January/February 2007 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/442/all en Local Hero: Solving the Plastic Bag Problem http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/local_heroes/local_hero_solving_the_plastic_bag_problem <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Marialisa Calta </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Plastic grocery bags are discarded by the billions each year in the United States and end up crowding landfills. Here&#039;s what one California politician is doing about it. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Urban tumbleweed. Bag hawks. Shoppers’ kites. Whatever you call them, plastic grocery bags are discarded by the billions each year in the United States and end up floating in waterways, dangling from trees and crowding landfills. But soon there will be fewer pesky plastic bags overtaking California’s landscapes, thanks to state assemblyman Lloyd Levine. Levine introduced a bill—recently signed into law—that requires supermarkets and large stores to implement an in-store plastic bag “take-back” and recycling program.</p> <p>After the law kicks into effect (in June of this year), California stores will only be permitted to distribute plastic bags imprinted with instructions to return them to participating stores. The stores then will send them off to recycling centers. Plastic bags can be used to make new bags as well as traffic cones and patio furniture, according to reusablebags.com. Stores also will be required to fund campaigns educating consumers about how to recycle bags (i.e., via store, not curbside, programs) and to offer sturdy reusable bags for sale. Levine sees the bill as a step in the right direction, but says curbside recycling (which requires the least effort of consumers) would be the “gold standard.”</p> <p>Levine first became aware of the bag problem during his regular runs along the Los Angeles River. “I come across thousands of plastic bags,” he says. “Some of the trees look like Christmas trees, only with bags in place of ornaments.” Levine discovered that Californians use 19 billion bags a year, creating 147,038 tons of trash and killing thousands of marine animals who ingest the bags or become entangled in them. Global production of these bags is estimated at about 1 trillion annually, consuming 12 million barrels of oil.</p> <p>As for that perennial check-out question, “Paper or plastic?”, according to reusablebags.com the pros and cons are roughly equal. Visit the website to learn about recent legislation (or to shop for products that help cut bag consumption).</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/local_heroes/local_hero_solving_the_plastic_bag_problem#comments Marialisa Calta January/February 2007 Food News & Origins - People & Perspectives Fri, 21 Aug 2009 15:28:05 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10218 at http://www.eatingwell.com Trend on Trial: Detox Diets http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/trend_on_trial_detox_diets <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Detox Diets </div> </div> </div> <p>January is a time when many people are looking to undo the damage caused by weeks of holiday indulgence. For some, a so-called “detoxification diet” seems like a perfect solution. The term “detox diet” is applied to a range of eating plans, from two-day juice fasts and short spans of consuming only vegetables and water to radical regimes that include colonic irrigations (a procedure similar to an enema).</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Anna Roufos </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Can periodic dietary cleansing make you healthier? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/produce_guide_310_0.jpg?1295450857" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/6_easy_steps_to_lose_10_pounds_healthfully">6 Easy Steps to Lose 10 Pounds Healthfully</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/ten_pounds_in_10_days">Ten Pounds in 10 Days?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/trend_on_trial_the_raw_food_diet">Trend on Trial: The Raw-Food Diet</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>January is a time when many people are looking to undo the damage caused by weeks of holiday indulgence. For some, a so-called “detoxification diet” seems like a perfect solution. The term “detox diet” is applied to a range of eating plans, from two-day juice fasts and short spans of consuming only vegetables and water to radical regimes that include colonic irrigations (a procedure similar to an enema). Advocates say periodic dietary cleansing helps clear toxins (originating, they claim, from pollution and junk food) that accumulate in the body’s fat stores and can result in headaches, fatigue and increased risk for chronic diseases, such as cancer.</p> <p>Supporting evidence: “For a week or so, fasting or following a very restrictive diet generally isn’t a problem,” says David Grotto, R.D., a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. “And many people say they feel better after doing it.” Still, says Grotto, there isn’t any scientific evidence to back the benefits ascribed to detoxifying eating plans.<br /> Pros: “Many programs encourage eating lots of fruits and vegetables, which are high in water and fiber and may help move things smoothly through the GI tract, and this tends to make people feel better,” says Grotto. Taking a temporary break from caffeine, alcohol and refined sugars—as is prescribed by most of these plans—may not only eliminate energy crashes sometimes associated with these ingredients but also could help people realize just how much “junk” they normally consume, says Dawn Jackson Blatner, R.D., at Northwestern Memorial Hospital Wellness Institute in Chicago. In this way, detox periods may inspire longer-term healthy changes.</p> <p>CONS: Colonic irrigations done improperly can seriously injure the large intestine, so avoid them, says Grotto. Even “safer” plans (those that promote eating only select, nutritious foods) may cause fatigue or dizziness if they don’t supply adequate calories. If severe calorie restriction is sustained for more than a few days, the body may sense impending starvation and release stress hormones that cause fat stores to break down rapidly—a response that, ironically, may increase circulating toxins. “When fat is metabolized very quickly, the process may free up toxins at a rate that overwhelms the body’s capacity for dealing with them,” says Peter Pressman, M.D., an internal-medicine specialist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Finally, the enhanced energy that detox dieters often report may be the result of surging stress hormones too. (Evolutionarily, it makes sense: a “fight or flight” response drives hungry animals to seek out food aggressively.) An adrenaline-charged drive is short-lived, and with prolonged calorie restriction, the body powers down to conserve energy, ultimately slowing the metabolism.</p> <p>OUR Verdict: If you’re a healthy adult, living on vegetables and water for a few days isn’t likely to do you harm—or much good. “People who operate on the mode of ‘live today, detox tomorrow’ are fooling themselves,” says Grotto. Optimizing your body’s natural detoxification systems, he says, is best achieved by consistently practicing healthy behaviors: consuming nutrient-rich foods, drinking plenty of fluids, getting adequate sleep and exercising regularly.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/trend_on_trial_detox_diets#comments Anna Roufos January/February 2007 Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Fri, 21 Aug 2009 15:01:01 +0000 Nifer 10200 at http://www.eatingwell.com Tackling a Weight Problem with Game-Day Favorites http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/tackling_a_weight_problem_with_game <p>Nacho chips smothered in cheese sauce. Spicy chicken wings begging to be dunked in creamy blue cheese dressing—those were Anthony Davis’ favorite. “Mmm… they were so good that I could never resist them,” says Davis, former NFL player and legendary University of Southern California running back. But too many football Sundays spent in the VIP box noshing on fattening appetizers didn’t do much for his health.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Football legend Anthony Davis shares his weight-loss story. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/2469boneless_wings225.jpg?1250866215" /> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/boneless_buffalo_wings.html">Boneless Buffalo Wings</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/spicy_blue_cheese_dip.html">Spicy Blue Cheese Dip</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/southwestern_layered_bean_dip.html">Southwestern Layered Bean Dip</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/super_bowl_1">Healthy Super Bowl Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Nacho chips smothered in cheese sauce. Spicy chicken wings begging to be dunked in creamy blue cheese dressing—those were Anthony Davis’ favorite. “Mmm… they were so good that I could never resist them,” says Davis, former NFL player and legendary University of Southern California running back. But too many football Sundays spent in the VIP box noshing on fattening appetizers didn’t do much for his health.</p> <p>In 2006, he got a wake-up call. The same year he was “enshrined” into the College Football Hall of Fame, he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. He suffered from painful flare-ups of gout (an inflammatory disease linked with obesity). Davis also struggled with sleep apnea, an obesity-related condition in which one stops breathing several times a night. When months of dieting proved unsuccessful, he and his doctors concluded that changing his life would require drastic measures. He scheduled gastric bypass surgery for March 11, 2006.</p> <p>Now, Davis is 90 pounds lighter and he feels better than ever. “I have so much energy,” he says. “My diabetes, gout and sleep apnea are gone.” While the surgery jump-started his weight loss, only regular exercise and a healthy diet will keep the pounds from creeping back. Physical exercise is again part of his daily routine. “I walk everywhere now,” says Davis. “And I’ve started working out at the gym again too.”</p> <p>Come this football season, Davis will opt for leaner snacks, like Boneless Buffalo Wings—with less than half the calories and 80 percent less sodium than traditional versions—and Southwestern Layered Bean Dip. With plenty of the good stuff—tomato, lettuce and protein-rich beans—and few ingredients high in calories or fat, our dip comes in with less than half the calories and one-quarter the saturated fat of the original. So go ahead and chow down with these healthy appetizers.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/tackling_a_weight_problem_with_game#comments Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. January/February 2007 Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:50:32 +0000 Nifer 10196 at http://www.eatingwell.com Food for the Heart http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/food_for_the_heart <p><em>Winner of the International Association of Culinary Professionals' Bert Greene Award in the Essay division.</em></p> <p>At home, I keep a framed photo of myself clinking wineglasses with a friend at dinner. It’s not flattering: I look wan and worn out, with red-rimmed eyes, cheeks flushed. But the expression the camera caught is one of pure contentment.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Laura Fraser </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Author Laura Fraser shares her essay on heartbreak and recovery and the meal that helped. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/flower_tulip_purple_310_0.jpg?1251490458" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2007 </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>—Winner of the International Association of Culinary Professionals' Bert Greene Award in the Essay division.</p> <p>At home, I keep a framed photo of myself clinking wineglasses with a friend at dinner. It’s not flattering: I look wan and worn out, with red-rimmed eyes, cheeks flushed. But the expression the camera caught is one of pure contentment.</p> <p>The photo was taken at Chez Panisse, in Berkeley, on May 8, 1997. I remember the date because on May 7, my husband left me. Up until dinner, May 8 was perhaps the worst day of my life. I spent most of it in bed, trying to grasp my new reality, that the man I loved and married and planned to have children with had left me, abruptly, for someone else. I’d been lied to, cheated on, abandoned—and I had a dinner reservation that evening at the restaurant that made Alice Waters famous for her fresh-from-the-farm approach to cooking.</p> <p>Ironically, the dinner with my longtime friend Larry was payment for a bet I lost about which of us would get married first. We’d made the wager years before, when I thought I was too free-spirited to settle down, before I met the man who changed my mind. After I wed, Larry got married, too, and each of our lives got busier. Finally, our schedules coincided with a day we could get a reservation. That it turned out to be the day after my husband left me made me laugh at the universe in spite of my sadness.</p> <p>When I told Larry the news, he asked if I wanted to cancel dinner. But I needed a reason to get out of bed, and that day, dinner at my favorite restaurant was the only one that would work. I might cry through every course, but I was going.</p> <p>I met Larry at the entryway to the dark-wood Arts &amp; Crafts building, greeted by a spray of wildflowers and a large bowl of seasonal fruit. We were seated in a cozy corner, with a view of the kitchen and its copper pots. We started with a glass of champagne and a plate of Hog Island oysters on the half shell with little sausages. The oysters were so fresh they tasted like my tears. I closed my eyes to feel the sensation of the sea.</p> <p>Larry chatted about wine with the server, chose something French, and started telling me about novels he’d enjoyed recently. He knew better than to ask how I was feeling.</p> <p>After the oysters came a fish and shellfish soup, with a delicate broth of fennel and leeks. The flavors were so subtle and perfectly balanced that my mind had to close off everything else and rest on my taste buds. There was no room in my consciousness for heartbreak, divorce and having to move out of my house, only space for a soup whose flavors shimmered like gold.</p> <p>The server poured a dark-hued Bandol wine, ripe and inviting. The flavors spread across my mouth into a smile. The main course arrived, an earthy grilled duck breast with rhubarb sauce and roasted turnips. The rhubarb brought me back to my childhood, when I would pick the bitter stalks from my grandmother’s garden and we would make my favorite pink stew. My grandmother is gone, but rhubarb is as permanent as my memories of her. The rhubarb duck comforted me with its familiarity; no matter what happens, in spring there is always rhubarb.</p> <p>When dessert came, a berry feuilleté, perfect little fresh spring berries in the lightest and flakiest of pastry, Larry uttered a French expression of delight. He said the meal made up for the time, years before, when we’d gone bicycling on Thanksgiving when everything was closed and all we could find for dinner was mango juice and pretzels. At that moment, the Chez Panisse meal was making up for so much more. The server snapped our photo as we finished our wine.</p> <p>I would go back to my tears the next day, and it would be months before such a look of contentment would cross my face again. But at that moment, sharing a wonderful meal with a friend, the last pastry flake melting on my tongue like snow, I was happy. And every time I looked at that photo during the dark times that followed, I knew I would be happy again.</p> <p><em>—Laura Fraser is the author of the bestselling travel memoir The Italian Affair and Losing It, an exposé of the diet industry.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/food_for_the_heart#comments Laura Fraser January/February 2007 Food News & Origins - People & Perspectives Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:25:15 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10178 at http://www.eatingwell.com Good Things Come in [Omega] Threes http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/good_things_come_in_omega_threes <p>As someone with a family history of heart problems, I struggle with far-from-perfect cholesterol numbers. I’m ever hopeful for a science breakthrough I can act on. I once ate oats every day for three months in an attempt to nudge my lipid values into healthier ranges; it worked, but alas, not enough. I still enjoy my oat cereal, but I know I need to do more. Lately, I’m eating more fish.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> &quot;Fish fats&quot; prove a powerful way to protect the heart. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/salmon_canned_310.jpg?1269290112" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/omega_3s.jpg?1268069379" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/delicious_canned_wild_salmon_recipes">Delicious Canned Wild Salmon Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/honey_soy_salmon.html">Honey-Soy Broiled Salmon</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/pistachio_crusted_tuna_steaks.html">Pistachio-Crusted Tuna Steaks</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/grandma_gingers_fish_casserole.html">Grandma Ginger&#039;s Fish Casserole</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_salmon_recipes">Healthy Salmon Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_fish_recipes">Healthy Fish Recipes and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_nut_recipes">Healthy Nut Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_flax_recipes">Healthy Flax Recipes and Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/healthy_cooking_blog/why_i_m_wild_about_canned_salmon">Why I’m wild about canned salmon</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/what_s_in_your_fish">What’s In Your Fish</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/can_salmon_save_your_skin">Can Salmon Save Your Skin?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/what_are_food_sources_of_omega_3s">What are food sources of omega-3s?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/omega_3_fats_and_adhd">Omega-3 Fats and ADHD</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>As someone with a family history of heart problems, I struggle with far-from-perfect cholesterol numbers. I’m ever hopeful for a science breakthrough I can act on. I once ate oats every day for three months in an attempt to nudge my lipid values into healthier ranges; it worked, but alas, not enough. I still enjoy my oat cereal, but I know I need to do more. Lately, I’m eating more fish.</p> <p>Last October, Harvard scientists analyzed two decades of research and concluded that modest consumption of fish (one to two servings per week), especially salmon, tuna and other types rich in the fatty acids known as omega-3s, reduced risk of heart disease death by 36 percent and overall deaths by 17 percent. The data were so compelling the authors claimed the health benefits of eating seafood outweigh the risks of exposure to environmental contaminants in fish such as methyl mercury or PCBs. (That said, women who are nursing, pregnant or planning to become pregnant and children younger than 12 should avoid fish with higher mercury levels, such as swordfish.)</p> <p>Ever since my grad-student days I’ve been intrigued by the story of pioneering epidemiologists who sought to learn why heart disease was practically unheard of in Greenland’s Inuit people—despite their diet of high-fat, high-cholesterol whale and seal meat. The scientists discovered that two omega-3 fatty acids predominant in fish—eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA)—were widespread in the Inuit blood and were likely protecting their hearts.</p> <p>How? When it comes to fats, we are what we eat: our cell membranes reflect the fat content of our diet. When we eat ample omega-3s, our membranes—including those of the heart and blood vessels—are more elastic (that’s how fish stay flexible in icy waters). Blood moves through the body more easily, reducing the risk of high blood pressure and blood clots. All this can help prevent hardened arteries and stroke, and lowers risk of an irregular heart rate. Lastly, EPA fights inflammation, a known disease risk factor. Inflammation is the body’s normal response to injury, but chronic inflammation seems to play a role in causing hardened arteries and other heart problems.</p> <p>Plant foods like flaxseed, soybeans, canola and walnuts are good sources of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), another omega-3 with its own heart benefits. A small amount of ALA is also converted to EPA and DHA in the body, “but at a very slow rate,” says William Connor, M.D., a longtime friend of mine and a professor at Oregon Health &amp; Science University who has studied fish and fish oils for more than 30 years. If it’s heart-health effects you’re after, he emphasizes, “what you want are EPA and DHA, from fish or fish-oil supplements.”</p> <p>But omega-3s are usually lacking in our diets, vastly outnumbered by omega-6 fatty acids common to processed foods made with vegetable oils including safflower and cottonseed. Omega-6s tend to promote inflammation, while omega-3s reduce it. Many experts believe our American diets tilt too much toward omega-6s, and that the best way to restore balance is to boost our intake of omega-3s from any source.</p> <p>So I’m doing my darnedest to eat more omega-3s. I aim to serve a fatty fish like salmon twice a week, and consider the seafood dishes first in restaurants. I sprinkle walnuts on my salads and make dressings with canola oil.</p> <p>As ever, moderation is key. Very high intakes of fish-based omega-3s (over 3,000 mg/day) can raise the risk of excessive bleeding or even hemorrhagic stroke. And, like any fat source, omega-3s are still calorie-rich. So focus on substituting (not adding) omega-3s for other fats you eat. After all, the most important thing you can do for your heart is to be at a healthy weight. Without that, keeping your heart healthy is just a fishing expedition.</p> <p>—Rachel Johnson, EatingWell’s senior nutrition advisor, is dean of the University of Vermont College of Agriculture &amp; Life Sciences.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/good_things_come_in_omega_threes#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. January/February 2007 Heart Healthy Diet Recipes & Menus - Seafood Diet, Nutrition & Health - Heart Health Tue, 18 Aug 2009 15:10:34 +0000 Penelope Wall 9679 at http://www.eatingwell.com Retrain Your Taste Buds http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/retrain_your_taste_buds <p>Even after decades of hiding uneaten peas, you can learn to prefer healthy foods. This writer’s husband did just that—and lost 55 pounds. Here’s how. (<a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/node/9677?page=8">Also see Taste Tips for some common healthy foods and our suggestions for how to learn to enjoy them!</a>)</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cynthia Sass, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Oh, to have been born loving broccoli instead of chocolate! Truth is, your DNA alone doesn’t dictate what you like (and don’t like). </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="300" height="300" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/Brussels_sprouts_so09.jpg?1414180018" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/broccoli_310.jpg?1261151889" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Kids Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/almond_crusted_chicken_fingers.html">Almond-Crusted Chicken Fingers</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/baked_mac_cheese.html">Baked Mac &amp; Cheese</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chilaquiles_casserole.html">Chilaquiles Casserole</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/broccoli_cheese_chowder.html">Broccoli-Cheese Chowder</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/pizza_roll_up.html">Pizza Roll-Up</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_eating_kids">Healthy Eating for Kids Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_kids_lunch_recipes">Healthy Kids Lunch Recipes &amp; Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Healthy Eating for Kids </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_kids/how_can_i_get_my_kids_to_try_new_foods">How can I get my kids to try new foods?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/3_tricks_to_get_your_kids_to_eat_healthier">3 tricks to get your kids to eat healthier</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/healthy_cooking_blog/how_to_love_5_of_the_most_hated_vegetables">How to love 5 of the most hated vegetables</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/videos/how_to_sneak_veggies_into_family_meals_video">How to Sneak Veggies into Family Meals Video</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/food_news_blog/angry_mommy_responds_chocolate_milk_is_soda_in_drag_puh_lease">Chocolate milk is &quot;soda in drag&quot;? Puh-lease!</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_kids_diet_center">Healthy Kids Diet Center</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Even after decades of hiding uneaten peas, you can learn to prefer healthy foods. This writer’s husband did just that—and lost 55 pounds. Here’s how. (Also see Taste Tips for some common healthy foods and our suggestions for how to learn to enjoy them!)</p> <p>When I met my husband Jack nine years ago, he was three sizes larger (XXL) than he is now. On one of our first dates, I watched in silent horror as he inhaled a huge slice of pizza piled with pepperoni, sausage and extra cheese—washing it down with Dr. Pepper. I was (still am) a vegetarian and a registered dietitian who teaches people how to eat well. I soon discovered that, more than pizza, Jack loved deep-fried tacos. He rarely touched fruit. Most of the vegetables he ate were battered and fried.</p> <p>While Jack’s food preferences made sense to me—he was raised in Texas on beef, whole milk and bacon grease—I couldn’t imagine eating the foods he favored. I’d grown up in upstate New York with a family that planted a garden every year. But after the initial shock, I didn’t think much about our drastic eating differences. Jack was charming, smart and sensitive. It didn’t much matter that he chose chicken-fried steak over stir-fried tofu.</p> <p>Even after we eloped four months later and began eating most meals together, I had no motives to make over Jack’s diet. I kept eating the foods I preferred: whole grains, vegetables and fruits (and chocolate). For a time, Jack stuck to his familiar favorites. At home, we prepared separate meals and ate them together. When we dined out, we chose restaurants that met both our needs (i.e., enchiladas for Jack; black bean soup and a salad for me). I always offered Jack tastes of whatever I was eating. Little by little, he started exploring new foods. He tasted a bite of my veggie (soy) burger, said it wasn’t bad, and eventually, he tried a whole one. Later, when he learned that edamame was soy, too, he gave it a go—and liked it. Eventually, he moved on to tofu, which now, stir-fried with vegetables, is one of his staple lunches.</p> <p>Soon Jack was showing an interest in eating well and consciously starting to shift his diet in healthier directions. He replaced whole milk with 2 percent and then skim; eventually, we were sharing cartons of soymilk. Noticeable physical improvements—increased energy, improved digestion and a gradually shrinking belly—reinforced Jack’s efforts. Over two years, he shed 55 pounds—simply by retraining himself to like healthier foods. He’s kept the weight off for four years.</p> <p>I’ve been thrilled by my husband’s eating evolution, but I had never really stopped to consider how a man who had eaten one way for over 30 years successfully pulled off a dietary one-eighty. Then, a few months ago at a nutrition conference, I attended a lecture on taste preferences by Julie Mennella, Ph.D., a scientist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. “What we like to eat is shaped by both biology and experience,” Dr. Mennella explained. Jack’s diet transformation was starting to make sense.</p> <p><strong>Born to be wild about vegetables?</strong></p> <p>There are five distinct tastes: sweet, sour, salty, bitter and umami, which means “savory” in Japanese and is associated with meats and cheeses. When we eat, chemicals in our food are sensed by the thousands of taste buds on the bumpy projections (fungiform papillae) of our tongues. The chemicals attach to receptors in the buds, sending signals to the brain, which registers taste perceptions. Receptors also respond to the temperature of foods and chemicals that create physical sensations (think of chili with fiery jalapeños). Smell plays into one’s flavor experiences, too: foods release chemicals that travel up the nose to olfactory receptors, triggering a chain reaction of signals that amplify taste perceptions. (Prove this to yourself by holding your nose and sampling a jelly bean: you’ll taste sweet, but won’t get a burst of “flavor”—the term used to refer to taste plus smell—until you unplug your nose.</p> <p>To a degree, taste preferences are hard-wired. Across cultures, people generally prefer foods that taste sweet and dislike bitter ones—which makes evolutionary sense. Sweetness is associated with foods that provide energy needed for survival (e.g., mother’s milk). Bitterness often signals the presence of a toxin. How much a person prefers sweet, and dislikes bitter, tastes depends partly upon the number of taste buds and the type of taste receptors he or she inherits. “We know that some people live in a more ‘pastel’ taste world and others, a more ‘neon’ one,” says Valerie B. Duffy, professor of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Connecticut.</p> <p>One of the most studied genetic factors affecting taste involves one’s ability to detect bitter compounds. Some people inherit genes for taste receptors that are acutely sensitive to bitterness. Other people, born with genes for receptors that make for less-intense taste experiences, often aren’t able to detect subtle bitter compounds. One can gauge a person’s bitterness sensitivity with a simple test: a slip of paper containing a small amount of a compound known to stimulate bitter-sensing receptors is placed on the tongue. The taster perceives bitterness only if his receptors are the sensitive kind.</p> <p>I had a chance to see this for myself during Dr. Mennella’s presentation. She asked each of us in attendance to “taste” a paper strip and raise a hand if we detected bitter. I slipped the paper into my mouth and shot my arm high into the air. It was as if someone had dumped a spoonful of dandelion root—one of the bitterest substances on earth—on my tongue. Scanning the room, I was amazed. Some of my colleagues were grimacing like me, but others looked as if they were waiting for something to happen. “What?” their faces said. “I don’t taste a thing.”</p> <p>If a built-in aversion to bitter might have helped our ancestors to survive and evolve, did this mean I’d gotten “good” taste genes? It’s a logical theory—but, in fact, there’s little evidence that a particularly acute sense of taste offers health protection. In fact, in a world where we “hunt” and “gather” at supermarkets, being easily turned off to bitter may be a liability. Many phytochemicals linked with health benefits—glucosinolates in Brussels sprouts and kale, flavonoids in grapefruit and isoflavones in soy—impart bitterness. And, in fact, research shows that people genetically programmed to detect subtle bitter tastes consume fewer cruciferous vegetables, leafy greens, tart citrus fruits, green tea and soy products—all foods associated with reduced risk of chronic diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s. “We have data that show that people who were more sensitive to bitter tastes consumed fewer vegetables and had a greater incidence of colon polyps, a marker of higher risk for colon cancer,” says Duffy. “This research is preliminary but it connects genetic variations that affect oral sensations with specific health outcomes.”</p> <p>Luckily, inheriting an ultra-sensitive bitter-detection system doesn’t mean that your diet is doomed. “You can temper the bitterness in foods by pairing them with other sweeter foods or cooking them in ways that bring out their natural sweetness,” says Duffy. “Salt and strong spices, such as garlic, chiles or ginger, also can make bitter foods more palatable.” Jack and I do a lot of this sort of thing at home: we sauté spinach with sweet red peppers and enhance asparagus with garlic and a sprinkle of sea salt. (See “Taste Tips")</p> <p>Even after bringing the bitterness of a food to a more acceptable level, it can take time to learn to enjoy the formerly off-putting flavors. Says Duffy: “Someone who has had unpleasant experiences in the past has to unlearn connections between unpalatable bitterness and particular food flavors.” One can do this by crowding out the bad memories with good experiences of eating deliciously prepared foods.</p> <p><strong>Like mother, like son</strong></p> <p>You can’t just blame your taste buds for not liking certain foods. DNA doesn’t define taste preferences; it’s just one piece of the puzzle that involves nurture at least as much as nature. Cultivating a “taste” for a specific something (be it expensive handbags or Brussels sprouts) requires exposure. Nutrition experts frequently counsel mothers about the importance of exposing young children to lots of different tastes: it conditions them to accept a variety of healthy foods. They advise parents to try and try again, as research shows that it can take as many as 10 to 15 tastes before a child will learn to appreciate a new flavor. But our first flavor experiences occur even before we’re able to eat solid foods.</p> <p>Infants are exposed to flavors through breast milk, which reflects the flavors of foods, spices and beverages in mothers’ diets. (Bottle-fed babies are limited to the standardized flavors of infant formulas, one of many reasons that nutrition experts recommend breastfeeding.) Food chemicals with distinct tastes and smells also are transmitted to the amniotic fluid that cushions a growing baby; the fetus swallows this fluid and can sense the flavors. “Taste and smell are fairly well developed in utero,” says Mennella.</p> <p>A few years back, Mennella and her colleagues conducted a study in which pregnant women planning to breastfeed were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Women in all groups consumed 1 1⁄4 cups of carrot juice or water four days a week for three consecutive weeks during the last trimester of pregnancy and again during the first two months of breastfeeding. One group consumed carrot juice during pregnancy and water during lactation. Another group, the reverse (water, then carrot juice). The third group drank water both times. Later, when it came time to introduce the infants to solid foods, the researchers observed the babies as they were fed cereal prepared with water on one occasion and cereal made with carrot juice on another. After each feeding session, the scientists also asked the mothers to rate their babies’ enjoyment of the cereal. When fed the carrot-flavored cereal, infants whose mothers had drunk the carrot juice while pregnant or breastfeeding displayed fewer negative facial expressions than the babies whose mothers had sipped water. These infants also appeared (according to their mothers, who were unaware of the scientists’ research question) to enjoy the carrot-flavored cereal more than the one made with water. “Prior exposure to the carrot juice made the taste familiar, and therefore more acceptable,” says Mennella.</p> <p>Of course, after I learned this, I was eager to relate this to my, and Jack’s, earliest flavor experiences. I knew that I’d been bottle-fed, as was common when I was born. But my mother loves all kinds of fruits and vegetables and, lucky for me, my birthday is in September, which means she ate loads of in-season produce for most of her pregnancy. To find out about Jack, I asked my sister-in-law, who was a teen when her brother was born. She told me that while their mother was pregnant with Jack and then breastfeeding she’d eaten the typical Texas fare she always served: beef brisket, meatloaf and fried chicken.</p> <p>Do these first flavor exposures explain my husband’s early love affair with meat and how I came to love vegetables despite my sensitive taste buds? It’s possible they played a part—but likely a small one. There’s yet another layer to this onion.</p> <p><strong>Watch and learn</strong></p> <p>As kids transition from infancy to the toddler years, “nurture” overtakes “nature” in respect to developing eating patterns. “Children learn the rules of eating from their caregivers,” says Mennella. Adult role models teach kids what constitutes food and how foods should be prepared. They set rules about when certain foods should or should not be eaten.</p> <p>One of the foremost experts on the development of eating behavior in children is Jennifer Orlet Fisher, Ph.D., assistant professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Fisher’s research, and that of her colleagues, shows that young children learn to prefer foods that are familiar and ones presented as “acceptable” in their homes.</p> <p>During early childhood one begins to associate both positive and negative experiences with particular foods. Offering a child a certain food as part of a fun celebration or ritual (e.g., birthday cake) enhances his preference for that food. On the other hand, insisting that a child eat something in order to get a reward—“finish your peas and then you can watch television”—usually creates a negative food association. “These ‘contingency’ strategies are effective in the short run: they do get a kid to eat peas,” says Fisher. “But over the long haul, they tend to backfire.” In other words, bribing a child to eat something tends to reinforce the negative associations with that food.</p> <p>The best way to teach someone that healthy foods are important (and delicious) is to eat them yourself. In a study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Dr. Fisher and her colleagues showed that parents who ate lots of fruits and vegetables generally had daughters who consumed plenty of produce, too, whereas parents who pushed fruits and vegetables but ate few servings themselves tended to have daughters who had low intakes of fruits and vegetables. Moral of the study: If you’re trying to help someone to eat a healthier diet, show—don’t tell—them how to do it.</p> <p>After speaking with Dr. Fisher, I realized that my parents never had to force me to eat vegetables or fruits because I’d learned to associate them with fun experiences, such as selecting fresh cherries at the farmer’s market with my mother. These activities emphasized that a juicy peach or a watermelon was the prize. Seeing my mother enjoy salads and sweet potatoes reinforced that concept. Could watching me enjoy healthy foods have suggested to Jack that they were “good” and encouraged him to try them for himself? Perhaps. Says Fisher: “We see other people enjoying different foods, and so we try them too.”</p> <p><strong>A whole new world</strong></p> <p>If one’s taste preferences truly stopped evolving during childhood, people who immigrate to the U.S. would always continue eating their native diets. Yet, for better or worse, most change their diets significantly, says David Himmelgreen, Ph.D., a professor of anthropology at the University of South Florida and former president of the Council on Nutritional Anthropology. “Changes in immigrants’ eating preferences stem from a combination of many social and cultural factors,” says Himmelgreen. For many, necessity drives change. For example, moving to the U.S. may mean longer commutes and extended workdays, which can force a shift toward more convenience foods. Or, if one’s traditional foods are far more expensive in one’s new home, it may be impractical, or impossible, to continue eating them.</p> <p>Sometimes, education and social support motivate positive dietary changes. “When people discover the benefits of healthy foods and learn that it may not be so difficult to implement new ways of eating, they generally want to change,” says Himmelgreen.</p> <p>In retrospect, I realize that an increasing awareness of nutrition probably was part of Jack’s motivation to change. Anytime I wrote a nutrition article or prepared a presentation, I tried it out on him. He’d give me feedback on what sounded too technical and what was interesting. It wasn’t long after Jack became my professional sounding board that he started making intentional dietary shifts.</p> <p>And somewhat like the immigrants Dr. Himmelgreen studies, Jack’s eating preferences were shaped by a new environment: we’d moved from Texas to Florida, where we now live. Tampa isn’t exactly a health-food mecca, but you’d be hard pressed to find many restaurants that serve chicken-fried steak, dumplings and fried okra. Our home was stocked conveniently with whole grains, fruits and vegetables, which I enjoyed regularly in Jack’s company, consistently offering tastes but not pressuring him to try anything. Basically, I’d created the very sort of positive eating environment that helps cultivate healthy taste preferences in kids, according to Dr. Fisher and other experts.</p> <p>People often tell me that they are wowed by Jack’s healthy transformation and weight loss. My response always has been, “He did all the work.” He did. But now I realize that I helped set the stage. What would Jack be eating today, if he’d never met me? I wondered. So I asked. “Crispy beef tacos with extra cheese,” he told me. “And wearing my size-40 pants,” he added, sitting comfortably in his 34s.</p> <p>—Cynthia Sass, M.P.H., R.D., is a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association and a lecturer at the University of South Florida.<br /> —Illustration by Serge Bloch</p> <p><strong>TASTE TIPS</strong><br /> Cultivating a taste for Brussels sprouts starts with palate-pleasing preparation methods. The EatingWell Test Kitchen cooks are always looking for ways to transform less-than-popular, nutrient-packed foods into unexpected crowd-pleasers. Here, a few of our favorite techniques.</p> <p><strong>Beans</strong><br /> Common Turn-Offs: Earthy flavors, mushy texture, G.I. issues.<br /> What’s to love: Super-lean protein, fiber, folate. Cheap too!<br /> Test Kitchen Wisdom: Pair with a flavorful dark meat like beef or chicken thighs. Combine with crisp ingredients for textural contrast (think celery in bean salad). Mash or puree beans to thicken sauces or creamy soups. Puree with herbs and olive oil for a creamy dip. For firmer texture, cook beans “from scratch” rather than using canned beans; change soaking water to reduce gaseousness.</p> <p><strong>Cabbage-Family Vegetables</strong><br /> Common Turn-Off: Pungent flavors<br /> What’s to love: Cancer-fighting phytochemicals, carotenoids, vitamin C, fiber.<br /> Test Kitchen Wisdom: Add assertive flavorings: bacon, toasted nuts, vinegar. Use creamy elements like cheese sauce (broccoli, Brussels sprouts). Don’t overcook (it makes flavors more pungent); vegetables should be tender-crisp, greens still bright.</p> <p><strong>Tofu</strong><br /> Common Turn-Offs: Soft texture, bland taste.<br /> What’s to love: Soy protein, isoflavones, calcium (in some types).<br /> Test Kitchen Wisdom: Dredge extra-firm tofu in flour, cornstarch or breadcrumbs, then sauté for a crisp outside, tender inside. Counteract blandness with extra-flavorful ingredients in a stir-fry.</p> <p><strong>Dark, Leafy Greens</strong><br /> Common Turn-Off: Bitter taste.<br /> What’s to love: Potassium, folate, vitamins A, E &amp; C, fiber.<br /> Test Kitchen Wisdom: Balance bitterness with sour flavors (lemon juice, vinegar), creaminess (sauce or dressing) or richness (flavorful cheese).</p> <p><strong>Fatty Fish</strong><br /> Common Turn-Off: “Fishy” flavor.<br /> What’s to love: Omega-3 fatty acids, protein, calcium (in canned fish with bones).<br /> Test Kitchen Wisdom: Soak fish in milk for an hour (in the refrigerator); discard milk and pat dry before cooking. Serve with lemon or other acidic elements (vinegar-based sauce, flavorful salad dressing, strong mustard or hot sauce). Make fishy fish an element in the meal rather than the star (think salads, spreads, sandwiches).</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/retrain_your_taste_buds#comments Cynthia Sass, M.P.H., R.D. January/February 2007 Healthy Eating for Kids Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Tue, 18 Aug 2009 14:59:44 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9677 at http://www.eatingwell.com EatingWell Taste Test: Chicken Sausage http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_chicken_sausage <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sausage Showdown </div> </div> </div> <p>Precooked chicken sausage is truly convenient. Keep a package or two on hand to accompany Sunday morning pancake breakfasts or to sauté with some sliced peppers and onions for a quick weeknight dinner. We knew many chicken sausages were healthier than their pork counterparts, but were pleasantly surprised to discover how much healthier (see below). The chicken sausages have far fewer calories and less fat per serving, so we’re happy to recommend them and use them in recipes.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sausage Showdown: The EatingWell Test Kitchen picks healthy sausages that taste great </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/chicken_sausage_taste_test_310.jpg?1274369129" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Chicken Sausage Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/favorite_healthy_chicken_sausage_recipes">Our Favorite Healthy Chicken Sausage Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Precooked chicken sausage is truly convenient. Keep a package or two on hand to accompany Sunday morning pancake breakfasts or to sauté with some sliced peppers and onions for a quick weeknight dinner. We knew many chicken sausages were healthier than their pork counterparts, but were pleasantly surprised to discover how much healthier (see below). The chicken sausages have far fewer calories and less fat per serving, so we’re happy to recommend them and use them in recipes.</p> <p>It was difficult to test this category, as there are many different manufacturers making myriad flavors. So we purchased as many sausages as we could find and tested them all. After a belly-filling tasting of 27 chicken sausages, it’s safe to say that each of us found a new favorite. Here’s what we thought about our Top 8 picks:</p> <p><strong>Al Fresco</strong><br /> Three of the seven Al Fresco flavors we tried ended up in our Top 8—Sweet Italian Style (our overall favorite), Buffalo Style and Teriyaki Ginger—but only the Sweet Italian flavor garnered our Smart Choice rating (the others were a bit high in sodium). All of us on the tasting panel prefer spicier foods, but we agreed with Jessie’s comment that the Sweet Italian had “great flavor—spicier than I would expect for a ‘sweet’ sausage.” Carolyn C. thought the flavors really came through in the Teriyaki Ginger sausage, but Stacy couldn’t get past its “too pink” color. Hilary wished for “a little more heat (and some blue cheese sauce)” on top of the Buffalo Style flavor.<br /> <em>Al Fresco Sweet Italian Style was chosen as an "EatingWell Smart Choice."</em></p> <p><strong>Applegate Farms</strong><br /> You might know Applegate Farms from its nitrate-free deli meats; it also has a selection of organic poultry sausages. The Chicken &amp; Apple offering is one of our favorites. Carolyn M. loved seeing big chunks of apple in the sausage and appreciated its “great smoky flavor.” Stacy and Hilary both noted its moist texture, which was welcome after tasting some really dry sausages.</p> <p><strong>Bilinski’s</strong><br /> Of the four Bilinski’s flavors we tried, two—Mild Italian Style and Spinach &amp; Garlic—get our Smart Choice award. Both are low in calories, fat and sodium. The Mild Italian got second place overall in our tasting. Stacy said, “Great color, nice sweet veggie flavor—finally a sausage I can eat!” Carolyn C. loved the garlic flavor in the Spinach &amp; Garlic variety.<br /> <em>Bilinski's Mild Italian Style and Spinach &amp; Garlic were both chosen as "EatingWell Smart Choices."</em></p> <p><strong>Casual Gourmet</strong><br /> Tomato, Basil &amp; Mozzarella—oh my! Most of the tasters really liked the combination, but its white color put off many of us. As Hilary noted, “Doesn’t look that good, but tastes the best! Cheesy! Yummy! Juicy!” Stacy felt the basil and mozzarella flavors really came through, but Carolyn C. thought there was “too much going on,” masking the chicken flavor.</p> <p><strong>Coleman Natural</strong><br /> We tasted quite a few sausages with southwestern spices, but only Coleman Natural’s Cilantro made the Top 8 in terms of flavor. Some of us thought these sausages were simply hot and lacked real cilantro flavor, but Stacy remarked, “Good spice level, nice texture and good casing snap.”</p> <p><em>Tasting Panel: Carolyn Casner, Recipe Tester, Stacy Fraser, Test Kitchen Manager, Carolyn Malcoun, Assistant Editor, Hilary Meyer, Recipe Tester, Jessie Price, Food Editor</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_chicken_sausage#comments EatingWell Editors January/February 2007 Healthy Cooking - Kitchen Product Reviews Fri, 14 Aug 2009 15:01:43 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9516 at http://www.eatingwell.com Garlic-Rosemary Mushrooms http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/garlic_rosemary_mushrooms.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/garlic_rosemary_mushrooms.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://assets.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD5734.JPG" alt="Garlic-Rosemary Mushrooms Recipe" title="Garlic-Rosemary Mushrooms Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148" /></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/garlic_rosemary_mushrooms.html" target="_blank">Garlic-Rosemary Mushrooms</a></div> <div>These simple sautéed mushrooms work as a quick, weeknight side dish. To turn them into a main course, toss with cooked pasta and a generous handful of Parmesan cheese or fold into an omelet with Gruyère, fontina or Swiss cheese.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/garlic_rosemary_mushrooms.html#comments EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (2008) January/February 2007 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High potassium Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health glutfree Recipes & Menus - Pompeian Alcohol Pork (used as flavoring) Vegetables Dinner
 Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Quick (total 30 min. or less) 30 minutes or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5233 at http://www.eatingwell.com Sesame Roasted Mushrooms & Scallions http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sesame_roasted_mushrooms_scallions.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sesame_roasted_mushrooms_scallions.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://assets.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD5733.JPG" alt="Sesame Roasted Mushrooms &amp;amp; Scallions Recipe" title="Sesame Roasted Mushrooms &amp;amp; Scallions Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148" /></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sesame_roasted_mushrooms_scallions.html" target="_blank">Sesame Roasted Mushrooms &amp; Scallions</a></div> <div>Roasting brings out the natural sweetness of mushrooms. Here they are paired with full-flavored sesame oil, ginger, garlic and scallions. Using a variety of mixed mushrooms makes this dish special (and delicious). Serve with Ginger-Steamed Fish with Troy&#039;s Hana-Style Sauce and rice noodles.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sesame_roasted_mushrooms_scallions.html#comments EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (2008) January/February 2007 Asian Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber High potassium Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health glutfree Recipes - Individual Recipes Vegetables Dinner
 Roast Fall Spring Summer Winter 6 Entertaining, casual Vegan Vegetarian 45 minutes or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5232 at http://www.eatingwell.com Egyptian Edamame Stew http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/egyptian_edamame_stew.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/egyptian_edamame_stew.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://assets.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MV5732.JPG" alt="Egyptian Edamame Stew Recipe" title="Egyptian Edamame Stew Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148" /></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/egyptian_edamame_stew.html" target="_blank">Egyptian Edamame Stew</a></div> <div>A riff on the Egyptian classic ful medames, a highly seasoned fava bean mash, this version is made with easier-to-find edamame. Edamame (fresh green soybeans) have been shown to lower LDL cholesterol. They can be found shelled in the freezer section of well-stocked supermarkets. This stew is great served with couscous, bulgur or warm whole-wheat pita bread to soak up the sauce.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/egyptian_edamame_stew.html#comments EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (2008) January/February 2007 African Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health glutfree Recipes & Menus - Gluten Free Citrus Soy Tomatoes Vegetables Dinner
 Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Budget Quick (total 30 min. or less) 30 minutes or less Main dish, vegetarian Soups/stews Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5231 at http://www.eatingwell.com Edamame Succotash with Shrimp http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/edamame_succotash_with_shrimp.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/edamame_succotash_with_shrimp.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://assets.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MF5731.JPG" alt="Edamame Succotash with Shrimp Recipe" title="Edamame Succotash with Shrimp Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148" /></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/edamame_succotash_with_shrimp.html" target="_blank">Edamame Succotash with Shrimp</a></div> <div>We give succotash—traditionally a Southern dish made with corn, lima beans and peppers—an update using edamame instead of limas and turn it into a main dish by adding shrimp. To get it on the table even faster, purchase peeled, deveined shrimp from the fish counter instead of doing it yourself. Make it a meal: All you need is a warm piece of cornbread to go with this complete meal.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/edamame_succotash_with_shrimp.html#comments EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (2008) January/February 2007 American Southern/Soul Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber Low calorie Low saturated fat Digestive Health glutfree Recipes - Individual Recipes Recipes & Menus - Seafood Citrus Pork (used as flavoring) Shellfish Soy Vegetables Shellfish Dinner
 Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Entertaining, casual Everyday favorites Quick (total 30 min. or less) 30 minutes or less Main dish, combination meal Main dish, fish/seafood Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5230 at http://www.eatingwell.com Hoisin Beef & Edamame Noodles http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/hoisin_beef_edamame_noodles.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/hoisin_beef_edamame_noodles.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://assets.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MB5730.JPG" alt="Hoisin Beef &amp;amp; Edamame Noodles Recipe" title="Hoisin Beef &amp;amp; Edamame Noodles Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148" /></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/hoisin_beef_edamame_noodles.html" target="_blank">Hoisin Beef &amp; Edamame Noodles</a></div> <div>Sweet hoisin sauce and tangy lime juice balance perfectly in this quick, colorful, Asian-inspired noodle dish. Make it a meal: Dress a cucumber salad with toasted sesame oil and lime juice and enjoy a cup of jasmine green tea.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/hoisin_beef_edamame_noodles.html#comments January/February 2007 Asian Easy Heart healthy Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health Recipes - Individual Recipes Citrus Pasta Soy Vegetables Wheat Beef Dinner
 Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Entertaining, casual Everyday favorites Quick (total 30 min. or less) 30 minutes or less Main dish, combination meal Main dish, meat Pasta Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5229 at http://www.eatingwell.com Provencal-Style Edamame Saute http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/provencal_style_edamame_saute.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/provencal_style_edamame_saute.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://assets.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MV5729.JPG" alt="Provencal-Style Edamame Saute Recipe" title="Provencal-Style Edamame Saute Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148" /></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/provencal_style_edamame_saute.html" target="_blank">Provencal-Style Edamame Saute</a></div> <div>Provence, in southeast France, has earned the culinary trademark a la Provencal for dishes prepared with plenty of garlic, olive oil and olives. Here we combine fennel, artichoke hearts, edamame, feta and olives in this quick and hearty one-skillet supper.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/provencal_style_edamame_saute.html#comments January/February 2007 French Moderate Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight High calcium High fiber Low calorie Low cholesterol Bone Health Digestive Health glutfree New Year's Eve Recipes & Menus - Pompeian Alcohol Cheese Citrus Soy Vegetables Dinner
 Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Entertaining, casual Everyday favorites Vegetarian 45 minutes or less Main dish, vegetarian Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5228 at http://www.eatingwell.com Warm Chicken Sausage & Potato Salad http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sausage_arugula_salad.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sausage_arugula_salad.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://assets.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MP5728.JPG" alt="Warm Chicken Sausage &amp;amp; Potato Salad Recipe" title="Warm Chicken Sausage &amp;amp; Potato Salad Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148" /></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sausage_arugula_salad.html" target="_blank">Warm Chicken Sausage &amp; Potato Salad</a></div> <div>This super simple bistro-style salad is substantial with potatoes, arugula and chicken sausage.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sausage_arugula_salad.html#comments EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (2008) January/February 2007 German Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health glutfree Recipes - Individual Recipes Vegetables Chicken Dinner
 Saute Steam Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Budget Entertaining, casual Everyday favorites Quick (total 30 min. or less) 30 minutes or less Main dish, poultry Salad, main dish Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5227 at http://www.eatingwell.com Catfish Amandine http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/catfish_amandine.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/catfish_amandine.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://assets.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MF5727.JPG" alt="Catfish Amandine Recipe" title="Catfish Amandine Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148" /></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/catfish_amandine.html" target="_blank">Catfish Amandine</a></div> <div>Here, we use healthier extra-virgin olive oil with a bit of butter added for its flavor instead of the tablespoons of butter usually used to make classic “amandine” sauce for pan-fried catfish fillets. The results are delicately flavored and have only a third of the calories, fat and sodium of a classic version.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/catfish_amandine.html#comments January/February 2007 American Cajun-Creole French Easy Diabetes appropriate Healthy weight Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low sodium Recipes - Individual Recipes Recipes & Menus - Seafood Citrus Dairy Eggs Flour Nuts Wheat Fish Dinner
 Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Budget Makeover Quick (total 30 min. or less) 30 minutes or less Main dish, fish/seafood Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5226 at http://www.eatingwell.com