December 2005/January 2006 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/449/node/node/recipes_menus en Pineapple Power http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/pineapple_power <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Jenny Stamos </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Can this tropical plant fight cancer? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Besides its tasty fruit, the pineapple plant may yield an even sweeter benefit: the ability to fight cancer. The power source is an enzyme called bromelain, better known for its meat-tenderizing ability than for its use as a pharmaceutical. Researchers at the Queensland Institute of Medical Research in Brisbane, Australia, have found compounds within bromelain, dubbed CCS and CCZ, which “can inhibit the growth of a broad range of tumor cells,” says lead author Tracey Mynott, Ph.D., “including lung, colon, breast and ovarian tumors, as well as melanoma.”</p> <p>Mynott and her colleagues found that in the test tube, CCS blocked a protein that’s present in about 30 percent of cancers, while CCZ helped stimulate specific immune cells to target and kill cancer cells. Moreover, unlike many current cancer therapies, the compounds seemed to target only cancer cells without harming healthy ones. If further study confirms this selective action, it could translate to fewer side effects.</p> <p>If you’re looking to prevent cancer, however, don’t start devouring pineapple chunks just yet. “Unfortunately, these molecules are in the stem of the plant,” says Mynott—not in the fruit itself—and CCS and CCZ have so far been tested only as an injection. Bromelain supplements aren’t a solution either: they contain only tiny amounts of CCS and CCZ and are toxic in large doses. Further studies, soon under way, may yield answers. But the idea that a potential new class of anticancer agents might come from a tropical fruit plant is as beguiling as a piña colada.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/pineapple_power#comments Jenny Stamos December 2005/January 2006 Healthy Immune System Diet, Nutrition & Health - Immunity Tue, 18 Aug 2009 22:28:24 +0000 Penelope Wall 9750 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Promise of Probiotics http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/digestive_health/the_promise_of_probiotics <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Alice Lesch Kelly </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Can friendly bacteria keep you healthy? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Many people have never heard of kefir, a cultured milk beverage. But it’s a staple in the home of Rebekah Smillie, a parent in Newton, Massachusetts—along with yogurt, naturally fermented sauerkraut, and occasionally even kimchi, a Korean pickled vegetable dish.</p> <p>Smillie keeps these foods on hand because they contain high levels of probiotics, so-called “friendly bacteria” purported to have beneficial effects on human health. She believes her 8-year-old son’s love of yogurt and kefir helps keep his asthma and eczema in check, “although there’s not much interest in the kimchi.”</p> <p>Smillie may be onto something. Growing numbers of studies are suggesting that these tiny, living organisms—they’re alive when you eat them, and stay alive in your digestive system—fight digestive disorders and help boost our ability to fight off some infections. But are they as effective as their proponents claim? While the verdict isn’t fully in, current research supplies some promising leads.</p> <h3>How They Work</h3> <p>Trillions of beneficial bacteria already reside in our intestines, where they assist in digesting food and fighting off harmful bacteria. But illnesses and medications, such as antibiotics, can reduce their numbers, allowing the harmful to outnumber the helpful. When this happens, taking a probiotic can help tip the scales back in a healthy direction, says Frank Lee, Ph.D., a nutrition researcher at the University of Vermont. “Probiotics improve the balance of intestinal microflora.”</p> <p>It’s not surprising then, that probiotics show most promise in digestive disorders, helping to prevent and treat diarrhea in particular. Recently, an Irish study found that people with irritable bowel syndrome who were given daily doses of a probiotic-laced malted-milk drink had less abdominal pain, bloating and constipation than a similar group taking a placebo.</p> <p>Probiotic bacteria may also have a role in treating allergies, such as atopic eczema. When kids were given probiotic supplements for six weeks, their eczema symptoms were significantly reduced compared to those of a control group. The success of probiotic therapy in the treatment of bacterial vaginitis is also well documented. There’s even tantalizing evidence hinting that probiotics may help fight the common cold: Earlier this year, German investigators reported that a probiotic-enhanced vitamin and mineral supplement shortened common-cold episodes by almost two days.</p> <p>Probiotics won’t cure everything that ails you, however. While many people use them to treat Crohn’s disease, ulcers, high cholesterol, lactose intolerance and constipation, there aren’t yet enough data to make firm recommendations, say experts. And pregnant or breastfeeding women, infants and anyone whose immune systems might be vulnerable to serious infection, such as chemotherapy patients, shouldn’t take them without consulting a doctor first. Still, the promise of probiotics is strong enough that UVM’s Lee and others think even healthy people can benefit from regular consumption.</p> <h3>Shopping Around</h3> <p>If you want to give the beneficial bugs a try, avoid using supplements, which currently aren’t closely regulated and don’t always deliver what they promise. “One-third of the supplements we tested had less than 1 percent of what was promised on the label,” says Tod Cooperman, M.D., president of ConsumerLab.com, an independent organization that has tested the probiotic content of 25 products.</p> <p>Instead, get your probiotics from foods, especially those in the dairy case, says Lee. “Dairy food is an almost perfect vehicle for delivering probiotics.” Compounds in products like yogurt and kefir shield probiotic bacteria from acid and bile as they travel through the digestive system, he explains, and they also provide bacteria with compounds (known as prebiotics) that help them thrive. Yogurt is a particularly potent source of friendly bacteria, such as Lactobacillus, outranking many supplements; when buying, check the ingredient label for the words “live and active cultures” or look for the “Live &amp; Active Cultures” seal from the National Yogurt Association, which ensures a minimum of 100 million live cultures per gram.</p> <p>Nondairy sources of probiotics, such as tempeh, miso, and kimchi, also provide beneficial bacteria, though their actions are less well documented, says Lee. Whatever probiotic food you choose, check the expiration date to ensure it’s fresh: the longer a probiotic-containing product hangs around, the more beneficial bacteria die off. Refrigeration keeps them viable longer.</p> <p>As researchers throughout the world continue to tease out the benefits of probiotics, there’s no reason to wait for their findings to dig into probiotic-rich foods now. “They’re pretty harmless,” says Lona Sandon, R.D., assistant professor of nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. “Why not try them and see if they help?”</p> <h3>How Much Is Enough?</h3> <p>There’s no recommended daily dose of probiotics, but research suggests aiming for 1 billion to 10 billion live bacteria cultures (measured in Colony Forming Units, or CFUs). Since bacteria counts are rarely found on food labels, focus instead on eating a serving of a probiotic-rich food every day. A cup of kefir, or yogurt labeled “live and active cultures,” for example, will put you well within that range.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/digestive_health/the_promise_of_probiotics#comments Alice Lesch Kelly December 2005/January 2006 Digestive Health glutfree Diet, Nutrition & Health - Digestive Health Mon, 17 Aug 2009 20:33:44 +0000 Penelope Wall 9632 at http://www.eatingwell.com Take a Pass on Gas http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/take_a_pass_on_gas <p>It’s true. Beans, beans, are good for the heart. The rest of that silly childhood poem is unfortunately true too. And not just with beans, but also cabbage, onions, apples, and many other fruits and vegetables loaded with the vitamins, minerals, fibers and phytochemicals we’re all urged to get more of. So what can we do to bypass the gas, short of giving up some of nature’s most nourishing foods? A few cooking and lifestyle changes can go a long way, say experts.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Avoiding the embarrassing side of healthy eating. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> December 2005/January 2006 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Also of Interest </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_bean_recipes">Healthy Bean Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/averting_a_gas_crisis">Averting a Gas Crisis</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/digestive_health_recipes">Digestive Health Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>It’s true. Beans, beans, are good for the heart. The rest of that silly childhood poem is unfortunately true too. And not just with beans, but also cabbage, onions, apples, and many other fruits and vegetables loaded with the vitamins, minerals, fibers and phytochemicals we’re all urged to get more of. So what can we do to bypass the gas, short of giving up some of nature’s most nourishing foods? A few cooking and lifestyle changes can go a long way, say experts.</p> <p>According to Karen Collins, R.D., nutrition advisor for the American Institute for Cancer Research, many people suffer gas because their digestive tracts aren’t used to a high-fiber diet—and avoiding fibrous foods like beans, broccoli and salads just worsens the problem. Rather than steering clear of the offending foods, advises Collins, gradually add them in, giving the body time to adapt. “It’s important not to make the jump overnight. The body can’t handle a dramatic makeover.” Add one daily serving of high-fiber foods each week, she advises, aiming for a goal of 7 to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables daily and several servings of beans weekly.</p> <p>What causes the noxious vapors, anyway? It begins when carbohydrate is not completely digested by the army of enzymes in the small intestine. Once the undigested sugars, starches and fibers reach the large intestine, friendly bacteria break down and ferment them—giving off gas in the process.</p> <p>Increasing your fiber intake not only helps your intestinal bacteria adapt, but it also moves food and waste through your intestines faster. The quicker the transit, the better, says Collins. “The longer food sits there, the longer the bacteria act on it,” she explains—which translates to more gas production.</p> <p>To help speed foods through your GI tract, stay regularly active and drink plenty of fluids, adds Collins. That’s good advice to heed, no matter what’s in the air.<br /> <em>—Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D., C.D.E.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/take_a_pass_on_gas#comments Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D. December 2005/January 2006 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:39:05 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9588 at http://www.eatingwell.com EatingWell Taste Test: Natural Peanut Butters http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_natural_peanut_butters <p> EatingWell's peanut butter prerequisites:</p> <h3>Natural, with Taste in Mind</h3> <p> The most natural of natural peanut butters would be peanuts only, of course, but we opted for brands with a modicum of salt (125 milligrams or less per serving) for a simple reason: taste. Other additions, like sugar, palm oil or partially or fully hydrogenated oil are dubious at best, harmful at worst.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Which is the peanuttiest? A panel of seven tasters reveal their answers. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/peanut_butter_310.jpg?1267739110" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> December 2005/January 2006 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Peanut Butter Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/peanut_energy_bars.html">Peanut Energy Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/double_peanut_butter_chocolate_cookies.html">Double Peanut Butter-Chocolate Chewies</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/peanut_butter_pretzel_truffles.html">Peanut Butter &amp; Pretzel Truffles</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/peanut_butter_cookies.html">Peanut Butter Cookies</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/peanut_butter_cinnamon_english_muffin.html">Peanut Butter-Cinnamon English Muffin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Taste Tests </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_salsas_worth_scooping">EatingWell Taste Test: Salsas Worth Scooping</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_healthy_snack_bars">EatingWell Taste Test: Healthy Snack Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_baked_tortilla_chips">EatingWell Taste Test: Baked Tortilla Chips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_the_great_whole_wheat_pasta_challenge">EatingWell Taste Test: The Great Whole-Wheat Pasta Challenge</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>EatingWell's peanut butter prerequisites:</p> <p><strong>Natural, with taste in mind</strong><br /> The most natural of natural peanut butters would be peanuts only, of course, but we opted for brands with a modicum of salt (125 milligrams or less per serving) for a simple reason: taste. Other additions, like sugar, palm oil or partially or fully hydrogenated oil are dubious at best, harmful at worst.</p> <p>When it comes to peanut butter, many of us have been eating the same brand since childhood—slathered in sandwiches, spread on apples or spooned straight from the jar. Despite the nutritional drawbacks of some brands, we will go to the mat for our favorite. Don’t mess with our peanut butter.</p> <p>EatingWell invited a panel of six tasters, including one connoisseur of high-end organic brands, one daily consumer of Fluffernutter sandwiches and one sixth-grader—our de facto expert—to taste and comment on a selection of smooth natural peanut butters. The brave volunteers went to work sampling spoonfuls and making a variety of tongue-stuck-to-the-roof-of-their-mouths faces.</p> <p><strong>Nut ‘N Better Organic: Creamy</strong><br /> Our winner in all three categories of taste, appearance and texture, this Canadian-made peanut butter can be found on the shelves of Costco or under the O Organics label at Safeway. Three tasters declared it their favorite overall. Doug Davis said it was “the most familiar” and had “the best peanut flavor.” Peter Doremus noted its “great texture and appearance.” Gillian Markowski mentioned it was “really smooth without being fake-looking.” Though Jessica Anderson thought it was “too salty and too runny,” she still liked the flavor.</p> <p><strong>Smucker’s Natural: Creamy</strong><br /> The omnipresent Smucker’s brand garnered second place in all categories. Tasters called its grainier texture “the crunchy-lover’s smooth.” Anderson thought it was a great choice for natural peanut butter (it was her top pick). Nancy Bloch said it had “more peanut butter taste.”</p> <p><strong>Woodstock Farms Organic: Smooth/Salted</strong><br /> This selection was a bit too grainy and sticky for some, but Markowski said, “It’s perfect! It has a nice, sweet taste the others don’t really have.” Anderson liked its looks and “great flavor.” But Davis found it grainy, bitter and too thick; Doremus said it tasted really good but “looked like Dijon mustard.” Bloch wasn’t a big fan: “Grainy and very blah.”</p> <p>Other natural peanut butters we liked:</p> <p> * MaraNatha Organic: Creamy &amp; Roasted<br /> * Peanut Butter &amp; Co.: Smooth Operator<br /> * Teddie Old Fashioned: Smooth</p> <p>Natural Peanut Butter Tip<br /> If the oil separation that occurs in natural peanut butters frustrates you, try leaving the peanut butter upside down for about an hour. The oil will migrate up to the jar bottom, making it easier to stir without making a mess. After stirring, store in the refrigerator.</p> <p>The Tasting Panel:<br /> Nancy Bloch, entrepreneur, Peter Doremus, attorney, Gillian Markowski, mother and Ruby Markowski, toddler, Jessica Anderson, marketing coordinator, Tinesha Davis, 6th-grader, Doug Davis, school food-service director.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_natural_peanut_butters#comments EatingWell Editors December 2005/January 2006 Recipes & Menus - Peanuts Fri, 14 Aug 2009 15:13:30 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9517 at http://www.eatingwell.com Wild Things http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/wild_things <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Exotic meats nudge into everyday territory </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Herb-Crusted Elk Chops and Buffalo Rib-Eye weren’t always on the menu at Henry’s End restaurant in Brooklyn Heights, New York. But when chef/owner Mark Lahm tried a “wild game month” years ago, customers ate it up and wanted more. “Now, we do it almost half the year,” says Lahm. “It just built its own momentum.”</p> <p>The same can be said of the so-called “exotic” game-meat industry, which has been growing at a healthy annual rate of 20 to 30 percent. Once barely on the culinary radar, buffalo, ostrich, elk and the like are routinely found on restaurant tables and in supermarkets. Even food-service giant Sysco, Inc. now offers venison, elk, wild boar, ostrich and even alligator to the 400,000-plus restaurants, hospitals, schools and hotels it supplies. And, thanks to online retailers, specialties like rattlesnake and yak are only a mouse click away.</p> <p>Why are game meats winning hearts and plates? A craving for culinary excitement, for one thing. From adventurous eaters and well-traveled gourmets to chefs, “people are looking for alternatives to the same old beef, chicken and pork,” says Russ McCurdy, owner of Seattle’s Finest Exotic Meats.</p> <p>But many people also buy exotic meat because they believe it’s healthier. Compared with beef and pork and even chicken and turkey, “game meats tend to be much lower in saturated fat and cholesterol,” notes Dave Grotto, R.D., nutrition director at the Block Center for Integrative Cancer Care in Evanston, Illinois. Indeed, kangaroo meat is so lean “you couldn’t live exclusively on it in the wild,” says McCurdy.</p> <p>And, since many exotic animals are raised on grass diets, their fat is often richer in heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, as well as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a purported breast-cancer fighter—but Grotto doesn’t think the evidence is strong enough to urge his patients to switch to wild meats just yet. “Something lean, like game meat, doesn’t contain much CLA,” he explains, “so whether it’s going to be therapeutic in cancer is questionable.” Likewise, he says, exotic meats “pale in comparison to fatty fish as an omega-3 source.”</p> <p><strong>Truly Wild?</strong><br /> To be sold commercially, game animals must be raised on farms or ranches conforming to governmental regulations—so their lives, with a predictable food supply and protection from predators, aren’t quite “Wild Kingdom.” Most exotic-meat aficionados don’t complain, though. “With farm-raised game, you know what the animal ate,” notes Grotto, who is also a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. “Natural isn’t always cleaner. Even Bambi could have drunk water from a pond downstream from the field Farmer Jones sprayed the heck out of.”</p> <p>Exotic meats can be pricy, but Russ McCurdy, for one, dreams that one day ostrich burgers will be on school lunch menus. “With the problem of childhood obesity, it would be a great way to feed kids,” he muses. “It’s very lean but it looks and tastes like beef. Kids don’t think it’s at all ‘gross.’”<br /> —Joyce Hendley</p> <p><strong>Exotic vs. Everyday</strong><br /> Based on a 100-gram raw portion (about 3.5 ounces); poultry is skinless.<br /> Calories Total Fat / Sat Fat (grams)</p> <p> * Alligator: 148 3/NA<br /> * Boar (wild): 122 3/1<br /> * Buffalo (bison): 109 2/0<br /> * Elk: 111 1/1<br /> * Goat: 109 2/1<br /> * Kangaroo: 93 0.5/NA<br /> * Ostrich: 117 3/1<br /> * Quail (breast): 123 3/1<br /> * Rabbit (wild): 114 2/1<br /> * Venison (deer): 120 2/1</p> <p> * Beef (sirloin): 224 15/6<br /> * Chicken (breast): 110 1/0<br /> * Pork (loin chop): 149 6/2<br /> * Turkey (breast): 111 1/0</p> <p>Source: USDA and <a href="http://www.exoticmeats.com" title="www.exoticmeats.com">www.exoticmeats.com</a> (NA=Not available)</p> <p><strong>To order farm-raised exotic meats online or by phone:</strong><br /> 888EatGame.com: <a href="http://www.888eatgame.com" title="www.888eatgame.com">www.888eatgame.com</a>, 888-EATGAME (328-4263)<br /> Game Sales International: <a href="http://www.gamesalesintl.com" title="www.gamesalesintl.com">www.gamesalesintl.com</a>, 800-729-2090<br /> MountRoyal USA: <a href="http://www.mountroyal.com" title="www.mountroyal.com">www.mountroyal.com</a>, 800-730-3337<br /> Seattle’s Finest Exotic Meats: <a href="http://www.exoticmeats.com" title="www.exoticmeats.com">www.exoticmeats.com</a>, 800-680-4375</p> <p><em>From the December 2005/January 2006 issue of EatingWell Magazine.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/wild_things#comments December 2005/January 2006 Food News & Origins - Food News Wed, 12 Aug 2009 19:54:13 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9436 at http://www.eatingwell.com Quinoa with Latin Flavors http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/quinoa_with_latin_flavors.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/quinoa_with_latin_flavors.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD4998.JPG" alt="Quinoa with Latin Flavors Recipe" title="Quinoa with Latin Flavors Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/quinoa_with_latin_flavors.html" target="_blank">Quinoa with Latin Flavors</a></div> <div>Cilantro, lime and scallions lend a bright finish to delicate quinoa. This versatile side pairs well with seafood, poultry or pork.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/quinoa_with_latin_flavors.html#comments December 2005/January 2006 Latin American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health glutfree Recipes & Menus - Whole Grains Citrus Vegetables Dinner
 Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 6 Entertaining, casual Vegetarian 45 minutes or less Side dish, grain Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4776 at http://www.eatingwell.com Fennel Sauerkraut with Turkey Sausage & Potatoes http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/fennel_sauerkraut_with_turkey_sausage_potatoes.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/fennel_sauerkraut_with_turkey_sausage_potatoes.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MP5023.JPG" alt="Fennel Sauerkraut with Turkey Sausage &amp;amp; Potatoes Recipe" title="Fennel Sauerkraut with Turkey Sausage &amp;amp; Potatoes Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/fennel_sauerkraut_with_turkey_sausage_potatoes.html" target="_blank">Fennel Sauerkraut with Turkey Sausage &amp; Potatoes</a></div> <div>Inspired by the Alsatian classic choucroute garni, this comforting one-pot meal takes a shortcut with already-cooked potatoes (look in the refrigerated section of the produce and/or dairy department of the market) and preshredded cabbage. Serve with additional mustard.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/fennel_sauerkraut_with_turkey_sausage_potatoes.html#comments December 2005/January 2006 EatingWell Serves Two German Moderate Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Low calorie Low cholesterol glutfree Recipes - Individual Recipes Recipes & Menus - Spices Vegetables Turkey Dinner
 Saute Fall Winter 6 Comfort foods Entertaining, casual Everyday favorites One dish meals 45 minutes or less Main dish, poultry Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4778 at http://www.eatingwell.com Turkey Sausage & Arugula Pasta http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/turkey_sausage_arugula_pasta.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/turkey_sausage_arugula_pasta.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MP5024.JPG" alt="Turkey Sausage &amp;amp; Arugula Pasta Recipe" title="Turkey Sausage &amp;amp; Arugula Pasta Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/turkey_sausage_arugula_pasta.html" target="_blank">Turkey Sausage &amp; Arugula Pasta</a></div> <div>The cheese in this dish is the key to the balance of flavors. For the biggest impact, make sure to use imported Italian cheese.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/turkey_sausage_arugula_pasta.html#comments December 2005/January 2006 EatingWell Serves Two Italian Mediterranean Easy Diabetes appropriate Healthy weight Heart healthy High calcium High fiber Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Bone Health Digestive Health Recipes - Individual Recipes Cheese Greens Pasta Tomatoes Vegetables Wheat Turkey Dinner
 Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 6 Budget Everyday favorites Quick (total 30 min. or less) 30 minutes or less Main dish, combination meal Main dish, poultry Pasta Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4779 at http://www.eatingwell.com Real-Man Quiche http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/real_man_quiche.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/real_man_quiche.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MP5025.JPG" alt="Real-Man Quiche Recipe" title="Real-Man Quiche Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/real_man_quiche.html" target="_blank">Real-Man Quiche</a></div> <div>We&#039;ve loaded this meaty pie with a whole pound of turkey sausage and given it a fabulous, flaky phyllo crust. Real men do eat quiche!</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/real_man_quiche.html#comments December 2005/January 2006 American French Moderate Diabetes appropriate Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low saturated fat Digestive Health Christmas Easter Father's Day Mother's Day New Year's Eve Thanksgiving Recipes & Menus - Organic Valley Cheese Dairy Eggs Greens Vegetables Wheat Eggs Turkey Brunch Dinner
 Lunch Bake Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Budget Comfort foods 45 minutes or less Main dish, poultry Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4780 at http://www.eatingwell.com Smoky Stuffed Peppers http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/smoky_stuffed_peppers.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/smoky_stuffed_peppers.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MP5026.JPG" alt="Smoky Stuffed Peppers Recipe" title="Smoky Stuffed Peppers Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/smoky_stuffed_peppers.html" target="_blank">Smoky Stuffed Peppers</a></div> <div>Turkey sausage and smoked cheese give a flavorful boost to this versatile, somewhat retro dinner. We&#039;ve speeded it up by microwave-blanching the peppers and using instant brown rice. If possible, choose peppers that will stand upright.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/smoky_stuffed_peppers.html#comments December 2005/January 2006 EatingWell Serves Two American Moderate Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health glutfree Recipes - Individual Recipes Cheese Tomatoes Vegetables Turkey Dinner
 Broil Microwave Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 6 Kid-friendly Make ahead instructions 45 minutes or less Main dish, combination meal Main dish, poultry Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4781 at http://www.eatingwell.com Horseradish-Dill Cream http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/horseradish_dill_cream.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/horseradish_dill_cream.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SV5017.JPG" alt="Horseradish-Dill Cream Recipe" title="Horseradish-Dill Cream Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/horseradish_dill_cream.html" target="_blank">Horseradish-Dill Cream</a></div> <div>This tangy and piquant sour-cream sauce is also a great accompaniment to steaks or baked potatoes.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/horseradish_dill_cream.html#comments December 2005/January 2006 American Eastern European/Russian Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health glutfree Recipes - Individual Recipes Dairy Dinner
 No-cook Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Make ahead instructions Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegetarian 15 minutes or less Sauce/Condiment, savory Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4775 at http://www.eatingwell.com Quick Applesauce http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/quick_applesauce.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/quick_applesauce.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SW5016.JPG" alt="Quick Applesauce Recipe" title="Quick Applesauce Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/quick_applesauce.html" target="_blank">Quick Applesauce</a></div> <div>This quick homemade applesauce recipe makes a healthy snack or fruit dessert for kids. Applesauce is also a fabulous complement to potato pancakes or latkes.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/quick_applesauce.html#comments December 2005/January 2006 September/October 2012 American Jewish Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health glutfree Hanukkah Passover Recipes - Individual Recipes Recipes & Menus - Antioxidants Recipes & Menus - Spices Fruit Dinner
 Lunch Snack Microwave Fall Winter 4 Kid-friendly Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegan Vegetarian 15 minutes or less Desserts, fruit Sauce/Condiment, sweet Snack Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4774 at http://www.eatingwell.com Sweet Potato & Cabbage Slaw http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sweet_potato_cabbage_slaw.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sweet_potato_cabbage_slaw.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD5020.JPG" alt="Sweet Potato &amp;amp; Cabbage Slaw Recipe" title="Sweet Potato &amp;amp; Cabbage Slaw Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sweet_potato_cabbage_slaw.html" target="_blank">Sweet Potato &amp; Cabbage Slaw</a></div> <div>Sweet potatoes can be eaten raw as well as cooked. Here they star in a sprightly slaw, a quick and light accompaniment for simple poached or steamed fish.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sweet_potato_cabbage_slaw.html#comments December 2005/January 2006 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health glutfree Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Citrus Vegetables Dinner
 Lunch No-cook Fall Winter 6 Make ahead instructions Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegetarian 15 minutes or less Salad, side/appetizer Side dish, potato/starch Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4773 at http://www.eatingwell.com Sweet Potatoes with Warm Black Bean Salad http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sweet_potatoes_with_warm_black_bean_salad.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sweet_potatoes_with_warm_black_bean_salad.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MV5019.JPG" alt="Sweet Potatoes with Warm Black Bean Salad Recipe" title="Sweet Potatoes with Warm Black Bean Salad Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sweet_potatoes_with_warm_black_bean_salad.html" target="_blank">Sweet Potatoes with Warm Black Bean Salad</a></div> <div>For a satisfying last-minute supper, it&#039;s hard to beat a sweet potato zapped in the microwave. The fragrant filling of beans and tomatoes adds protein. Be sure to eat the skin, which is full of fiber, as well.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sweet_potatoes_with_warm_black_bean_salad.html#comments December 2005/January 2006 EatingWell Serves Two Mexican Southwest Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber High potassium Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health glutfree Recipes & Menus - Pompeian Beans/legumes Dairy Tomatoes Vegetables Beans/Legumes Dinner
 Bake Microwave Saute Fall Winter 4 Budget Everyday favorites Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegetarian 30 minutes or less Main dish, vegetarian Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4772 at http://www.eatingwell.com Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Balsamic Drizzle http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/roasted_sweet_potatoes_with_balsamic_drizzle.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/roasted_sweet_potatoes_with_balsamic_drizzle.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD5018.JPG" alt="Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Balsamic Drizzle Recipe" title="Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Balsamic Drizzle Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/roasted_sweet_potatoes_with_balsamic_drizzle.html" target="_blank">Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Balsamic Drizzle</a></div> <div>A delicious tangy-sweet balsamic-and-honey reduction looks dramatic over roasted sweet potato wedges.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/roasted_sweet_potatoes_with_balsamic_drizzle.html#comments December 2005/January 2006 American Easy Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health glutfree Recipes - Individual Recipes Dairy Vegetables Dinner
 Bake Fall Winter 4 Entertaining, casual Kid-friendly Vegetarian 45 minutes or less Side dish, potato/starch Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4771 at http://www.eatingwell.com