June/July 2005 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/452/all en Why Do We Need Vitamin C? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/vitamin_c_why_do_we_need_it <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/orange_grapefruit_310_0.jpg?1274726641" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Vitamin C: Why do we need it?<br /> Five reasons why you need Vitamin C and ideas on how to fit it in everyday</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Vitamin C burst into prominence back in the 1970s, when Nobel Prize-winning scientist Linus Pauling claimed that high doses could stop cancer and might be the long-sought cure for the common cold. </p> <p> Alas, neither claim has quite held up under scrutiny. Vitamin C doesn’t prevent colds. Nor does taking large doses slow or stop cancer. But Pauling’s instincts were not entirely wrong. There are still many sound reasons to get plenty of C.</p> <h3>What It Does</h3> <p> Researchers have long known that vitamin C is an essential building block of collagen, the structural material for bone, skin, blood vessels and other tissue. Failing to get enough vitamin C causes inflammation of the gums, scaly skin, nosebleed, painful joints and other problems associated with scurvy.</p> <p> In addition, many studies show that eating foods rich in C can reduce the risk of developing cancer, particularly cancers that strike the mouth and digestive tract, according to Jane Higdon, a nutrition scientist at the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. Vitamin C is a potent antioxidant, able to neutralize unstable oxygen molecules that might otherwise damage DNA. Recent findings suggest it may also protect against Helicobacter pylori, bacteria linked to both stomach cancer and ulcers. A 2003 study at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center reported that people with high blood levels of vitamin C are less likely to test positive for infection by H. pylori. The vitamin appears to inhibit bacterial growth. </p> <p> Vitamin C is also proving to be friendly to the heart and arteries. Analyzing data from more than 85,000 women in the Nurses Health Study, researchers at Children’s Hospital, Boston, reported in 2003 that those with the highest intake of C had the lowest risk of heart disease over a 16-year period. Here, too, the antioxidant effect may be at work, preventing damage to artery walls that can promote cholesterol buildup. But vitamin C seems to protect in other ways as well. In 2004, scientists from the University of Oslo reported that after volunteers ate two or three vitamin-C-rich kiwis a day for 28 days, platelets in their blood were less likely to clump together and form small blood clots that can jam arteries and lead to heart attack or stroke. Eating kiwis also lowered triglycerides, or fats in the blood, by 15 percent, an effect that scientists credit to kiwis’ vitamin C, E and polyphenol content.</p> <p> Getting plenty of C may be especially important for pregnant moms and infants. Last year a study in Seoul, South Korea, reported higher birth weights among babies born to mothers with high vitamin C levels. This year a report in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests that vitamin C in breast milk may reduce the risk of allergic dermatitis in predisposed infants. </p> <h3>How Much You Need</h3> <p> The current recommended daily intake for men is 90 mg and for women it is 75 mg. “Don’t waste your money on megadoses of vitamin C,” says Higdon. A National Institutes of Health study showed that the body can only absorb a maximum of about 400 milligrams a day; more than that simply washes out of the system (the upper tolerable limit for vitamin C has been set at 2,000 milligrams per day). Follow the latest advice to eat between five and nine servings of fruits and vegetables a day and chances are you’ll get all you need—especially if you choose several foods high in C. </p> <h3>Food Sources of Vitamin C</h3> <p> Virtually everything in the produce section boasts some vitamin C. Excellent sources (per 1/2 cup serving) include:</p> <p>green bell pepper = 60 mg<br /> orange = 48 mg<br /> strawberries = 45 mg<br /> broccoli = 39 mg<br /> cantaloupe = 29 mg<br /> tomato = 23 mg<br /> turnip greens, cooked = 20 mg<br /> sweet potato, baked with skin = 20 mg<br /> okra, cooked = 13 mg </p> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrient_library/vitamin_c_rich_recipes">Vitamin C-Rich Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_citrus_recipes">Healthy Citrus Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/sweet_strawberry_recipes">Sweet Strawberry Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_tomato_recipes">Healthy Tomato Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-2"><legend>Related Content Group 2</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Vitamin C </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrient_library/vitamin_c">Vitamin C</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/can_vitamin_c_save_your_skin">Can Vitamin C Save Your Skin?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Peter Jaret </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> June/July 2005 </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/vitamin_c_why_do_we_need_it#comments Peter Jaret June/July 2005 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:44:46 +0000 Nifer 10194 at http://www.eatingwell.com Eat. Drink. Be Well. http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/eat_drink_be_well <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Peter Jaret </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Food tempers alcohol&#039;s effect on blood pressure. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/meal_wine_bread_310.jpg?1250608078" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>A glass of wine, beer or spirits may be good for the heart, but there is a catch. Although alcohol makes blood less likely to clot and lowers cholesterol levels, researchers have long known that drinking, even in moderation, can raise blood pressure. In fact, alcohol consumption is typically listed as a standard risk factor for hypertension. But if you imbibe moderately with dinner, worry not. New findings published last December in the journal Hypertension show that consuming alcohol with a meal is much less likely to affect blood pressure than drinking on an empty stomach.</p> <p>Reviewing data from a survey of 2,609 men and women collected between 1995 and 2001, researcher Saverio Stranges and his colleagues at the University at Buffalo found that the risk of hypertension was almost 50 percent higher in people who reported drinking without food compared to those who typically imbibed with a meal. “One of the surprises is that consuming alcoholic beverages with food seems to reduce the effect of alcohol on blood pressure even among light and moderate drinkers,” says Stranges. “And it doesn’t matter whether people consume wine, beer or liquor.”</p> <p>Although the study didn’t look at why, Stranges speculates that food slows the rise of alcohol in the blood and speeds its elimination from the body. But he admits the explanation may be much simpler: people who sip their drinks over hors d’oeuvres or dinner may also have healthier lifestyles than people who drink without food.</p> <p><strong>“One Drink” means:</strong></p> <p>12 ounces beer<br /> or<br /> 5 ounces wine<br /> or<br /> 1 1/2 ounces spirits</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/eat_drink_be_well#comments Peter Jaret June/July 2005 Heart Healthy Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Heart Health Tue, 18 Aug 2009 14:56:00 +0000 Penelope Wall 9676 at http://www.eatingwell.com Fish on the Menu http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/fish_on_the_menu <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachael Moeller Gorman </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Out of the deep fryer and into the oven. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>It’s hard to escape all the news about eating fish to benefit our health. But anyone feeling virtuous about opting for fish-and-chips or a fish sandwich will now have to think again. A new study has found that eating commercially fried fish and battered-fish sandwiches is associated with a higher risk of stroke in older adults, whereas consuming canned tuna or baked or broiled fish is associated with reduced risk. Cardiologist Dariush Mozaffarian at Harvard University and his colleagues recently analyzed the diets of 4,775 adults ages 65 and over, comparing the amount and type of fish consumed to the number and type of strokes suffered over a 12-year period.</p> <p>The researchers found that people who ate one to four meals of tuna or any baked or broiled fish per week had a 27 percent lower risk of suffering an ischemic stroke. Accounting for 88 percent of all strokes, the ischemic stroke occurs when a clot or other obstruction blocks an artery that leads to the brain.</p> <p>Those who consumed commercially fried fish or fish sandwiches more than once per week had a 44 percent higher risk of ischemic stroke. Although the diet questionnaire used in the study did not go into detail on food-preparation methods, Mozaffarian says “fried” fish in this country usually means fast-food fish burgers, frozen fish sticks and fish-and-chips—all breaded and deep-fried at some point. These typically contain dangerous trans fats or oxidation products from frying. “I think it’s pretty likely that the fish oil is what’s producing the benefit we see,” said Mozaffarian. “Now, if you took a fatty fish and fried it in healthy oils like canola or extra-virgin olive oil, would that reduce risk? Possibly, but that’s the kind of question that I think further studies need to address.”</p> <p><strong>Bottom Line:</strong> To reduce risk of stroke, avoid commercially deep-fried fish, opting instead for canned light tuna or baked or broiled fatty fish.</p> <p><strong>First Choice (fatty) Fish:</strong></p> <p> * Salmon<br /> * Striped Bass<br /> * Farmed Sturgeon</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/fish_on_the_menu#comments Rachael Moeller Gorman June/July 2005 Heart Healthy Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Heart Health Tue, 18 Aug 2009 13:44:00 +0000 Penelope Wall 9661 at http://www.eatingwell.com EatingWell Taste Test: Veggie Burgers http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_veggie_burgers <p>For many, the thought of a “veggie” burger conjures up images of Birkenstock-shod communards having a “barbecue” to celebrate the solstice—without animal sacrifice. However, a trip down the frozen-food aisle of any major supermarket tells an entirely different story: the nonmeat burger has become far more mainstream than fringe. Many stores have more than a dozen varieties on display. Most fall into one of two categories: (1) trying to mimic the experience of the meaty patty, or (2) going its own way merrily down the garden path.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Where&#039;s the Beef? Navigating the world of burger alternatives. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/veggie_burgers_630.jpg?1282255505" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/veggie_burgers_310.jpg?1282255513" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> June/July 2005 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/vegetarian_burger_recipes">Vegetarian Burger Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/what_s_in_your_veggie_burger">What’s in Your Veggie Burger?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/why_veggie_burgers_aren_t_always_a_healthy_choice">Why veggie burgers aren’t always a healthy choice</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>For many, the thought of a “veggie” burger conjures up images of Birkenstock-shod communards having a “barbecue” to celebrate the solstice—without animal sacrifice. However, a trip down the frozen-food aisle of any major supermarket tells an entirely different story: the nonmeat burger has become far more mainstream than fringe. Many stores have more than a dozen varieties on display. Most fall into one of two categories: (1) trying to mimic the experience of the meaty patty, or (2) going its own way merrily down the garden path.</p> <p>EatingWell convened a panel of tasters including some regular consumers of veggie burgers, a young vegetarian and a few proud carnivores who rarely stray from the all-beef patty. Their top picks represent choices that ought to satisfy every kind of burger-lover.</p> <p><strong>Amy’s California Burger</strong>. This entry from one of the largest selling brands of natural and organic convenience foods falls into the more-veggie-less-meaty category and was the top pick of five of our panelists. Joslin: “It has a slightly nutty taste. I like that I can actually see some veggies.” Strausser: “It looked and tasted like vegetables. I would buy these and eat them.” Carr: “I can pronounce everything on the ingredient label.”</p> <p><strong>Morningstar Farms Garden Veggie Patties</strong>. This golden-colored burger from the vegetarian-food division of Kellogg’s also falls into the “unbeef” category and was our second-favorite. Landscape designer Nate Carr liked the “clean veggie flavor” and respected the burger for “not trying to be meat.” Cherington: “Lots of visible vegetables. Nice mushroomy taste.”<br /> The tastes-like-meat style of burger wasn’t quite as popular with our panel although two entries did emerge as decent choices.</p> <p><strong>Yves Good Burger Veggie Authentic</strong> was singled out by Liz Joslin, our teen vegetarian panelist, because it “actually looked like a burger.” Sennhenn: “Dense, chewy texture, good all-around flavor.”</p> <p><strong>Gardenburger Homestyle Classic</strong> was another real-burger-pretender given a positive nod by some. Carr: “I like its uniform beeflike appearance.” Pete: “There’s some good spice in the flavor.”</p> <p><strong>Veggie Victory</strong></p> <p>While veggie burgers may not provide the iron, zinc and vitamin B12 found in beef, they fortunately also lack the high fat (over a third of it saturated), high cholesterol and calories found in a typical 3-ounce beef burger.</p> <p>Veggie burgers offer fiber, a variety of trace minerals and plant phytochemicals. Because most are soy-based, they also deliver high-quality protein. In addition, research suggests that soy phytochemicals, such as isoflavones, may help to prevent cancer, and that soy peptides (partially digested soy proteins) may help to reduce hypertension.<br /> How to choose?</p> <p>The 18 veggie burgers we looked at were made from wholesome ingredients, such as vegetables, whole grains and soy products. They were also free of artificial preservatives and flavors or other controversial ingredients. None had any trans fats and only a few harbored a gram or two of saturated fat or cholesterol. All were healthful choices.</p> <p>Bottom Line: From a nutritionist’s perspective, the best picks were veggie burgers that delivered at least 10 grams of protein, 4 grams of fiber and contained under 350 mg of sodium.</p> <p>The Tasting Panel:<br /> Emmalee Cherington, graphic designer<br /> Rolf Sennhenn, general-store owner<br /> Lisa Strausser, wine buyer<br /> Nate Carr, landscaping-business owner<br /> Liz Joslin, high school student<br /> Rick Pete, landscape architect</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_veggie_burgers#comments EatingWell Editors June/July 2005 Healthy Cooking - Kitchen Product Reviews Fri, 14 Aug 2009 15:35:00 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9521 at http://www.eatingwell.com Sesame Snap Peas with Carrots & Peppers http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sesame_snap_peas_with_carrots_peppers.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sesame_snap_peas_with_carrots_peppers.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD4800.JPG" alt="Sesame Snap Peas with Carrots &amp;amp; Peppers Recipe" title="Sesame Snap Peas with Carrots &amp;amp; Peppers Recipe" border="0"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sesame_snap_peas_with_carrots_peppers.html" target="_blank">Sesame Snap Peas with Carrots &amp; Peppers</a></div> <div>The colorful combination of sugar snap peas, red bell pepper and carrot plus an Asian-inspired flavors make this side dish a pleasure to whip up for a weeknight dinner.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sesame_snap_peas_with_carrots_peppers.html#comments May/June 2009 June/July 2005 Asian Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Vegetables Dinner
 Steam Spring Summer 4 Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegan Vegetarian 30 minutes or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4657 at http://www.eatingwell.com Snap Pea Salad with Radish & Lime http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/snap_pea_salad_with_radish_lime.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/snap_pea_salad_with_radish_lime.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SA4801.JPG" alt="Snap Pea Salad with Radish &amp;amp; Lime Recipe" title="Snap Pea Salad with Radish &amp;amp; Lime Recipe" border="0"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/snap_pea_salad_with_radish_lime.html" target="_blank">Snap Pea Salad with Radish &amp; Lime</a></div> <div>This colorful combination of sugar snap peas, wax beans and radishes is dressed with a tangy lime vinaigrette for a refreshing side dish.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/snap_pea_salad_with_radish_lime.html#comments EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (2008) June/July 2005 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Father's Day July 4th Labor Day Memorial Day Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Beans/legumes Citrus Vegetables Dinner
 Lunch Steam Spring Summer 4 Picnic Vegan Vegetarian 45 minutes or less Salad, side/appetizer Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4658 at http://www.eatingwell.com Chilled Snap Peas with Creamy Tarragon Dressing http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chilled_snap_peas_with_creamy_tarragon_dressing.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chilled_snap_peas_with_creamy_tarragon_dressing.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD4802.JPG" alt="Chilled Snap Peas with Creamy Tarragon Dressing Recipe" title="Chilled Snap Peas with Creamy Tarragon Dressing Recipe" border="0"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chilled_snap_peas_with_creamy_tarragon_dressing.html" target="_blank">Chilled Snap Peas with Creamy Tarragon Dressing</a></div> <div>Crisp chilled snap peas with creamy tarragon dressing make a nice alternative to a lettuce-based salad. The dressing can be doubled and used for chicken salad. Substitute fresh or dried dill for the tarragon if you like.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chilled_snap_peas_with_creamy_tarragon_dressing.html#comments June/July 2005 American French Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Easter Father's Day July 4th Labor Day Memorial Day Mother's Day Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Dairy Eggs Vegetables Dinner
 Steam Spring Summer 4 Make ahead instructions Vegetarian 45 minutes or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4659 at http://www.eatingwell.com Roasted Snap Peas with Shallots http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/roasted_snap_peas_with_shallots.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/roasted_snap_peas_with_shallots.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD4803.JPG" alt="Roasted Snap Peas with Shallots Recipe" title="Roasted Snap Peas with Shallots Recipe" border="0"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/roasted_snap_peas_with_shallots.html" target="_blank">Roasted Snap Peas with Shallots</a></div> <div>Roasting brings out a caramelized complexity in the already sweet peas. A scattering of crumbled blue cheese would make a savory addition or substitution for the bacon.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/roasted_snap_peas_with_shallots.html#comments EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (2008) June/July 2005 American Mediterranean Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Vegetables Dinner
 Roast Spring Summer 4 Kid-friendly Quick (total 30 min. or less) 30 minutes or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4660 at http://www.eatingwell.com Blueberry Ketchup http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/blueberry_ketchup.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/blueberry_ketchup.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SV4774.JPG" alt="Blueberry Ketchup Recipe" title="Blueberry Ketchup Recipe" border="0"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/blueberry_ketchup.html" target="_blank">Blueberry Ketchup</a></div> <div>Here&#039;s an exceptionally easy condiment, perfect for a summer barbecue. Not only great on burgers, it&#039;s terrific as a glaze on grilled salmon or served alongside barbecued chicken.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/blueberry_ketchup.html#comments June/July 2005 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health Recipes - Individual Recipes Berries Citrus Fruit Dinner
 Braise/Stew Fall Spring Summer 8 or more Freezing instructions Make ahead instructions Vegan Vegetarian More than 1 hour Sauce/Condiment, savory Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4665 at http://www.eatingwell.com Strawberry Cream http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/strawberry_cream.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/strawberry_cream.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/DS4779.JPG" alt="Strawberry Cream Recipe" title="Strawberry Cream Recipe" border="0"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/strawberry_cream.html" target="_blank">Strawberry Cream</a></div> <div>This chilled strawberry dessert gets creaminess and a touch of tanginess from reduced-fat sour cream. Topped with some ruby-red diced strawberries, it makes a delightful ending to any meal.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/strawberry_cream.html#comments June/July 2005 American Easy Gluten free Healthy weight High fiber Low calorie Low cholesterol Low sodium Digestive Health Easter Father's Day July 4th Labor Day Memorial Day Mother's Day Recipes - Individual Recipes Recipes & Menus - Strawberries Berries Dairy Fruit Dessert Microwave Spring Summer 4 Entertaining, formal Kid-friendly More than 1 hour Desserts, fruit Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4666 at http://www.eatingwell.com Grilled Artichokes http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/grilled_artichokes.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/grilled_artichokes.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD4799.JPG" alt="Grilled Artichokes Recipe" title="Grilled Artichokes Recipe" border="0"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/grilled_artichokes.html" target="_blank">Grilled Artichokes</a></div> <div>Artichokes are most often served steamed, but grilling them adds a smoky dimension to their flavor. If you can get them, first-of-the-season baby artichokes will yield extra-tender results—double the number of artichokes and reduce the cooking time as needed.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/grilled_artichokes.html#comments June/July 2005 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber High potassium Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Father's Day Mother's Day Recipes & Menus - Vegan Citrus Vegetables Dinner
 Grill/BBQ Fall Spring Summer 4 Entertaining, casual Picnic Vegan Vegetarian 1 hour or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4656 at http://www.eatingwell.com Papaya-Lime Sorbet http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/papaya_lime_sorbet.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/papaya_lime_sorbet.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/DF4798A_Burris.jpg" alt="Papaya-Lime Sorbet Recipe" title="Papaya-Lime Sorbet Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/papaya_lime_sorbet.html" target="_blank">Papaya-Lime Sorbet</a></div> <div>In Mexico, papayas are served with a wedge of lime and a pinch of salt. This sorbet honors the sweet-tart combination and transforms it into an elegant dessert. It&#039;s like a tropical vacation in your mouth.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/papaya_lime_sorbet.html#comments June/July 2005 Caribbean Easy Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Cinco de Mayo Easter Father's Day July 4th Labor Day Memorial Day Mother's Day Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Citrus Fruit Dessert Freeze Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Entertaining, casual Entertaining, formal Kid-friendly Vegan Vegetarian 45 minutes or less Desserts, frozen Desserts, fruit Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4655 at http://www.eatingwell.com Mango-Radish Salsa http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mango_radish_salsa.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mango_radish_salsa.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD4797.JPG" alt="Mango-Radish Salsa Recipe" title="Mango-Radish Salsa Recipe" border="0"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mango_radish_salsa.html" target="_blank">Mango-Radish Salsa</a></div> <div>Crisp, peppery diced radishes, sweet, juicy mango and tart lime juice have opposing flavors that come together here to create salsa nirvana. Serve with grilled fish, steak or chicken or just put out a dish of it with some crisp baked corn chips.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mango_radish_salsa.html#comments June/July 2005 Caribbean Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Cinco de Mayo Father's Day July 4th Labor Day Memorial Day Mother's Day Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Citrus Fruit Vegetables Appetizers Dinner
 Lunch Snack No-cook Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Comfort foods Entertaining, casual Entertaining, formal Make ahead instructions Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegan Vegetarian 30 minutes or less Appetizer Sauce/Condiment, savory Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4654 at http://www.eatingwell.com Easy Black Beans http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/easy_black_beans.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/easy_black_beans.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD4795.JPG" alt="Easy Black Beans Recipe" title="Easy Black Beans Recipe" border="0"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/easy_black_beans.html" target="_blank">Easy Black Beans</a></div> <div>These easy black beans are the perfect accompaniment to any Mexican fiesta.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/easy_black_beans.html#comments EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (2008) June/July 2005 Mexican Southwest Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Cinco de Mayo Recipes & Menus - Spices Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Beans/legumes Tomatoes Vegetables Beans/Legumes Dinner
 Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Make ahead instructions Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegan Vegetarian 30 minutes or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4653 at http://www.eatingwell.com Garlic-Chile Flank Steak http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/garlic_chile_flank_steak.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/garlic_chile_flank_steak.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MB4794.JPG" alt="Garlic-Chile Flank Steak Recipe" title="Garlic-Chile Flank Steak Recipe" border="0"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/garlic_chile_flank_steak.html" target="_blank">Garlic-Chile Flank Steak</a></div> <div>Serve this great-tasting, tender steak as part of a taco party or with a mixed green salad and sliced avocados.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/garlic_chile_flank_steak.html#comments June/July 2005 Mexican Southwest Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Cinco de Mayo Father's Day July 4th Labor Day Memorial Day Recipes - Individual Recipes Recipes & Menus - Antioxidants Recipes & Menus - Grilling Recipes & Menus - Spices Beef Dinner
 Grill/BBQ Marinate/Rub Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Entertaining, formal More than 1 hour Main dish, meat Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4652 at http://www.eatingwell.com