January/February 2008 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/436/all en Meet the Farmer: Hawaii Pineapple Farmer Ken Love http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/meet_the_farmer_hawaii_pineapple_farmer_ken_love <p>Hawaii’s “Pineapple Island,” Lana’i, was where I first visited a pineapple field. It was a sultry day. The heat rose from the red dirt in waves, making the pineapple leaves look like they were dancing the hula. I inhaled deeply, smelling the sweet fruit scent tinged with salty ocean air. I did a little dance myself, down those long rows of green and gold with the blue sky above. Funny what pineapple will do to a grown woman.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Janice Wald Henderson </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Ken Love cultivates his passion for pineapple on Hawaii’s Big Island. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/pineapple_KenLove_310.jpg?1260895462" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/pineapple_310.jpg?1265733214" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Pineapple Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/pineapple_coconut_layer_cake.html">Pineapple-Coconut Layer Cake</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/pineapple_ham_bread_souffl.html">Pineapple &amp; Ham Bread Soufflé</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/sesame_crusted_tofu_with_spicy_pineapple_noodles.html">Sesame-Crusted Tofu with Spicy Pineapple Noodles</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/tom_yum_soup_with_pineapple.html">Tom Yum Soup with Pineapple</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/pineapple_empanaditas.html">Pineapple Empanaditas</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_pineapple_recipes">Healthy Pineapple Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/meet_the_farmer_hawaii_pineapple_farmer_ken_love#comments Janice Wald Henderson January/February 2008 Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Tue, 15 Dec 2009 16:31:58 +0000 Penelope Wall 15304 at http://www.eatingwell.com Can Food Really Get You in the Mood? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/mind_body_spirit/can_food_really_get_you_in_the_mood <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/chocolate_3_0.jpg?1297262330" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Do some foods really increase libido? Read our findings—before your next romantic meal.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Oysters. Chocolate. Chile peppers that make you hot—and bothered? For centuries, people all over the world have been claiming that these so-called aphrodisiacs—and others, including asparagus, bananas, strawberries and you fill in the blank—stoke sex drive. </p> <p>But sparking libido with food is more fable than fact, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which reviewed the science on the subject. So why, then, do some people report heightened arousal after eating “aphrodisiacs”? Experts tell us it’s all in the mind—and in the heart, literally. </p> <p>“Experiencing increased libido from an aphrodisiac is analogous to feeling healing properties from placebos,” explains June Meyer, M.A., L.P.C., a psychotherapist in Stamford, Connecticut. “What’s in your mind matters more than what’s in your stomach. But if you think a particular food works for you,” says Meyer, “why not go for it?” </p> <p>What’s more, research shows that sexual dysfunction is sometimes a result of vascular disease, says Melissa Ohlson, M.S., R.D., of The Cleveland Clinic Preventive Cardiology Nutrition Program. “Eating a heart-healthy diet,” says Ohlson, “helps keep blood vessels healthy.” And since blood vessels nourish sex organs, substituting unsaturated fats for saturated ones, getting plenty of fruits, vegetables and fiber-rich grains and laying off the salt may pay off in unexpectedly delightful places. </p> <p>Bottom line: While there’s no proof that certain foods directly enhance libido, eating a well-balanced diet improves cardiovascular health, which in turn improves total body and sexual health. And if eating dark chocolate or oysters sets the mood, go right ahead. Just balance your calories with ample physical activity—in the bedroom and elsewhere.</p> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Recipes to Get You in the Mood </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_chocolate_recipes">Healthy Chocolate Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/instant_chocolate_desserts">Instant Chocolate Desserts</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/romantic_dinners_for_two">Romantic Dinners for Two</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/chile_pepper_recipes_and_other_spicy_recipes">Chile Pepper Recipes and Other Spicy Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-2"><legend>Related Content Group 2</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/mind_body_spirit/saffron_to_boost_your_mood">Saffron to Boost Your Mood</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/mind_body_spirit_center">Mind, Body &amp; Spirit Center</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Milton Stokes, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2008 </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/mind_body_spirit/can_food_really_get_you_in_the_mood#comments Milton Stokes, M.P.H., R.D. January/February 2008 Mind Body Spirit Diet, Nutrition & Health - Mind, Body & Spirit Thu, 17 Sep 2009 21:42:30 +0000 Penelope Wall 14967 at http://www.eatingwell.com Secrets to Staying Slim Past 40 http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/secrets_to_staying_slim_past_40 <p>If you’ve celebrated your fortieth birthday, you probably suspect that your metabolism isn’t quite what it used to be. The bad news is you’re right: calorie burn does decrease with age. But there’s also good news: you’re probably burning more than you think. New research in the <em>American Journal of Clinical Nutrition</em> reveals just how many calories, on average, men and women in their forties, fifties and sixties burn each day. Drum roll… please! According to the study, men aged 40 to 69 expend about 2,900 calories. Women of the same age burn 2,300 calories daily.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How to outsmart age-related weight gain. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/scale_for_food_jf09_310.jpg?1268671360" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/lunch_sandwich_310.jpg?1260397890" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/quick_low_calorie_dinner_recipes">Quick Low-Calorie Dinner Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/3_magic_breakfast_ingredients_to_kick_start_your_metabolism">3 &quot;Magic&quot; Breakfast Ingredients to Kick-Start Your Metabolism</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/breakfasts_that_fight_fat">Breakfasts That Fight Fat</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/recipes_to_trim_your_waistline">Recipes to Trim Your Waistline</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans/500_calorie_dinners_30_minute_dinners">500-Calorie Dinners: 30-Minute Dinners</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans/Lunches_for_400_calories_or_less">Lunches for 400 Calories or Less</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Healthy Aging </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans/weight_loss_diet_meal_plan">Weight-Loss Diet Meal Plan</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/must_eat_foods_for_women_at_every_age">Must-eat foods for women at every age</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/the_search_for_the_anti_aging_diet">The Search for the Anti-Aging Diet</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/7_foods_to_keep_young">7 Foods to Keep You Young</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/3_ways_to_beat_your_age">3 Ways to Beat Your Age</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/can_vitamin_c_save_your_skin">Can Vitamin C Save Your Skin?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/diet_nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_get_a_better_night_s_sleep_after_40">How to Get a Better Night’s Sleep after 40</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>If you’ve celebrated your fortieth birthday, you probably suspect that your metabolism isn’t quite what it used to be. The bad news is you’re right: calorie burn does decrease with age. But there’s also good news: you’re probably burning more than you think. New research in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reveals just how many calories, on average, men and women in their forties, fifties and sixties burn each day. Drum roll… please! According to the study, men aged 40 to 69 expend about 2,900 calories. Women of the same age burn 2,300 calories daily. (These averages vary based on a person’s height, weight and activity.)</p> <p>These numbers may sound surprisingly high if you compare them to a Nutrition Facts label, which implies the average person needs about 2,000 calories daily. They may seem downright decadent to one who has followed dieting plans where daily calorie caps are set at 1,200 or 1,500 calories. But they’re good approximations for how much energy people of this age group are expending. Janet Tooze, Ph.D., lead researcher and assistant professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, and her colleagues used doubly labeled water, a tool that measures carbon dioxide production (an actual marker of calories burned), to determine the energy expenditure of the 450 middle-age men and women in the study.</p> <p>The reason people of all ages may assume they’re burning less than they really are may be that they think they’re eating fewer calories than they are actually consuming. When it comes to estimating calories, says Tooze, “generally people underreport [their calorie intake] by about one-third.”</p> <p>As for that age-related decrease in metabolism, it’s probably most marked in one’s sixties and beyond. “We found—and so have other studies—that there is a decrease in muscle in your sixties, particularly in women,” says Tooze. Since muscle is a calorie-burning powerhouse, muscle loss equals fewer calories burned. In this study, daily caloric burn of women and men in their early fifties was 4 and 8 percent higher, respectively, than that of people in their late sixties. (Men in their sixties still burned about 2,700 calories; women, 2,200.)</p> <p>Bottom line: While the aging metabolism situation isn’t as bleak as you might assume, you do need to be more vigilant to maintain your weight as you age. “You will lose muscle as you grow older, but with strengthening exercises you can preserve a lot of it,” says EatingWell advisor Miriam Nelson, Ph.D., director of Tufts University’s John Hancock Center for Physical Activity and Nutrition. Assess how accurate you are in estimating the calories you consume by gauging changes in your weight. “If you’re weight-stable, go with what you’re doing,” says Nelson.</p> <p>If you’re gaining, start making changes. The EatingWell Diet, a 28-day menu plan and self-tracking program, helps you lose weight by balancing calories in with calories out. For tips from the book and worksheets to track your eating and activity, go to eatingwell.com/diet.</p> <p>—Brierley Wright</p> <p>**picture caption: Keeping track of calories is key to managing your weight. Even healthy foods can add up quickly. This modest-looking lunch contains 900 calories. (Cranberry juice: 230 calories; Banana: 120 calories; Tuna sandwich: 550 calories.)</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/secrets_to_staying_slim_past_40#comments Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. January/February 2008 Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Wed, 19 Aug 2009 17:50:53 +0000 Nifer 9821 at http://www.eatingwell.com Ladies, Take Heart! http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/ladies_take_heart <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Studies suggest women don&#039;t view heart-attack risk as seriously as men do. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Having a parent or sibling who’s had a heart attack early (generally before age 55 for men, before 65 for women) increases your risk of suffering the same fate. But a recent study in American Heart Journal suggests that women aren’t getting the message. </p> <p>Researchers at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center discovered that women with a family history of heart attack didn’t exercise any more—and were more likely to smoke—than lower-risk women. (Men with a family history were more likely to acknowledge their increased cardiovascular risk and more likely to do something about it.) Particularly if you have a family history, start getting screened and making healthy lifestyle changes—like improving your diet and committing to regular exercise—now.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/ladies_take_heart#comments Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. January/February 2008 Heart Healthy Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Heart Health Tue, 18 Aug 2009 20:07:27 +0000 Penelope Wall 9720 at http://www.eatingwell.com Inflammatory Foods http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/inflammatory_foods <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Inflammatory Foods </div> </div> </div> <p>As a nutrition professor, I thought I was up to speed on which healthy habits can help you prevent heart disease—until a few years ago when my University of Vermont colleague Paula Fives-Taylor, Ph.D., rattled my thinking. In a riveting lecture, this professor of microbiology and molecular genetics explained that something as simple as flossing your teeth regularly could make a big difference in reducing heart disease risk.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Science is uncovering close connections among food, inflammation and heart disease. Here’s what you should know. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/oil_bean_citrus_nut_choc_630.jpg?1299707802" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/oil_bean_citrus_nut_choc_310.jpg?1299707838" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/heart_health/10_steps_to_heart_health">10 Steps to Heart Health</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/heart_healthy_chicken_recipes">Heart-Healthy Chicken Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans/heart_healthy_meal_plan">Heart-Healthy Meal Plan</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/heart_health/3_foods_for_healthy_gums_hearts">3 Foods for Healthy Gums &amp; Hearts</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/heart_healthy_diet_center/top_15_heart_healthy_foods">Our Top 15 Heart-Healthy Foods</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>As a nutrition professor, I thought I was up to speed on which healthy habits can help you prevent heart disease—until a few years ago when my University of Vermont colleague Paula Fives-Taylor, Ph.D., rattled my thinking. In a riveting lecture, this professor of microbiology and molecular genetics explained that something as simple as flossing your teeth regularly could make a big difference in reducing heart disease risk. (That’s when my jaw dropped.) Since flossing keeps plaque-forming bacteria from invading gum tissue, she explained, it helps prevent the body’s immune system from launching into defense mode—a process known as inflammation. Inflammation, she added, was now understood to be both a warning sign and a trigger for a number of medical conditions including heart disease.</p> <p>Fives-Taylor was onto something. Today, inflammation is so widely linked to heart disease, many physicians routinely order tests for a key marker of inflammation, C-reactive protein (CRP), as readily as they do cholesterol tests.</p> <h3>How Inflammation Harms the Heart</h3> <p>It seems counterintuitive, but inflammation begins with the body’s way of defending itself against harm. We’ve all experienced it as part of the normal healing process after a scrape or cut. Waves of immune cells rush to the injury, combatting threatening pathogens and sometimes causing heat, redness and swelling. But the new thinking is that serious health problems begin when inflammation overstays its welcome, persisting in a chronic, low-grade state in which some immune cells remain activated even though they’re not needed.</p> <p>We used to think heart disease resulted from deposits of fatty plaques in our arteries, like the buildup of rust in a water pipe. But we now know that heart attacks rarely happen simply due to this buildup. Far from being mere “pipes,” arteries are active participants in the progress of heart disease, both attracting and harboring cells that release inflammatory substances. The result is a fatty plaque that forms within the artery walls and is a target for yet more inflammatory damage. According to my friend Penny Kris-Etherton, Ph.D., R.D., distinguished professor of nutrition at Penn State, “inflammation plays a key role in weakening arterial plaque, causing the deposits to rupture—which can lead to sudden coronary death, heart attack or stroke.”</p> <p>Anything you can do to lower your level of inflammation, then, can go a long way toward reducing your risk for heart disease. Your doctor may recommend a daily dose of aspirin, the original anti-inflammatory drug. Also, since body fat is itself a source of inflammation, losing extra pounds can help—as can increasing your fitness level. And exciting research is showing that what we eat can make a difference too.</p> <h3>How Diet Can Help</h3> <p>Numerous studies show that individual foods and nutrients can either stoke or subdue the inflammatory process. The foods that inflame aren’t new villains: they are saturated fats and trans-fatty acids, along with high-glycemic-index carbohydrates like refined starches and sweets, which the body quickly converts to glucose.</p> <p>It’s old news that saturated fats and trans fats increase LDL (“bad” cholesterol) in the blood, but we now know that too much LDL can start a cascade of inflammatory events. When it accumulates in artery walls excessively, LDL undergoes chemical changes, including oxidization; the body interprets these changes as “danger” and responds by drawing inflammatory compounds into arteries. This process ultimately results in both the buildup of plaque and chronic inflammation.</p> <p>The anti-inflammatory prescription, then, begins with avoiding anything that increases LDL, and it’s a familiar refrain: Limit intake of full-fat animal products and read labels to avoid common trans-fat sources like commercial cakes, cookies, crackers, pies and breads. Focus on getting more omega-3 fats, which the body converts to substances that decrease inflammation. And, since elevated blood sugar can stoke some of the chemical changes that render LDL more dangerous, it makes sense to limit your intake of refined grains and other high-glycemic-index carbohydrates like white bread and potatoes.</p> <p>Instead, try to get more of what I call “inflammation soothers”: foods that inhibit LDL and help prevent reactions that spark inflammation. The list is long and includes foods high in healthy mono-unsaturated and omega-3 fats (like extra-virgin olive oil and canola oil, fatty fish, nuts and seeds—particularly omega-3-rich walnuts and flaxseed), along with antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables. (A few surprising “extras” like red wine, cocoa and turmeric have shown promising anti-inflammatory activity in some studies.) Whole grains and legumes are also key. And phytosterols, cholesterol-lowering plant compounds that are turning up in some brands of low-fat yogurt, orange juice, butterlike spreads and granola bars, also may help reduce inflammation.</p> <p>But rather than just concentrating on individual foods, Kris-Etherton and other experts recommend focusing on an overall dietary pattern that combines these foods for additive and/or synergistic effects. The renowned Mediterranean Diet pattern, rich in plant foods and seasoned with olive oil, is one of many healthy models that fit this description.</p> <p>Of course, lowering LDL cholesterol remains the cornerstone of reducing your risk of heart disease. But it’s clear that inflammation plays an important role, too, and soothing the flames of inflammation is within our power.</p> <p>So lose weight if you need to, take a daily aspirin if prescribed and make sensible food choices. As you can see, there’s plenty of common ground between anti-inflammatory eating and healthy eating in general. You’ve undoubtedly heard this advice before, but now there are new reasons to act on it.</p> <p>Oh, and don’t forget to floss.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/inflammatory_foods#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. January/February 2008 Heart Healthy Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Heart Health Tue, 18 Aug 2009 20:05:24 +0000 Penelope Wall 9719 at http://www.eatingwell.com Change the Way You Think About Food http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/change_the_way_you_think_about_food <p>“Sarah” (not her real name) remembers one particularly argumentative telephone call from her ex-husband a few years ago, a call that really set her off. “I felt so uncomfortable and inadequate,” the 57-year-old Vermont-based social worker remembers, “the thought of candy just popped into my mind, and I couldn’t get rid of it. It was almost as if I was having two conversations.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Here’s how to overcome temptation and guilt and forge a healthier relationship with food. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/3718oreo_bite225.jpg?1251746503" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More information </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/the_eatingwell_diet/staying_positive_get_healthier">Staying Positive May Help You Get Healthier</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/8_tips_for_winning_the_food_fight">8 Tips for Winning the Food Fight</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/a_nation_addicted_to_food">A Nation Addicted to Food</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/quiz_are_you_obsessed_with_food">Quiz: Are You Obsessed with Food?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>“Sarah” (not her real name) remembers one particularly argumentative telephone call from her ex-husband a few years ago, a call that really set her off. “I felt so uncomfortable and inadequate,” the 57-year-old Vermont-based social worker remembers, “the thought of candy just popped into my mind, and I couldn’t get rid of it. It was almost as if I was having two conversations. One was with him, fighting, and the other was with myself, saying, ‘When can I go out and get that candy?’” Long after she’d hung up, the visions of sweet treats remained, tempting and specific: “It was Pepsi, and three different types of candy,” she recalls distinctly. “Pull-apart Twizzlers, Skor bars and Butterfinger bars.” Though it was the middle of a workday, Sarah couldn’t concentrate on her work or think of anything else until she went out and bought the candy and soda. “I ate them all in my car, really fast,” she remembers. “And then, like always, I felt terrible about myself for being so weak.”</p> <p>The shame and remorse led Sarah to keep going, onto a second binge. “Once I started, I figured I’d blown it anyway, so I might as well have everything I like.” She stopped at a McDonald’s drive-through and ordered the works—burger, fries, soda; on another day, she might have ordered a pizza or subs to be delivered to her house. Either way, it ended as it always did: with her stuffing herself with food, alone and ashamed. “I took in thousands of calories without even feeling it,” she recalls.</p> <p>A binger most of her adult life, Sarah’s weight fluctuated as she alternated binging with extreme dieting. “I’ve been as much as 250 pounds, and at my thinnest, around 125,” says Sarah, who now carries 215 pounds on her 5-foot-6-inch frame. After nearly two years of counseling and weight-control group sessions at the Vermont Center for Cognitive Behavior Therapy (VCCBT)—along with daily, conscious effort—she has finally gained the upper hand over what she eats, but not always. “I’m in control of my eating 90 percent of the time now,” she says. “I have to struggle with it every day.”</p> <p><strong>The “Almost Eating Disorder”</strong></p> <p>Sarah is typical of most of the patients seen by Elena Ramirez, Ph.D. (co-founder of VCCBT) in that her eating patterns frequently spiraled out of control, but not nearly enough to qualify as having a classic eating disorder like bulimia or anorexia. Nor does she fit the profile of a more recently recognized problem, binge eating disorder, or BED—which features regular bulimia-like binges but without its “purging” behaviors (like vomiting and laxative abuse). “I see a lot of people with subclinical eating problems who fall between the cracks,” Ramirez explains. Many, like Sarah, “use food to distract themselves from negative emotions like anxiety, fear or anger.” Some, she adds, are serial dieters who have been so restrictive about what they can or can’t eat that when they finally do give in to that forbidden bite of pizza or chocolate, “they think they don’t have any control at all, and just eat everything in sight.”</p> <p>This kind of eating behavior can evolve into a full-fledged eating disorder, but more often the overeater waxes and wanes on the edges of an “almost eating disorder,” says Ramirez. “Over time, their eating tends to get more and more out of control, and they start to gain weight. That’s when they seek help.”</p> <p>Whether binge-eating problems are diagnosed or fly under the diagnostic radar, researchers are just beginning to understand their impact on the population. Last year, researchers at Harvard’s McLean Hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts, polled 2,980 Americans in the first national survey of eating disorders. They found that BED is the most common eating disorder, affecting some 3.5 percent of women and 2 percent of men—making it more than twice as common as bulimia and more than four times as prevalent as anorexia. While BED and other binging behaviors aren’t as well recognized as anorexia and bulimia, “some of the driving forces behind them are the same,” notes Cynthia Bulik, Ph.D., director of the eating disorders program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and co-author of Runaway Eating: The 8-Point Plan to Conquer Adult Food and Weight Obsessions (Rodale, 2005). All involve “the consistent use of food or food-related behaviors (such as purging or exercising excessively) to deal with unpleasant feelings,” she notes, coupled with “the feeling that these behaviors are out of control.”</p> <p>Most experts believe binge eating is much more prevalent than any survey can measure. “Our findings only document people whose eating problems are clinically significant and causing marked distress—and that’s probably just the tip of the iceberg,” says James Hudson, M.D., Sc.D., director of the psychiatric epidemiology research program at McLean Hospital and lead author of the national eating disorders survey. “Because there’s so much shame associated with eating disorders, a lot of people aren’t willing to admit they have a problem.</p> <p>“We suspect there’s a much larger group of people who aren’t binging as often or as intensely, but nevertheless have tendencies toward out-of-control eating,” Hudson continues. “That’s hard to quantify in a survey, but it’s out there.”</p> <p>Most of us have done our share of out-of-control eating, whether it’s polishing off a family-size bag of potato chips without noticing or eating all the chocolates in the Valentine’s sampler—and we’ve probably felt at least a little guilty for overindulging. But if you find yourself having those “slip-ups” fairly regularly—or if your eating causes you so much shame that you have to do it in secret—your eating issues might be cause for concern. </p> <p><strong>What Makes Us Overeat</strong></p> <p>To some extent we’ve been programmed to overeat since the days our ancestors hunted and gathered on the African savanna. Having the capacity to binge on huge quantities of food whenever it became available was probably an evolutionary advantage in an environment where food supplies were erratic and scarce. So anytime we see or smell food, several systems kick in simultaneously in various parts of the brain to make sure we don’t miss the opportunity to chow down. The brain’s reward and motivation system gets fired up (“I must have that pizza now!”), while centers of the brain that link to emotion and memory switch into higher gear (“The last time I had pizza, it made me happy!”). At the same time, the brain’s pleasure centers are activated (“Pizza is yummy!”), with the most high-calorie foods causing the most stimulation (“Pizza with double cheese and pepperoni is even yummier!”). The result? Too often we dig in, hungry or not.</p> <p>These overlapping systems made sense on the savanna, ensuring we’d always seek out the calorie-packed foods that offered the most insurance against famine. But for most of us living in America today, every day is a feast, not a famine. Ads for doughnuts and soda confront us every time we pump gas, and cinnamon buns and pretzel aromas fill every shopping mall. That means our brains’ appetite systems are in a frequent—sometimes constant—state of arousal, experts say. “If you’re the type who lights up at the sight or smell of food, just shopping at the mall is a barrage,” says Bulik. “You can’t even go to a bookstore anymore without being bombarded by the smell of baked goods and coffee. You have to be vigilant almost all the time.”</p> <p>What makes us decide to eat, or not eat, begins in the hypothalamus, a key control center at the base of the brain, explains Mary Boggiano, Ph.D., a psychologist at the University of Alabama at Birmingham who has extensively researched neurochemical changes associated with dieting and binging. “The hypothalamus is what induces satiety or hunger, depending on our caloric needs,” she says. “But when it comes to binge eating, which really isn’t about true hunger or satiety, normal hypothalamic function may get overpowered.” The parts of the brain that govern rational responses, like the neocortex (“I need sleep, not that pint of Ben &amp; Jerry’s”) get overridden, too, she explains. What seem to win out are other, connected brain structures that form the “feeling parts of the brain,” she says—regions like the amygdala (which plays a role in attaching emotional meanings to various stimuli) and the nucleus accumbens (involved in emotions, addictions and pleasure-seeking behavior). For some of us, this inner war with our rational sides and our primal urges to stock up on calories happens dozens of times daily—or more. Consider that we’re confronted with an average of 200 food-related decisions to make every day, according to Brian Wansink, Ph.D., of Cornell University’s Food and Brand Laboratory and an EatingWell advisory board member.</p> <p>The overstressed lives most of us lead today make the picture even more complicated. “We’re also hard-wired to store up calories to deal with stress,” says Boggiano, recalling that primordial savanna. “In those days, stress involved events where we needed energy. It was important for the body to have plenty of calories if it was being attacked by a saber-toothed tiger.” Food fuels muscles to launch a life-saving response (something along the lines of “Run for your life!”)—so “it makes sense for survival that stress and food are coupled,” she adds.</p> <p>But in modern life, most of the stresses we face are the sedentary, nonfuel-requiring type—like that overdue presentation that must be finished tonight or the simmering feud with a nasty in-law. Nonetheless, the vestigial connections between food and stress remain—and we turn to food to soothe, or distract us from, our stressful emotions, especially if we have a tendency to binge. There’s a reason why we often turn to chocolate, cake and other treats. Anything high in sugar and fat causes opioids—“feel-good” chemicals like endorphins—to be released in the brain, which replace stressed-out feelings with pleasurable ones. Researchers from Boggiano’s lab and from the University of California, San Francisco, also found that sugary, fatty foods seem to help suppress levels of a key stress hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH).</p> <p>“Of course, for bingers and other disordered eaters, overeating in response to stress becomes a stressor in itself,” notes Boggiano. “It becomes a vicious cycle of feeling bad about overeating, then eating more to distract from the guilt.”</p> <p><strong>The Pleasure Fix</strong></p> <p>Whether you’re stressed or sad, food can also provide a quick fix by stimulating the brain’s pleasure/reward system, in which the neurotransmitter dopamine is released in response to pleasurable experiences involving, say, food, music or sex. Those rewards make us want to repeat a behavior again and again, says Nora Volkow, M.D., director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. “Dopamine is in charge of motivation. Drugs like cocaine use these same reward systems—only much more powerfully,” she explains. “In some people the compulsive pattern of food intake is so out of control that it mimics what you see in people who are addicted to drugs.”</p> <p>Overeating to soothe emotions is also what behavioral scientists call a “conditioned” or “learned” response. When we repeatedly engage in a certain behavior every time we’re in a certain situation—say, grabbing a bag of chips at the vending machine every time we have a stressful meeting at work—we learn to associate one activity with the other. In the brain, the pleasure-inducing opioids that surge when you eat the chips work together with the dopamine system to make the experience more reinforcing, says Boggiano, “meaning that we are likely to want to do it again.” The more the behavior is repeated, the more ingrained it becomes; eventually just seeing the conference room door might trigger a powerful craving for Pringles.</p> <p>“If you’ve always had something you do in response to stress, like eating, you keep on turning to it because that’s what you’ve practiced,” says Ramirez. “You’ve become ‘conditioned’ to that behavior. That kind of behavior might feel ‘addictive,’ but it’s not a true addiction.”</p> <p><strong>A Toss of the Genes</strong></p> <p>Of course, there are those lucky few—people who don’t soothe themselves with food or find it hard to resist foods’ siren songs unless their stomach is empty. “You can put five people in a room with a cake,” says eating-disorders researcher Gayle Timmerman, Ph.D., R.N., of the University of Texas at Austin; “there will be one or two people who couldn’t care less about the cake, unless they’re really hungry. But at least a few of them will have a hard time thinking about anything but the cake.”</p> <p>Genetic programming may determine why at least some of us are the cake-obsessing types. Last year, Hudson and his colleagues reported that binge eating (along with a tendency toward obesity) often runs in families. “If you have a relative who’s a binge eater, you’re twice as likely to have problems with binging yourself,” he says. “And you’re also about two and a half times as likely to become obese.”</p> <p>Research by Volkow and Gene-Jack Wang, M.D., at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, suggests a neurochemical basis for why some people might be more likely to become “addicted” to food than others. Using positron emission tomography (PET) scans—computerized images that show activity levels in various parts of the brain—Volkow and Wang looked at the brains of the most likely candidates for the “food addict” label: a group of 10 extremely obese women and men. They found the group had fewer receptors for dopamine in their brains than did a similar group of normal-weight controls—suggesting, perhaps, that an impaired dopamine system might make obese people more sensitive to the rewarding properties of food.</p> <p>Last October, researchers at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, uncovered a possible genetic link to dopamine’s influence on overeating. When they looked at the DNA of 29 obese people and that of 45 slightly overweight or normal-weight people, the researchers found that about half of them had a form of a gene linked to having fewer dopamine receptors in the brain. The scientists then gave the study subjects computer tasks to perform with their favorite foods (like chocolate and potato chips) as a reward—more work, more food. They found that the obese people with the fewer-dopamine-receptors gene worked twice as hard for their food rewards than the other obese group who didn’t have the variation—and much harder than those in the normal-weight groups of either genetic background. The investigators speculated that without as many dopamine receptors, the obese group might have had to seek out excess reward from their food. (What about those people who had the gene, but remained a normal weight? The researchers speculated that they might have found other, nonfood ways to satisfy their need for rewarding experiences—for example, smoking or exercising.)</p> <p>Do obese people eat more, perhaps, to stimulate the dopamine pleasure circuits in their brains, as addicts might do by taking drugs? “I think so, but that’s just one piece of what’s involved,” says Wang. “Humans are complicated, and many factors affect the dopamine system, including social behavior and sleep patterns.” But the model provides tantalizing clues as to why so many disordered eaters eventually become overweight. </p> <p><strong>The Case Against Diets</strong></p> <p>“You name a diet, I’ve been on it,” says Sarah, the social worker from Vermont who has struggled with binging most of her life. She’s not alone. In fact, says Ramirez, most of the people she treats for eating disorders started out as dieters. “It’s not uncommon for someone who’s been very restrictive to have some form of binge eating eventually…for physical as well as psychological reasons, their bodies won’t let them be that restrictive for very long.”</p> <p>For her part, Bulik believes chronic dieting is a “catalyst” for eating disorders. “It encourages rigid, hypercontrolled behavior, encouraging you to ignore your body’s own signals of hunger and satiety.” This negative relationship with food, she believes, “can trigger binging.”</p> <p>Chronic dieting can also induce changes in levels of key neurotransmitters, according to research from Boggiano’s laboratory. When she put rats on a “weight cycling” diet that simulated the on-again, off-again pattern many human dieters follow, she found the rats’ levels of serotonin (a “feel-good” neurotransmitter) dropped significantly, similar to what’s seen in the brain of an anorexic at the height of illness. Dopamine levels also plummeted, and the food-deprived animals had symptoms that suggested depression.</p> <p>At the same time, in follow-up experiments, Boggiano found that the dieting rats seemed to be extremely sensitive to the effects of opioid drugs like morphine, which tend to stimulate appetite if given in high enough doses. The dieting rats went on a rat-chow binge when given an opioid drug dose that had no effect on nondieting rats. Later, when the rats were subjected to the equivalent of a stressful lifestyle (occasional harmless but annoying shocks) and allowed just a bite of sugary, fatty cookies, the dieting rats reacted the same way that they had to the opioid drugs. “It triggered them to overeat everything—even boring rat chow if that was all that was available—even when they were completely full,” says Boggiano. In contrast, rats who’d never been put on a restricted diet ate normally.</p> <p>This sounds a lot like what happens with chronic human dieters like Sarah, for whom, when they’re stressed, just a taste of a forbidden, calorie-packed food (like a Butterfinger bar) can trigger an uncontrolled eating binge. It also helps explain why so many dieters meet their downfall in calorie-laden fare like peanut butter and pizza. “Nobody breaks a diet with broccoli and cottage cheese,” quips Boggiano. “A very powerful food like chocolate that’s loaded with fat and sugar is going to create a big release of endorphins in the brain, which can trigger overeating. And for someone who has been dieting, that reaction might be exaggerated.”</p> <p>The finding suggests that a tendency toward overeating isn’t all in our heads, she adds. “Psychologists have always explained this problem as a cognitive process—the ‘I’ve blown it’ syndrome,” she explains. “But dieting rats aren’t capable of those higher thought processes—they don’t worry about their weight or feel guilty about food—and they can’t stop eating after they’ve had just a bite of yummy food either.”</p> <p>What does all this mean for humans? “When someone severely restricts their calories or has an eating disorder, having these yummy foods around can be like a drink to an alcoholic,” Boggiano says. “Until they’ve quit dieting and have learned to eat a normal amount of food, it’s probably not safe to reintroduce those triggering foods or the floodgates will open.”</p> <p><strong>Back in Control</strong></p> <p>Overeating may be in our genetic makeup; a tendency toward stressed-out binging might be part of our evolutionary baggage. Our brains’ reward systems seem obsessively focused on obtaining calories, and our 24/7 eating environment gives them plenty to dwell on. But the good news is that we can overcome these hurdles to become “normal” eaters again, and perhaps even shift our neurochemistry to favor more stable eating patterns—even if we’re genetically predisposed to binge-eat. “Your genes don’t dictate that you’re going to develop an eating disorder, only that you’re more vulnerable to it,” explains Hudson. “A lot depends on environmental factors bringing that predisposition out.” And, while you can’t completely control your environment, “you can work on how you react to it.”</p> <p>Emotional eating can be managed too. “Because many associations between negative emotions and eating are learned,” says Ramirez, “they can also be unlearned,” with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) skills, such as the ones she teaches to clients like Sarah. By focusing on replacing old behavior patterns with new ones, she explains, “you can learn how to manage your eating to the point that it doesn’t feel like an addiction, but like something you have control over.” In some cases, drug therapy—including fluoxetine (Prozac) and other medications that target the serotonin system—can be a useful addition. (Other drugs that target the dopamine receptors are in the works.) “Behavioral therapy can work without drugs, but drugs can’t work without behavioral therapy,” says Ramirez. “A combination of the two can be helpful for many people.”</p> <p>“The brain is very plastic,” adds Boggiano. The same circuitry that gets activated by learning an association (say, gorging on peanut butter cookies every time you’re late with a deadline) gets deactivated when you break that connection with new thinking and behavior (like calling a friend for a “stress break” instead). Expose the brain to new stimuli, she explains, “and it can start forming new, healthier habits and activation pathways.”</p> <p>Practicing new ways of thinking and eating has helped put Sarah back in control, steadily and slowly, over the months she has worked with Ramirez. While she has gradually begun to lose weight, she has, more importantly, shed emotional baggage and retrained her brain to think differently. “I’ve learned to take a step back when I’m feeling anxious or upset and talk myself through it, rather than going immediately to food,” she says. “I’ll talk to myself in a positive way, instead of beating up on myself.”</p> <p>Being accountable for her actions has also been key. Sarah logs everything she eats in a food diary—even on those (now rarer) occasions when she overeats. She keeps “trigger” foods like chips or French fries out of the house, but lets herself enjoy them in manageable amounts at restaurants. She avoids tempting situations like the gas station checkout counter, where candy bars lurk by the cash register; “I pay at the pump with my credit card instead,” she says. She has also “normalized” her favorite binge foods by making them part of her daily eating, and enjoying them out in the open rather than in secret: on most afternoons, she’ll have an 8-ounce can of Pepsi and a small chocolate bar. “That comes to between 230 and 300 calories,” she says. “I just write it down in my diary.”</p> <p>Recently, Sarah realized how far she had come when she made a “huge” mistake at work that in the old days would have sent her straight to the candy counter. She accidentally hit the “send” button too soon, and an unedited document “went to the wrong person,” she remembers. “It created all kinds of bad feelings between the parties involved.”</p> <p>But instead of escaping her feelings temporarily by gorging on candy, Sarah faced up to the problem instead and got on the phone. “I admitted to everyone involved that I had blown it and that I was very sorry,” she remembers, “but I also said that I had to move on from there.” By taking responsibility for the problem, she was able to get through the bad feelings without eating over them, and now they’re history.</p> <p>“I know I’ve got to work at this every day, but now I have the skills to do it,” she says proudly.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/change_the_way_you_think_about_food#comments Joyce Hendley January/February 2008 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Tue, 18 Aug 2009 14:04:37 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9662 at http://www.eatingwell.com Flaxseed for Hot Flashes? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/flaxseed_for_hot_flashes <p>New research suggests that lignans, estrogen-like compounds in flaxseeds, may help relieve hot flashes. In the pilot study, 28 women consumed four tablespoons of ground flaxseed daily—two in the morning, two at night. After six weeks, the frequency of their hot flashes dropped, on average, from 7.3 to 3.6 a day. Intensity of the hot flashes decreased too.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Anna Roufos </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Recent research suggests it might just help. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/flaxseeds_jf08_630.jpg?1285861685" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/flax_seeds_310.jpg?1251749964" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_recipes_with_flax_seed">Healthy Recipes with Flaxseed</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/a_natural_solution_for_hot_flashes">A Natural Solution for Hot Flashes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/are_store_bought_pre_ground_flaxseeds_as_nutritionally_e">Are store-bought pre-ground flaxseeds as nutritionally effective as buying whole seeds and grinding yourself?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>New research suggests that lignans, estrogen-like compounds in flaxseeds, may help relieve hot flashes. In the pilot study, 28 women consumed four tablespoons of ground flaxseed daily—two in the morning, two at night. After six weeks, the frequency of their hot flashes dropped, on average, from 7.3 to 3.6 a day. Intensity of the hot flashes decreased too. “[Lignans in] flax offer a ‘natural,’ less potent estrogen effect on hot flashes than synthetic hormone therapy,” says the study’s lead author, Sandhya Pruthi, M.D., of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who is planning a larger study to confirm the findings. Pruthi recommends starting with two tablespoons daily and working up to four. (Note: 4 tablespoons = 190 calories.) Flaxseeds are rich in fiber—2.5 grams per tablespoon—so increasing intake too quickly can cause bloating. Grind whole flax—a coffee grinder works great—and sprinkle it on yogurt, cereal, fruit and salads.</p> <p>[pagebreak]</p> <p><strong>Flax Cooking and Storage Tips</strong></p> <p>One of the best plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids, flaxseeds provide both soluble fiber, linked to reduced risk of heart disease, and insoluble fiber, which provides valuable roughage. They must be ground for your body to absorb the benefits. Whole flaxseeds have a longer shelf life (grind them in a clean coffee grinder or dry blender). Once ground, flaxseeds are highly perishable, so store them in a tightly covered container in the refrigerator or freezer. You can purchase whole seeds and ground flaxmeal in natural-foods markets.</p> <p>Flaxseed oil, pressed from flaxseeds, is a valuable source of omega-3 fatty acids. It is highly perishable, so store in the refrigerator and use as soon as possible. Available at natural-foods stores.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/flaxseed_for_hot_flashes#comments Anna Roufos January/February 2008 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:20:58 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9578 at http://www.eatingwell.com Cooking for Kids With Diabetes http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/cooking_for_kids_with_diabetes <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Elizabeth Drumheller </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How one chef found delicious ways to cook healthier for the whole family and is teaching others to do the same. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>During his first 15 years as a chef, Mark Allison loved using butter, cream and fatty meats. That changed when his son Matthew was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at 14 months. “We were determined that he would not grow up on some special diet,” says Allison. “Matthew [now 9] eats the same as we do, and his blood sugars are as near to normal as you can get.” (People with type 1 diabetes must also be treated with insulin.) Given his family’s success, Allison was determined to help others. </p> <p>Last year, Allison introduced “Diabetic Cooking or Just Plain Healthy,” a four-hour cooking course open to the public at Johnson &amp; Wales University in Charlotte, North Carolina. The class—which runs twice this spring—includes talks by an endocrinologist and dietitian. The rest of the time, Allison leads participants in making delicious dishes based on whole grains, fresh produce and lean proteins, like fish and chicken. One of his biggest hits: shrimp and galia melon with garlic-lime dressing.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/diabetes/cooking_for_kids_with_diabetes#comments Elizabeth Drumheller January/February 2008 Diabetic Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Diabetes Thu, 13 Aug 2009 21:44:38 +0000 Penelope Wall 9510 at http://www.eatingwell.com Lower Your Cholesterol with Stanols and Sterols http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/cholesterol/lower_your_cholesterol_with_stanols_and_sterols <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Some foods are being fortified with cholesterol-lowering plant chemicals. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When your cholesterol levels run high, many favorite foods are forbidden. Butter, whole milk, full-fat cheese, milk chocolate: all out. But now, some of these same foods—and others, like granola bars and yogurt—are being fortified with cholesterol-lowering plant chemicals called sterols and stanols. (The term “phytosterols” includes both.)</p> <p>Pros: Phytosterols have no taste, odor or negative mouthfeel, so manufacturers have no qualms about fortifying foods with them. “Plant stanols and sterols have the same structure as cholesterol, so they compete for absorption in the intestine with cholesterol produced by the body and that which we get from food,” says Jenna Bell-Wilson, Ph.D., R.D., a nutrition consultant in Arlington, Massachusetts—and they win. Studies confirm these powerful plant substances reduce cholesterol levels by up to 15 percent, a level that could translate into a 20 percent lower risk of heart attack or stroke.<br /> A 2006 report in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition found that consuming spreads fortified with 1.8 to 2.8 grams of sterols/stanols per day for one to three months lowered cholesterol by seven to 11 percent. Other studies have found similar reductions after just two weeks of daily consumption of 2 grams of stanols. </p> <p>Cons: You need to eat foods fortified with sterols or stanols daily—for the rest of your life—to see lasting results. And while sterols/stanols themselves aren’t high in calories, they’re often incorporated into spreads and other high-calorie foods. Even if the phytosterols might mitigate the unhealthy fats in these foods, you can’t ignore high calorie contents, says cardiologist Philip Ades, M.D., author of EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (April 2008). His advice: “If you choose to add sterols and stanols to your diet, get them in the lowest-calorie package possible—particularly since up to 20 percent of people with high cholesterol fail to show improvement with phytosterols.” </p> <p>Bottom line: To get the most cholesterol-lowering impact from phytosterol-spiked foods, eat two to four servings daily. “A plant-sterol-fortified soft margarine is good to try,” says Bell-Wilson. “Cooking with it instead of butter can dramatically reduce your saturated fat intake.” Substituting milk or yogurt products with phytosterol-fortified versions is also a good idea. A 2004 study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that drinking plant sterol-fortified low-fat milk dropped cholesterol almost three times more than eating sterol-enriched bread or cereal. </p> <p>Note: Trace amounts of sterols and stanols are found naturally in corn, rice, apples, bananas, tomatoes and nuts. But you would have to eat about 13 cups of almonds (7,000 calories) to reach the 2 grams a day required to see a cholesterol change.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/cholesterol/lower_your_cholesterol_with_stanols_and_sterols#comments Amy Paturel January/February 2008 High Cholesterol Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Cholesterol Thu, 13 Aug 2009 21:19:40 +0000 Penelope Wall 9504 at http://www.eatingwell.com Cooking in the Slow Lane http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_travel/cooking_in_the_slow_lane <p>Some years ago, I had the distinct pleasure of visiting the idyllic Turkish village of Sirince, in the orchard-lined hills above the ancient city of Ephesus. My husband and I had checked into the beautifully restored Erdem Pansiyon. When our host, Mahmut, learned of my interest in Turkish food, he invited me to spend the day cooking with him. The following morning, Mahmut laid out the ingredients—many of them freshly harvested from his garden—for the güveç (casserole) we would prepare for dinner that evening.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Patsy Jamieson </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Warm up with these easy one-pot meals for your slow cooker. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/MB6381.JPG?1258402100" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Slow Cooker Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/hungarian_beef_goulash.html">Hungarian Beef Goulash</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/barley_risotto_with_fennel.html">Barley Risotto with Fennel</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/greek_chicken_vegetable_ragout.html">Greek Chicken &amp; Vegetable Ragout</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/middle_eastern_lamb_stew.html">Middle Eastern Lamb Stew</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/dried_fruit_compote_with_green_tea_lemon.html">Dried Fruit Compote with Green Tea &amp; Lemon</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/apple_confit.html">Apple Confit</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_slow_cooker_recipes">Healthy Crock Pot &amp; Slow Cooker Recipes and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/programmable_slow_cookers">Programmable Slow Cookers</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/one_pot_cooking_healthy_winter_meals">One-Pot Cooking: Healthy Winter Meals</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Some years ago, I had the distinct pleasure of visiting the idyllic Turkish village of Sirince, in the orchard-lined hills above the ancient city of Ephesus. My husband and I had checked into the beautifully restored Erdem Pansiyon. When our host, Mahmut, learned of my interest in Turkish food, he invited me to spend the day cooking with him. The following morning, Mahmut laid out the ingredients—many of them freshly harvested from his garden—for the güveç (casserole) we would prepare for dinner that evening. After layering lamb, onions, eggplant, zucchini, potatoes, tomatoes and green beans in a ceramic pot, we scattered bay leaves over the top, sealed the pot and carried it along the cobblestone streets of the village to the bakery. We left the casserole to bake slowly at the side of the baker’s oven for the rest of the day and retreated to the comfortable pension to wait out the intense heat of an Anatolian summer day.</p> <p>In the welcome cool of the evening, we sat down to a leisurely meal in the garden surrounded by fruit trees and grapevines. After an assortment of traditional Turkish meze (small dishes), which included stuffed grape leaves made from leaves we had plucked from the garden vines, Mahmut lifted the lid of the güveç. The mingling of the vegetables and lamb produced the most enticing aroma. Although we had prepared all the ingredients for the dish, I had the feeling that the casserole had miraculously cooked itself. To finish the meal, Mahmut picked fresh apricots and cherries from nearby trees. Perfection!</p> <p>I learned an important lesson from that memorable day. Mahmut’s relaxed pace in the kitchen reminded me to slow down, appreciate the ingredients and treasure the process of cooking. I realized that although it is not as romantic as the wood-burning oven in the village bakery, my slow cooker is ideal for making this type of hearty stew. Since that trip to Turkey, I have adapted more recipes, often inspired by dishes I have discovered in my travels, to this convenient appliance.</p> <p>Even though my passion for this type of cooking was ignited on a searing summer day, I value my slow cooker most in winter. The hearty, brothy dishes it creates so well have warmed many a chilly evening in my Vermont kitchen. What a luxury to load the slow cooker, leave the house to glide across local cross-country ski trails or simply run errands around town, and return to the aroma of a satisfying dinner that is ready to serve. Saucy slow-cooked dishes are also ideal candidates for making ahead and reheating, so I often enjoy the leftovers for several days. And, a slow cooker provides advantages for healthy cooking. It allows you to stretch small amounts of meat with flavorful sauce and a generous portion of vegetables—the essence of a healthy diet.</p> <p>Patsy Jamieson is an EatingWell contributing editor and frequently returns to the Test Kitchen to style the food for many of our photos.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_travel/cooking_in_the_slow_lane#comments Patsy Jamieson January/February 2008 Food News & Origins - Food & Travel Wed, 12 Aug 2009 23:12:26 +0000 Paula Joslin 9463 at http://www.eatingwell.com Indonesian Tofu Satés http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/indonesian_tofu_sat_s.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/indonesian_tofu_sat_s.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MV6393.JPG" alt="Indonesian Tofu Satés Recipe" title="Indonesian Tofu Satés Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/indonesian_tofu_sat_s.html" target="_blank">Indonesian Tofu Satés</a></div> <div>Here we skewer and broil cubes of extra-firm tofu and serve them with peanut sauce for a vegetarian version of the popular Indonesian street food. The accompanying peanut sauce is filled with exquisite sweet, hot and salty flavors but omits the often-used coconut milk, which is high in saturated fat. This flexible recipe works with tofu or chicken. If serving a group with some vegetarians and some meat eaters, prepare half chicken and half tofu and marinate them separately.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/indonesian_tofu_sat_s.html#comments January/February 2008 Asian Moderate Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium New Year's Eve Recipes & Menus - Peanuts Beans/legumes Dairy Nuts Soy Vegetarian, soy Appetizers Dinner
 Broil Marinate/Rub Fall Spring Summer Winter 6 Entertaining, casual Make ahead instructions Vegan Vegetarian More than 1 hour Appetizer Main dish, vegetarian Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6962 at http://www.eatingwell.com Ginger, Split Pea & Vegetable Curry (Subzi dalcha) http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/ginger_split_pea_vegetable_curry_subzi_dalcha.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/ginger_split_pea_vegetable_curry_subzi_dalcha.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MV6392.JPG" alt="Ginger, Split Pea &amp;amp; Vegetable Curry (Subzi dalcha) Recipe" title="Ginger, Split Pea &amp;amp; Vegetable Curry (Subzi dalcha) Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/ginger_split_pea_vegetable_curry_subzi_dalcha.html" target="_blank">Ginger, Split Pea &amp; Vegetable Curry (Subzi dalcha)</a></div> <div>Protein-rich yellow split peas combined with fresh vegetables yields a hearty, stewlike curry—perfect for a cold winter night by the fireplace, with a loaf of crusty bread. Try any combination of vegetables—sweet potatoes, winter squash and spinach create a sweeter offering. Don&#039;t be alarmed by the number of chiles—the vegetables and split peas bring the heat level down to make each bite addictive without being excessively hot.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/ginger_split_pea_vegetable_curry_subzi_dalcha.html#comments January/February 2008 Indian Moderate Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber High potassium Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Citrus Dairy Vegetables Vegetarian, other Dinner
 Braise/Stew Saute Fall Winter 6 Budget Entertaining, casual Vegan Vegetarian 1 hour or less Main dish, vegetarian Soups/stews Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6961 at http://www.eatingwell.com Black Bean Croquettes with Fresh Salsa http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/black_bean_croquettes_with_fresh_salsa.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/black_bean_croquettes_with_fresh_salsa.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MV6391.JPG" alt="Black Bean Croquettes with Fresh Salsa Recipe" title="Black Bean Croquettes with Fresh Salsa Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/black_bean_croquettes_with_fresh_salsa.html" target="_blank">Black Bean Croquettes with Fresh Salsa</a></div> <div>Staples like canned black beans and frozen corn transform into spicy croquettes in mere minutes. Serve with warm corn tortillas, coleslaw and lime wedges.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/black_bean_croquettes_with_fresh_salsa.html#comments January/February 2008 Hispanic Easy Diabetes appropriate Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber High potassium Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Recipes & Menus - Avocados Recipes & Menus - Vegan Tomatoes Vegetables Wheat Beans/Legumes Dinner
 Bake Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Budget Entertaining, casual Everyday favorites Kid-friendly Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegan Vegetarian 45 minutes or less Main dish, combination meal Main dish, vegetarian Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6960 at http://www.eatingwell.com Basmati Rice & Curry Casserole (Chana aur Sarson ka Saag Biryani) http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/basmati_rice_curry_casserole_chana_aur_sarson_ka_saag_biryani.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/basmati_rice_curry_casserole_chana_aur_sarson_ka_saag_biryani.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MV6390.JPG" alt="Basmati Rice &amp;amp; Curry Casserole (Chana aur Sarson ka Saag Biryani) Recipe" title="Basmati Rice &amp;amp; Curry Casserole (Chana aur Sarson ka Saag Biryani) Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/basmati_rice_curry_casserole_chana_aur_sarson_ka_saag_biryani.html" target="_blank">Basmati Rice &amp; Curry Casserole (Chana aur Sarson ka Saag Biryani)</a></div> <div>Biryanis are rice-based casseroles that combine a saucy meat, vegetable or legume curry with basmati rice, whole spices, nuts and raisins. This particular dish is a nutritional powerhouse, thanks to the mustard greens and chickpeas. Look for the specialty spices—cardamom pods, saffron and garam masala—in the spice section of well-stocked supermarkets or online at penzeys.com.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/basmati_rice_curry_casserole_chana_aur_sarson_ka_saag_biryani.html#comments January/February 2008 Indian Moderate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber High potassium Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health Recipes - Individual Recipes Recipes & Menus - Antioxidants Recipes & Menus - Spices Fruit Nuts Tomatoes Vegetables Beans/Legumes Dinner
 Bake Saute Fall Spring Winter 6 Casserole Entertaining, casual Entertaining, formal One dish meals Potluck More than 1 hour Main dish, vegetarian Side dish, grain Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6959 at http://www.eatingwell.com Barley Risotto with Fennel http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/barley_risotto_with_fennel.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/barley_risotto_with_fennel.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MV6389.JPG" alt="Barley Risotto with Fennel Recipe" title="Barley Risotto with Fennel Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/barley_risotto_with_fennel.html" target="_blank">Barley Risotto with Fennel</a></div> <div>This convenient alternative to traditional stovetop risotto uses healthy, fiber-rich whole grains—either barley or brown rice—seasoned with Parmesan cheese, lemon zest and oil-cured olives. The gentle, uniform heat of a slow cooker allows you to cook a creamy risotto without the usual frequent stirring.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/barley_risotto_with_fennel.html#comments January/February 2008 American Moderate Diabetes appropriate Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health New Year's Eve Recipes & Menus - Whole Grains Alcohol Cheese Citrus Vegetables Whole Grains Vegetarian, other Dinner
 Slow cooker/Crockpot Fall Winter 6 Budget Entertaining, casual Make ahead instructions Vegetarian More than 1 hour Main dish, vegetarian Side dish, grain Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 6940 at http://www.eatingwell.com