November/December 2007 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/437/recipes_menus en What’s the Healthy Aging Secret in Cocoa, Tea and Red Wine? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/what_s_the_healthy_aging_secret_in_cocoa_tea_and_red_wine <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/epicatechin2_310.jpg?1259880516" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/hot_chocolate_310.jpg?1260396158" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>What’s the Healthy Aging Secret in Cocoa, Tea and Red Wine?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Epicatechin. This specific type of flavonoid (antioxidant)—in cocoa, tea and red wine—helps blood vessels maintain a healthy elasticity, which lowers blood pressure and increases blood flow to the heart and other organs, including the skin. In a study of 24 women, published last year in the <em>Journal of Nutrition</em>, drinking an epicatechin-rich cocoa beverage daily for 12 weeks improved skin texture and protected against sunburn. The authors explained that epicatechin increased blood flow to the skin, boosting nutrient and oxygen supply—both factors essential for keeping skin healthy. It likely also absorbed UV light that otherwise might react with and damage skin cells, and swept up tissue-damaging free radicals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Healthy Aging </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/foods_for_beautiful_skin">Foods for Beautiful Skin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/7_anti_aging_superfoods">7 Anti-Aging Superfoods</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/3_ways_to_beat_your_age">3 Ways to Beat Your Age</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_aging_recipes">Healthy Aging Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2007 </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/what_s_the_healthy_aging_secret_in_cocoa_tea_and_red_wine#comments Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. November/December 2007 Healthy Aging Recipes & Menus - Wrinkles Thu, 03 Dec 2009 22:37:54 +0000 Penelope Wall 15279 at http://www.eatingwell.com 3 Ways to Beat Your Age http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/3_ways_to_beat_your_age <p>A poor diet and couch-potato tendencies are two ways to accelerate aging—but they’re not the only behaviors that can make you old beyond your years. In <em>YOU: Staying Young: The Owner’s Manual for Extending Your Warranty</em> (Free Press), just out, Mehmet C. Oz, M.D., and Michael F. Roizen, M.D., discuss other “major agers” and ways to combat them. Here are three tips from the book to get you started.</p> <h3>1. Squelch stress. </h3> <p> <strong>They say:</strong> “Stress isn’t just something you write off as a need for spa treatments; it’s a major biological driver of aging.” </p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Nicci Micco </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Tips on staying young from Mehmet C. Oz, M.D. and Michael F. Roizen, M.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/dr_oz_roisin_310.jpg?1260566695" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/yoga_2_310.jpg?1260454674" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/you_book_310.jpg?1259879306" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/yoga_310.jpg?1260394187" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Healthy Aging </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/7_foods_to_keep_young">7 Foods to Keep You Young</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_aging_recipes">Healthy Aging Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/healthy_aging_diet_guidelines">Healthy Aging Diet Guidelines</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/7_ways_to_keep_your_body_young">Antidotes for Aging Parts</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/the_search_for_the_anti_aging_diet">The Search for the Anti-Aging Diet</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/3_reasons_to_run_or_walk_for_your_life">3 Reasons to Run (or Walk) for Your Life</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/mind_body_spirit/6_remedies_for_sleep_problems">6 Remedies for Sleep Problems—Do They Work?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/can_vitamin_c_save_your_skin">Can Vitamin C Save Your Skin?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/3_ways_to_beat_your_age#comments Nicci Micco November/December 2007 Healthy Aging Thu, 03 Dec 2009 22:24:39 +0000 Penelope Wall 15278 at http://www.eatingwell.com Fresh vs. Frozen Vegetables: Are we giving up nutrition for convenience? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/fresh_vs_frozen_vegetables_are_we_giving_up_nutrition_fo <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/frozen_fruit_310.jpg?1271713034" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/veggie_basket_310_2.jpg?1263244271" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Fresh vs. Frozen Vegetables: Are we giving up nutrition for convenience?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Americans typically eat only one-third of the recommended daily intake (three servings instead of nine) of fruits and vegetables, so if you’re in a bind, a vegetable in any form is better than no vegetable at all.</p> <p>And as winter approaches, fresh produce is limited—or expensive—in much of the country, which forces many of us to turn to canned or frozen options. While canned vegetables tend to lose a lot of nutrients during the preservation process (notable exceptions include tomatoes and pumpkin), frozen vegetables may be even more healthful than some of the fresh produce sold in supermarkets, says Gene Lester, Ph.D., a plant physiologist at the USDA Agricultural Research Center in Weslaco, Texas. Why? Fruits and vegetables chosen for freezing tend to be processed at their peak ripeness, a time when—as a general rule—they are most nutrient-packed.</p> <p>While the first step of freezing vegetables—blanching them in hot water or steam to kill bacteria and arrest the action of food-degrading enzymes—causes some water-soluble nutrients like vitamin C and the B vitamins to break down or leach out, the subsequent flash-freeze locks the vegetables in a relatively nutrient-rich state.</p> <p>On the other hand, fruits and vegetables destined to be shipped to the fresh-produce aisles around the country typically are picked before they are ripe, which gives them less time to develop a full spectrum of vitamins and minerals. Outward signs of ripening may still occur, but these vegetables will never have the same nutritive value as if they had been allowed to fully ripen on the vine. In addition, during the long haul from farm to fork, fresh fruits and vegetables are exposed to lots of heat and light, which degrade some nutrients, especially delicate vitamins like C and the B vitamin thiamin.</p> <p><strong>Bottom line: </strong>When vegetables are in-season, buy them fresh and ripe. “Off-season,” frozen vegetables will give you a high concentration of nutrients. Choose packages marked with a USDA “U.S. Fancy” shield, which designates produce of the best size, shape and color; vegetables of this standard also tend to be more nutrient-rich than the lower grades “U.S. No. 1” or “U.S. No. 2.” Eat them soon after purchase: over many months, nutrients in frozen vegetables do inevitably degrade. Finally, steam or microwave rather than boil your produce to minimize the loss of water-soluble vitamins.</p> <h3><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/free_downloads/healthy_vegetable_side_dish_recipes">Download a FREE Healthy Vegetable Side Dish Recipe Cookbook!</a></h3> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/organic_or_not_is_organic_produce_healthier_than_conventional">Organic—or Not? Is Organic Produce Healthier Than Conventional?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/healthy_cooking_blog/what_s_fresh_how_to_eat_in_season_even_in_winter">What’s Fresh: How to eat in season even in winter</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/quick_budget_friendly_suppers_with_canned_beans">Quick &amp; Budget-Friendly Suppers with Canned Beans</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/food_blog/why_smart_cooks_use_frozen_vegetables">Why smart cooks use frozen vegetables</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/trying_to_save_money_15_foods_you_don_t_need_to_buy_organic">Trying to save money? 15 foods you don’t need to buy organic</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-2"><legend>Related Content Group 2</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Try These Recipes Using Frozen Vegetables </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/easy_recipes_for_frozen_fruit_and_vegetables">Easy Recipes for Frozen Fruit and Vegetables</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/tortellini_primavera.html">Tortellini Primavera</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/ravioli_vegetable_soup.html">Ravioli &amp; Vegetable Soup</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/ravioli_with_bell_pepper_sauce.html">Ravioli with Bell Pepper Sauce</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/sweet_sour_beef_cabbage_soup.html">Sweet &amp; Sour Beef-Cabbage Soup</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/minestrone_pepperoni_soup.html">Minestrone with Endive &amp; Pepperoni</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/quick_mixed_berry_topping.html">Quick Mixed Berry Topping</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachael Moeller Gorman </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2007 </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/fresh_vs_frozen_vegetables_are_we_giving_up_nutrition_fo#comments Rachael Moeller Gorman November/December 2007 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:28:33 +0000 Nifer 10180 at http://www.eatingwell.com Do You Know Where Your Food Comes From? http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/do_you_know_where_your_food_comes_from <p>Have you noticed how easy it is to identify what country the fish at your market came from? In 2005, retailers began labeling seafood to comply with a Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) law passed with the 2002 Farm Bill. As soon as next fall, you could start seeing such labels (e.g., “product of Chile”) on meat, produce and peanuts too.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheryl Sternman Rule </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> COOL regulations coming to a supermarket near you. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2007 </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Have you noticed how easy it is to identify what country the fish at your market came from? In 2005, retailers began labeling seafood to comply with a Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) law passed with the 2002 Farm Bill. As soon as next fall, you could start seeing such labels (e.g., “product of Chile”) on meat, produce and peanuts too.</p> <p>According to a Consumer Reports poll, 92 percent of Americans want to know where their food comes from and, in fact, the COOL regulations, as originally conceived, were to apply to meat, fruits, vegetables and peanuts. But legislative battles and political wrangling derailed full implementation of COOL. For example, groups like the National Farmers Union—a coalition of family farmers and ranchers—fought for COOL labeling, believing Americans would support locally grown and raised products. But alliances of food processors and meat packers, such as the American Meat Institute and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, balked at the burden and expense of complying with such compulsory labeling.</p> <p>This past summer, however, the House passed new compromise legislation that will make COOL mandatory. At press time, full implementation was scheduled for September 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/do_you_know_where_your_food_comes_from#comments Cheryl Sternman Rule November/December 2007 Thu, 20 Aug 2009 19:54:55 +0000 Penelope Wall 10144 at http://www.eatingwell.com Nell Newman's Organic Thanksgiving http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/holiday_entertaining/nell_newmans_organic_thanksgiving <p>Fifteen years ago, Nell Newman, then age 33, decided to make an all-organic Thanksgiving dinner for her father and mother, the actors Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward, and her sisters. That meal helped launch Newman’s Own Organics, the offshoot of the company her father started in 1982. Kathy Tracy, personal chef to the Newman family, caught up with Nell in Westport, Connecticut.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about that Thanksgiving when you first served an all-organic meal to your family.</strong></p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Kathy Oberman Tracy </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How one meal helped launch one of America’s best-loved organic product lines. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/nell_newman_310_0.jpg?1257808548" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/herb_roasted_turkey.html">Herb-Roasted Turkey</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/herbed_pan_gravy.html">Herbed Pan Gravy</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/pear_prosciutto_hazelnut_stuffing.html">Pear, Prosciutto &amp; Hazelnut Stuffing</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/sizzled_green_beans_with_crispy_prosciutto_pine_nuts.html">Sizzled Green Beans with Crispy Prosciutto &amp; Pine Nuts</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/mashed_roots_with_buttermilk_chives.html">Mashed Roots with Buttermilk &amp; Chives</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/gingered_cranberry_raspberry_relish.html">Gingered Cranberry-Raspberry Relish</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/glazed_chocolate_pumpkin_bundt_cake.html">Glazed Chocolate-Pumpkin Bundt Cake</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/oatmeal_nut_crunch_apple_pie.html">Oatmeal-Nut Crunch Apple Pie</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sustainable for the Holidays </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/organic_natural/sources_for_organic_thanksgiving_ingredients">Sources for Organic Thanksgiving Ingredients</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/eatingwell_in_season/nell_newmans_secrets_to_eating_in_season">Nell Newman&#039;s Secrets to Eating In Season</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/turkey_buyers_guide">Turkey Buyer&#039;s Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_holiday_gift_recipes">Healthy Holiday Gifts from the Kitchen</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/holidays_occasions/vegetarian_thanksgiving_menu_and_planner">Vegetarian Thanksgiving Menu and Planner</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/which_napkins_are_the_greenest">Which Napkins Are The Greenest?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/local_heroes/remembering_paul_newman_and_how_he_went_organic">Remembering Paul Newman and how he went organic</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Fifteen years ago, Nell Newman, then age 33, decided to make an all-organic Thanksgiving dinner for her father and mother, the actors Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward, and her sisters. That meal helped launch Newman’s Own Organics, the offshoot of the company her father started in 1982. Kathy Tracy, personal chef to the Newman family, caught up with Nell in Westport, Connecticut.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about that Thanksgiving when you first served an all-organic meal to your family.</strong></p> <p>Dad’s idea of the perfect Thanksgiving was always roast turkey, Pepperidge Farm stuffing, canned petit pois, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce and Mom’s pecan pie with maple whipped cream.</p> <p>It’s rare for my parents to let me even toy with our favorite family recipes. But one year I wanted to prove to my family that organic food was not only healthier but delicious. I had wanted to start the organic line of Newman’s Own and needed Dad to understand and like this “new” food. So I brought organic salad greens, veggies and potatoes back from California where I live (at the time, you just couldn’t get that kind of beautiful organic produce here in Connecticut). I was able to order an organic turkey from Dean &amp; DeLuca and cooked the whole Thanksgiving dinner myself. After we ate it I told him it was all organic! His words were, “You got me, kid!”</p> <p>The really cool thing was that Pop got it. Here is this guy who really didn’t know what organic was and probably had some bad association with something my mom made back in the ’70s. (She used to make these heavy muffins that I like to call atomic muffins, with coarse whole-wheat flour.) It was a revelation to him that organic food could be so delicious; it was a much different kind of food than he thought it was.</p> <p><strong>What was it like growing up in the Newman family kitchen?</strong></p> <p>It was crazy with all the traveling for movies but when they were home, my parents each had their own specialties. Mom did all the birthday cakes and made breakfast, Dad did the burgers, steaks, corn and salad, of course. My parents also liked to cook wacky stuff with us. I remember making pulled taffy with my mom. I’ll also never forget Dad making marshmallows from scratch. God knows how he did it, but there’s love for you!</p> <p>My mother taught me how to cook simple things but with real attention to ingredients—but it was really during four years at College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor, Maine, that I learned out of necessity. In the winter everything closed except three diners and one bar that had specials like “Fish of the Day”—let me guess, haddock! “Chowder of the Day”—let me guess, haddock! “Haddock Cakes”—you get the picture, it was monotonous. I got a subscription to Gourmet and found the food in there utterly fascinating. </p> <p><strong>What was the catalyst that made you want to eat organic?</strong></p> <p>In 1968, when I was 8, I was given a pet kestrel—a sparrow hawk—by our gardener. The hawk sparked my interest in becoming an ornithologist. Within a couple of years ornithologists realized that peregrine falcons were extinct east of the Mississippi due to DDT, and becoming extinct across the rest of the United States. It’s just a shock for a kid to hear that this incredible falcon, which can dive at 200 mph, was disappearing. What is DDT? What is it used for? I would ask.</p> <p>As a child, it was very difficult for me to understand the effects of mankind on the earth but it really got the whole ball rolling for me. I didn’t know at that age what organic food was but once I found out, I decided that’s what I was going to eat.</p> <p><strong>What do you see as the main argument for eating organic? Health or the environment?</strong></p> <p>Well, you can’t separate the two. What you’re spraying on your food has a direct effect on the environment. Pesticides are poisons that kill insects and plants. Number one, you are killing everything in the soil, and two, the pesticides don’t just go away, they go into the water, then the soil and move up the food chain.</p> <p>One of my biggest concerns is the accumulation of all these poisons and chemicals in our bodies, as we don’t know what their effects are, especially when combined. I had a blood test done about 15 years ago just to see what was there. They found DDT, PCBs and a termite pesticide!</p> <p><strong>How did you start the organic line of Newman’s Own?</strong></p> <p>In 1992 I was a frustrated fundraiser for a small nonprofit, the Predatory Bird Research Group. I was looking at what my father was doing by giving 100 percent of his profits from Newman’s Own to charity and thought: Gee, why don’t I do something like that, start a line of organic products and support worthy organizations?</p> <p>I was very naive about what I was getting into so I asked my friend Peter Meehan, who had a business degree, to help me out. We convinced Pop through the famous “Thanksgiving Dinner” that organic food was delicious and a worthy cause. He said, “OK, I’ll pay you each $15,000 plus expenses to get this off the ground but you have to pay me back.”</p> <p><strong>Did you pay your dad back?</strong></p> <p>Yes! The organic line started in 1993, with pretzels. Carbs were in back then and pretzels were my dad’s favorite snack and the number-one-selling snack food. I paid him back in one year. Today, Newman’s Own Organics is an independent company with 80 products. This year marks $250 million donated by Paul Newman and the Newman’s Own Foundation to educational and charitable organizations, including to my top three nonprofits: the Organic Farming Research Foundation in Santa Cruz, the Homeless Garden Project, which provides resources for the homeless through organic gardening, and Shared Adventures, which serves the physically and developmentally challenged.</p> <p><strong>Some people criticize Newman’s Own Organics for, say, serving coffee with McDonald’s or partnering with Green Mountain Coffee.</strong></p> <p>Our intention is to help grow organic and introduce people to organic who might not necessarily be aware or interested in it. We are now using more organic coffee than ever before because of McDonald’s. And if the best way for me to introduce the world to organics is through coffee at McDonald’s then that’s OK with me! If you are a small coffee farmer in a Third World country, I think it’s fair to say, you would be happy the sales of organic coffee have gone up tremendously.</p> <p><strong>Do you grow your own food?</strong></p> <p>At my house in Santa Cruz, California, I grow my own salad greens, raspberries and grapes and, in the summer, amazing fraises du bois. I also have one white peach tree, one pear tree and one Meyer lemon tree. When the pears are ripe—you’ll love this—I put little blow-up mattresses, egg foam and one queen-size mattress under my fruit trees so I don’t lose the fruit when it falls.</p> <p><strong>What’s on the menu for Thanksgiving this year?</strong></p> <p>I’m lucky enough to get an organic heirloom turkey through Michel Nischan, who is the chef at the Dressing Room, my father’s year-old restaurant at the Westport Playhouse. This year I’m making a few small changes to our very traditional meal. I’m adding mint and shallots to the peas, pecans and brown sugar to the sweet potatoes, and maple syrup to the pecan pies that my mom makes. Of course we’ll be having stuffing, cranberry sauce and chopped salad, too—all organic, of course.</p> <p>While the changes sound small, they actually pack huge flavor. The key for me is to keep things kind of simple because I usually fly in the day before Thanksgiving and I’m tired, so these recipes don’t require a lot of time to prepare.</p> <p><strong>With so many cooks in the family now, what happens in the Newman household on Thanksgiving Day?</strong></p> <p>Everyone has their own job to do: I’m in charge of overseeing everything and cooking the turkey. My mom makes the pies and Dad makes his famous homemade salad dressing. My sister Lissy makes the sweet potatoes and peas and my other sister Clea makes her special chopped salad.</p> <p>To set the scene, we have kind of a family compound where my parents live in one farmhouse with a renovated barn and Lissy lives in the other farmhouse. The property is split by a river with a suspension bridge with one house on either side of it. Clea lives in the next town, so everyone is home for the holiday. Dinner is hosted at Lissy’s house, which is actually the home where we were all raised as children.</p> <p>Thanksgiving Day goes something like this: I’m very particular about basting my turkey every 20 minutes, which can be pretty funny as the day progresses. I cook the 25-pound turkey in the kitchen at my parents’ barn, where I stay when I’m home. I run up to my folks’ house and help Mom bake the pecan pies, I run back to the barn to baste the turkey and then I literally run over the bridge and through the woods to Lissy’s house to help make the sweet potatoes and peas. Then I run back to the barn to baste again. I get more exercise than you can possibly imagine! When the turkey is ready I haul it over to Lissy’s with my husband, Gary, and join my parents and their two dogs, my two sisters and their husbands, my two nephews and the odd relative or family friend that may join us for the holiday.</p> <p>It’s wonderful to be home again and seated around the table in the dining room of the 200-year-old New England farmhouse. The conversation around the table is lively, generally political and always controversial. At Christmas, we do it all over again and we have the very same meal!</p> <p><em>—Kathy Oberman Tracy</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/holiday_entertaining/nell_newmans_organic_thanksgiving#comments Kathy Oberman Tracy November/December 2007 Healthy Cooking - Holiday & Entertaining Tue, 18 Aug 2009 18:30:56 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9707 at http://www.eatingwell.com 3 Reasons to Run (or Walk) for Your Life http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/3_reasons_to_run_or_walk_for_your_life <p>You’ve heard it before: regular exercise—nothing more strenuous than a brisk half-hour walk most days of the week—offers potent protection against heart disease. But if that bit of information hasn’t motivated you to move more, perhaps the promise of living to be a robust 100 will. New research shows that exercise:</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Peter Jaret </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> New studies suggest regular exercise may help you live longer and healthier. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Exercise Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/can_exercise_override_bad_genes">Can Exercise Override Bad Genes?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/exercise_basics">Exercise Basics</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/can_you_trick_yourself_into_liking_exercise">Can you trick yourself into liking exercise?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/6_ways_to_sneak_in_your_exercise">6 ways to sneak in your exercise</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>You’ve heard it before: regular exercise—nothing more strenuous than a brisk half-hour walk most days of the week—offers potent protection against heart disease. But if that bit of information hasn’t motivated you to move more, perhaps the promise of living to be a robust 100 will. New research shows that exercise:</p> <p><strong>1. Buys you time.</strong> Data from the Framingham Heart Study, a 40-year study of 5,209 people, suggest that people walking 30 minutes a day for five days a week (or an equivalent amount of other exercise) add about a year and a half to their lives. Those who push themselves a little harder—running instead of walking, for example—add three and a half years on average.</p> <p><strong>2. Keeps you sharp.</strong> A slew of studies suggest that regular physical activity can help maintain memory and other aspects of brainpower. A 2007 study out of Texas Tech University showed that exercise boosts a key neurochemical that allows brain cells to communicate. At Oregon Health &amp; Science University, researchers studying a group of people in their late eighties found that those who remained active were two to five times more likely to avoid memory loss and other cognitive deficits. </p> <p><strong>3. Preserves agility.</strong> Findings from the Rush Memory and Aging Project at Chicago’s Rush University Medical Center recently showed that exercise puts the brakes on the decline in motor function associated with age. That may be one reason, along with maintaining strength, that physical activity helps prevent falls, one of the leading causes of health problems for older people.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/3_reasons_to_run_or_walk_for_your_life#comments Peter Jaret November/December 2007 Healthy Aging Diet, Nutrition & Health - Healthy Aging Mon, 17 Aug 2009 21:05:22 +0000 Penelope Wall 9640 at http://www.eatingwell.com Antidotes for Aging Parts http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/7_ways_to_keep_your_body_young <p>From your head to your toes and in between, here’s what to eat to help ward off aging starting in your twenties and into your fifties, sixties and beyond.</p> <h3>Brain</h3> <p>From our mid-twenties on, the brain—particularly the frontal lobe, where much of problem-solving and short-term memory is processed—shrinks at a rate of 2 percent per decade. A 2006 study in Neurology showed that people who ate two or more daily servings of vegetables, especially leafy greens, had the mental focus of people five years their junior.</p> <p><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/node/9639?page=2">Next: Skin &raquo;</a></p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 7 ways to maintain your health and prevent disease as you age. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/cutting_board_foods_500Cal_630.jpg?1311190155" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/cutting_board_foods_500Cal_310.jpg?1311190195" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More to Keep You Healthy </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/7_anti_aging_superfoods">7 Anti-Aging Superfoods</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/eat_for_a_sharper_mind_5_brain_boosting_foods">Eat for a Sharper Mind: 5 Brain-Boosting Foods</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/foods_for_beautiful_skin">Foods for Beautiful Skin</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/recipes_for_better_vision">Recipes for Better Vision</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/heart_healthy_diet_center/top_15_heart_healthy_foods">Our Top 15 Heart-Healthy Foods</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans/healthy_aging_meal_plan">Healthy Aging Meal Plan</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/high_fiber_whole_grain_recipes">High-Fiber Whole-Grain Recipes </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/calcium_rich_recipes_with_yogurt">Calcium-Rich Recipes with Yogurt</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <h3>Brain</h3> <p>From our mid-twenties on, the brain—particularly the frontal lobe, where much of problem-solving and short-term memory is processed—shrinks at a rate of 2 percent per decade. A 2006 study in Neurology showed that people who ate two or more daily servings of vegetables, especially leafy greens, had the mental focus of people five years their junior. </p> <h3>GI Tract </h3> <p>As we age, nerve cells that control muscles that move food through the digestive tract gradually die off, especially in the large intestine—one reason why constipation may occur more frequently as you get older. Fiber helps keep things moving. Men 50-plus should aim for 30 grams of fiber per day; women, 21 grams. Get your fill by eating plenty of whole-grain cereals and breads, fruits, vegetables and beans.</p> <h3>Skin </h3> <p>In our twenties, production of collagen (a fiber that keeps skin firm) slows and dead skin cells shed less quickly. Good genes can keep you looking young but research suggests that lycopene and beta carotene also may help by scavenging for free radicals that contribute to skin aging. Eat sweet potatoes, carrots, cantaloupe and leafy greens for beta carotene and include lycopene-packed tomatoes and watermelon in your diet. </p> <h3>Muscle Mass </h3> <p>Metabolism slows by 1 to 2 percent each decade after age 30. When you’re young, muscle burns up to 10 times more calories per pound than fat. As you age, muscle metabolism decreases. So even if you maintain the same level of exercise and calorie intake, you tend to accumulate fat. Regular exercise can help offset reduced muscle metabolism and help you stay lean. So will choosing nutrient-dense, lower-calorie foods. </p> <h3>Eyes </h3> <p>Years of exposure to UV light and smoke may contribute to age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in older people. But an antioxidant-rich diet may help. Studies link higher intakes of vitamins C and E, beta carotene and zinc as well as lutein and zeaxanthin (antioxidants in yellow and green vegetables and egg yolks) and omega-3 fats with reduced risk for AMD. </p> <h3>Heart (and Blood Vessels)</h3> <p>Over the years, the heart and artery walls thicken and stiffen, which often results in high blood pressure and plaque buildup. Earlier this year, Greek scientists reported that the more closely people followed a Mediterranean diet—rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, fish and poultry, dairy and olive oil, with moderate amounts of wine and little red meat—the less likely they were to develop high blood pressure, high cholesterol or obesity. </p> <h3>Bones </h3> <p>From age 30 on, cells that build bone become less active while those that dismantle bone keep working. (In women, decreasing estrogen during menopause accelerates this loss.) Bone-strengthening calcium and vitamin D, which enhances calcium absorption, become increasingly important as you age. New research indicates that vitamin K—essential to the proteins that rebuild bone and abundant in leafy greens—also helps reduce age-related bone loss.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/7_ways_to_keep_your_body_young#comments Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. November/December 2007 Healthy Aging Diet, Nutrition & Health - Healthy Aging Mon, 17 Aug 2009 21:03:12 +0000 Penelope Wall 9639 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Search for the Anti-Aging Diet http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/the_search_for_the_anti_aging_diet <p>“What’s the secret to a long and healthy life?” When I asked my great-grandmother that question on the occasion of her 90th birthday, her answer took everyone by surprise. “I always make sure to eat the fat and gristle off meat,” she said. </p> <p>Fat and gristle? </p> <p>We all laughed at the time, Great-Grandma included, but no one dared argue with her. What her pet theory lacked in scientific evidence it more than made up for by personal example. She lived a jolly, healthy, sharp-minded life well into her nineties.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Peter Jaret </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> New studies suggest healthy eating may add years to your life. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/supplements_plate_310.jpg?1260202802" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Aging Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_aging_recipes">Healthy Aging Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/7_foods_to_keep_young">7 Foods to Keep You Young</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Healthy Aging </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/3_ways_to_beat_your_age">3 Ways to Beat Your Age</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/what_s_the_healthy_aging_secret_in_cocoa_tea_and_red_wine">What’s the Healthy Aging Secret in Cocoa, Tea and Red Wine?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/3_reasons_to_run_or_walk_for_your_life">3 Reasons to Run (or Walk) for Your Life</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/7_ways_to_keep_your_body_young">Antidotes for Aging Parts</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging_center">Healthy Aging Center</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>“What’s the secret to a long and healthy life?” When I asked my great-grandmother that question on the occasion of her 90th birthday, her answer took everyone by surprise. “I always make sure to eat the fat and gristle off meat,” she said. </p> <p>Fat and gristle? </p> <p>We all laughed at the time, Great-Grandma included, but no one dared argue with her. What her pet theory lacked in scientific evidence it more than made up for by personal example. She lived a jolly, healthy, sharp-minded life well into her nineties.</p> <p>Since then, whenever the headlines tout a new breakthrough in longevity—whether it’s green tea, red wine or a supercharged antioxidant supplement—I haven’t paid much heed. Lately, though, I’ve begun to wonder if it isn’t time to take a fresh look at the field of anti-aging research—and not only because I’m halfway through my fifties. </p> <p>Increasingly, serious scientists have joined the quest for a fountain of youth. The National Institutes of Health is spending millions to explore ways to increase life span, including research into drugs, nutritional supplements and calorie restriction. Last year, headlines announced that a new anti-aging drug, based on a substance called resveratrol found in wine and grapes was being tested in people. If the booming science of anti-aging medicine has turned up anything that really works, I decided, I want to know about it. </p> <p>So a few months ago I set off on my own search for a fountain of youth. From the start I decided to rule out things like potions of mysterious-sounding Chinese herbs, anti-aging vitamin formulas and injections of pituitary-gland extract at mountainside Swiss clinics. Maybe they work, maybe they don’t; so little evidence exists either way that the claims are almost impossible to evaluate. What I really wanted to know was simple: can the foods we eat and the way we live make a measurable difference in life span? Beyond that, is there any way to actually slow the hands of time and push the limits of longevity? </p> <p>I decided to start my investigation with the people who should know best—those who live the longest.</p> <h3>Secrets of Long Life From Around the World</h3> <p>For years scientists have been trekking the globe in search of communities of people rumored to live unusually long and healthy lives, trying to pinpoint their age-defying secrets. In the last few decades, they’ve come up with a handful of promising candidates. For example, research suggests that olive oil (see below) has helped the Greeks beat heart disease. For native Inuits of Alaska, diets containing extraordinary amounts of fish provide cardiovascular protection. The secret of longevity on the San Blas islands, off the coast of Panama, may be the most unexpected—and welcome—of all: chocolate, which happily turns out to be a rich source of compounds that help keep blood vessels healthy.</p> <p>But some of the most compelling findings on longevity and diet comes from the islands of Okinawa in southern Japan. People here are five times as likely to live to 100 than people in the United States or other industrialized countries. (In Okinawa there are about 50 centenarians per 100,000 people versus 10 in 100,000 in the U.S. and most other developed countries.)</p> <p>When I contacted Bradley Willcox, M.D., co-principal investigator of the Okinawa Centenarian Study, to ask what accounts for the Okinawans’ longevity, his answer startled me. “Sweet potatoes,” he wrote back. It turns out that sweet potatoes are a staple in the Okinawan diet, along with bitter melon (a tropical fruit often used in stir-fries) and sanpin tea (a blend of green tea and jasmine flowers). All three foods are exceptionally rich in antioxidants, which may help protect against cellular wear and tear from unstable oxygen molecules generated by our body’s biochemical processes. Although researchers still aren’t exactly sure why we age, one theory is that oxygen radicals keep chipping away at healthy cells, damaging and ultimately destroying them. The antioxidant theory may help explain why another group recognized for exceptional longevity—the Seventh-Day Adventists—typically outlive their neighbors by four to seven years. Their religious denomination, founded in the U.S. in the 1840s, emphasizes healthy living and a vegetarian diet starring vegetables, fruit, whole grains and nuts—all foods packed with antioxidants. </p> <h3>Dinner at the Longevity Cafe</h3> <p>The more I poked through the research, the longer my list of age-defying foods became. Wine or other alcoholic beverages deserve a place at the table; they’ve consistently been associated with lower mortality, as long as they’re consumed in moderation. Blueberries, too, as they’ve been shown to ward off age-related brain impairments. </p> <p>I was hoping to add an item or two to the list when I put in a call to Katherine L. Tucker, Ph.D., director of the nutritional epidemiology research program at Tufts University. Tucker has been sifting through 50 years of data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, the longest-running study of aging in the world. When I asked her what foods have popped up in her findings, she gently steered the question in a different direction. What mattered more than single foods, she said, was overall food patterns. </p> <p>“It’s always been tempting to look at a particular food and then home in on what it contains. That’s how a lot of nutrition science has been conducted,” she explained. When fruits and vegetables rich in beta carotene showed up in many studies, for instance, researchers rushed to test beta-carotene supplements—experiments that went famously wrong when the pills offered no special benefits and posed some danger. The experience encouraged many nutrition scientists to go back to studying eating patterns, since people eat foods in combination, not one at a time. </p> <p>Tucker pointed to results from a recent analysis she did of 501 men from the study. Over time, those who helped themselves to lots of fruits and vegetables were less likely to develop heart disease and more likely to be alive at the end of 18 years of study. Each serving of fruits and vegetables was associated with a 6 percent reduction in risk of death from any cause. Men who limited their saturated fat also reduced their risk of heart disease. But far and away the most impressive benefits fell to men who served up fruits and vegetables and cut back on saturated fat: they slashed their risk of dying of heart disease by 76 percent and of any cause by 31 percent during the study period.</p> <p>Current health recommendations don’t stop with fruits and vegetables and saturated fat, of course. Most of us know the advice by heart: 1) Get plenty of whole grains; 2) Eat fish a couple of times a week; 3) Eliminate trans fats; 4) Take a glass of wine with dinner if you’d like; 5) Don’t smoke. What’s the payoff for following all the best advice to the letter? To find that out, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health looked at more than 84,000 women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study. Those who got a gold star for following each of these five “commandments” cut their risk of heart attacks and other coronary events by a spectacular 82 percent.</p> <p>Because so many variables are involved, scientists can’t say exactly how many extra years of life you or I will gain by eating well and staying active. But when I asked Harvard nutrition scientist Meir Stampfer, M.D., Ph.D., he estimated that the women in the Nurses’ Health Study who followed all the best health advice might be adding an additional 14 years to their lives. Joan Sabaté, M.D., Ph.D., chair of nutrition at Loma Linda University, told me the Seventh-Day Adventists add an extra 10 years to their lives, on average, thanks to five lifestyle factors: being vegetarian, not smoking, exercising frequently, maintaining a healthy weight and eating lots of nuts.</p> <h3>How to Live to be 120</h3> <p>A lifestyle that helps avoid chronic health problems isn’t the only thing that determines how long you live, of course. Genes, too, help decide whether one’s life span ends up being average (which is about 78 in the United States) or extraordinary (like that of Frenchwoman Jeanne Calment, the oldest person on record, who died in 1997 at age 122). If I manage to live into my nineties, the genes I inherited from my gristle-eating great-grandmother will be partly to thank for it. Thomas Perls, M.D., who directs the New England Centenarian Study, believes that good health habits may be enough to carry many of us into our mid-eighties. To live longer than that, though, we need lucky genes. </p> <p>But is that the whole story? What about that most elusive fountain of youth—a way to actually slow the aging process and extend the limits of longevity? A growing number of experts think they’ve found it. For years, in fact, researchers have been aware of a sure-fire way to put the brakes on aging. </p> <p>In 1935, a team of Cornell University nutritionists discovered that mice fed one-third fewer calories than normal lived about 40 percent longer than mice that ate as much as they wanted. Since then, scientists have tested a Noah’s ark of creatures—from yeast cells and fruit flies to monkeys. In most studies, calorie restriction appears to increase life expectancy and protect against a host of diseases. Well into old age, animals typically remain more active and younger-looking, as well.</p> <p>Scientists don’t know exactly why cutting calories may lengthen life, but the leading theory goes like this: When calorie intake falls short, cells sound an alarm, switching their priorities from reproduction to repair and maintenance, fending off genetic damage and the wear and tear caused by the effects of unstable oxygen molecules. Controlling this switch, researchers have learned over the past few years, are a class of enzymes called sirtuins, which affect how energy is delivered to cells. In a 2006 experiment straight out of science fiction, University of California, San Francisco, biochemistry researcher Cynthia Kenyon, Ph.D., tinkered with the equivalent gene in roundworms. The result: a mutant species with a life span six times longer than normal.</p> <h3>Eat Less, Live Longer?</h3> <p>Maybe gene manipulation will allow us to live to 200—someday. Until then, there’s calorie restriction (CR). Three large studies are under way to test the principle in people. Early findings show promise. In 2007, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis reported that CR improved heart function and lowered inflammation levels in a group of volunteers—two signs that could mean better health and longer life down the road. In a study of 48 volunteers, Eric Ravussin and his colleagues at Louisiana State University’s Pennington Biomedical Research Laboratory found that after six months those men and women who cut calories by 25 percent reduced their insulin levels and their core body temperature—two changes associated with longevity. They also had fewer signs of the kind of chromosomal damage that is associated with aging and cancer. </p> <p>Clinical trials are far from proving that CR dramatically extends life span in humans. Still, an estimated 50,000 Americans subscribe to CR, a practice popularized by Roy Walford, M.D. Walford, a pathologist at UCLA, wrote several books—including Beyond the 120-Year Diet—on the health benefits of eating a low-calorie, high-nutrient diet. (Walford died in 2004, at age 79, from complications of Lou Gehrig’s disease.) </p> <p>Peter Voss, 53, is an expert in artificial intelligence who runs a start-up firm in Los Angeles. A Google search led me to Voss’s lively website about his experiences with CR (optimal.org), which he began in 1997. He now consumes just 1,850 calories daily, which he guesses is about one-third less than what he ate more than a decade ago. “The more I read about calorie restriction, the more interested I became, until I finally decided to give it a try,” he told me when I reached him. Five foot 10 inches tall, he now weighs 130, down from 155 pounds 10 years ago. His blood pressure, good to begin with, resembles that of an active teenager, about 100/60. His triglyceride and cholesterol levels are rock bottom. </p> <p>In the beginning Voss scrupulously counted calories and scoured nutrient labels. Now he monitors his progress by keeping his weight stable. Voss’s diet is Spartan by any standard. Steel-cut oatmeal with fruit and skim milk is a special treat. But Voss insists that he isn’t always hungry. “I eat whenever I feel like it,” he says. Instead of reaching for a cookie for a snack, however, he crunches a carrot or a red pepper. At restaurants, he sticks with appetizers or a first-course salad. His girlfriend, a marathon runner, also follows a CR diet, which probably helps him stick with the program.</p> <p>There are downsides. Calorie restriction reduces testosterone levels, which in men can mean lower libido. (Researchers don’t have much data about the way CR affects female hormones.) Voss is now so thin that sitting on a hard chair gets uncomfortable. But he insists he still has all the energy he needs to work the 14 hours a day required by his company, and to squeeze in an hour or so of power walking most days.</p> <p>Not everyone thinks CR will buy Peter Voss much extra time. Recently, John Phelan, Ph.D., a researcher at UCLA, published a mathematical model predicting that calorie restriction is likely to offer at best a 7 percent increase in human life expectancy. As evidence he pointed out that the average Japanese male consumes about 2,300 calories a day. Men on Okinawa consume about 17 percent fewer calories—very close to Peter Voss’s 1,850 a day—but they only live a little less than a year longer than Japanese mainlanders. Calorie restriction may have its most dramatic effects in species that have experienced periodic famines, forcing them to evolve extreme measures to shut down reproduction and focus on staying alive until food supplies return. We humans, naysayers argue, aren’t likely to be among them.</p> <p>Still, many researchers are excited about the potential benefits. In August, just back from an Experimental Biology conference where the latest findings on CR were presented, Susan Roberts, Ph.D., who is directing a calorie-restriction experiment at Tufts University, wrote in an e-mail: “The human data on people who are already doing CR themselves is extremely impressive. I was sitting in the meeting virtually ready to sign up…myself!”</p> <h3>Practicing the 80 Percent Solution</h3> <p>That’s all I needed to hear. The next day I gave CR a try. For about 14 hours. The experience made me understand why even researchers who are convinced that calorie restriction will extend life span doubt it’s of much practical use. Let’s face it: it’s hard enough to get people to make the changes that are already proven to increase the odds of a long and healthy life, like eating more vegetables and exercising half an hour a day. </p> <p>There’s a delicious paradox here. Research into calorie restriction comes at a time when people around the world are consuming more calories than ever—and packing on the pounds. Calorie-restriction diets may seem extreme. But the truth is, most of us would do well to follow the basic tenet, which is to favor low-calorie, nutrient-rich foods. To offer support and advice for people trying calorie restriction themselves, a group of enthusiasts started the CR Society in 1994 (calorierestriction.org). Their advice is anything but controversial: avoid simple sugars and flours, eat lots of leafy greens and other vegetables, choose monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fats and avoid saturated fat. Peter Voss’s typical daily fare is a nutritionist’s dream: strawberries with nonfat yogurt, almonds, steamed vegetables, salmon, five-bean chili, peanut butter and bananas. If more of us helped ourselves to a menu like his, we’d be healthier for it even if we didn’t cut calories. And probably add years to our lives. </p> <p>Long before the verdict is in on calorie restriction, in other words, and even longer before effective longevity pills hit the market, there’s a lot most of us can do to better our odds of living long and staying active and alert. For my part, I decided to dish up a few extra servings of vegetables, snack on nuts, treat myself to a small square of dark chocolate for dessert and get to the gym a little more often. Oh yes, and to take a page from those long-lived Okinawans, who have been practicing their own simple form of calorie restriction long before modern science came along. According to Bradley Willcox, the Okinawans have traditionally followed hara hachi bu, a custom of eating until they are just 80 percent full. The practice allows them to consume fewer calories without bothering to read nutrition labels—and it means they don’t have to obsess about what to eat and not eat but can go about enjoying themselves. </p> <p>And that, in the end, may be even more crucial to their longevity than, well, sweet potatoes or sanpin tea. Finding delight in family and friends, having something to look forward to every day: studies of centenarians around the world suggest that these intangibles, even more than the specifics of diet, may be the most powerful secret to longevity. The Okinawans have a name for it: ikigai, or “finding your reason to live.”</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/the_search_for_the_anti_aging_diet#comments Peter Jaret November/December 2007 Healthy Aging Diet, Nutrition & Health - Healthy Aging Mon, 17 Aug 2009 20:39:41 +0000 Penelope Wall 9635 at http://www.eatingwell.com Can Understanding the Glycemic Index Help You Eat Better? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/can_understanding_the_glycemic_index_help_you_eat_better <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Scientists debate the pros and cons. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>There are times when I feel like I need to duck when the subject of the glycemic index (GI) comes up. This system of ranking foods according to how much they raise blood sugar (glucose) was first developed as a tool to help people with diabetes control their blood sugar. Now, it’s squarely in the public mainstream: low-GI diet books crowd bookstore shelves, many diet plans have “low-glycemic” variations and Australian supermarkets have foods labeled with their GI ratings. But a huge debate about the value of the GI is raging in the nutrition community. Some of my colleagues are staking their careers on the GI’s importance, while others disparage its value; I’ve seen their arguments come close to blows. What makes the index so controversial? And until the dust settles, is there anything we can apply to our own eating? First, a little background.</p> <h3>The Premise (and Controversy)</h3> <p>The glycemic index measures how much a fixed quantity of different foods raises your blood-sugar levels compared with a standard, pure glucose (GI=100). Foods with a high GI value (greater than 70) tend to cause a higher spike in blood sugar—and in insulin, the hormone that helps glucose get into cells. The spikes are especially problematic for people with diabetes, who lack an effective insulin system to clear the sugar from their blood. And, because high-GI foods are so quickly metabolized, they tend to make you hungry again sooner, says David Ludwig, M.D., Ph.D., a Harvard endocrinologist and author of Ending the Food Fight (Houghton Mifflin, 2007). Ludwig’s research found that obese teenage boys were hungrier after they’d eaten a high-GI breakfast of instant oatmeal, and ate 600 to 700 calories more at lunchtime than when they’d breakfasted on moderate- or low-GI meals like steel-cut oats or omelets.</p> <p>By contrast, lower-GI foods (under 55) are metabolized more slowly, and are believed to keep your appetite on a more even keel. Some experts think that by tempering blood-sugar surges, eating low-GI foods may even help prevent the damage to cells that’s caused by high blood-glucose concentrations.</p> <p>But others poke holes in the GI concept for lots of reasons. “Despite what the diet books say, the glycemic index does not measure how rapidly blood-glucose levels increase,” argues Marion Franz, R.D., C.D.E., a nationally recognized diabetes expert who wrote the introduction to The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook. “Blood glucose peaks at about the same time with most foods—and the differences between the highest and lowest glycemic responses are small.”</p> <p>Those in the anti-GI camp also point out another major weakness in using the system: the glucose response to foods can vary widely from person to person, and even in the same person from day to day, so the numbers don’t tell the whole story. A low GI score is no guarantee of healthy fare, either: cola (63), potato chips (54) and even some candies (a Snickers bar is 55) qualify as low or moderate GI. “But the biggest problem is that the GI looks at single foods, and the real issue is what happens with meals,” says Franz. A high-GI potato becomes a low-GI meal if you add a pat of butter, because the added fat helps slow the absorption of the potato’s carbohydrates. These complexities, she says, are too confusing to make the GI useful for most people.</p> <p>Ludwig, who regularly tests GI principles in his research studies, responds: “Tell that to the thousands of people who come to our clinics!” (I told you the arguments can get heated.) </p> <h3>The Potential?</h3> <p>Despite these limitations, some studies suggest the GI concept holds promise. Following low-GI eating principles can help people with diabetes fine-tune their blood-sugar responses and may even help people with prediabetes lower their risk of progressing to full-blown disease. New research connects low-GI diets with lower risk of age-related macular degeneration, a major cause of blindness, and other work suggests a possible link with reducing risk for heart disease and even colorectal cancer.</p> <p>And of course, there’s the tantalizing possibility that by its moderating effects on blood sugar and thus appetite, eating a low-GI diet may help people lose weight. Unfortunately, research results in this area have been mixed. Ludwig has found that low-GI diets seem to be most effective in people whose bodies secrete more insulin: more often “apple-shaped” people, who accumulate extra fat around their waists, compared to people with lower-body fat (“pear shapes”). “Apple-shaped people who have done poorly on traditional low-fat diets may do especially well on a low-glycemic-load diet,” he says. And, regardless of body shape, those who followed low-glycemic diets improved their triglyceride and HDL cholesterol levels, he added; both are important risk factors for heart disease.</p> <h3>In the Meantime</h3> <p>Will the great GI debate end anytime soon? Knowing nutrition scientists as well as I do, I don’t think so. But I believe the concept makes some sense as long as we don’t get too hung up on the numbers. In the end, choosing low-GI foods is common sense: for the most part, they’re more natural, whole, unpolished and unprocessed. Getting more of these types of foods is smart eating, no matter which side you’re on.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/can_understanding_the_glycemic_index_help_you_eat_better#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. November/December 2007 Diabetic Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Diabetes Mon, 17 Aug 2009 18:12:11 +0000 Penelope Wall 9609 at http://www.eatingwell.com 4 Easy Tips for Eating Low on the Glycemic Index http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/easy_tips_for_eating_low_on_the_glycemic_index <p>Following the glycemic index (GI) system can be confusing—“but only if you spend too much time crunching numbers and not looking at the big picture,” says Joyce Hendley, EatingWell’s nutrition editor and author of <em>The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook</em> (The Countryman Press). Knowing a few overall principles can make low-glycemic eating much simpler, she explains:</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/node/9595?page=2">1. Bigger is better &raquo;</a></strong></p> <p>[pagebreak]</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> No number-crunching required. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/bowl_of_fruit_630_0.jpg?1289417669" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/fruit_bowl_310_0.jpg?1256323993" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/diabetes/can_understanding_the_glycemic_index_help_you_eat_better">Can Understanding the Glycemic Index Help You Eat Better?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/food_blog/how_to_cook_7_whole_grains_and_9_simple_ways_to_jazz_them_up">How to cook 7 whole grains and 10 simple ways to jazz them up</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/grab_go_high_fiber_breakfasts">Grab &amp; Go High-Fiber Breakfasts</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans/diabetes_meal_plan">Diabetes Meal Plan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Following the glycemic index (GI) system can be confusing—“but only if you spend too much time crunching numbers and not looking at the big picture,” says Joyce Hendley, EatingWell’s nutrition editor and author of The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (The Countryman Press). Knowing a few overall principles can make low-glycemic eating much simpler, she explains:</p> <p><strong>Bigger is better.</strong> Large food particles take longer for the body to break down and absorb, so they move more slowly through your digestive system. So in general, the more intact and less processed a food is, the lower its GI. Think whole rather than refined grains, whole fruit rather than fruit juice, steel-cut oats rather than instant oatmeal and stone-ground rather than plain cornmeal. When buying whole-grain bread choose stone-ground, sprouted or cracked-wheat types; the grain kernels should be visible.</p> <p><strong>Fiber up.</strong> By definition, fiber is the part of plant foods that cannot be digested by the body, so fiber-rich foods like beans, nuts, dried fruits and high-fiber cereals, pasta and breads are inherently low on the GI. Focus on boosting fiber by eating more foods like these and you won’t have to think about GI.</p> <p><strong>Pair with protein.</strong> When it has protein to break down, the stomach empties more slowly. Adding a little protein to a carbohydrate-based meal or snack—say, adding a few chicken strips and a sprinkle of cheese to your pasta bowl, or a light smear of peanut butter on your toast—can lower the GI value of your meal.</p> <p><strong>Drizzle on a healthy fat.</strong> Like protein, fat molecules also slow down digestion, so including a little fat can lower a food’s GI and make it more satisfying. Be sure to choose heart-healthy unsaturated fats like vegetable oils and nuts. And, if you’re watching calories, be moderate: drizzle bread with a little olive oil, toss carrots with a bit of tasty dressing, sprinkle slivered almonds on your salad.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/easy_tips_for_eating_low_on_the_glycemic_index#comments Joyce Hendley November/December 2007 Diabetic Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Diabetes Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:46:39 +0000 Penelope Wall 9595 at http://www.eatingwell.com Cinnamon's Secret Health Benefit http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/cinnamons_secret_health_benefit <p>With holiday favorites like pumpkin bread and spiced cider on the menu, recent research in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition provides welcome news: cinnamon may help you better regulate your blood-glucose levels. In a study of 14 healthy people, scientists at Malmö University Hospital in Sweden gave half the subjects rice pudding mixed with about 3 teaspoons of cinnamon; the other half got an unspiced version of the dessert. Then, they switched: each group tried the opposite pudding.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachael Moeller Gorman </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The popular spice may help regulate blood-glucose levels. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/cinnamon_310.jpg?1256318020" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> November/December 2007 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/apple_cinnamon_rice_pudding.html">Apple-Cinnamon Rice Pudding</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/apple_cupcakes_cinnamon_frosting.html">Apple Cupcakes with Cinnamon-Marshmallow Frosting</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/baked_apple_cinnamon_french_toast.html">Baked Apple-Cinnamon French Toast</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/basil_cinnamon_peaches.html">Basil-Cinnamon Peaches</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/cider_glazed_roots_with_cinnamon_walnuts.html">Cider-Glazed Roots with Cinnamon Walnuts</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/cinnamon_oranges.html">Cinnamon Oranges</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Diabetes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/diabetic_diet">Diabetic Diet Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/diabetes/healthy_holiday_eating_for_diabetes">Healthy Holiday Eating for Diabetes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/diabetes/on_the_spice_trail_cinnamon_to_thwart_diabetes_and_heart_disease">On the Spice Trail: Cinnamon to thwart diabetes and heart disease</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>With holiday favorites like pumpkin bread and spiced cider on the menu, recent research in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition provides welcome news: cinnamon may help you better regulate your blood-glucose levels. In a study of 14 healthy people, scientists at Malmö University Hospital in Sweden gave half the subjects rice pudding mixed with about 3 teaspoons of cinnamon; the other half got an unspiced version of the dessert. Then, they switched: each group tried the opposite pudding. Both times, up to two hours after eating, the people who’d enjoyed the cinnamon-spiced pudding measured significantly lower blood-glucose levels than those who’d eaten the unspiced one—an indication that their blood sugar was moving more efficiently into cells, where it’s used.</p> <p>Eating the spiced pudding also appeared to slow the movement of food from the stomach into the small intestine (a part of digestion called “gastric emptying”). Though researchers don’t know exactly how cinnamon slows digestion, the fact that it does may, in part, explain the lower blood sugar. “When food enters the intestine more slowly, carbohydrates are broken down slower, which leads to a lower [post-meal] blood-glucose concentration,” says the study’s investigator, Joanna Hlebowicz, M.D.</p> <p>Other studies suggest that the spice also may improve blood-glucose levels by increasing a person’s insulin sensitivity, the ability of cells to respond to insulin’s signal to move glucose out of the blood. One 2003 trial of 60 people with type 2 diabetes reported that consuming as little as 1 gram (about 1⁄2 teaspoon) of cinnamon daily for six weeks reduced blood-glucose levels significantly. It also improved the subjects’ blood cholesterol and triglycerides—perhaps because insulin plays a key role in regulating fats in the body. But other work disputes these findings. A 2006 study showed that insulin sensitivity in diabetic women taking cinnamon supplements did not improve. Why the discrepancy? It could be because the study examined only a specific population: postmenopausal women, many of whom were taking a variety of glucose-lowering medications (which wasn’t the case in the other studies), say the authors.</p> <p>Bottom line: Sprinkling a 1⁄2 teaspoon of cinnamon on your oatmeal in the morning can’t hurt, it’s tasty and it just may, over time, help ward off diabetes. But don’t go overboard. Animal studies suggest that a compound in cinnamon called coumarin may be toxic in high doses (although humans may not be as susceptible). Cinnamon oils are particularly concentrated, so steer clear. And if you have diabetes, don’t try cinnamon supplements without talking with your doctor: combining them with a prescription medication may be dangerous.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/cinnamons_secret_health_benefit#comments Rachael Moeller Gorman November/December 2007 Diabetic Diet Recipes & Menus - Spices Diet, Nutrition & Health - Diabetes Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:43:46 +0000 Penelope Wall 9592 at http://www.eatingwell.com One Nutty Date http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/one_nutty_date.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/one_nutty_date.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/BG6306.JPG" alt="One Nutty Date Recipe" title="One Nutty Date Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/one_nutty_date.html" target="_blank">One Nutty Date</a></div> <div>Financial advisor Linda Croley was inspired by childhood memories of a family treat when she created these peanut butter-date cookies. “I get a great feeling when I bite into these cookies and think of my family who are around me today, and those whose memories I&#039;ll always cherish,” says Croley. Once you try them, you may never make an ordinary peanut butter cookie again.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/one_nutty_date.html#comments November/December 2007 American Moderate Diabetes appropriate Low carbohydrate Christmas Labor Day Memorial Day Thanksgiving Recipes & Menus - Antioxidants Recipes & Menus - Diabetic Desserts Recipes & Menus - Peanuts Recipes & Menus - Spices Recipes & Menus - Walnuts Eggs Fruit Nuts Wheat Dessert Snack Bake Microwave Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Entertaining, casual Entertaining, formal Kid-friendly Potluck Vegetarian More than 1 hour Baked Goods, bars & cookies Snack Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6347 at http://www.eatingwell.com Ginger Crinkle Cookies http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/ginger_crinkle_cookies.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/ginger_crinkle_cookies.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/BG6305.JPG" alt="Ginger Crinkle Cookies Recipe" title="Ginger Crinkle Cookies Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/ginger_crinkle_cookies.html" target="_blank">Ginger Crinkle Cookies</a></div> <div>Cynthia Farr-Weinfeld, a hypnotherapist and writer, started improving the nutritional profile of a friend&#039;s mother&#039;s ginger cookie recipe by substituting whole-wheat pastry flour for all-purpose flour and canola oil for shortening. “Experiment with these cookies,” she advises, “as they taste great either slightly underdone or crispy.” She calls them “the quickest cookies you&#039;ll ever bake.”</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/ginger_crinkle_cookies.html#comments November/December 2007 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Low carbohydrate Christmas Halloween Labor Day Memorial Day Recipes - Individual Recipes Recipes & Menus - Baking Recipes & Menus - Antioxidants Recipes & Menus - Diabetic Desserts Recipes & Menus - Spices Alcohol Eggs Wheat Dessert Snack Bake Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Entertaining, casual Entertaining, formal Kid-friendly Make ahead instructions Makeover Potluck Vegetarian 1 hour or less Baked Goods, bars & cookies Snack Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6346 at http://www.eatingwell.com Date Bran Jingle Balls http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/date_bran_jingle_balls.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/date_bran_jingle_balls.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/BG6304.JPG" alt="Date Bran Jingle Balls Recipe" title="Date Bran Jingle Balls Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/date_bran_jingle_balls.html" target="_blank">Date Bran Jingle Balls</a></div> <div>Trisha Kruse, an administrative assistant, created quick, easy, no-bake date-nut balls to fill that special niche in your holiday repertoire.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/date_bran_jingle_balls.html#comments November/December 2007 Easy Diabetes appropriate Low carbohydrate Christmas Recipes - Individual Recipes Recipes & Menus - Diabetic Desserts Alcohol Dairy Fruit Nuts Wheat Whole Grains Dessert No-cook Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Entertaining, casual Entertaining, formal Kid-friendly Make ahead instructions Makeover Vegetarian 1 hour or less Baked Goods, bars & cookies Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6345 at http://www.eatingwell.com Cranberry-Orange-Nut Cookies http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cranberry_orange_nut_cookies.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cranberry_orange_nut_cookies.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/BG6303.JPG" alt="Cranberry-Orange-Nut Cookies Recipe" title="Cranberry-Orange-Nut Cookies Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cranberry_orange_nut_cookies.html" target="_blank">Cranberry-Orange-Nut Cookies</a></div> <div>Crisp, moist and chewy, this cookie created by Georgene Egri of Walnut Creek, California, has the essential ingredients for the holidays: citrus, nuts and cranberries. These cookies travel well for gift-giving and lunchboxes.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cranberry_orange_nut_cookies.html#comments November/December 2007 American Moderate Diabetes appropriate Low carbohydrate Christmas Thanksgiving Recipes - Individual Recipes Recipes & Menus - Antioxidants Recipes & Menus - Diabetic Desserts Recipes & Menus - Walnuts Berries Citrus Fruit Nuts Wheat Dessert Snack Bake Fall Spring Summer Winter 8 or more Entertaining, casual Entertaining, formal Gifts Kid-friendly Make ahead instructions Makeover Potluck Vegetarian More than 1 hour Baked Goods, bars & cookies Snack Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6344 at http://www.eatingwell.com