February/March 2006 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/448/all en Baked Cod Casserole http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/baked_cod_casserole.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/baked_cod_casserole.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MF5065.JPG" alt="Baked Cod Casserole Recipe" title="Baked Cod Casserole Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/baked_cod_casserole.html" target="_blank">Baked Cod Casserole</a></div> <div>Dry white wine and Gruyère cheese give this fish casserole a rich flavor that hides its virtue. Before baking, we top the dish with seasoned whole-wheat breadcrumbs, which add a wholesome, nutty flavor and dietary fiber. For variety, you can substitute almost any mild white fish.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/baked_cod_casserole.html#comments EatingWell Serves Two February/March 2006 American French Easy High calcium Low carbohydrate Low sodium Bone Health Recipes & Menus - Pears Recipes & Menus - Pompeian Recipes & Menus - Seafood Recipes & Menus - Spices Alcohol Cheese Fish Vegetables Wheat Fish Dinner
 Bake Saute Fall Spring Winter 4 Casserole Comfort foods Entertaining, casual Everyday favorites 45 minutes or less Main dish, fish/seafood Wed, 09 Jan 2019 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4791 at http://www.eatingwell.com Chicken & Sweet Potato Stew http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chicken_sweet_potato_stew.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chicken_sweet_potato_stew.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MP5098.JPG" alt="Chicken &amp;amp; Sweet Potato Stew Recipe" title="Chicken &amp;amp; Sweet Potato Stew Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chicken_sweet_potato_stew.html" target="_blank">Chicken &amp; Sweet Potato Stew</a></div> <div>Here&#039;s a dinnertime warmer with a hint of spring&#039;s sweetness, designed for that day when you&#039;d rather be outside raking the leaves from the garden, getting it ready for what&#039;s ahead, than slaving over the stove.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chicken_sweet_potato_stew.html#comments February/March 2006 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High potassium Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health Recipes - Individual Recipes Alcohol Vegetables Chicken Dinner
 Braise/Stew Slow cooker/Crockpot Fall Winter 6 Budget Comfort foods Freezing instructions Make ahead instructions One dish meals More than 1 hour Main dish, poultry Soups/stews Sun, 10 Jan 2010 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4836 at http://www.eatingwell.com Mustard-Maple Pork Tenderloin http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mustard_maple_pork_tenderloin.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mustard_maple_pork_tenderloin.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MK5069.JPG" alt="Mustard-Maple Pork Tenderloin Recipe" title="Mustard-Maple Pork Tenderloin Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mustard_maple_pork_tenderloin.html" target="_blank">Mustard-Maple Pork Tenderloin</a></div> <div>Pork tenderloin is about as lean as it comes so it&#039;s a great healthy option, but it shouldn&#039;t be overcooked as it can dry out. Maple and mustard make a sweet-and-savory mahogany-colored sauce. A delicate note of sage gives it a wintery touch. Fresh thyme or rosemary also work if you prefer. Serve with barley, roasted squash and a Pinot Noir.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mustard_maple_pork_tenderloin.html#comments EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (2008) February/March 2006 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health New Year's Eve Recipes - Individual Recipes Pork Dinner
 Roast Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Budget Entertaining, formal 45 minutes or less Main dish, meat Thu, 07 Jan 2010 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4795 at http://www.eatingwell.com Men and Women: Differences in How Men Eat and How Women Eat http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/his_hers_eating <p>Restaurants are made for people-watching—where anyone with an interest in contemporary eating trends can keep an eye on the plates arriving at nearby tables. Engaged in a bit of this professional nosiness, I recently observed a server bringing a middle-aged couple their dinners. Not sure who had ordered what, he looked at the plates, then offered the woman the vegetarian entrée and placed the beef dish in front of her male companion. What sort of gender profiling was going on here?</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Does gender make a difference when it comes to the way we eat? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/restaurant_310_0.jpg?1263828502" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="160" height="160" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/202his_hers_eating_160.jpg?1250863773" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> February/March 2006 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes for Two </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_fish_recipes_for_two">Healthy Fish Recipes for Two</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_low_calorie_dinner_recipes_for_two">Healthy Low-Calorie Dinner Recipes for Two</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/heart_healthy_recipes_for_two">Heart Healthy Recipes for Two</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_low_calorie_dinner_recipes_for_two">Healthy Low-Calorie Dinner Recipes for Two</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/one_pot_recipes_for_two">One-Pot Recipes for Two</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Restaurants are made for people-watching—where anyone with an interest in contemporary eating trends can keep an eye on the plates arriving at nearby tables. Engaged in a bit of this professional nosiness, I recently observed a server bringing a middle-aged couple their dinners. Not sure who had ordered what, he looked at the plates, then offered the woman the vegetarian entrée and placed the beef dish in front of her male companion. What sort of gender profiling was going on here?</p> <p>As it turned out, the waiter had it right: there are gender differences in food selection. Men eat more meat and bread, while women consume more fruit, yogurt and diet soda. There are also gender differences in eating styles. Women take smaller bites and take longer to eat than men. When psychologists asked male and female volunteers to read sample food diaries and then make judgments about the diary writers—sight unseen, women who reported eating smaller meals were considered (by both male and female readers) to be more feminine, more concerned about their appearance and better looking than women who recorded larger meals.</p> <p>Women, generally, have also been shown to eat less when they are with a desirable male partner than when they are with other women. I think I’ve moved past that. I would have spent three hungry decades if I tried to limit my intake when eating with my husband.</p> <p>It’s no surprise that women are more likely than men to be on diets and are more dissatisfied with their body weight and shape. One large survey found that, of those people who were a healthy weight, 23 percent of the women perceived themselves as overweight, while only 9 percent of the men did. At the same time, of those who were actually overweight, 41 percent of the men versus 13 percent of the women thought their weight was about right. Men are obviously more accepting of their bodies and as a result seem to have a more relaxed approach about their food choices. To compound this, studies show that women think men favor much thinner women than the men in fact say they prefer.</p> <p>One biological fact is inescapable: most women have lower calorie needs than men, and that means we have fewer extra calories to play with. The new USDA MyPyramid labels the extra calories that are leftover after our nutrient needs are met as “discretionary calories.” For my age, gender and activity level, I have 195 calories for the extras after I’ve gotten my recommended whole grains, fruits and vegetables, low-fat dairy and lean meats. My husband has 425. So while I may have to choose between dessert or a glass of wine, he gets to have both. What’s fair about that? I think because men grow up having this added flexibility, they are often more cavalier about what they eat. Does that make a difference to their health overall? Perhaps—American women do outlive men by about five years, but women also outlive men in virtually every country in the world, suggesting the influence of many factors other than diet.</p> <p>Still, I think we can learn from each other. While as women we can be tough on ourselves, it probably means we tend to be more attentive to our health. And with 87 percent of American women saying they are the person most responsible for their household’s meals, we’re the primary gatekeepers for the food that comes into our family kitchens. I think the men in our lives often benefit from our vigilance. But at the same time, women’s diets can improve when they share meals with men. A friend goes the extra mile to serve healthy foods at home because her physician husband makes unhealthy choices when he’s on the run at the hospital. Another friend eats fewer sweet treats than she might because of her husband’s aversion to sugar.</p> <p>My husband and sons, like a lot of men, put a high value on convenience when it comes to eating. I try to make it easier for them to make good food choices. I usually keep washed grapes on the counter, knowing they’ll be gone in no time. (If I leave them packaged up in the fridge, they often sit there and rot.) I try to keep individually packaged string cheese, baby carrots, apples and yogurt in the front of the fridge where my guys can grab them.</p> <p>Some of our happiest times as a family are spent over a great meal accompanied by lively conversation and lots of good-natured teasing. I’ve been razzed over the years about<br /> my plate-watching habits and my sometimes overzealous approach to good nutrition. The men in my life help me appreciate that great food is much more than just nutrients and calories.</p> <p>Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. is senior nutrition advisor to EatingWell Magazine and dean of the University of Vermont College of Agriculture &amp; Life Sciences.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/his_hers_eating#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. February/March 2006 Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:10:58 +0000 Nifer 10169 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Food Cancer Connection http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/the_food_cancer_connection <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Peter Jaret </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Can diet make a difference? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Hardly a month goes by without a headline trumpeting the news that yet another food has been shown to fight cancer. Broccoli, garlic, onions, green tea, tomatoes, whole grains, even coffee have all joined the anticancer brigade over the years. </p> <p>So it came as a shock when one of the largest diet and health studies ever undertaken threw cold water on some of those glad tidings. Analyzing data from more than 100,000 people enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study, scientists at Harvard School of Public Health found no link at all between eating fruits and vegetables and cancer risk. It didn’t matter whether people consumed two servings a day or 10; their risk of developing cancer over the 15-year study period was exactly the same.</p> <h3>Lack of Evidence</h3> <p>How could that be? For years, the National Cancer Institute has promoted its “Eat 5 to 9 a Day” program, encouraging Americans to eat more fruits and vegetables. Some of the country’s leading cancer-research centers have published diet books designed to lower cancer risk, featuring fruits and vegetables. Were the experts wrong?</p> <p>“We’d all like to believe that a healthy diet can help prevent cancer,” says Alice Lichtenstein, D.Sc., a nutrition expert at the USDA Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. “Unfortunately, though there appears to be an association between diets high in fruits and vegetables and lower risk of cancer, we have yet to identify exactly which dietary components may be protective, or indeed whether simply upping produce intake may decrease more potentially risky food choices.”</p> <p>Fiber offers a case in point. Early studies suggested that the more fiber people consumed, the lower their risk of colon cancer. With hopes running high, the National Cancer Institute funded two studies that compared two groups of volunteers, some eating a high-fiber diet, others a diet low in fiber. To universal surprise, the high-fiber diet showed no benefit in reducing risk. </p> <h3>Produce in Perspective</h3> <p>Sharon Ross, a program director at the NCI, remains optimistic that ongoing research will bring better news: “Part of the difficulty is that we don’t have good tools to study diet and cancer,” she says. Many studies are based on what people recall eating over previous years, a notoriously undependable source of information. Animal studies can help, but it’s not easy to know if the results apply to people in the real world. The gold standard is a study that controls what people eat and follows them over time. But because cancer typically takes decades to show up, this kind of study is enormously expensive and difficult to conduct.</p> <p>Eventually, Ross suspects, scientists may discover that the importance of diet varies, due to genetic differences. “We may find that for some people, eating fruits and vegetables will make a big difference. In others, it may not play much of a role. We’ll be able to tailor dietary advice much more precisely to individuals.”</p> <h3>Bottom Line</h3> <p>Wherever research leads, the recent news is no reason to abandon a healthy diet. “There is still a great deal of evidence from many studies that diet can help prevent some cancers,” insists Richard S. Rivlin, M.D., director of the Anne Fisher Nutrition Center at the Strang Cancer Prevention Laboratory in New York. “Prostate cancer is a good example. Precancerous changes occur at the same rate in men almost everywhere around the world, but the progression of the disease is very different. Lots of evidence points to differences in diet as the explanation.” </p> <h3>News You Can Use</h3> <p>The American Institute for Cancer Research just published its most up-to-date food, nutrition and activity recommendations to help prevent cancer. Here are 8 quick tips:</p> <p>1. Be as lean as possible without becoming underweight.<br /> 2. Be physically active for at least 30 minutes every day.<br /> 3. Avoid sugary drinks. Limit consumption of energy-dense foods (particularly processed foods high in added sugar, or low in fiber, or high in fat).<br /> 4. Eat more of a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes such as beans.<br /> 5. Limit consumption of red meats (such as beef, pork and lamb) and avoid processed meats.<br /> 6. If consumed at all, limit alcoholic drinks to 2 for men and 1 for women a day.<br /> 7. Limit consumption of salty foods and foods processed with salt (sodium).<br /> 8. Don't use supplements to protect against cancer.</p> <p>Source: American Institute of Cancer Research<br /> For more information go to <a href="http://www.aicr.org" title="www.aicr.org">www.aicr.org</a>.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/the_food_cancer_connection#comments Peter Jaret February/March 2006 Healthy Immune System Diet, Nutrition & Health - Immunity Tue, 18 Aug 2009 22:24:26 +0000 Penelope Wall 9748 at http://www.eatingwell.com Nutrition? Duh. http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_kids/nutrition_duh <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Melissa Pasanen </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Frontline gets skeptics into the kitchen to make food and health palatable. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>“So, who’s eaten protein today?” asks Connal McCullough of a group of intent preteens gathered at the Jordan Boys and Girls Club in Chelsea, Massachusetts.</p> <p>“I had chicken,” says Juan Lopez, 12. “Kentucky Fried—but that’s still chicken.”</p> <p>It was the perfect opening for the evening’s subject: making a healthier alternative to Juan’s deep-fried lunch. Instructors McCullough, a Culinary Institute of America graduate, and Tony Rosenfeld, chef and co-owner of b.good restaurant, are teaching hands-on cooking and health as part of a six-week course created by Operation Frontline, a program of Share Our Strength, the national antihunger and antipoverty organization.</p> <p>“You hear about a nutrition class and you roll your eyes,” says Erica Vogelei, former program manager for Operation Frontline in Massachusetts, “but a cooking class with a real chef—that’s exciting.”</p> <p>Since 1993, Operation Frontline courses have reached more than 31,000 people in 15 states, including low-income adults, children and teens, and people living with HIV and AIDS. The in-kitchen classes are led by volunteer teaching teams—usually a professional chef paired with a nutrition educator. In most cases, students leave with a bag of groceries so they can recreate what they’ve just learned at home.</p> <p>Tonight’s project—low-fat baked chicken—emerged from the oven crisp and juicy. “Is it better than KFC?” asks Rosenfeld. “Sure. It’s homemade,” says Jerricka Rodas, 12. “We should have put some spice on it,” volunteers a classmate. The final verdict comes when another voice asks, “Is there any more?”</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_kids/nutrition_duh#comments Melissa Pasanen February/March 2006 Healthy Eating for Kids Diet, Nutrition & Health - Healthy Kids Mon, 17 Aug 2009 21:52:22 +0000 Penelope Wall 9651 at http://www.eatingwell.com EatingWell Taste Test: Healthy Snack Bars http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_healthy_snack_bars <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Raising the (Snack) Bar </div> </div> </div> <p>When you’re looking for a quick and satisfying pick-me-up, you want more than empty calories. You grab a snack bar, the hybrid between a cookie and a candy bar. But is it really any better for you? The answer is a qualified yes: some (but not all) are great alternatives that can make a positive contribution to your daily nutrition.</p> <p>Most people can enjoy a tasty 225-calorie snack without tipping the calorie scale, especially if the bar is made of wholesome ingredients, such as whole grains, nuts and dried fruit.<br /> Look for bars with:<br /> • less than 225 calories</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Carolyn Malcoun </div> <div class="field-item even"> Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Raising the (Snack) Bar: Finding nutrition and taste within the same wrapper </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/energy_bar_taste_test_310.jpg?1274368704" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> February/March 2006 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/peanut_energy_bars.html">Peanut Energy Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/apricot_walnut_cereal_bars.html">Apricot-Walnut Cereal Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/fruit_pecan_granola_bars.html">Fruit &amp; Pecan Granola Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/low_fat_granola_bars.html">Low-Fat Granola Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_snack_recipes">Quick and Healthy Snack Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When you’re looking for a quick and satisfying pick-me-up, you want more than empty calories. You grab a snack bar, the hybrid between a cookie and a candy bar. But is it really any better for you? The answer is a qualified yes: some (but not all) are great alternatives that can make a positive contribution to your daily nutrition.</p> <p>Most people can enjoy a tasty 225-calorie snack without tipping the calorie scale, especially if the bar is made of wholesome ingredients, such as whole grains, nuts and dried fruit.<br /> Look for bars with:<br /> • less than 225 calories<br /> • less than 3 grams saturated fat<br /> • more than 5 grams protein<br /> • at least 3 grams of fiber.</p> <p><strong>Label scrutiny is essential</strong>; many bars are high in calories—those labeled as “energy bars” are better suited for sustenance on a hike rather than a snack at your desk, even if the ingredients are wholesome. And others, usually those labeled “high protein,” are also chock-full of calories and saturated fat with little or no fiber. The ingredient lists are often similar to those of candy bars: plenty of corn syrup, sugars and partially hydrogenated oils. Lastly, steer clear of meal-replacement bars for specific weight-loss plans; these expensive concoctions often taste terrible and are surprisingly high in calories, while including undesirable ingredients and questionable health and diet claims.</p> <p>What Snickers and Hershey bars did for past generations, snack bars are doing today. They’re trailside pick-me-ups, pre-exercise energy boosters, afternoon snacks. Consumers assume they are getting better forms of energy than those delivered by mere candy, but with all the new bars crowding the supermarket, it’s hard to know which ones are healthy and worth the calories.</p> <p><strong>The EatingWell Taste Test</strong></p> <p>We set out to find a nutritionally sound snack bar that tasted great. We chose bars with a specific nutrient profile: 225 calories or less, less than 3 grams saturated fat and (for satiety) at least 5 grams of protein and 3 grams of fiber. We then did a blind tasting with a diverse panel that included two active teenagers who often eat bars while participating in sports and a fly-fishing guide who will take three or four bars on a trip for lunch.</p> <p>As we all discovered, it pays to read the label when buying any sort of snack bar. One taster reported that she used to eat power bars as a meal replacement, until she realized that the right sandwich could be lower in calories—and more satisfying.</p> <p><strong>BALANCE BAR Trail Mix Chocolate Chip</strong><br /> This bar garnered a first place rating from four of our tasters (including the two teenagers). Nathan, who often eats a few power bars for lunch while guiding fly-fishing trips, said he could “easily eat 4 or 5 of these a day.” Stephanie noted its crunchiness and said she liked it best because it seemed “like a healthier candy bar.” Cully thought it had “the right amount of chocolate.”</p> <p><strong>LUNA Bar Chai Tea</strong><br /> Earning praise for its taste, appearance and texture, this rich and spicy alternative is marketed toward the female slice of the power-bar-purchasing pie. Robert noted its “moist texture and spicy flavor,” while Elizabeth loved “the frosting-like bottom and texture.” Cully thought the flavor was a bit too spicy, while Nathan thought the Chai spice was “authentic.” Maria frowned at its aftertaste.</p> <p><strong>Kashi GOLEAN Crunchy! Chocolate Caramel Karma</strong><br /> This lower-calorie and low-fat bar also drew rave reviews from our tasting panel. Robert enjoyed its “subtle suggestion of caramel and warm amber color.” Nathan thought it looked great but likened the taste to Rice Krispies snacks he once made in kindergarten. Cully thought it would be better without popcorn in it.</p> <p><strong>Mojo Bar Mixed Nuts</strong><br /> Clif Bar developed the Mojo line for “people on the move who want something salty when sweet just won’t cut it.” Elizabeth cited this as her favorite for that very same reason: “it’s not too sweet—like a salty Rice Krispies treat!” Stephanie liked the nuts and pretzels but wasn’t sure how filling it would be. Maria and Cully thought it had too many nuts.</p> <p>Other power bars EW liked:<br /> LäraBar Banana Cookie<br /> Odwalla Bar! Berries GoMega</p> <p>The Tasting Panel:<br /> Robert Bloch, entrepreneur<br /> Stephanie Lylis, fair-weather outdoor enthusiast<br /> Cully Millikin, hockey-playing 8th-grader<br /> Nathan Moreau, fly-fishing guide<br /> Elizabeth Sengle, White Sox fan<br /> Maria Sengle, 9th-grader<br /> <em>—Carolyn Malcoun and Sylvia M. Geiger, M.S., R.D.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_healthy_snack_bars#comments Carolyn Malcoun Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. February/March 2006 Healthy Cooking - Kitchen Product Reviews Fri, 14 Aug 2009 15:16:50 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9518 at http://www.eatingwell.com Statin Nation http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/cholesterol/statin_nation <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Peter Jaret </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The benefits and risks of cholesterol-lowering drugs. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Over the past few years, cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins have become the most widely prescribed medicines in the world. The pills, which include Lipitor, Pravachol and Zocor, as well as less expensive generic brands, are so effective at reducing cholesterol levels that they’ve encouraged experts to lower the official recommended numbers for LDL for those people with the highest risk of heart disease.</p> <p>Like most drugs, statins have side effects. Over time, 15 percent of people experience some problems. Most are mild, such as headaches or fatigue. But in rare cases, statins have been associated with a serious problem called rhabdomyolysis, which results in muscle damage and can even lead to liver failure. For that reason, doctors typically perform liver function tests periodically for people prescribed the drugs.</p> <p>On balance, though, experts say the benefits for people with elevated cholesterol far outweigh the risks. And new benefits are being discovered all the time.</p> <p>An analysis published in December 2005 showed that statins lowered the risk of heart attacks by 26 percent and of strokes by 18 percent. There’s tantalizing evidence they may also protect against Alzheimer’s disease and perhaps ward off age-related memory loss. A few studies have even suggested that statins may lower the risk of certain cancers. No wonder some doctors have joked that the drugs should be added to the water system.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/cholesterol/statin_nation#comments Peter Jaret February/March 2006 High Cholesterol Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Cholesterol Thu, 13 Aug 2009 21:21:37 +0000 Penelope Wall 9505 at http://www.eatingwell.com 7 Super Foods to Improve Cholesterol http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/cholesterol/7_super_foods_to_improve_cholesterol <p>The best meal for anyone worried about their cholesterol is a meal low in saturated fat and abundant in fruits and vegetables. And although there are no magic bullets beyond that healthy prescription, certain foods have been shown to give cholesterol levels an extra nudge in the right direction.</p> <p>Weave some of these whole foods, all pinpointed by research as cholesterol-friendly, into your daily diet, and be sure to try some of our heart-healthy recipes below.</p> <p><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/node/9503?page=2">Next: 1. Alcohol &raquo;</a></p> <p>[pagebreak] </p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Peter Jaret </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Whole foods and great recipes for a healthy heart. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/almonds_310.jpg?1252693067" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> February/March 2006 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/see_it_make_it_quick_avocado_recipes">See It, Make It: Quick Avocado Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/hearty_barley_recipes">Hearty Barley Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/quick_budget_friendly_suppers_with_canned_beans">Quick &amp; Budget-Friendly Suppers with Canned Beans</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/our_best_healthy_blueberry_recipes">Our Best Healthy Blueberry Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/easy_healthy_oats_recipes">Easy Healthy Oats Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_low_cholesterol_recipes">Quick and Healthy Low-Cholesterol Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Cholesterol </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/cholesterol/lower_your_cholesterol_with_stanols_and_sterols">Lower Your Cholesterol with Stanols and Sterols</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/videos/healthy_cholesterol_whole_grain_tips_for_reducing_cholesterol_video">Healthy Cholesterol: Whole Grain Tips for Reducing Cholesterol Video</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/cholesterol/high_cholesterol_diet_guidelines">High Cholesterol Diet Guidelines</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/high_cholesterol_center">High Cholesterol Center</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The best meal for anyone worried about their cholesterol is a meal low in saturated fat and abundant in fruits and vegetables. And although there are no magic bullets beyond that healthy prescription, certain foods have been shown to give cholesterol levels an extra nudge in the right direction.</p> <p>Weave some of these whole foods, all pinpointed by research as cholesterol-friendly, into your daily diet, and be sure to try some of our heart-healthy recipes below.</p> <h3>Alcohol</h3> <p>Drinking a glass of wine with dinner—any alcoholic beverage, in fact—has been shown to raise good-cholesterol levels and lower the risk of a heart attack. (Excessive drinking, however, raises heart-disease danger.)</p> <h3>Almonds</h3> <p>Substances in almond skins help prevent LDL “bad” cholesterol from being oxidized, a process that can otherwise damage the lining of blood vessels and increase cardiovascular risk.</p> <p>• Sprinkle almonds on cereals and salads, nibble on a handful for an afternoon snack.</p> <h3>Avocados</h3> <p>The monounsaturated fats in avocados have been found to lower “bad” LDLs and raise “good” HDLs, especially in people with mildly elevated cholesterol.</p> <p>• Slice avocadoes into sandwiches and salads or mash with garlic, lemon juice and salsa for a terrific guacamole.</p> <h3>Barley</h3> <p>When volunteers in a USDA study added barley to the standard American Heart Association diet, LDL “bad” cholesterol levels fell more than twice as far.</p> <p>• Barley makes a great substitute for rice, adds depth to soups and is terrific combined with dried fruits, nuts and a little oil and vinegar for a hearty salad.</p> <h3>Beans &amp; Lentils</h3> <p>From a recent study in the Annals of Internal Medicine, LDL “bad” cholesterol levels fell almost twice as far in those volunteers on a low-fat diet who added beans and lentils (along with more whole grains and vegetables) to the menu.</p> <p>• Experiment with beans in soups, salads, and dips. Tuck them into burritos, lasagnas and casseroles.</p> <h3>Blueberries</h3> <p>Blueberries contain a powerful antioxidant called pterostilbene that may help lower LDL cholesterol.</p> <p>• Toss a cup of frozen blueberries together with a half-cup of orange juice and vanilla-flavored yogurt into the blender for a healthy breakfast drink. Sprinkle fresh blueberries on cereals and eat them by the handfuls for snacks.</p> <h3>Oats</h3> <p>When women in a University of Toronto study added oat bran to an already heart-healthy diet, HDL-cholesterol levels—the beneficial kind—climbed more than 11 percent.</p> <p>• Consider a daily bowl of oat bran hot cereal or old-fashioned oatmeal for breakfast. Oat bran muffins can also pack a tasty dose into your day.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/cholesterol/7_super_foods_to_improve_cholesterol#comments Peter Jaret February/March 2006 High Cholesterol Diet Recipes & Menus - Avocados Recipes & Menus - Walnuts Diet, Nutrition & Health - Cholesterol Thu, 13 Aug 2009 21:15:47 +0000 Penelope Wall 9503 at http://www.eatingwell.com Minted Peas & Rice with Feta http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/minted_peas_rice_with_feta.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/minted_peas_rice_with_feta.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD5116.JPG" alt="Minted Peas &amp;amp; Rice with Feta Recipe" title="Minted Peas &amp;amp; Rice with Feta Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/minted_peas_rice_with_feta.html" target="_blank">Minted Peas &amp; Rice with Feta</a></div> <div>The flavors of fresh mint and feta enliven this instant brown rice. Toss any leftovers with some cooked shrimp for a satisfying, easy lunch.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/minted_peas_rice_with_feta.html#comments EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (2008) February/March 2006 Greek Mediterranean Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Recipes & Menus - Pompeian Cheese Vegetables Dinner
 Lunch Fall Winter 4 Quick (total 30 min. or less) 30 minutes or less Side dish, grain Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4825 at http://www.eatingwell.com Trio of Peas http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/trio_of_peas.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/trio_of_peas.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD5115.JPG" alt="Trio of Peas Recipe" title="Trio of Peas Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/trio_of_peas.html" target="_blank">Trio of Peas</a></div> <div>Tart lemon and tarragon liven up this three-pea saute, terrific served with grilled chicken or fish.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/trio_of_peas.html#comments EatingWell Serves Two February/March 2006 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Citrus Dairy Vegetables Dinner
 Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Entertaining, formal Vegetarian 30 minutes or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4824 at http://www.eatingwell.com Miso-Glazed Peas & Carrots http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/miso_glazed_peas_carrots.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/miso_glazed_peas_carrots.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD5113.JPG" alt="Miso-Glazed Peas &amp;amp; Carrots Recipe" title="Miso-Glazed Peas &amp;amp; Carrots Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/miso_glazed_peas_carrots.html" target="_blank">Miso-Glazed Peas &amp; Carrots</a></div> <div>This sweet, salty and tangy twist on the old standby vegetable combo is sure to please the whole family.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/miso_glazed_peas_carrots.html#comments February/March 2006 Asian Japanese Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health Recipes - Individual Recipes Vegetables Dinner
 Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Kid-friendly Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegan Vegetarian 15 minutes or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4823 at http://www.eatingwell.com Sweet Pea Mash http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sweet_pea_mash.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sweet_pea_mash.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD5112.JPG" alt="Sweet Pea Mash Recipe" title="Sweet Pea Mash Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sweet_pea_mash.html" target="_blank">Sweet Pea Mash</a></div> <div>Brighten up your plate with this brilliant-green puree. Serve with roasted jumbo shrimp or garlic-rubbed lamb chops.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sweet_pea_mash.html#comments February/March 2006 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free High fiber Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low sodium Digestive Health Recipes - Individual Recipes Dairy Pork (used as flavoring) Vegetables Dinner
 Fall Spring Winter 4 Comfort foods Freezing instructions Kid-friendly Quick (total 30 min. or less) 30 minutes or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4822 at http://www.eatingwell.com Roasted Vegetable Stock http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/roasted_vegetable_stock.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/roasted_vegetable_stock.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/OT5104.JPG" alt="Roasted Vegetable Stock Recipe" title="Roasted Vegetable Stock Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/roasted_vegetable_stock.html" target="_blank">Roasted Vegetable Stock</a></div> <div>Roasting the vegetables yields rich and flavorful results.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/roasted_vegetable_stock.html#comments February/March 2006 American Easy Gluten free Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Alcohol Tomatoes Vegetables Dinner
 Lunch Roast Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Freezing instructions Make ahead instructions Vegan Vegetarian More than 1 hour Other (non-main dish) Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4821 at http://www.eatingwell.com Barbecue Pulled Chicken http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/barbecue_pulled_chicken.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/barbecue_pulled_chicken.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MP5102A_Scrivani.JPG" alt="Barbecue Pulled Chicken Recipe" title="Barbecue Pulled Chicken Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/barbecue_pulled_chicken.html" target="_blank">Barbecue Pulled Chicken</a></div> <div>This BBQ pulled chicken recipe is a fanciful reinterpretation of pulled pork that slow-cooks chicken in lots of tangy tomato sauce. Have sliced jalapenos, sliced red onions and some sour cream on hand to top this barbecue pulled chicken, which makes a hearty main course. You can turn it into an unbelievable sandwich or serve it on mashed potatoes or even whole-grain spaghetti. Serve with shredded napa cabbage tossed with low-fat mayonnaise, cider vinegar, celery seed and honey to taste.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/barbecue_pulled_chicken.html#comments February/March 2006 July/August 2012 Gluten-Free American Easy Gluten free Heart healthy High potassium Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Father's Day July 4th Labor Day Memorial Day Super Bowl Recipes - Individual Recipes Tomatoes Vegetables Chicken Dinner
 Braise/Stew Slow cooker/Crockpot Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Budget Entertaining, casual Freezing instructions Make ahead instructions More than 1 hour Main dish, poultry Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 4820 at http://www.eatingwell.com