September/October 2007 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/438/all en Guide to Food Allergies and Special Eating Needs http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/guide_to_food_allergies_and_special_eating_needs <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> What-they-can-eat cheat sheet </div> </div> </div> <p>Following this guide can help you prepare a meal for someone with food allergies or other special eating needs. Hidden sources are not as elusive as they were before it became mandatory to list, in plain language, ingredients derived from the &ldquo;Big Eight&rdquo; allergens. But you still need to read labels. We&rsquo;ve simplified that job by identifying some foods in which these risky ingredients are common.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The 8 most common food allergies and how to eat around them. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="196" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/food_allergies_630.jpg?1299799309" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/EatingWell_wheat.jpg?1299794416" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/EatingWell_eggs.jpg?1299794422" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/EatingWell_fish_opt1.jpg?1299794429" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/EatingWell_milk.jpg?1299794437" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/EatingWell_peanuts.jpg?1299794444" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/EatingWell_shellfish.jpg?1299794453" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/EatingWell_soy_opt1.jpg?1299794461" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/EatingWell_tree_nuts.jpg?1299794470" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Allergies and Special Diets </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_eat_around_allergies">How to Eat Around Allergies</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/are_food_allergies_on_the_rise">Are Food Allergies on the Rise?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_cook_for_people_with_special_diets">How to Cook for People with Special Diets</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/gluten_free_diet/should_you_go_gluten_free">Should You Go Gluten-Free?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/gluten_free_recipes">Gluten-Free Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_vegan_recipes">Healthy Vegan Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/guide_to_food_allergies_and_special_eating_needs#comments EatingWell Editors September/October 2007 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Tue, 13 Apr 2010 22:33:05 +0000 Penelope Wall 15728 at http://www.eatingwell.com Cast Iron Skillet Cooking http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/cast_iron_skillet_cooking <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cast-Iron Chef </div> </div> </div> <p>When I spotted the black cast-iron skillet at a yard sale in the late 1960s it was love at first sight. Having arrived from Europe (I grew up in Barcelona) a few months earlier, I had never been to a tag sale. My then boyfriend, now my husband, and I were on our way to visit friends in Pennsylvania Dutch Country when we came across a sale at a stone farmhouse flanked by two sugar maples in full autumn regalia. There, on a long table covered with farm tools, was the skillet. Three dollars later, it was mine.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Perla Meyers </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Make one-skillet dinners in a pan you’ll come to cherish. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/cast_iron_skillet_recipes.jpg?1267209289" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cast-Iron Skillet Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/pan_roasted_chicken_gravy.html">Pan-Roasted Chicken &amp; Gravy</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/catalan_saut_of_chicken_with_sausage_capers_herbs.html">Catalan Sauté of Chicken with Sausage, Capers &amp; Herbs</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/seared_scallops_with_saut_ed_cucumbers.html">Seared Scallops with Sautéed Cucumbers</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/tuscan_cabbage_mushrooms.html">Tuscan Cabbage &amp; Mushrooms</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chicken_with_tarragon_cream_sauce.html">Chicken with Tarragon Cream Sauce</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/basque_vegetable_rice.html">Basque Vegetable Rice</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/braised_fennel_with_tomatoes_potatoes.html">Braised Fennel with Tomatoes &amp; Potatoes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/cast_iron_recipes">Healthy Cast Iron Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/cast_iron_skillet_tips">Cast Iron Skillet Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy One-Pot Meals </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/healthy_cooking_blog/one_pot_dinners_i_wouldn_t_live_without">One-pot dinners I wouldn’t live without</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/one_pot_cooking_healthy_winter_meals">One-Pot Cooking: Healthy Winter Meals</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_slow_cooker_recipes">Healthy Crock Pot &amp; Slow Cooker Recipes and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/pressure_cooker_recipes">Pressure Cooker Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/cast_iron_skillet_cooking#comments Perla Meyers September/October 2007 Fri, 26 Feb 2010 18:29:24 +0000 Penelope Wall 15590 at http://www.eatingwell.com Broccoli, Cannellini Bean & Cheddar Soup http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/broccoli_cannellini_bean_cheddar_soup.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/broccoli_cannellini_bean_cheddar_soup.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SP6160.JPG" alt="Broccoli, Cannellini Bean &amp;amp; Cheddar Soup Recipe" title="Broccoli, Cannellini Bean &amp;amp; Cheddar Soup Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/broccoli_cannellini_bean_cheddar_soup.html" target="_blank">Broccoli, Cannellini Bean &amp; Cheddar Soup</a></div> <div>White beans pureed into this broccoli soup make it extra creamy so you don&#039;t need heaps of cheese to do the job. Serve with a crunchy whole-grain roll and a glass of winter ale.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/broccoli_cannellini_bean_cheddar_soup.html#comments September/October 2007 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free High calcium High fiber Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Bone Health Digestive Health glutfree Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Beans/legumes Cheese Vegetables Dinner
 Lunch Fall Spring Summer Winter 6 Everyday favorites Kid-friendly Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegetarian 30 minutes or less Soups/stews Tue, 05 Jan 2010 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6261 at http://www.eatingwell.com Is high-fructose corn syrup bad for you? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_high_fructose_corn_syrup_bad_for_you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/junk_food_on_plate_310_0.jpg?1256753503" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Is high-fructose corn syrup bad for you? Should I avoid all foods containing it?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a manmade sweetener that’s found in a wide range of processed foods, from ketchup and cereals to crackers and salad dressings. It also sweetens just about all of the (regular) soda Americans drink. HFCS used in foods is between 50 to 55 percent fructose—so chemically, it’s virtually identical to table sugar (sucrose), which is 50 percent fructose. Metabolic studies suggest our bodies break down and use HFCS and sucrose the same way.</p> <p>Yet, after HFCS began to be widely introduced into the food supply 30-odd years ago, obesity rates skyrocketed. And because the sweetener is so ubiquitous, many blame HFCS for playing a major role in our national obesity epidemic. As a result, some shoppers equate HFCS with “toxic waste” when they see it on a food label. But when it comes right down to it, a sugar is a sugar is a sugar. A can of soda contains around nine teaspoons of sugar in the form of HFCS—but, from a biochemical standpoint, drinking that soda is no worse for you than sipping home-brewed iced tea that you’ve doctored with nine teaspoons of table sugar or an equivalent amount of honey.</p> <p>Even Barry Popkin, Ph.D., a nutrition professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill who previously suggested, in an influential 2004 paper, a possible HFCS-obesity link, stresses that the real obesity problem doesn’t lie just with HFCS. Rather, it’s the fact that sugars from all sources have become so prevalent in our food supply, especially in our beverages. He scoffs at the “natural” sweeteners sometimes added to upscale processed foods like organic crackers and salad dressings. “They all have the same caloric effects as sugar,” he explains. “I don’t care whether something contains concentrated fruit juice, brown sugar, honey or HFCS. The only better sweetener option is ‘none of the above.’”</p> <p>At EatingWell, it’s our philosophy to keep any sweeteners we use in our recipes to a minimum—and likewise, to limit processed foods with added sugars of any type, including HFCS. We recommend you do the same.</p> <h3>Did you know?</h3> <p>The corn syrup found on supermarket shelves is only a distant cousin to the high-fructose corn syrup used commercially. Both start by processing corn starch with enzymes and/or acids, but the HFCS process is much more complex and results in a different chemical structure.</p> <h3><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/free_downloads/best_healthy_dessert_recipes">Download a Free Cookbook with Our Best Healthy Dessert Recipes!</a></h3> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/whats_so_bad_about_high_fructose_corn_syrup">What&#039;s So Bad About High Fructose Corn Syrup?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/high_fructose_corn_syrup_and_mercury">High-Fructose Corn Syrup and Mercury</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/is_high_fructose_corn_syrup_making_you_fat">Is high-fructose corn syrup making you fat?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2007 </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_high_fructose_corn_syrup_bad_for_you#comments Joyce Hendley September/October 2007 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:32:39 +0000 Nifer 10183 at http://www.eatingwell.com Eat to Beat the Odds of Breast Cancer http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/eat_to_beat_the_odds_of_breast_cancer <p>I need two hands to count the number of my friends and colleagues who learned in the past year or so they have breast cancer. I shouldn’t be surprised; after skin cancer, it’s the most common cancer women face. </p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Health update: can diet make a difference? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/rachel_johnson_310.jpg?1252004042" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/does_eating_red_meat_increase_a_woman_s_risk_of_breast_cancer">Does Eating Red Meat Increase a Woman’s Risk of Breast Cancer?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/walnuts_ward_off_cancer">Walnuts Ward Off Cancer?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/3_everyday_tips_for_immune_support">3 Everyday Tips for Immune Support</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/does_broccoli_fight_cancer">Does broccoli fight cancer?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/what_to_eat_right_now_for_better_breast_health">What to eat right now for better breast health</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/thriving_with_cancer">Thriving with Cancer</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>I need two hands to count the number of my friends and colleagues who learned in the past year or so they have breast cancer. I shouldn’t be surprised; after skin cancer, it’s the most common cancer women face.</p> <p>Even women with extensive health knowledge, who seem to get everything right, get cancer. We know there are some things we can’t control. We can’t change risk factors like our family history; scientists predict that just over one-quarter of breast-cancer risk is due to inherited factors. But it’s clear that eating well is part of doing everything you can to tip the odds in your favor.</p> <p>So what can we do (or not do) to lower our risk? For perspective, I checked in with colleagues who are experts in cancer and nutrition.</p> <h3>Drink moderately, if at all</h3> <p>Much of the research connecting breast-cancer prevention and diet is inconclusive, according to Laurence Kolonel, M.D., Ph.D., director of the epidemiology program at the Cancer Research Center of Hawaii and co-author of a forthcoming major review of diet and cancer. However, one of the areas where consensus is strongest is the role of alcoholic drinks. “Even as little as one drink a day increases breast-cancer risk,” he says. While we know consuming alcohol in moderation has benefits for the heart—and heart disease kills far more women than cancer does—you’ll need to weigh your decisions about drinking if you have other risk factors for breast cancer. Consider limiting yourself to one drink a day; more won’t provide additional heart benefits. If you have a family history of breast cancer, you may want to avoid alcohol altogether.</p> <h3>Stay lean, move more</h3> <p>A recent review article in the journal Cancer found that one of the most important ways to reduce risk of breast cancer is to avoid gaining weight. That means balancing a healthy diet with plenty of exercise. Research also suggests that if you’re overweight, losing those extra pounds before age 45 can reduce your risk of breast cancer after menopause. Even if you’re past your forties, managing your weight through physical activity helps. A study of over 100,000 women reported that those who got regular, strenuous exercise had a lower risk of developing breast cancer than others who didn’t. Exercise may help lower levels of hormones that are involved in breast cancer. Commit to regular exercise, if you haven’t already.</p> <h3>Enjoy fats in moderation</h3> <p>The Women’s Intervention Nutrition Study (WINS), a major clinical trial of postmenopausal women with early-stage breast cancer, found that those who followed a low-fat diet significantly reduced their risk of cancer coming back. They also lost an average of 4.6 pounds after the first year of the trial, while those in the control group gained a half-pound. Because weight gain is linked with breast-cancer recurrence and lower survival rates, perhaps the key benefit of a lower-fat diet is the weight loss it encourages. Watching your fat intake can help prevent you from gaining weight and may thus be a cancer-fighting strategy.</p> <h3>Eat soyfoods, not supplements</h3> <p>In countries like China and Japan where soyfoods are commonly eaten, breast-cancer rates are among the lowest in the world—and one analysis of 18 studies found that eating soyfoods, such as tofu and soy nuts, slightly lowered breast-cancer risk. But don’t be tempted to pop a soy supplement, warns Kolonel: the high doses of soy phytoestrogens found in supplements can behave like estrogen in the body, causing breast-cell changes that could potentially lead to cancer. Breast-cancer survivors and women at high risk for the disease should avoid soy supplements.</p> <h3>Boost vegetables and fruits?</h3> <p>Research to assess whether fruits and vegetables can fight breast cancer has been disappointing, but “a diet that’s rich in fruits and vegetables tends to be lower in calories,” says Kolonel, “and that can help you maintain a [cancer-fighting] healthy weight.” Cheryl Rock, Ph.D., R.D., who coordinates the Women’s Healthy Eating and Living Study (WHEL) at the University of California, San Diego, found that women who ate at least five servings of vegetables and fruits a day (along with taking a brisk 30-minute daily walk) cut their risk of dying from breast cancer by half. “A healthy weight is what matters most,” she says, “but if women aren’t able to lose weight but eat plenty of fruits and vegetables and exercise, they can still lower their risk of cancer recurrence.” Eating more fruits and vegetables certainly couldn’t hurt and may help.</p> <p>These simple strategies could lower your cancer risk—and give you a healthier heart too. But I think the best benefit is knowing you’re doing everything in your power to stay healthy.</p> <p>Rachel Johnson, EatingWell’s senior nutrition advisor, is dean of the University of Vermont College of Agriculture &amp; Life Sciences.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/eat_to_beat_the_odds_of_breast_cancer#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. September/October 2007 Healthy Immune System Recipes & Menus - Cancer Recipes & Menus - Walnuts Diet, Nutrition & Health - Immunity Tue, 18 Aug 2009 22:34:01 +0000 Penelope Wall 9752 at http://www.eatingwell.com Thriving with Cancer http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/thriving_with_cancer <p><strong>Lillie Shockney, R.N., 53</strong><br /> Administrative Director, Breast Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD</p> <p>“At the time of my diagnosis, I got a lot of crazy advice from well-meaning people [advising me to try] everything from shark cartilage to herbs. Thank goodness with my health background I knew better! I began to reduce fatty foods in my diet and eat more fruits and veggies than I had before.”</p> <p><strong>Suzanne Murphy, Ph.D., R.D., 65</strong><br /> Professor and Researcher, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How three health pros faced a breast-cancer diagnosis. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/eat_to_beat_the_odds_of_breast_cancer">Eat to Beat the Odds of Breast Cancer</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/does_broccoli_fight_cancer">Does broccoli fight cancer?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_immunity_recipes">Healthy Immunity Recipes </a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Lillie Shockney, R.N., 53</strong><br /> Administrative Director, Breast Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD</p> <p>“At the time of my diagnosis, I got a lot of crazy advice from well-meaning people [advising me to try] everything from shark cartilage to herbs. Thank goodness with my health background I knew better! I began to reduce fatty foods in my diet and eat more fruits and veggies than I had before.”</p> <p><strong>Suzanne Murphy, Ph.D., R.D., 65</strong><br /> Professor and Researcher, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii</p> <p>“Seven years ago I participated in the WINS study of cancer survivors, so I had to limit myself to 15 percent of my total calories from fat. The study ended in 2004, but I’ve stayed on the low-fat diet—not necessarily to prevent a recurrence, but because a low-fat diet helps me control my calories. [Murphy also avoids weight gain by staying active, and has finished three Honolulu marathons since her diagnosis.]</p> <p>“I think an overall healthy diet reduces the risk of cancer so I try to follow the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and eat plenty of fruits and vegetables…it’s easy to eat a lot of fruit in Hawaii, but I have to make a conscious effort to get more vegetables. I fill plastic bags with carrots, peppers and grape tomatoes and bring them to work to munch on all afternoon.”</p> <p><strong>Diana Dyer, m.s., R.D., 57</strong><br /> Author, A Dietitian’s Cancer Story (Swan Press, 2002)</p> <p>“I already had a healthy diet but cranked it up a notch or two…that meant cutting out virtually all junk or empty calories. I focused on eating and enjoying foods I knew contained a multitude and variety of anticancer actions, such as whole-plant foods (fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts, seeds) and foods containing healthy fats like monounsaturated fatty acids and omega-3 fatty acids (extra-virgin olive and canola oils, fatty fish, walnuts, flaxseeds). I eat organic foods when available and affordable.</p> <p>“I also went back to cooking every day, and getting the family together for a meal every night. It was a time commitment, but we chose to view it as a gift we gave ourselves.”</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/thriving_with_cancer#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. September/October 2007 Healthy Immune System Recipes & Menus - Cancer Diet, Nutrition & Health - Immunity Tue, 18 Aug 2009 22:31:27 +0000 Penelope Wall 9751 at http://www.eatingwell.com Is Salt the Next Health Focus? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/blood_pressure/is_salt_the_next_health_focus <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Peter Jaret </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A recent study suggests that a low sodium diet may reduce the risk of heart disease by as much as 25 to 30 percent. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the past four years the number of reduced-salt alternatives on grocery shelves, from V8 juice to Goldfish crackers, has more than doubled. Indeed, “low-sodium” seems poised to follow “trans-fat-free” as the next rallying cry in the campaign for healthier diets, especially as new evidence underscores the benefits of easing up on salt.</p> <p>The most startling numbers come from a study published in the April 2007 British Medical Journal, which found that reducing sodium slashed cardiovascular-disease risk by 25 to 30 percent—far more than even many advocates of low-sodium diets imagined. “We’ve known for a long time that excessive sodium raises blood pressure,” says Nancy Cook, Sc.D., an associate professor of preventive medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, who led the study. Two previous investigations, reported in 1992 and 1997, had shown that when some of the participants were counseled to reduce sodium, average blood pressure levels fell. Cook and her team decided to check back to see if the volunteers in the low-sodium group—1,169 people in all—were any healthier 10 to 15 years later. They were. Surveys showed that people who’d been counseled to cut back on salty foods were still following that advice. And they were as much as one-third less likely to have suffered a heart attack, stroke or other complications of cardiovascular disease. </p> <p>“The numbers really surprised us,” says Cook, who acknowledges that while cutting back on salt has been shown to lower blood pressure, the reduction is usually fairly modest—a few points, on average, in those with borderline hypertension. The reduction in the study participants’ heart-disease risk, by contrast, was dramatic. One reason may be that elevated blood pressure is only one way excessive sodium is bad for the body. Recent studies show it can also stiffen artery walls and may even damage heart muscle. Too much sodium may also be a factor in fueling the epidemic of insulin resistance, a risk factor for both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.</p> <p>How much sodium is too much? Federal experts recommend a maximum of 2,300 milligrams (mg) a day—the amount in a teaspoon of table salt. Some studies show that cutting back even further (to a Spartan 1,500 mg daily) offers additional protection against hypertension. </p> <p>Unfortunately, most Americans still consume about 3,375 mg of sodium a day. The growing ranks of low-sodium processed foods should help bring those numbers down, since processed foods account for a whopping 80 percent of sodium in Americans’ diets.</p> <p>Bottom Line: Watching your sodium intake now can provide big health payoffs later. Reduced-sodium processed foods can help, but you’ll get even more benefit by choosing whole, unprocessed foods, cooking more from “scratch” and using just a dash of salt as needed. By gradually reducing the amount you use, you can reset your taste buds so that less salt doesn’t mean bland. “Many of the people in our study reported that they had grown to prefer low-sodium alternatives,” says Cook.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/blood_pressure/is_salt_the_next_health_focus#comments Peter Jaret September/October 2007 High Blood Pressure Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Blood Pressure Tue, 18 Aug 2009 21:46:51 +0000 Penelope Wall 9741 at http://www.eatingwell.com How to Cook for People with Special Diets http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_cook_for_people_with_special_diets <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Who Else is Coming to Dinner? </div> </div> </div> <p>You may never host a guest with food allergies, which affect one in 25 Americans. But it’s likely that someday you will be in the position of serving someone who avoids certain foods for a medical condition, such as celiac disease, or for personal beliefs (e.g., veganism). Here’s help in understanding your guests’ reasons for not eating “everything” and advice on how to accommodate their needs, deliciously.</p> <p><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/node/9678?page=2">Next: Lactose-Intolerance &raquo;</a></p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheryl Sternman Rule </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Understanding the dietary needs of your guests. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/bread_1.jpg?1319656765" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Allergies and Special Diets </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/are_food_allergies_on_the_rise">Are Food Allergies on the Rise?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_eat_around_allergies">How to Eat Around Allergies</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_vegan_recipes">Healthy Vegan Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_vegetarian_recipes">Healthy Vegetarian Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/gluten_free_recipes">Gluten-Free Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_food_guide/yogurt">Yogurt Healthy Food Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/a_buyer_s_guide_to_milk_part_ii">A Buyer&#039;s Guide to Milk Alternatives</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>You may never host a guest with food allergies, which affect one in 25 Americans. But it’s likely that someday you will be in the position of serving someone who avoids certain foods for a medical condition, such as celiac disease, or for personal beliefs (e.g., veganism). Here’s help in understanding your guests’ reasons for not eating “everything” and advice on how to accommodate their needs, deliciously.</p> <p><strong>“I’m lactose-intolerant.”</strong><br /> Translation: This person doesn’t make enough of the enzyme needed to digest lactose, the sugar in milk. Consuming dairy causes gastrointestinal discomfort (e.g., bloating, diarrhea) within 30 minutes to two hours. Odds: 1 in 6 people. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), up to 50 million Americans are lactose-intolerant. Also consider: Using lactose-free milk. People with lactose intolerance can safely digest the proteins in milk, just not the sugars. Some can tolerate aged cheeses and yogurts with live active cultures. Learn more: digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/lactoseintolerance/.</p> <p><strong>“I have celiac disease.”</strong><br /> Translation: This person cannot digest gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Untreated, the disease can damage the small intestine, interfering with the body’s ability to absorb nutrients. This can lead to anemia and osteoporosis. There’s a genetic component to the disorder. The only effective treatment is a gluten-free diet for life. Odds: 1 in 133 people, suggest NIH stats. Also consider: Your guest also must avoid rye and barley. Even trace amounts of gluten can cause health problems, so when using packaged products look not only for wheat-free foods but also a “gluten-free” label. Learn more: celiac.org.</p> <p><strong>“I’m a vegan.”</strong><br /> Translation: This person chooses not to eat (or use) animal-derived products or products tested on animals. Odds: 1 in 72 people. A 2006 poll conducted by the Vegetarian Resource Group found that 1.4 percent of American adults consider themselves vegan. Also consider: Vegan diets exclude all foods of animal origin, including meats, poultry, dairy and gelatin (some avoid honey too). Learn more: vegan.org.</p> <p><em>—Cheryl Sternman Rule</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_cook_for_people_with_special_diets#comments Cheryl Sternman Rule September/October 2007 glutfree Recipes & Menus - Gluten Free Tue, 18 Aug 2009 15:09:19 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9678 at http://www.eatingwell.com How to Eat Around Allergies http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_eat_around_allergies <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How to Eat Around Allergies </div> </div> </div> <p>Earlier this year, my 5-year-old son, Alex, joined the growing ranks of Americans who have tested positive for food allergies. Alex had been sick to his stomach, off and on, for weeks. Tests revealed allergic responses to a large number of foods and an abnormally high white blood cell count. An allergist advised us to temporarily eliminate wheat, dairy, chicken, fish, pork, beef and eggs from Alex’s diet. My husband and I were stunned.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheryl Sternman Rule </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cooking for people with food allergies and special diets. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Allergies and Special Diets </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/are_food_allergies_on_the_rise">Are Food Allergies on the Rise?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/guide_to_food_allergies_and_special_eating_needs">Guide to Food Allergies and Special Eating Needs</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_cook_for_people_with_special_diets">How to Cook for People with Special Diets</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/gluten_free_diet/should_you_go_gluten_free">Should You Go Gluten-Free?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/gluten_free_recipes">Gluten-Free Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Earlier this year, my 5-year-old son, Alex, joined the growing ranks of Americans who have tested positive for food allergies. Alex had been sick to his stomach, off and on, for weeks. Tests revealed allergic responses to a large number of foods and an abnormally high white blood cell count. An allergist advised us to temporarily eliminate wheat, dairy, chicken, fish, pork, beef and eggs from Alex’s diet. My husband and I were stunned.</p> <p>I ran through his favorite foods in my head, mentally ticking off those that were suddenly forbidden. Milk? Gone. Regular pasta? Nope. Bread, brownies, crackers, pizza? History. Cheese sticks, squeezable yogurts, hamburgers? Sorry.</p> <p>For a while, it was tough going. Try explaining to a kid why you’re suddenly serving his sandwiches on crackly brown-rice tortillas with egg-free mayo, and you’ll know what I mean.</p> <p>But we adjusted. Turns out, oat flour makes terrific cookies and pancakes. Quinoa spaghetti holds up well to marinara. Fortified rice milk and soymilk work beautifully in many recipes. And whoever invented dairy-free chocolate chips earned a place of honor in our home.</p> <p>Perhaps what surprised me most during the early weeks of Alex’s ordeal was how many people told me they, too, had to avoid certain foods, or knew of someone else with a food restriction. According to the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network, about 12 million Americans have food allergies. A true food allergy causes the body’s immune system to attack the proteins in a particular food, releasing chemicals (histamines) that cause symptoms like hives, gastrointestinal or respiratory distress. Symptoms, whether mild or severe, occur quickly: within a few minutes to two hours of eating. In the most severe cases, they progress to anaphylaxis, a potentially fatal condition in which the allergic reaction overtakes the entire body.</p> <p>Any food can cause an allergic reaction, but 90 percent of the time one of the “Big Eight” foods—milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, fish or shellfish—is the trigger. Allergists and immunologists don’t understand why these foods cause a reaction, nor do they know exactly what leads someone to develop a food allergy. There does, however, appear to be a genetic component, as studies show those who suffer from hay fever, or asthma, or who have family members with allergies, are more likely to develop food allergies. </p> <p>Still, anyone can develop a food allergy, at any time, says Scott Sicherer, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics at the Jaffe Food Allergy Institute at Mount Sinai in New York and author of Understanding and Managing Your Child’s Food Allergies (Johns Hopkins Press, 2006). Some allergies—including milk, eggs, soy and wheat allergies—appear more often during childhood, and many kids outgrow them. Others, like shellfish allergies, tend to develop during adulthood. Such is the highly individual (and unpredictable) nature of the food-allergy beast.</p> <p>Many people mistake localized discomfort, say a rumbling tummy after eating certain foods, as a food allergy, but it’s generally not. In fact, according to Dr. Sicherer, “Roughly 20 percent of people think they have food allergies, but the majority of them don’t.” They may, for example, have suffered a single bout of food poisoning or have trouble digesting certain sugars, but these don’t fall under the food-allergy umbrella. Knowing the difference is often tricky, which is why consulting a doctor is so important.</p> <p>For instance, milk is one food to which people can either be allergic or intolerant (or both), so it’s useful for highlighting the difference between the two terms. When the milk’s protein triggers an immune reaction like hives or breathing problems, this is usually a milk allergy. But when a person can’t digest the milk’s sugars (often causing loose stools), this is usually lactose intolerance.</p> <p>According to Annie Khuntia, M.D., clinical associate of allergy and immunology at the University of Chicago, two main tests can help determine the presence of a food allergy. One involves putting a small amount of the suspected allergen underneath the skin and looking for a raised bump, or wheal. “This method provides quick, easy results within 15 or 20 minutes,” Dr. Khuntia says. Another, the RAST blood test, “gives you a quantitative number to follow over time.” (Both tests have high rates of false positives, so follow-up testing is sometimes necessary.) Once allergies are identified and foods are eliminated, patients may need advice on maintaining proper nutrition. It’s unwise to self-diagnose and avoid foods haphazardly, since you risk depriving your body of important nutrients.</p> <p>Avoiding known triggers is the only surefire way to prevent reactions—which can be life-threatening, particularly with peanuts, tree nuts and shellfish. So people with allergies must be on high alert at all times, fastidiously reading labels and avoiding cross-contamination. Even trace amounts of peanut protein lingering on a utensil can cause trouble for someone with a peanut allergy.</p> <p>Fortunately, in the last couple of years, living with food allergies has become a little easier. Thanks to the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA), which took effect in January 2006, reading food labels is no longer an exercise in deciphering secret code. For example, before the law passed, those allergic to eggs had to memorize a laundry list of terms (e.g., albumin) that implied “egg inside.” Now that food manufacturers must disclose in plain language the top eight allergens, those same people can look for a single word: “egg.”</p> <p>Also, the number of allergy-friendly products has grown surprisingly large. In fact, a 2007 report from Chicago-based market research firm Mintel shows that the number of new dairy-free products more than tripled between 2005 and 2006 due to an increased awareness of dairy allergies.</p> <p>Eating with food restrictions (or cooking for someone with them) is far from easy, as I learned firsthand. Still, as I also discovered in the early weeks of Alex’s allergy ordeal, many people do it every day, or at least know someone who does. I have a new appreciation for their challenges. I’ve also come to view acquaintances who keep kosher or follow vegan diets with new respect. After all, it’s hard enough to restrict your diet when forced to by medical necessity, but they choose to do so for religious and personal beliefs.</p> <p>Following Alex’s initial diagnosis, I learned to cook creatively with the staples of an allergy-friendly diet—less-familiar grains, like quinoa, plenty of fruits and vegetables, fewer processed foods. The exercise was both eye-opening and a good lesson in nutrition.</p> <p>As it turns out, we were among the lucky ones. Alex’s symptoms were never life-threatening and we eventually got the green light to reintroduce many foods under careful supervision. Today, his diet is close to normal—a surprisingly quick turnaround that’s hardly typical among food-allergy sufferers. This whole ordeal even had a silver lining: together, Alex and I discovered a wide variety of new, healthful foods we might not have encountered otherwise. In fact, his favorite breakfast is still banana-oat pancakes, which are wheat-, egg- and dairy-free. And his dinners include more nutrient-rich grains and vegetables than ever before.</p> <p>In the days when Alex’s eating was most restrictive, I came up with what I call “One Dinner Everyone Will Love,” a menu of three recipes that contain none of the Big Eight foods, so they’re appropriate for many allergy sufferers (as well as vegans and people with celiac disease). Even better, those without food restrictions can enjoy the same meal without ever suspecting that anything’s “missing.”</p> <p><em>—Cheryl Sternman Rule</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_eat_around_allergies#comments Cheryl Sternman Rule September/October 2007 glutfree Recipes & Menus - Gluten Free Mon, 17 Aug 2009 20:58:56 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9638 at http://www.eatingwell.com Are Food Allergies on the Rise? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/are_food_allergies_on_the_rise <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Are Allergies on the Rise? </div> </div> </div> <p>The Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN), a nonprofit group dedicated to raising awareness of food allergies, conducted a telephone survey of 13,000 households (in which 5,000 participated) and determined that peanut allergies doubled in children between 1997 and 2002. But that’s not all. “Anecdotally,” says FAAN’s CEO and founder Anne Muñoz-Furlong, “we know from physicians and school nurses that other food allergies, and allergies in general, have increased as well.”</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheryl Sternman Rule </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Some theories on the increased prevalence of allergies. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Allergies and Special Diets </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_eat_around_allergies">How to Eat Around Allergies</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/guide_to_food_allergies_and_special_eating_needs">Guide to Food Allergies and Special Eating Needs</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_cook_for_people_with_special_diets">How to Cook for People with Special Diets</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/gluten_free_diet/should_you_go_gluten_free">Should You Go Gluten-Free?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/gluten_free_recipes">Gluten-Free Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN), a nonprofit group dedicated to raising awareness of food allergies, conducted a telephone survey of 13,000 households (in which 5,000 participated) and determined that peanut allergies doubled in children between 1997 and 2002. But that’s not all. “Anecdotally,” says FAAN’s CEO and founder Anne Muñoz-Furlong, “we know from physicians and school nurses that other food allergies, and allergies in general, have increased as well.”</p> <p>Identifying what’s responsible for the increased prevalence of allergies is difficult—but several theories abound. One is the so-called “hygiene hypothesis,” which posits that we’ve done such a good job eradicating diseases and sanitizing our environment that our immune systems are looking for something to do. Another theory is that we’re introducing potentially allergenic foods too early, or too late, into young children’s diets.</p> <p>Could it be that we’re all exposed to more and more of the “Big Eight” allergens through processed foods and this might be contributing to the rising rates? “Possibly,” says Annie Khuntia, M.D., clinical associate of allergy and immunology at the University of Chicago. “But it’s really difficult to come to this conclusion because there isn’t any evidence to support it. This issue hasn’t been studied.” At this point, say experts, most hypotheses tend to be, well, educated guesses. “Even the big players tend to disagree,” says Khuntia. “It’s an evolving science.”<br /> <em>—Cheryl Sternman Rule</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/are_food_allergies_on_the_rise#comments Cheryl Sternman Rule September/October 2007 glutfree Recipes & Menus - Gluten Free Mon, 17 Aug 2009 20:55:28 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9637 at http://www.eatingwell.com Chewing Gum Conundrum http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/chewing_gum_conundrum <p>Teachers may outlaw chewing gum in class: it sticks to desks and hair, not to mention that bubble-blowing is a big taboo. But the sticky stuff is gaining ground as a potentially good-for-you treat. Preliminary research suggests that regular chewing can help you remember names, make you thinner, whiten teeth, and more. Just last year, the Wrigley Company formed the Wrigley Science Institute to fund gum studies around the world.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Emily Sohn </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Is chewing gum good for your health? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/chewing_gum310.jpg?1248991182" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_mind_and_memory">Recipes for a Healthy Mind and Memory</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Healthy Mind and Memory </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/how_to_feed_your_mind">How to Feed Your Mind</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/eat_for_a_sharper_mind_5_brain_boosting_foods">Eat for a Sharper Mind: 5 Brain-Boosting Foods</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/is_dieting_a_brain_drain">Is Dieting a Brain Drain?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Teachers may outlaw chewing gum in class: it sticks to desks and hair, not to mention that bubble-blowing is a big taboo. But the sticky stuff is gaining ground as a potentially good-for-you treat. Preliminary research suggests that regular chewing can help you remember names, make you thinner, whiten teeth, and more. Just last year, the Wrigley Company formed the Wrigley Science Institute to fund gum studies around the world. </p> <p><strong>Supporting evidence:</strong> In a 2002 study of 75 people out of Northumbria University in England, gum-chewers performed better than nonchewers on a memory test. From a list of 15 words, chewers remembered eight or nine words immediately after hearing them and seven words 25 minutes later. Nonchewers and people who pretended to chew remembered six or seven words immediately and just five words later. How could that be? The simple act of chewing can get your heart pumping significantly more blood to the brain, suggests a small Japanese study. And more blood carries noggin-nourishing oxygen. It’s one theory, anyway.</p> <p>If you’re trying to lose weight, gum might help with that, too, suggests a 2006 study in the journal Appetite. Of 60 people, those who chewed gum for 15 minutes every hour after eating lunch snacked on 36 fewer calories three hours after the meal and craved fewer sweets than people who didn’t chew gum during the study. </p> <p><strong>Cons:</strong> Much of the work on gum is still in its early stages, and for each purported benefit, different studies turn up opposite results. The repetitive stress of chewing can exacerbate pain in people with jaw problems, such as TMJ. “Chewing gum will never be a suitable replacement for good nutrition and exercise,” says Gayl Canfield, Ph.D., R.D., a dietitian at the Pritikin Longevity Center &amp; Spa in Aventura, Florida.</p> <p><strong>Our verdict:</strong> Some research suggests that chewing sugarless gum can help fight cavities and bad breath. As for other touted properties and added health-boosters, it may be too early to tell. As long as your jaw muscles and pocketbook tolerate the habit, a stick or two a day is fine.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/chewing_gum_conundrum#comments Emily Sohn September/October 2007 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Thu, 30 Jul 2009 21:54:14 +0000 Penelope Wall 8772 at http://www.eatingwell.com Cottage Cheese Veggie Dip http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cottage_cheese_veggie_dip.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cottage_cheese_veggie_dip.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/OT6208.JPG" alt="Cottage Cheese Veggie Dip Recipe" title="Cottage Cheese Veggie Dip Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cottage_cheese_veggie_dip.html" target="_blank">Cottage Cheese Veggie Dip</a></div> <div>Stir lemon pepper into cottage cheese for a quick and healthy vegetable dip. We like carrots and snow peas, but any crunchy vegetables you have on hand will do.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cottage_cheese_veggie_dip.html#comments September/October 2007 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High calcium Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Bone Health Digestive Health glutfree Recipes & Menus - Gluten Free Cheese Citrus Dairy Vegetables Snack No-cook Fall Spring Summer Winter 1 Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegetarian 15 minutes or less Snack Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6295 at http://www.eatingwell.com BBQ Chicken Sandwich http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/bbq_chicken_sandwich.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/bbq_chicken_sandwich.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MP6206.JPG" alt="BBQ Chicken Sandwich Recipe" title="BBQ Chicken Sandwich Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/bbq_chicken_sandwich.html" target="_blank">BBQ Chicken Sandwich</a></div> <div>Toss leftover cooked chicken with barbecue sauce and crunchy carrots for a quick and healthy lunch.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/bbq_chicken_sandwich.html#comments September/October 2007 American Southern/Soul Easy Diabetes appropriate Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health Recipes - Individual Recipes Vegetables Wheat Chicken Lunch No-cook Fall Spring Summer Winter 1 Everyday favorites Picnic Quick (total 30 min. or less) 15 minutes or less Main dish, combination meal Main dish, poultry Sandwich Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6294 at http://www.eatingwell.com Tuscan Cabbage & Mushrooms http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/tuscan_cabbage_mushrooms.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/tuscan_cabbage_mushrooms.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD6205.JPG" alt="Tuscan Cabbage &amp;amp; Mushrooms Recipe" title="Tuscan Cabbage &amp;amp; Mushrooms Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/tuscan_cabbage_mushrooms.html" target="_blank">Tuscan Cabbage &amp; Mushrooms</a></div> <div>Savoy cabbage, shiitake mushrooms and leeks are braised together in this earthy Italian side dish.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/tuscan_cabbage_mushrooms.html#comments September/October 2007 Italian Mediterranean Moderate Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight High fiber Low calorie Low cholesterol Digestive Health glutfree Recipes - Individual Recipes Greens Pork (used as flavoring) Vegetables Dinner
 Braise/Stew Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Entertaining, casual 45 minutes or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6293 at http://www.eatingwell.com Mediterranean Roasted Broccoli & Tomatoes http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mediterranean_roasted_broccoli_tomatoes.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mediterranean_roasted_broccoli_tomatoes.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD6204.JPG" alt="Mediterranean Roasted Broccoli &amp;amp; Tomatoes Recipe" title="Mediterranean Roasted Broccoli &amp;amp; Tomatoes Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mediterranean_roasted_broccoli_tomatoes.html" target="_blank">Mediterranean Roasted Broccoli &amp; Tomatoes</a></div> <div>This dish of roasted broccoli and tomatoes is tossed with bright Mediterranean ingredients just before serving.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/mediterranean_roasted_broccoli_tomatoes.html#comments September/October 2007 Mediterranean Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health glutfree Recipes - Individual Recipes Recipes & Menus - Eat More Vegetables Challenge Recipes & Menus - Pompeian Recipes & Menus - Spices Citrus Tomatoes Vegetables Dinner
 Roast Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegan Vegetarian 15 minutes or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6292 at http://www.eatingwell.com