March/April 2007 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/441/healthy_cooking en Zesty Wheat Berry-Black Bean Chili http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/zesty_wheat_berry_black_bean_chili.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/zesty_wheat_berry_black_bean_chili.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MV5808.JPG" alt="Zesty Wheat Berry-Black Bean Chili Recipe" title="Zesty Wheat Berry-Black Bean Chili Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/zesty_wheat_berry_black_bean_chili.html" target="_blank">Zesty Wheat Berry-Black Bean Chili</a></div> <div>This rib-sticking chili offers a hearty mix of wheat berries, beans, peppers and onion. Feel free to add an additional chipotle pepper to crank up the heat in this one-pot meal. Cooked wheat berries will keep for up to 1 month in your freezer and there&#039;s no need to thaw them; just stir them directly into the chili.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/zesty_wheat_berry_black_bean_chili.html#comments EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (2008) March/April 2007 American Southwest Moderate Diabetes appropriate Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber High potassium Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health Super Bowl Recipes & Menus - Avocados Recipes & Menus - Spices Recipes & Menus - Whole Grains Beans/legumes Berries Citrus Fruit Tomatoes Vegetables Wheat Beans/Legumes Dinner
 Lunch Saute Fall Winter 6 Budget Entertaining, casual Everyday favorites One dish meals Vegan Vegetarian More than 1 hour Main dish, combination meal Main dish, vegetarian Soups/stews Mon, 04 Jan 2010 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5528 at http://www.eatingwell.com Meals to Remember: Signs of Spring http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/meals_to_remember_signs_of_spring <p>Rain darkens this march morning, here in the hills of southern Indiana. Despite the gloom, I rejoice at the prospect of making lentil soup today with my wife and our granddaughter, Elizabeth. I am washing dishes, glancing out the window at our soggy garden, wondering if it will ever be dry enough to plant, when Elizabeth bursts into the kitchen. At just over three feet tall and just under four years old, she arrives like a tiny whirlwind, flinging off her slicker, dragging her stepstool to the counter and clambering up, chattering about Grammy’s soup.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Scott Russell Sanders </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Spring rain, garlic and Grammy&#039;s soup in this short by Scott Russell Sanders. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/onion_spring_mj08_310.jpg?1267486288" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Garlic Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/wilted_spinach_with_garlic.html">Wilted Spinach with Garlic</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/broccoli_with_black_bean_garlic_sauce.html">Broccoli with Black Bean-Garlic Sauce</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/garlic_chile_flank_steak.html">Garlic-Chile Flank Steak</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/garlic_white_bean_dip.html">Garlic &amp; White Bean Dip</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/mashed_garlicky_potatoes_with_portobello_gravy.html">Mashed Garlicky Potatoes with Portobello Gravy</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Rain darkens this march morning, here in the hills of southern Indiana. Despite the gloom, I rejoice at the prospect of making lentil soup today with my wife and our granddaughter, Elizabeth. I am washing dishes, glancing out the window at our soggy garden, wondering if it will ever be dry enough to plant, when Elizabeth bursts into the kitchen. At just over three feet tall and just under four years old, she arrives like a tiny whirlwind, flinging off her slicker, dragging her stepstool to the counter and clambering up, chattering about Grammy’s soup.</p> <p>Grammy is Ruth, my favorite cook now through 40 years of marriage. She and Elizabeth gather carrots, potatoes and onions, mostly from last summer’s garden, as well as dried oregano, basil and thyme, also grown in our tiny backyard. The lentils are already soaking. With sleeves pushed up, Elizabeth plunges her arms into the bowl of water halfway to her elbows and gleefully swishes the lentils around, feeling for any stones that might have sunk to the bottom.</p> <p>Surveying the ingredients, Ruth says, “Oh, Lizzie, we’ve forgotten something. What do we put in to make everything else taste good?”</p> <p>Elizabeth withdraws her arms from the water, dries them, and ponders for a moment. Then she brightens. “Garlic!”</p> <p>“That’s it,” Ruth says, and sends her to retrieve a few cloves. Ever since Elizabeth learned to go up and down stairs safely by herself, one of her jobs at home has been to fetch garlic from the basement and then to help squeeze the pungent cloves in a press.</p> <p> <strong>Oh, Lizzie, we’ve forgotten something. What do we put in to make everything else taste good?”</strong></p> <p>Now she demonstrates to Ruth and me that she is strong enough to squeeze the press all by herself, and the kitchen fills with an earthy aroma, like the fragrance of thawing soil.</p> <p>Perhaps remembering how, in October, she helped Ruth and me plant cloves from last year’s garlic for this year’s crop, Elizabeth scoots her stool nearer the sink and climbs up beside me to look outside at the humped, straw-mulched rows. At the time of planting, we explained to Elizabeth why the rounded end of each clove must be pressed into the dirt, leaving the pointy end on top to send up a shoot toward the sun. Today, Elizabeth notices green leaves spiking up through the mulch and drooping in the rain, and she asks me if the garlic is waking up. I tell her it is, although even in winter it was never entirely asleep, for the roots were slowly spreading and each clove was forming small bumps that would eventually swell into new cloves. She wants to go outside right now and dig one up and see the bumps, but I tell her we need to let the garlic grow.</p> <p>I remind her that every day the sun is climbing higher in the sky, and soon it will shine over the peak of our house onto the garden, and then stiff green stalks will rise from the garlic bed. And during the summer each plant will form a bulb at the bottom and a flower at the top, and in hot weather the flowers will give way to seeds, the stalks will curl into crazy loops, and the leaves will wilt. Along about July, when the leaves have turned brown, she and I will take the spading fork and loosen the dirt and carefully tug the bulbs loose and lay them out on the picnic table to dry. And after they’re dry, we’ll brush off the dirt and braid the stalks into bunches for family and friends.</p> <p>Elizabeth takes in the whole story before announcing, “Garlic makes me happy.”</p> <p>“Me too,” I say, finishing up the last of the dishes.</p> <p>Ruth meanwhile has cut up the vegetables. She sautés the onions and garlic in the soup pot, allows the pot to cool, then places it in the sink, within reach of short arms. Elizabeth pours in water, adds the lentils, tomatoes, potatoes and carrots, sprinkles in the herbs, then stirs the whole concoction with a wooden spoon.</p> <p>Soon the kitchen begins to smell like the whole garden. Again I glance outside at the soggy earth. In spite of the rain, the day seems brighter. The green spikes thrusting up through the straw mulch, which had looked forlorn before Elizabeth arrived, now gleam with the promise of spring.</p> <p><em>—Scott Russell Sanders, author of 19 books including A Private History of Awe (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006), is the Distinguished Professor of English at Indiana University.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/meals_to_remember_signs_of_spring#comments Scott Russell Sanders March/April 2007 Food News & Origins - People & Perspectives Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:42:45 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10192 at http://www.eatingwell.com 7 Steps to a New You http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/7_steps_to_a_new_you <p>In 6 months, one couple lost more than 100 pounds between them—thanks to a life-changing, university-tested program, VTrim™. Here’s how they did it and how you can take the pounds off, too.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How one couple lost more than 100 pounds between them and how you can too. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/blittersdorfs_310.jpg?1250785771" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_diet_recipes">Healthy Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_low_calorie_recipes_menus">Quick and Healthy Low-Calorie Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/eatingwell_diet_challenge_recipes">EatingWell Diet Challenge Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans">Diet Meal Plans</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More EatingWell Diet Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/6_ways_to_sneak_in_your_exercise">6 ways to sneak in your exercise</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/the_eatingwell_diet/7_steps_to_permanent_weight_loss">7 Steps to Permanent Weight Loss</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/8_tips_for_winning_the_food_fight">8 Tips for Winning the Food Fight</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In 6 months, one couple lost more than 100 pounds between them—thanks to a life-changing, university-tested program, VTrim™. Here’s how they did it and how you can take the pounds off, too.</p> <p>David Blittersdorf has the tall, rangy look of someone who has always been thin. Having just celebrated his 50th birthday, he has a few more gray streaks in his hair than he used to, but he walks with a purposeful stride that makes him seem much younger and carries a lean 170 pounds on his 6'1" frame. You might never guess that a mere 18 months ago David was 80 pounds heavier. His friends called him “Buddha” and in clinical terms, he was obese. </p> <p>Jan Blittersdorf, 47, David’s wife of 23 years, is what some might call “statuesque.” At 5 feet 10 inches tall and around 145 pounds, she’s not the same woman who once combed the plus-size racks in clothing stores. “I went from a plus-size 2X to a size 12,” says Jan, who lost 55 pounds over a year and a half. Now, “instead of looking for camouflage,” she shops for form-fitting clothes. </p> <p>What happened was a transformation neither Jan nor David could have imagined. The Vermont-based couple, who just couldn’t see themselves drinking slimming shakes or attending weight-watching meetings, reinvented themselves—literally—with the help of an innovative weight-loss program that skipped the gimmicks. Instead, the VTrim program focused on helping the Blittersdorfs change the behaviors that put on the pounds in the first place. “VTrim wasn’t a fad diet or a magic bullet or potion,” says Jan. “It was just common sense.”</p> <p>VTrim was developed by Jean Harvey-Berino, R.D., Ph.D., a nationally recognized weight-loss researcher at the University of Vermont and an EatingWell Nutrition Advisor. Her concept is based on behavior change: a systematic shaping of daily habits to help people move more and eat less. VTrim’s focus on everyday strategy sets it apart from conventional weight-loss plans. “Most diets tell you what to do but not how to do it,” says Harvey-Berino. “They don’t provide you with a plan for the long term.” </p> <p>Harvey-Berino developed the strategies and tools that the Blittersdorfs used in their weight-loss journey. She then worked with EatingWell to adapt them into a book, to be published this month by Countryman Press, The EatingWell Diet. Our book lists the seven essential steps the Blittersdorfs and other VTrim participants took toward achieving healthy weight loss and adds in a 28-day menu plan and nearly 100 recipes from the EatingWell Test Kitchen. </p> <p>Here’s how the program worked for Jan and David Blittersdorf.</p> <h3>Step 1: Make Sure You’re Ready for Change</h3> <p>Sometimes a single event is all it takes to spur you to commit to losing weight—a chastening visit to a doctor, say, or the death of a loved one. David, for one, got plenty of wake-up calls: his cholesterol was out of control, staying above the 220-milligrams-per-deciliter danger zone even as his doctor prescribed higher and higher doses of a cholesterol-lowering drug. One winter afternoon, he nearly fainted as he bent over to lace up his skates for a pick-up hockey game. His own mortality suddenly loomed large. “I used to think I’d be fine if I made it to age 65,” David explains. “But as I got closer to 50, it scared the heck out of me that I could drop dead of a heart attack any day.” </p> <p>For Jan, the signs were more subtle. She’d gained a few pounds a year as she raised her children—but her kids were now 18 and 21, and her weight had climbed to nearly 200 pounds. “I wasn’t eating junk food; I’ve always been interested in healthy eating,” she says. “I just ate too much.’’</p> <p>Looking back, David describes them as “living the fat, happy American lifestyle.” Maybe they weren’t always happy, but they were certainly busy: Both were working long hours at NRG Systems, the world’s leading manufacturer of wind-measurement equipment for the energy industry. David founded the company in 1982 in his college dorm room; Jan, a former nurse whose student loans once provided the first venture capital, was recently made CEO. (David now designs small home wind turbines for Earth Turbines, his new startup.)</p> <p>Like most overworked executives, David and Jan didn’t have much time to prepare or plan meals or even think about what they were eating. And, while they weren’t couch potatoes, neither found time to exercise regularly. Ironically, even after NRG moved into a super-energy-efficient “green” building, which had extensive fitness facilities, including an indoor pool, the Blittersdorfs still rarely found time to work out. “The fitness room was sort of for everybody else,” admits David. </p> <p>Just as the pounds crept on slowly, so did the recognition that it was time to make a change. The turning point came when the Blittersdorfs spent a summer vacation with John Miller, an NRG engineer who had just shed more than 70 pounds following the VTrim program. “He’d gone from looking like me to being this skinny guy who was doing all kinds of exercise,” David recalls. The more Miller told them about VTrim, the more the Blittersdorfs liked the concept. It seemed simple enough: keep track of daily food intake and exercise in a journal, and meet weekly with an educator trained in nutrition and behavioral techniques, a person who would help you to replace old habits with healthier ones. That the plan was science-based and university-backed was especially appealing. Inspired, the couple agreed to sign up for the next VTrim session, that September. “I knew there was no turning back,” says Jan. </p> <h3>Step 2: Set Goals</h3> <p>To kick off VTrim, the Blittersdorfs met weekly with about 15 others and then-program director Beth Casey Gold, M.S., R.D. The group plotted the course their lives would take for the next six months and beyond. But at the time, it felt more like they were planning to get through a single week. “That’s the principle behind behavioral intervention,” explains Harvey-Berino. “You don’t say, ‘I have to lose 60 pounds for this cruise I’m taking in December’—that’s too overwhelming. Instead,” she continues, “you set short-term, manageable, achievable goals. You achieve one, then you move on to the next.” </p> <p>Although they’d dreamed of losing much more, the Blittersdorfs decided to aim to take off 20 pounds each by the end of the six-month program, losing at the slow, steady rate research shows is most sustainable: one to two pounds a week. Working with Gold, they set specific weekly behavior goals—such as squeeze in a 10-minute walk at lunchtime on at least three workdays, or snack on a piece of fruit instead of chips. “It’s this focus on the ‘hows’ of everyday life that makes this approach work,” says Harvey-Berino. “You really have to get that specific to change behavior.” </p> <p>Gold also helped the Blittersdorfs set daily calorie goals, based on how many calories they needed just to maintain their current weights. A simple formula gave them a ballpark range: their current weight in pounds, times 12. Since one pound of fat contains about 3,500 calories, they’d need to cut 3,500 calories on average—about 500 per day—to lose one pound a week (see “Calculate Your Calorie Goal”). Doubling that to 1,000 fewer daily calories would let them lose approximately two pounds per week. (The lowest calorie goal on the plan is 1,200 daily calories; below that level, “it’s hard to meet your daily nutrition needs,” explains Harvey-Berino.)</p> <p>“The calculations were so simple, but they really worked,” says Jan. David concurs: “As an engineer, I understand formulas. You play by the rules, and the formula works.” </p> <h3>Step 3: Track Yourself</h3> <p>In those first meetings, Jan and David also received what was to become their most powerful tool for losing weight—a daily diary, dubbed “the little green book.” Their assignment was to carry it with them everywhere, to write down everything they ate and drank, then tally up the calories at the end of each day. And, whenever they made a conscious effort to exercise, they were instructed to write down what they did and for how long, estimating how many calories they’d burned. It all went into the little green books. </p> <p>For David, a self-confessed “junk-food junkie,” the results were a sobering shot of truth serum. “I was drinking almost 1,000 calories a day just in sodas.” Although he had calculated that about 3,000 calories daily would keep his current weight steady, the diary revealed he was actually taking in about 3,900 calories—while getting virtually no regular exercise. In the weight-management world, that amounts to a perfect storm for gaining.</p> <p>“For me, it was a kind of ignorance, really,” admits Jan. “Not knowing what a portion size was, not thinking about how calories added up.” She remembers, “I’d love to get a bagel and cream cheese in the morning. I had no idea it was over 400 calories.” </p> <p>With program director Gold’s guidance, the group learned to measure out everything they ate until they were able to recognize sensible portions. “In this culture, people tend to eat two to three times a normal portion without blinking an eye,” says Gold. “I think working hard to be as accurate as possible really worked in Jan and David’s favor.” </p> <p>The simple act of writing down behavior, in fact, is a key component of successful weight control. “Having the evidence right in front of you makes you accountable for your behavior,” explains Harvey-Berino, “and it can point you to what you need to change.” Besides his soda revelations, David’s journal documented that he often skipped breakfast, setting himself up for uncontrollable hunger later in the morning. “I’d come into the office and grab a doughnut and a soda,” he recalls (a little wistfully). Now, after acting on suggestions from Gold, David starts most days with a bowl of whole-grain oat cereal. He has also switched to diet sodas—not exactly breaking the soda-drinking habit, but saving him nearly 1,000 calories a day. “Calories are calories without judgment,” explains Gold, “so we encourage any change that decreases caloric intake.” </p> <h3>Step 4: Eat Mindfully</h3> <p>With a daily calorie goal to aim for, and diet diaries to record how they’d get there, the Blittersdorfs had begun to cultivate a ground-level awareness of the food they were eating, and how much. In their weekly meetings, they learned practicalities: what realistic portion sizes looked like, how to fill their plates with vegetables, salads and other low-calorie foods, how adding a little protein to each meal prolonged its staying power. No food was off-limits, but no food was below scrutiny, either. Even that mini candy bar cadged from a co-worker’s desk had to be accounted for. “You don’t pass judgment on what you eat, but you have to count it,” David says. “So you end up eating better anyway.” Case in point: after years of avoiding salads, he now eats them almost daily. </p> <p>With time, the calorie awareness became intuitive, and the Blittersdorfs acquired the confidence to handle situations that had previously triggered them to overeat. “I remember being terrified to go to a friend’s house for brunch,” recalls Jan. “How was I going to be around all that delicious food without falling apart?” She smiles. “Now, it’s a no-brainer, because I’ve learned I can have a good time without having to try everything.” Instead, she’ll choose a few items she likes, skipping the rest—and eat them in moderate portions. “If there’s a Danish sitting in front of me, I’ll cut off a small piece, not eat the whole thing. That’s enough for me to be satisfied.” </p> <p>The behavioral-modification skills the Blittersdorfs honed on the program come in handy when they eat in restaurants too. David learned to control his environment so that he’s not surrounded by tempting food (what behavioral scientists call stimulus control). He no longer lets himself be served a typically huge restaurant portion. “Instead, I’ll say, ‘I’d like it without sauce’—or ‘just bring me half a portion, and wrap up the rest for me to take home,’” he reports confidently. “When you ask for what you want, restaurants are really accommodating.” </p> <h3>Step 5: Commit to Move More</h3> <p>When asked about her old exercise habits, Jan is brutally honest. “I got virtually no exercise,” she admits. “We’d take a hike sometimes on weekends, or I might do a tiny bit of swimming.” David played the occasional hockey or basketball game, but he was hampered by how hard it was just to move. “I couldn’t even walk upstairs without huffing and puffing,” he remembers. “After all, I was carrying along 70, 80 extra pounds everywhere I went.” </p> <p>As sedentary as they were, the Blittersdorfs were still ahead of the 26 percent of American adults who report getting no physical activity in their leisure time, according to the Centers for Disease Control. And no wonder, when getting through the day rarely takes more than getting into a car or sitting in front of a computer screen. “Society just isn’t set up for us to be active,” says Harvey-Berino. “Our participants tell us it’s the biggest obstacle they have to overcome.” </p> <p>And yet, successful weight loss is practically impossible without an exercise commitment, according to the National Weight Control Registry—a database of more than 5,000 people who have lost a minimum of 30 pounds or more and kept it off for at least a year. While participants report using any number of different methods to lose the pounds, one common thread unites virtually all of them: they engage in regular physical activity. </p> <p>Harvey-Berino emphasizes incorporating so-called “programmed” activity—deliberately making room in a daily schedule for exercise, usually walking. “That’s the only way it becomes a habit,” she explains. Doing it at a regular time each day makes it easier to remember and plan around, and tracking daily activity in the diet diaries helps establish and reinforce that routine.</p> <p>Taking it one step at a time, the Blittersdorfs began with longer and longer daily walks and bike rides. They also reacquainted themselves with the stair machines and fitness bikes in the NRG Systems fitness room to get them through the long Vermont winter. </p> <p>And they started to see results, slowly and surely. “I lost about 2 1⁄2 pounds each week,” David remembers—so he met his 20-pound goal within two months, and kept going. “By the time we completed the six months of classes, I was down to about 185 pounds.” He’d lost 65 pounds. </p> <p>Jan had to keep revising her expectations. “I was down to my goal, about 180 pounds, by the end of November, so I decided that in my wildest dreams, I’d like to get down to 165.” When she made that goal a few weeks shy of the six-month mark, “I didn’t want to stop.” She continued to lose 20 more pounds within the next few months. </p> <p>As the pounds came off, more energy and enthusiasm for exercise moved in. Today, the Blittersdorfs aim for a 45-minute walk two or three times a week, with biking, kayaking or swimming on the weekends. </p> <p>As with the food they eat, both are ever cognizant of the calories they’re expending—and by now, the calculations are instinctive. One of their favorite bike rides is around a lake near their vacation home in northern Vermont. “It’s an 11-mile loop,” notes David. “We know we use up about 50 calories a mile, so that’s 550 calories.” Likewise, they try to sneak in activity wherever they can, whether it’s taking the stairs instead of escalators, using a push lawnmower rather than a sit-down type—or, in David’s case, shingling his own roof last summer instead of hiring someone else to do it. “I’m trying to be the Energizer bunny,” he explains. “Just moving a lot more in everything I do.” </p> <h3>Step 6: Get Support</h3> <p>The Blittersdorfs know they are lucky. All along their journey to losing weight, they’ve had the support and encouragement of their families, friends and work colleagues (including John Miller—himself an encouraging reminder of the program’s success). But most of all, they had each other. </p> <p>“It was so much easier doing this together,” says Jan. “We’d help each other write something down if one saw the other forgetting.” Each was the other’s empathetic cheerleader. “Because the weight loss was so gradual, nobody really noticed for the first four months or so,” said David. “It really helped to have someone else going through the same experience.” </p> <p>Of course, not everyone is able to forge such a successful weight-loss partnership. With some relationships, in fact, the opposite occurs when one partner manages, unintentionally or otherwise, to derail the other’s efforts to lose weight. (That would be the “friend” who groans when someone orders a skim cappuccino instead of dessert, or the spouse who buys his partner’s favorite brand of super-premium ice cream.) The EatingWell Diet includes strategies for identifying sources of support as well as handling those so-called “saboteurs.” </p> <h3>Step 7: Plan for Life</h3> <p>As challenging as it was to lose the combined 135 pounds—the equivalent of another whole person—the greater challenge the Blittersdorfs faced (and still face) is keeping the pounds from coming back on. Studies show that this “maintenance phase,” (which might better be called “the rest of your life”) holds the most booby traps.</p> <p>Why? “At that point, weight loss is no longer so rewarding,” explains Harvey-Berino. “People stop complimenting you, you’re no longer moving down to smaller and smaller clothing sizes. You’re just staying the same. And yet,” she goes on, “you have to continue on with your new behaviors even without that positive feedback. That can really be tough.” Therefore, to complete the program, dieters need to come up with a “Long-Term Success Plan” that outlines in exquisite detail just what behaviors worked best for their individual weight loss—and exactly what they should do if an inevitable lapse occurs. </p> <p>In fact, knowing that they will lapse—and being prepared for it—has been empowering, not frightening, for the Blittersdorfs, even as they’ve both weaned themselves off having to use their diet diaries. Through the program, they’ve mastered techniques to overcome the “all-or-nothing” thinking that so often derails a successful weight loss. They’ve learned to rewrite their internal scripts by replacing negative thoughts [say, “I can’t control myself around pizza,”] with positive counter thoughts [“I’ll have one slice with vegetable toppings and really enjoy it.”]. By thwarting negative thinking before it becomes a downward spiral, they help ensure, says Harvey-Berino, “that a lapse doesn’t become a relapse—or worse, a collapse.” </p> <p>“If I gain three to five pounds, that’s when my disaster plan kicks in,” says Jan. “I’ll bring myself back to daily weighing and recording everything I eat.” Adds David, “I understand averages. If I blow a few days, but get right back on track and cut back later in the week, I can still hit my target.” What’s noticeably absent is the guilt they used to feel around eating, and the fear that they wouldn’t be able to stick with their healthy habits. </p> <p>Just how far have the Blittersdorfs come, since that summer day they decided to change their lives? In his “Buddha” days, David couldn’t ride his bike for more than a mile without becoming exhausted. But last summer, his new, leaner body biked the length of the state of Vermont—a total of 230 miles. Riding with three other NRG engineers, he made it from the Massachusetts border to the Canadian border in just five days, with plenty of Tour de France-style mountains in between. Included in the group was John Miller (admiringly dubbed “Lance” by his comrades), their original inspiration. </p> <p>In regular postings on his blog, David reported on the group’s mileage and mishaps, the swimming holes and thunderstorms and (still versed in the language of his diet diaries) the stupefying quantities of food he needed to keep fueled. “Pigging out on peanuts, ice cream, gator-aid [sic],” he wrote from Bellows Falls, Vermont. “I ate 3,600 calories today and burned 2,300 biking.”</p> <p>Later, in a reflective post that seemed to sum up much more than just the past week’s accomplishments, David wrote, “Amazing what the human body can achieve, even ones that are nearing the half-century mark.”</p> <p>Then he added, “What’s next?” </p> <p>Joyce Hendley is the Nutrition Editor of EatingWell and co-author of The EatingWell Diet (The Countryman Press, 2007).</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/7_steps_to_a_new_you#comments Joyce Hendley March/April 2007 Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Thu, 20 Aug 2009 16:23:32 +0000 Penelope Wall 9903 at http://www.eatingwell.com Can Your Dog Really Help You Lose Weight? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/can_your_dog_really_help_you_lose_weight <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Dog-Gone Those Pounds! </div> </div> </div> <p>Just as Americans have become increasingly overweight, so too have their pooches packed on pounds: roughly 40 percent of dogs in the U.S. now are considered overweight. So when Topeka-based Hill’s Pet Nutrition (a pet-food company) contacted Robert F. Kushner, M.D., obesity expert and professor of medicine at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, to brainstorm ways to address the pet and people obesity epidemics simultaneously, he was intrigued. “The cause of pet obesity is the same as human obesity: overeating plus under-exertion,” says Kushner.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheryl Sternman Rule </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Your pup may be the perfect partner in weight loss. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/dog_jog_illo_ma07_310.jpg?1267719534" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/5_ways_to_walk_more">5 Ways to Walk More</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Just as Americans have become increasingly overweight, so too have their pooches packed on pounds: roughly 40 percent of dogs in the U.S. now are considered overweight. So when Topeka-based Hill’s Pet Nutrition (a pet-food company) contacted Robert F. Kushner, M.D., obesity expert and professor of medicine at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, to brainstorm ways to address the pet and people obesity epidemics simultaneously, he was intrigued. “The cause of pet obesity is the same as human obesity: overeating plus under-exertion,” says Kushner. But there’s one difference, he says: “People cause pets’ obesity.” Ignoring portion sizes, offering copious treats and skimping on dog walks all contribute to pets’ added girth.</p> <p>Research shows that when people embark on weight-loss programs with supportive friends, they do better. Would it matter if the friends happened to be furry and walk on four legs? Kushner wondered.</p> <p>In a study published last October in the journal Obesity, Kushner and his colleagues followed 36 people paired with their dogs and 36 people without pets through a year-long weight-loss program. Both groups met regularly with a dietitian, who counseled participants on healthy eating, setting calorie goals and ways to increase physical activity. A veterinarian taught pet owners about dog health and suggested activities to foster bonding with their pets. (The dogs also consumed a calorie-controlled diet.)</p> <p>Turned out, the dog owners didn’t lose more weight than their “petless” peers. They did, however, say that the dogs made exercise more enjoyable. Seeing their pets slim down also inspired them to stick with their own healthy habits.</p> <p>Bottom line: “If you don’t have someone to walk with, get a dog,” says Kushner, the proud owner of Cooper, a spotted Havanese. Or borrow one: walk an elderly neighbor’s pet or exercise rescued dogs at a shelter.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/can_your_dog_really_help_you_lose_weight#comments Cheryl Sternman Rule March/April 2007 Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Wed, 19 Aug 2009 15:23:32 +0000 Nifer 9762 at http://www.eatingwell.com Feed a Cold http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/feed_a_cold <p>Before she became a full-time mom, my mother was a registered nurse. It was a career she had been proud of and whenever my sister or I got sick, she jumped right back into that role, doing everything short of donning her starched white nursing cap. She’d examine the thermometer critically and shake it down with a crack of her wrist, and announce, “You’ll be spending the day in bed!” No child could have been better cared for. A glass of ginger ale (with a bendy straw) was always placed in easy reach. And I can still taste her chicken soup, with its perfectly cooked noodles.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> From chicken soup to supplements, there are hundreds of myths about “cold cures.” Here’s the science. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/SP4389.jpg?1256224338" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chicken_noodle_soup_with_dill.html">Chicken Noodle Soup with Dill</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrient_library/vitamin_c_rich_recipes">Vitamin C-Rich Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_immunity_recipes">Healthy Immunity Recipes </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_soup_recipes">Healthy Soup and Bread Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/quick_weeknight_dinners/6_speedy_soups">6 Speedy Soups</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Healthy Immunity </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/immune_boosting_superfoods">Immune-Boosting Superfoods</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/kitchen_cures">Kitchen Cures</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/healing_with_honey">Healing with Honey</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_immunity_center">Healthy Immunity Center</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/healthy_immunity_faqs">Healthy Immunity: FAQs</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/try_this_drink_to_cure_a_headache_4_more_home_remedies_for_common">Try this drink to cure a headache &amp; 4 more home remedies for common ailments</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/can_a_breakfast_cereal_boost_your_immunity">Can a breakfast cereal boost your immunity?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/are_you_wasting_your_money_on_vitamin_drinks_try_these_3_immunity_b">Are you wasting your money on vitamin drinks? Try these 3 immunity boosters instead</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/3_immune_boosting_foods_to_get_you_through_winter">3 immune-boosting foods to get you through winter</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Before she became a full-time mom, my mother was a registered nurse. It was a career she had been proud of and whenever my sister or I got sick, she jumped right back into that role, doing everything short of donning her starched white nursing cap. She’d examine the thermometer critically and shake it down with a crack of her wrist, and announce, “You’ll be spending the day in bed!” No child could have been better cared for. A glass of ginger ale (with a bendy straw) was always placed in easy reach. And I can still taste her chicken soup, with its perfectly cooked noodles. </p> <p>Mom was following a timeless tradition: people have always looked to food as medicine. This cold and flu season, I decided to look into the beliefs long held by my mom and many others to see which are nutritionally valid and which are merely folklore. </p> <p><strong>Sip Chicken Soup</strong><br /> It turns out there is something to chicken soup after all. In one study, researchers measured nasal mucus velocity (science-speak for “runny nose”) and nasal airflow resistance (stuffy nose) after volunteers drank cold water, hot water or chicken soup. Of the three, hot chicken soup was the most effective at making noses run—a good thing since nasal secretions help rid the body of pathogenic viruses and bacteria. Like any hot liquid, soup also helps hydration and raises the temperature of the airways, both important for loosening secretions. Adding a few hot chiles, as chef Rick Bayless does (see “Home Remedies,” below), might help loosen things up even more.</p> <p><strong>Try Vitamin C </strong><br /> Ever since biochemist Linus Pauling proposed megadoses of vitamin C to stave off cold symptoms, research has been piling up to assess its effectiveness. For perspective, I turned to a well-regarded review of 29 studies that involved more than 11,000 participants. The reviewers found that vitamin C failed to reduce the incidence of colds. But overall, with doses of 200 mg or greater (more than twice the 60-75 mg current recommended dietary intake for adults), the duration of colds was shortened by about 8 percent—not a huge difference, but something. There was also a significant reduction in the number of days subjects took off from work or school, which suggests vitamin C might help reduce a cold’s severity. The likelihood of success seems to vary with the person—some people improve after taking vitamin C supplements, others don’t. Try it and see for yourself but don’t exceed 2,000 milligrams per day. More than this can cause an upset stomach.</p> <p>think before you zinc Zinc’s effectiveness against cold symptoms is more controversial. One study found that zinc lozenges shortened the duration of colds by one-half, while others found no advantage over a placebo. If you want to try zinc lozenges, follow the protocol used in scientific studies: take the lozenges every two hours and stop when your symptoms die down. Don’t assume more is better; excessive doses of zinc can interfere with the absorption of other minerals, and high doses can be toxic. </p> <p><strong>Get a Dose of Vitamin D</strong><br /> Since colds and flu tend to strike during the darker winter months, some researchers believe a lack of vitamin D, the “sunshine” vitamin, might have something to do with making us more susceptible. At least one study found that a group of kids who took vitamin D supplements had fewer colds than another group that didn’t. There’s still much to learn, but unless you get steady exposure to the sun in the winter it seems prudent to take a multivitamin that contains 100 percent of the daily value for vitamin D.</p> <p><strong>Don’t Avoid Dairy </strong><br /> Some people avoid dairy products because they are thought to increase mucus secretions, but scientific evidence has yet to support this. There may be some placebo effect at work: interestingly, people who say they believe that milk causes more mucus production tend to report more respiratory symptoms after they’re given milk. But in a blind test using a soy-based drink with similar sensory characteristics as milk, subjects reported the same changes in mucus production as they did with cow’s milk. Don’t skimp on calcium-rich milk and especially not yogurt, which contains beneficial bacteria that may actually stimulate the immune system.</p> <p>Today, I wonder if my mother would have given me something else to wash down with my ginger ale (maybe vitamin C?). I do know that she made me feel loved and cared for, and that did wonders for my prognosis. </p> <p>And without a doubt the chicken soup helped. </p> <p>Rachel Johnson, EatingWell’s senior nutrition advisor, is dean of the University of Vermont College of Agriculture &amp; Life Sciences.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/feed_a_cold#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. March/April 2007 Healthy Immune System Diet, Nutrition & Health - Immunity Tue, 18 Aug 2009 22:19:01 +0000 Penelope Wall 9746 at http://www.eatingwell.com New Reasons to Love Eggs http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/new_reasons_to_love_eggs <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Victoria Shanta Retelny, R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Research shows links to reduced risk for age-related macular degeneration. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Those brightly dyed Easter eggs look pretty—and may help you see better, too, suggests new research in the Journal of Nutrition. Egg yolks contain lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoid compounds that mounting research links with reduced risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Characterized by the deterioration of the central retina, or macula, AMD is the leading cause of blindness in people over 50.</p> <p>Green and yellow vegetables, including spinach and corn, are also rich in lutein and zeaxanthin. Hens absorb the carotenoids from their feed (often corn) and the nutrients concentrate in their eggs’ yolks. From vegetables and eggs, we, in turn, absorb these compounds. Some deposit in our eyes, where they are referred to as “macular pigment.” </p> <p>“Macular pigment appears to protect the retina by absorbing potentially harmful wavelengths of light, and by quenching free radicals that can damage tissues,” says Adam Wenzel, Ph.D., who conducted the recently published research at the University of New Hampshire. While previous research has shown that eating spinach increases macular pigment density (presumably boosting protection against AMD), scientists had never studied whether eating eggs—which contain only a fraction of the carotenoids found in vegetables—might have a similar effect. </p> <p>To find out, Wenzel and his colleagues (partly funded by the American Egg Board) randomly assigned 24 women to consume six eggs per week or a placebo pill daily. After 12 weeks, macular pigment density had increased in the women eating eggs but not in those taking the placebo. “This suggests that the relatively low concentration of carotenoids in egg yolks may be highly bioavailable to the retina,” says Wenzel, explaining that the fatty yolk is a perfect delivery vehicle for fat-soluble carotenoids. </p> <p>But how do those fatty yolks affect cholesterol? In otherwise healthy people, they don’t, according to Wenzel’s research and another study in the journal, which found that eating an egg daily for five weeks boosted levels of lutein and zeaxanthin, but did not significantly impact cholesterol or triglyceride levels. </p> <p>Bottom line: “Our data show that eating an egg a day isn’t a factor for raising cholesterol,” says Robert Nicolosi, Ph.D., one of the study’s authors and director of the Center for Health &amp; Disease Prevention at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. “In fact, people who avoid eggs may be missing an opportunity to consume vital nutrients that can help prevent age-related macular degeneration.”</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/new_reasons_to_love_eggs#comments Victoria Shanta Retelny, R.D. March/April 2007 Healthy Aging Diet, Nutrition & Health - Healthy Aging Mon, 17 Aug 2009 21:15:43 +0000 Penelope Wall 9643 at http://www.eatingwell.com EatingWell Taste Test: Hummus http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_hummus <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Spread the Word </div> </div> </div> <p>There are lots of reasons why we love to keep a tub of hummus (a.k.a. hommus) in the fridge. Protein-rich hummus—a creamy blend of chickpeas and tahini (sesame paste) flavored with lemon juice and garlic—is a staple in the Middle East, where it is traditionally served as part of a meze platter with bread or vegetables for dipping. We use it the same way, dipping veggies in it instead of creamy dressings or spreading some in a whole-wheat pita along with leftover roasted veggies. It’s a great take-to-work snack or lunch.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Carolyn Malcoun </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Protein-rich, with good-for-you fats, hummus is (nearly) always a healthy choice. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/hummus_taste_test_310.jpg?1274369667" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Hummus Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/hummus_vegetables.html">Hummus &amp; Vegetables</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/roasted_garlic_hummus.html">Roasted Garlic Hummus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>There are lots of reasons why we love to keep a tub of hummus (a.k.a. hommus) in the fridge. Protein-rich hummus—a creamy blend of chickpeas and tahini (sesame paste) flavored with lemon juice and garlic—is a staple in the Middle East, where it is traditionally served as part of a meze platter with bread or vegetables for dipping. We use it the same way, dipping veggies in it instead of creamy dressings or spreading some in a whole-wheat pita along with leftover roasted veggies. It’s a great take-to-work snack or lunch.</p> <p>The good news, the basic ingredients in hummus mean that most brands we found are generally healthy, made with omega-3-rich canola oil or heart-healthy olive oil, along with chickpeas, tahini, garlic and lemon. And you can feel good about using it to replace your creamy veggie dips for snacking—most brands of hummus have one-third to one-half fewer calories and a fraction of the fat. Plus they have a little bit of fiber and protein, while most creamy dips have none. It’s hard to say that any hummus tastes bad, as everyone’s preferences on taste and texture are different (indeed, even our tasters couldn’t agree on one favorite).</p> <p>But hummus does warrant a label reading as we were surprised to see that one of the national brands is made with high-fructose corn syrup. And if you’re watching your sodium intake, check that too, as sodium levels vary from brand to brand.</p> <p>With so many to choose from, we limited our tests this issue to the best and most widely available hummus brands that met our nutrition guidelines. And all of them merit Smart Choice ratings for both their taste and nutritional value. But don’t limit yourself to the ones we tested; try those available in your area to find the one that will keep you dipping in for more.</p> <p><em>Our 5 favorite brands all meet the Smart Choice criteria for good nutrition and good taste.</em></p> <p><strong>Cedar’s Original Hommus Tahini</strong><br /> Generally smooth with little flecks of chickpea throughout. Carolyn C. appreciated its “authentic taste with a nice balance of chickpea and tahini flavors.” This hummus was the highest in protein and fiber.</p> <p><strong>Emerald Valley Kitchen Organic Traditional Hummus</strong><br /> If you’re looking for a hummus that’s all about the chickpeas, this slightly chunky one’s for you. Stacy observed, “The garlic and lemon flavors are good, but it needs more tahini.” Sodium watchers might want to consider another brand.</p> <p><strong>Joseph’s Hommus Tahini</strong><br /> The tasters were divided on this one, but Carolyn M. thought it looked most like homemade hummus with little bits of chickpea mixed in. She loved its “lemony flavor and thick, rich texture.” It’s also the lowest in sodium.</p> <p><strong>Sabra Classic Hummus</strong><br /> The lighter color of this hummus was off-putting to some, but this was the favorite of many of our tasters. Hilary said, “Nicely balanced and the creamy, smooth texture is fabulous.” Sabra is higher in calories and fat than the other brands we tested.</p> <p><strong>Tribe Hummus Classic</strong><br /> This hummus rated high overall, with tasters enjoying its smooth texture and lemony flavor. “Real garbanzo flavor and a touch of lemon add nuance to this one—yum!” commented Jessie.<br /> —C.M.</p> <p>Tasting Panel:<br /> Carolyn Casner, Recipe Tester | Stacy Fraser, Test Kitchen Manager | Carolyn Malcoun, Associate Editor | Hilary Meyer, Recipe Tester | Jessie Price, Food Editor</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_hummus#comments Carolyn Malcoun March/April 2007 Healthy Cooking - Kitchen Product Reviews Fri, 14 Aug 2009 15:42:24 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9523 at http://www.eatingwell.com Where the Elk (and the Buffalo) Roam http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/where_the_elk_and_the_buffalo_roam <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Beef isn&#039;t your only option for healthy grass-fed meat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Dave Whittlesey learned early on that if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em. When a 1986 drought drove wild elk to denude the irrigated pastures of his bison ranch near Steamboat Springs, Colorado, he decided to start raising elk too.</p> <p>Now, Dave and his wife, Sue, raise both bison and elk on their 320-acre High Wire Ranch, set in the mountains near Hotchkiss in western Colorado. Dave’s still learning to let nature take its course. “I used to wean and cull my herds,” he says in his friendly drawl. Now, they roam freely, pretty much the way they do in the wild.</p> <p>Elk is delicious. It has an earthy, mineral taste reminiscent of aged beef—but it’s significantly lower in calories and saturated fat than beef. And because Dave’s elk are grass-fed, they contain more heart-healthy omega-3s to boot.</p> <p>The Whittleseys sell the meat at farmer’s markets in Colorado. They also ship frozen cuts ordered via the Internet and by phone (highwireranch.com, 970-835-7600).</p> <p>Dave’s favorite recipe? Elk steaks on the grill, of course. A little olive oil, some crushed garlic, and about 3 minutes per side over high heat. Frankly, we can’t imagine a better dinner.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/where_the_elk_and_the_buffalo_roam#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough March/April 2007 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Thu, 13 Aug 2009 15:02:46 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9485 at http://www.eatingwell.com Ham & Swiss Rosti http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/ham_swiss_rosti.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/ham_swiss_rosti.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MK5797.JPG" alt="Ham &amp;amp; Swiss Rosti Recipe" title="Ham &amp;amp; Swiss Rosti Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/ham_swiss_rosti.html" target="_blank">Ham &amp; Swiss Rosti</a></div> <div>Rösti is a traditional Swiss potato pancake typically served as a side dish but we added ham and cheese to transform it into an easy weeknight supper. Enjoy with steamed asparagus and chunky applesauce on the side.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/ham_swiss_rosti.html#comments EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (2008) March/April 2007 Other European Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight High calcium Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low sodium Bone Health Recipes - Individual Recipes Cheese Eggs Vegetables Pork Dinner
 Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Budget Comfort foods Kid-friendly Quick (total 30 min. or less) Main dish, meat Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5520 at http://www.eatingwell.com Maple-Walnut Tapioca Pudding http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/maple_walnut_tapioca_pudding.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/maple_walnut_tapioca_pudding.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/DS5790.JPG" alt="Maple-Walnut Tapioca Pudding Recipe" title="Maple-Walnut Tapioca Pudding Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/maple_walnut_tapioca_pudding.html" target="_blank">Maple-Walnut Tapioca Pudding</a></div> <div>Turn comforting tapioca pudding into a special dessert for two by spiking it with pure maple syrup and finishing it with a simple spiced maple-nut topping.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/maple_walnut_tapioca_pudding.html#comments March/April 2007 American Easy Gluten free High calcium Low sodium Bone Health Digestive Health Recipes & Menus - Antioxidants Recipes & Menus - Gluten Free Recipes & Menus - Spices Recipes & Menus - Walnuts Dairy Eggs Nuts Dessert Fall Spring Summer Winter 2 Comfort foods Cooking for 2 Kid-friendly Vegetarian 45 minutes or less Desserts, other Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5519 at http://www.eatingwell.com Mashed Maple Squash http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mashed_maple_squash.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mashed_maple_squash.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD5789.JPG" alt="Mashed Maple Squash Recipe" title="Mashed Maple Squash Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mashed_maple_squash.html" target="_blank">Mashed Maple Squash</a></div> <div>Acorn squash makes a sweet substitute for potatoes in this easy mash. Use a serrated grapefruit spoon to get all the seeds and stringy fibers out of the inside of the squash.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mashed_maple_squash.html#comments March/April 2007 American Easy Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber High potassium Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Recipes & Menus - Antioxidants Recipes & Menus - Spices Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Vegetables Dinner
 Bake Fall Spring Winter 2 Comfort foods Cooking for 2 Kid-friendly More than 1 hour Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5518 at http://www.eatingwell.com Maple-Glazed Chicken Breasts http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/maple_glazed_chicken_breasts.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/maple_glazed_chicken_breasts.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MP5788.JPG" alt="Maple-Glazed Chicken Breasts Recipe" title="Maple-Glazed Chicken Breasts Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/maple_glazed_chicken_breasts.html" target="_blank">Maple-Glazed Chicken Breasts</a></div> <div>Here&#039;s an easy main dish that&#039;s sure to set you on your own quest for the best syrup. Start the chicken breasts marinating on a Saturday afternoon for a quick meal later in the day, just about the time you come in from raking the last of the winter leaves off the garden.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/maple_glazed_chicken_breasts.html#comments March/April 2007 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Recipes - Individual Recipes Recipes & Menus - Grilling Citrus Chicken Dinner
 Marinate/Rub Fall Spring Summer Winter 2 Cooking for 2 Kid-friendly More than 1 hour Main dish, poultry Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5517 at http://www.eatingwell.com Cinnamon-Chocolate Meringues http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cinnamon_chocolate_meringues.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cinnamon_chocolate_meringues.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/DS5787.JPG" alt="Cinnamon-Chocolate Meringues Recipe" title="Cinnamon-Chocolate Meringues Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cinnamon_chocolate_meringues.html" target="_blank">Cinnamon-Chocolate Meringues</a></div> <div>Perfect meringues depend on totally yolk-free whites. The seemingly fussy step of separating each egg into a small bowl before combining them guarantees yolk-free whites for bakeshop-quality meringues every time. These crispy little morsels travel well and make great gifts too.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cinnamon_chocolate_meringues.html#comments March/April 2007 American French Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Christmas Valentine's Day Recipes & Menus - Antioxidants Recipes & Menus - Diabetic Desserts Recipes & Menus - Gluten Free Recipes & Menus - Spices Chocolate Eggs Dessert Bake Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Entertaining, casual Freezing instructions Gourmet Kid-friendly Make ahead instructions Picnic Potluck Vegetarian More than 1 hour Baked Goods, bars & cookies Desserts, chocolate Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5516 at http://www.eatingwell.com Toasted Almond-Coconut Meringues http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/toasted_almond_coconut_meringues.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/toasted_almond_coconut_meringues.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/DS5786.JPG" alt="Toasted Almond-Coconut Meringues Recipe" title="Toasted Almond-Coconut Meringues Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/toasted_almond_coconut_meringues.html" target="_blank">Toasted Almond-Coconut Meringues</a></div> <div>Perfect meringues depend on totally yolk-free whites. The seemingly fussy step of separating each egg into a small bowl before combining them guarantees yolk-free whites for bakeshop-quality meringues every time. These crispy little morsels travel well and make great gifts too.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/toasted_almond_coconut_meringues.html#comments March/April 2007 American French Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Christmas Recipes & Menus - Diabetic Desserts Recipes & Menus - Organic Valley Eggs Nuts Dessert Bake Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Entertaining, casual Entertaining, formal Gourmet Make ahead instructions Picnic Potluck Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegetarian More than 1 hour Baked Goods, bars & cookies Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5515 at http://www.eatingwell.com Frangelico & Toasted Hazelnut Meringues http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/frangelico_toasted_hazelnut_meringues.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/frangelico_toasted_hazelnut_meringues.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/DS5784.JPG" alt="Frangelico &amp;amp; Toasted Hazelnut Meringues Recipe" title="Frangelico &amp;amp; Toasted Hazelnut Meringues Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/frangelico_toasted_hazelnut_meringues.html" target="_blank">Frangelico &amp; Toasted Hazelnut Meringues</a></div> <div>Perfect meringues depend on totally yolk-free whites. The seemingly fussy step of separating each egg into a small bowl before combining them guarantees yolk-free whites for bakeshop-quality meringues every time. These crispy little morsels travel well and make great gifts too.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/frangelico_toasted_hazelnut_meringues.html#comments March/April 2007 Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Christmas Recipes & Menus - Diabetic Desserts Recipes & Menus - Gluten Free Alcohol Eggs Nuts Dessert Bake Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Entertaining, casual Entertaining, formal Freezing instructions Gourmet Make ahead instructions Picnic Potluck Vegetarian More than 1 hour Baked Goods, bars & cookies Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 5514 at http://www.eatingwell.com