson has to maximize his growing seasons. To protect crops, he designed four innovative 7,000-square-foot greenhouses that slide on metal tracks. He can now plant tomatoes in March or April under cover of one of the structures while frost and snow still cover the ground outside. After harvesting tomatoes in August, he’ll slide the structure over his signature crops—his greens, such as chard, parsley and kale—which will allow him to harvest into December. Meanwhile, the elements will cleanse the newly uncovered soil he holds so dear, and cool temperatures will rid it of the pests that often plague stationary greenhouses.</p> <p>While Johnson would probably love to grow year-round, his greenhouses are not heated and he isn’t trying to completely defy the northern seasons. “Glory in the limitations of the seasons,” he says, “and fully exhaust what each season has to offer.” Eat it while it’s fresh, and pine for it when it’s not. It will taste that much better when it comes around again next year.</p> <p>Pete’s Greens at Craftsbury Village Farm<br /> Craftsbury, Vermont<br /> (802) 586-2882<br /> petesgreens.com</p> <p><em>-Mark Aiken</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/meet_the_farmer_vermont_greens_grower_pete_johnson#comments Mark Aiken EatingWell In Season: The Farmers' Market Cookbook (2009) Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:34:46 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9955 at http://www.eatingwell.com 5 Ways to Eat Local Beyond the Farmers' Market http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/eatingwell_in_season/5_ways_to_eat_local_beyond_the_farmers_market <p><strong>1. Join a CSA</strong></p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Support your community and reap the harvest with these ideas for going local. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/greens_basket_310.jpg?1261600991" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/greens_growing_310.jpg?1282591486" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell In Season: The Farmers&#039; Market Cookbook (2009) </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes in Season </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/quick_summer_dinners">Quick Summer Dinners</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_summer_recipes">Healthy Summer Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/easy_spring_dinners">Easy Spring Dinners</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_fall_recipes">Healthy Fall Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_winter_recipes">Healthy Winter Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Ways to Eat Local </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/container_gardening_with_salad_greens">Container Gardening with Salad Greens</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/your_kitchen_garden">Tips for Growing a Kitchen Garden</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/americas_top_farmers_markets">America&#039;s Top Farmers&#039; Markets</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/7_reasons_to_eat_and_cook_from_the_farmers_market">7 Reasons to Eat and Cook from the Farmers&#039; Market</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions">Renewing America&#039;s Food Traditions</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/truck_farm_unusual_urban_garden_project">Truck Farm: Unusual Urban Garden Project</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>1. Join a CSA</strong></p> <p>If you like to cook and like to try new foods, get a community supported agriculture (CSA) share from a local farm. You pay up front, which helps the farmer pay for early-season costs in exchange for farm-fresh produce each week. Typically pick-ups are at the farm or a central location like a local business. If you work for a large company and your fellow employees are interested as well, ask if the farm will do a workplace drop-off. Before you commit, ask about the amount of produce to expect in a typical pick-up to see if it’s manageable. You may also find you get produce you’re not familiar with (rutabaga, anyone?). But that provides a great opportunity to get ideas from your farmer and other CSA members. And, of course, the recipes in this book will inspire you as well.</p> <p><em>Find a CSA near you at localharvest.org or ask farmers at the market if they have CSA shares.</em></p> <p><strong>2. Buy the Cow</strong></p> <p>Don’t just buy a burger, buy the cow—or a pig or a lamb. Small farms are increasingly selling “animal shares”: a whole animal or portion of one. The farm takes care of processing, USDA inspection and packaging. Buying an animal is a great way to save money if you are committed to eating locally raised meat, as prices are lower per pound (usually $3 to $5, depending on type of animal and how much you’re buying). Make sure you have adequate freezer space before purchasing an animal. If the amount of meat seems daunting, ask friends or family to go in on a share with you.</p> <p><em>Find a local farm where you can buy meat direct at localharvest.org or check your local classified ads.</em></p> <p><strong>3. Start a Kitchen Garden</strong></p> <p>A kitchen garden is a great way to supplement your trips to the grocery store. Whether you grow a pot of herbs on your windowsill or replace a bed of flowers with dark leafy greens, your kitchen garden will inspire you to celebrate fresh flavors. Start by making a list of foods, focusing on crops that you can’t always buy fresh. Lettuce is easy to sow and quick to grow. Fresh herbs pack lively flavors, and edible flowers serve as pretty garnishes. Plant your seeds in rich, organic soil supplemented with organic compost, usually found at garden centers, to give plants a boost. Mail-order seed sources offer a wide selection, or go to local nurseries for heirloom tomatoes and ornamental edibles, such as rainbow chard and Tuscan kale.</p> <p><em>Learn how to start a successful garden at gardeners.com or seedsofchange.com.</em></p> <p><strong>4. Join a Community Garden</strong></p> <p>If you want to garden but don’t have space where you live, get involved in a community garden. A community garden can be as small as a simple bed next to a building or an acre of land in a park. The garden may be divvied into small plots, each worked by an individual. Other gardens are worked collectively and all involved share the bounty.</p> <p><em>To start your own community garden, go to communitygarden.org.</em></p> <p><strong>5. Pick Your Own</strong></p> <p>Enjoy the sunshine while gathering berries, apples or citrus fruit at a local pick-your-own farm. Some farms even give you the opportunity to dig potatoes or cut flowers. Freeze extra berries and stone fruit or try making freezer jam. Both are great ways to enjoy summer-ripe fruit all year long.</p> <p><em>Find a you-pick farm near you at pickyourown.org.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/eatingwell_in_season/5_ways_to_eat_local_beyond_the_farmers_market#comments EatingWell Editors EatingWell In Season: The Farmers' Market Cookbook (2009) Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Thu, 20 Aug 2009 17:48:16 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9929 at http://www.eatingwell.com Organic—or Not? Is Organic Produce Healthier Than Conventional? http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/organic_or_not_is_organic_produce_healthier_than_conventional <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/apples_3_310_0.jpg?1266356695" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/grapes_on_burgandy_310.jpg?1260812166" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/apple_picking_310_0.jpg?1253658693" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Organic—or Not? Is organic produce healthier than conventional?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>There are at least two good arguments for eating organic: fewer pesticides and <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrient_library">more nutrients</a>. Let’s start with pesticides. Pesticides can be absorbed into fruits and vegetables, and leave trace residues. The Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, pored over the results of nearly 51,000 USDA and FDA tests for pesticides on 44 popular produce items and identified the types of fruits and vegetables that were most likely to have higher trace amounts. Most people have no problems eating conventionally grown produce but if you feel strongly about pesticide residues, the EWG’s list below should help you shop.</p> <p>As for nutrients, in 2007 a study out of Newcastle University in the United Kingdom reported that organic produce boasted up to 40 percent higher levels of some nutrients (including vitamin C, zinc and iron) than its conventional counterparts. Additionally, a 2003 study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that organically grown berries and corn contained 58 percent more polyphenols—antioxidants that help prevent cardiovascular disease—and up to 52 percent higher levels of vitamin C than those conventionally grown. Recent research by that study’s lead author, Alyson Mitchell, Ph.D., an associate professor of food science and technology at the University of California, Davis, pinpoints a potential mechanism to explain why organic techniques may sometimes yield superior produce.</p> <p>It’s a difference in soil fertility, says Mitchell: “With organic methods, the nitrogen present in composted soil is released slowly and therefore plants grow at a normal rate, with their nutrients in balance. Vegetables fertilized with conventional fertilizers grow very rapidly and allocate less energy to develop nutrients.” Buying conventional produce from local farmers also has benefits. Nutrient values in produce peak at prime ripeness, just after harvest. As a general rule, the less produce has to travel, the fresher and more nutrient-rich it remains. </p> <p>A 2008 review by the Organic Center of almost 100 studies on the nutritional quality of organic produce compared the effects conventional and organic farming methods have on specific nutrients. The report’s conclusion: “Yes, organic plant-based foods are, on average, more nutritious.” </p> <p><strong>Bottom line:</strong> “Eating more fresh fruits and vegetables in general is the point,” says Mitchell. If buying all organic isn’t a priority—or a financial reality for you—you might opt to buy organic specifically when you’re selecting foods that are most heavily contaminated with pesticide and insecticide residues. See next page for a handy chart for common fruits and vegetables.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="vertical-align:text-top"> <h3>Preferably Organic<br /> &mdash;Most Commonly Contaminated*</h3> </td> <td style="vertical-align:text-top"> <h3>If Budget Allows, Buy Organic</h3> </td> <td style="vertical-align:text-top"> <h3>It&rsquo;s Your Call<br /> &mdash;Least Commonly Contaminated</h3> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="vertical-align:text-top"> <ul> <li>Apples</li> <li>Celery</li> <li>Strawberries</li> <li>Peaches</li> <li>Spinach</li> <li>Nectarines</li> <li>Grapes</li> <li>Sweet Bell Peppers</li> <li>Potatoes</li> <li>Blueberries</li> <li>Lettuce</li> <li>Kale/Collard Greens</li> </ul> </td> <td style="vertical-align:text-top"> <ul> <li>Green Beans</li> <li>Summer Squash</li> <li>Peppers</li> <li>Cucumbers</li> <li>Raspberries<br /> </li> <li>Grapes - Domestic</li> <li>Plums<br /> </li> <li>Oranges</li> <li>Cauliflower</li> <li>Tangerines</li> <li>Bananas</li> <li>Winter Squash</li> <li>Cranberries</li> </ul> </td> <td style="vertical-align:text-top"> <ul> <li>Onions</li> <li>Sweet Corn</li> <li>Pineapples</li> <li>Avocado</li> <li>Asparagus</li> <li>Sweet Peas</li> <li>Mangoes</li> <li>Eggplant</li> <li>Cantaloupe</li> <li>Kiwi</li> <li>Cabbage</li> <li>Watermelon</li> <li>Sweet Potato</li> <li>Grapefruit</li> <li>Mushrooms</li> </ul> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="3"><p><em>*Listed in order of pesticide load<br /> </em><em>Source: Environmental Working Group. Go to foodnews.org for updates. Updated June 2011.</em></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/organic_natural/dirty_dozen_plus_14_foods_you_should_buy_organic">The Dirty Dozen Plus: 14 Foods You Should Buy Organic</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/organic_natural/15_foods_you_dont_need_to_buy_organic">15 Foods You Don&#039;t Need to Buy Organic</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/kitchen_tips_techniques/how_to_cook_20_vegetables">How to Cook 20 Vegetables</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/what_is_a_serving_size_of_fruit">What is a Serving Size of Fruit?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-2"><legend>Related Content Group 2</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/low_calorie_dinners_packed_with_produce">Low-Calorie Dinners Packed with Produce </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/our_best_healthy_summer_recipes">Our Best Healthy Summer Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/recipes_fresh_from_the_farmers_market">Recipes Fresh from the Farmers’ Market</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/fresh_recipes_from_eatingwells_garden">Fresh Recipes from EatingWell’s Garden</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Marissa Lippert, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell In Season: The Farmers&#039; Market Cookbook (2009) </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/organic_or_not_is_organic_produce_healthier_than_conventional#comments Marissa Lippert, M.S., R.D. EatingWell In Season: The Farmers' Market Cookbook (2009) Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Tue, 11 Aug 2009 22:16:09 +0000 Paula Joslin 9416 at http://www.eatingwell.com Pomegranate Poached Pears http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/pomegranate_poached_pears.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/pomegranate_poached_pears.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/DS4338A_0.JPG" alt="Pomegranate Poached Pears Recipe" title="Pomegranate Poached Pears Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/pomegranate_poached_pears.html" target="_blank">Pomegranate Poached Pears</a></div> <div>Pears are simmered in a blend of tart pomegranate juice and sweet dessert wine with gorgeous garnet-red results. The pears are served with the reduced poaching liquid and a sprinkling of pomegranate seeds. A striking finale to any festive meal, garnish the pears with toasted slivered almonds and a touch of tangy Greek yogurt.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/pomegranate_poached_pears.html#comments EatingWell In Season: The Farmers' Market Cookbook (2009) Fall 2003 November/December 2011 American French Easy Gluten free Heart healthy High fiber High potassium Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Christmas New Year's Eve Thanksgiving Recipes - Individual Recipes Recipes & Menus - Antioxidants Recipes & Menus - Gluten Free Recipes & Menus - Pears Alcohol Dairy Fruit Dessert Poach Fall Winter 4 Entertaining, formal Make ahead instructions Vegetarian More than 1 hour Desserts, fruit Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5331 at http://www.eatingwell.com Barley-Root Vegetable Chowder http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/barley_root_vegetable_chowder.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/barley_root_vegetable_chowder.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/imagefield_default_images/no-recipe-image.jpg" alt="Barley-Root Vegetable Chowder Recipe" title="Barley-Root Vegetable Chowder Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/barley_root_vegetable_chowder.html" target="_blank">Barley-Root Vegetable Chowder</a></div> <div>This hearty soup is full of root vegetables: celery root, rutabaga, carrots and parsnips. The chowder is made with beef broth, but vegetable broth can be used instead to make a vegetarian version. This robust-flavored recipe makes 12 first-course portions. Or serve double-size portions along with a salad and crusty bread for dinner.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/barley_root_vegetable_chowder.html#comments EatingWell In Season: The Farmers' Market Cookbook (2009) American Easy Diabetes appropriate Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health Recipes & Menus - Whole Grains Tomatoes Vegetables Vegetarian, other Dinner
 Braise/Stew Fall Winter 8 or more Entertaining, casual More than 1 hour Main dish, vegetarian Soups/stews Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6524 at http://www.eatingwell.com