March/April 2008 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/435/all en Container Gardening with Salad Greens http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/container_gardening_with_salad_greens <p>Greens love cool weather, so take advantage of the spring and fall seasons to grow them. Here are some tips to get you started on growing greens in a container garden:</p> <ol> <li><strong>A nitrogen-rich soil feeds and supports leafy green plants.</strong> Till compost or aged bagged manure into your soil with a garden fork before sowing seeds—both are good sources of nitrogen.</li> </ol><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Ellen Ecker Ogden </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Easy tips to start your own salad greens container garden. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="250" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/planter_greens_630.jpg?1251144509" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/salad_greens_container_garden_310.jpg?1267482756" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Fresh Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_salad_recipes">Healthy Salad Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_travel/inspiration_and_recipes_from_an_irish_garden">Inspiration and Recipes from an Irish Garden</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Gardening Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/grow_your_dinner_and_save_money_with_a_vegetable_garden">Grow Your Dinner and Save Money with a Vegetable Garden</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/your_kitchen_garden">Tips for Growing a Kitchen Garden</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/why_you_should_grow_your_own_herbs">Why You Should Grow Your Own Herbs</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/how_to_start_a_vegetable_garden">How To Start a Vegetable Garden </a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/ingredient_glossary/fresh_mint_the_one_herb_every_kitchen_needs">Fresh Mint: The one herb every kitchen needs</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/healthy_cooking_blog/9_great_greens_to_add_to_your_salad_bowl">9 great greens to add to your salad bowl</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/container_gardening_with_salad_greens#comments Ellen Ecker Ogden March/April 2008 Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Fri, 21 Aug 2009 17:36:45 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10259 at http://www.eatingwell.com Cultivating New Starts http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/local_heroes/cultivating_new_starts <p>“I know how it feels to be an immigrant and not have access to land,” says Maria Moreira, who moved to the U.S. from Portugal’s Azores Islands 40 years ago. “People should have land to grow their own food.” In the early ’80s, Moreira and her husband bought a dairy farm in Lancaster, Massachusetts, and started renting a small plot for $25 to a Hmong farmer from Laos. Each year, the woman renewed the lease, bringing more families eager to work. Now, the couple leases 26 acres to more than 60 immigrant farmers.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Victoria Abbott Riccardi </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2008 </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>“I know how it feels to be an immigrant and not have access to land,” says Maria Moreira, who moved to the U.S. from Portugal’s Azores Islands 40 years ago. “People should have land to grow their own food.” In the early ’80s, Moreira and her husband bought a dairy farm in Lancaster, Massachusetts, and started renting a small plot for $25 to a Hmong farmer from Laos. Each year, the woman renewed the lease, bringing more families eager to work. Now, the couple leases 26 acres to more than 60 immigrant farmers. The growers have become popular at farmers’ markets for selling produce, such as baby bok choy and pea tendrils, native to their homelands.</p> <p>Moreira’s willingness to “share” her land inspired the formation of the New Entry Sustainable Farming Project (NESFP). The 10-year-old program, based at Tufts University, helps Massachusetts immigrant farmers get started. Moreira now works with such growers full-time, as a marketing specialist for one of NESFP’s partners, the University of Massachusetts Extension Vegetable Team. “I am committed to making farming sustainable in Massachusetts,” says Moreira. “Food tastes better when it’s local, and it makes me happy to see these farmers use my land to do so well.” </p> <p><em>-By Victoria Abbott Riccardi</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/local_heroes/cultivating_new_starts#comments Victoria Abbott Riccardi March/April 2008 Food News & Origins - People & Perspectives Fri, 21 Aug 2009 15:03:38 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10203 at http://www.eatingwell.com Inheritance http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/inheritance <p>It was in my Grandma Clara’s farm kitchen, amid a cloud of flour and the heady fragrance of yeast, that I inherited my knowledge of bread making. I can’t use the word learned because that would be an inadequate description. From an early age, my education on what it took to make bread extended beyond our kitchen into the fields where oats and wheat grew, the barn where milk and butter came from, and the chicken coop where I collected brown eggs from disapproving hens who scolded me for my efforts.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sue Browning </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Learning to make fresh bread on the farm. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/fresh_bread_recipes.jpg?1266967433" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Oven-Fresh Bread Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/seeded_multigrain_boule.html">Seeded Multigrain Boule</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/anadama_bread.html">Anadama Bread</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/honey_oat_quick_bread.html">Honey Oat Quick Bread</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/kneadless_black_olive_herb_yeast_loaves.html">Kneadless Black Olive &amp; Herb Yeast Loaves</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/whole_wheat_irish_soda_bread.html">Whole-Wheat Irish Soda Bread</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/pear_hazelnut_quick_bread.html">Pear-Hazelnut Quick Bread</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>It was in my Grandma Clara’s farm kitchen, amid a cloud of flour and the heady fragrance of yeast, that I inherited my knowledge of bread making. I can’t use the word learned because that would be an inadequate description. From an early age, my education on what it took to make bread extended beyond our kitchen into the fields where oats and wheat grew, the barn where milk and butter came from, and the chicken coop where I collected brown eggs from disapproving hens who scolded me for my efforts.</p> <p>On bread day I helped my grandmother gather tools and ingredients on the kitchen counter. The counter ran beneath a window that faced west across land ruffled with fields of hay and corn. Beyond the windowsill, a line of oak trees my grandparents had planted early in their marriage followed a tractor road as it curved between the garden and the machine shed. The oaks stopped at the edge of the garden, but the dirt road went on until it was swallowed up by pasture. In spring, while I created white mountains on the counter with the flour sifter, we watched my grandfather plowing in the distance, the rich soil churning up behind him like black flour.</p> <p>We would begin by dissolving cake yeast in warm milk in a giant stoneware bowl. Slowly, I added flour one cup at a time. After we had a gummy mixture of flour and liquid, we added salt, melted butter, more warm milk and flour, until the sticky mass could no longer be managed with the wooden spoon. Now it was ready to be turned out on the floured counter.</p> <p>Little by little we kneaded in the geography of my flour hills, my grandmother’s strong arms and fingers pushing and rolling the dough in a practiced pattern. Soon the unruly blob transformed to a smooth well-mannered ball. During these times I learned flour had not always come easily dipped from the bin in the pantry. Instead, Grandma Clara earned it by cranking the arm of a hand-operated grain grinder into which was poured kernels of red winter wheat.</p> <p>“Spend a day grinding bushels of wheat into flour, then you know you’ve done something,” she would tell me.</p> <p>Turning our now chastened dough back into the bowl, she let me cover it with a clean dishtowel. Then my grandmother would suggest we lie down for a few minutes to “give the bread some quiet.” I was well acquainted with this naptime ruse and would volunteer to watch the bread so nothing bad happened. But my grandmother insisted.</p> <p>“Just close your eyes for a few minutes,” she said, holding me tight so I couldn’t wiggle away. I closed my eyes, certain each time I would sneak away as soon as she fell asleep. But the warmth of my grandmother’s shoulder, the creaking of the old house and the smell of sunshine on the quilt cast a sleepy spell over me. Later, I woke to the clatter of empty bread tins being lined up on the counter and my grandmother softly humming.</p> <p>Together we divided the dough and shaped it in the loaf pans. After its second rise, just before we slipped the pans into the mouth of the cast-iron oven, we each pressed a thumbprint into a corner of the loaves.</p> <p>“There now, we’ve left our sign,” she would say. When the hot fragrant bread came out of the oven, I carefully inspected the corners. There, in the lovely brown crust, I could see our faint marks. They were a trace, a small reminder of our presence, a sign that we had bequeathed a bit of ourselves to the bread and whoever might enjoy it.</p> <p><em>—Sue Browning, a freelance writer based in Arlington, Virginia, has been published in The Almanac for Farmers &amp; City Folk, Welcome Home Magazine and 515 Magazine.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/inheritance#comments Sue Browning March/April 2008 Food News & Origins - People & Perspectives Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:30:07 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10181 at http://www.eatingwell.com Tips for Growing a Kitchen Garden http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/your_kitchen_garden <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Your Kitchen Garden </div> </div> </div> <p>The Irish have always grasped the important connection between the garden and the kitchen and often have a nearby potager, or kitchen garden. Translated directly from the French, potager means literally a soup pot of vegetables, and dates back to the Middle Ages, when monks and nuns planted gardens behind wall-high hedges that served as retreats for meditation as well as a source of vegetables, culinary and medicinal herbs, aromatics and flowers.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Ellen Ecker Ogden </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Learn how to grow your own container garden and enjoy fresh herbs and edible flowers year round. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/potted_mint_310.jpg?1267482941" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Fresh Recipes to Try: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/warm_dandelion_greens_with_roasted_garlic_dressing.html">Warm Dandelion Greens with Roasted Garlic Dressing</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/fragrant_fish_soup.html">Fragrant Fish Soup</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/spring_chicken_blue_cheese_salad.html">Spring Chicken &amp; Blue Cheese Salad</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/garden_fresh_asparagus_soup.html">Garden-Fresh Asparagus Soup</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/spinach_soup_with_rosemary_croutons.html">Spinach Soup with Rosemary Croutons</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/smoked_trout_salad_with_herb_horseradish_dressing.html">Smoked Trout Salad with Herb &amp; Horseradish Dressing</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_salad_recipes">Healthy Salad Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Gardening Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/why_you_should_grow_your_own_herbs">Why You Should Grow Your Own Herbs</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/healthy_cooking_blog/add_flavorhold_the_fatwith_my_5_favorite_fresh_herbs">Add flavor—hold the fat—with my 5 favorite fresh herbs</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/ingredient_glossary/fresh_mint_the_one_herb_every_kitchen_needs">Fresh Mint: The one herb every kitchen needs</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/grow_your_dinner_and_save_money_with_a_vegetable_garden">Grow Your Dinner and Save Money with a Vegetable Garden</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/how_to_start_a_vegetable_garden">How To Start a Vegetable Garden </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/container_gardening_with_salad_greens">Container Gardening with Salad Greens</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_travel/inspiration_and_recipes_from_an_irish_garden">Inspiration and Recipes from an Irish Garden</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The Irish have always grasped the important connection between the garden and the kitchen and often have a nearby potager, or kitchen garden. Translated directly from the French, potager means literally a soup pot of vegetables, and dates back to the Middle Ages, when monks and nuns planted gardens behind wall-high hedges that served as retreats for meditation as well as a source of vegetables, culinary and medicinal herbs, aromatics and flowers.</p> <p>A potager can be as small as one square foot or a container. Start by making an inventory of foods you enjoy during the spring, summer and fall, focusing on crops that you can’t always buy fresh—fancy lettuce and mesclun mixes, for instance, are easy to sow and quick to grow. Fresh herbs pack lively flavors, often taking the place of salt in recipes, and edible flowers serve as pretty garnishes.</p> <p>Start with rich, organic soil. Supplement with organic compost, usually found at garden centers, to give plants a boost. Companion planting, such as edible marigolds planted near tomatoes to repel pests, builds on symbiotic combinations for a healthy partnership both in the garden and on the plate. Mail-order seed sources offer a wide selection, or go to local nurseries for heirloom tomatoes and ornamental edibles like rainbow chard and Tuscan kale. Ultimately, the kitchen garden will inspire you to celebrate fresh flavors. Think of yourself as a food artist, building color in the garden and on your plate.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/gardening/your_kitchen_garden#comments Ellen Ecker Ogden March/April 2008 Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:18:19 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10173 at http://www.eatingwell.com Calling All Dieters! http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/calling_all_dieters <p>Your cell phone keeps you in touch on-the-go. It could also help you lose weight. Subscribers to Nutrax (nutrax.com) use camera phones to photograph foods they eat and send the pictures to online food diaries (where they add descriptions of portions and ingredients). For those who pay $8 a week, dietitians review the photos and provide biweekly feedback online. myFoodPhone (myfoodphone.com) offers similar plans, starting at $9.99 per month. Sounds easy, but does it work?</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Michelle Edelbaum </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Your cell phone could help you lose weight. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4136cell_phone_blank225.jpg?1250700552" /> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Learn more: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_diet_recipes">Healthy Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/betcha_50_you_cant_lose_15_pounds">Betcha $50 you can&#039;t lose 15 pounds...</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_salad_recipes">Healthy Salad Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/secrets_to_staying_slim_past_40">Secrets to Staying Slim Past 40</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/videos/eat_more_lose_weight_video">Eat More, Lose Weight Video</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Your cell phone keeps you in touch on-the-go. It could also help you lose weight. Subscribers to Nutrax (nutrax.com) use camera phones to photograph foods they eat and send the pictures to online food diaries (where they add descriptions of portions and ingredients). For those who pay $8 a week, dietitians review the photos and provide biweekly feedback online. myFoodPhone (myfoodphone.com) offers similar plans, starting at $9.99 per month. Sounds easy, but does it work?</p> <p>Pros: Studies show that tracking what you eat can help you shed pounds. And a 2006 study in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that college students preferred to track their eating with a PDA camera phone than to record everything they ate and recap it in interviews with nutritionists.</p> <p>Cons: “These services aren’t much of an improvement over other forms of self-monitoring because subscribers are burdened to provide meal details,” says Jean Harvey-Berino, Ph.D, R.D., chair of the Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences at the University of Vermont and author of The EatingWell Diet. Plus, she says, feedback isn’t instant and it’s expensive to send picture messages on many phone plans.</p> <p>Bottom line: If you’re motivated to lose weight and already wed to your phone, cell-phone-based weight-loss programs may be a good call.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/calling_all_dieters#comments Michelle Edelbaum March/April 2008 Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Wed, 19 Aug 2009 16:50:07 +0000 Nifer 9792 at http://www.eatingwell.com Why You Should Start Your Meal with Soup or Salad http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/start_your_meal_with_soup_or_salad <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The EatingWell Diet: Tips for a New You </div> </div> </div> <p>Filling up on fiber- and water-rich foods first can help prevent you from overdoing high-calorie fare later. Research out of Penn State shows that eating a first-course salad can reduce overall calorie intake at a meal by up to 12 percent. And in a study in Appetite last November, people who started lunch with vegetable soup ended up eating 20 percent less than those who skipped the soup.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Fill up first on soups and salads—and eat fewer calories later. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4139salad225.jpg?1250698211" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Try these delicious power salads and healthy soup recipes: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/soups_and_salads_to_help_you_lose_weight">Soups and Salads to Help You Lose Weight</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/asian_tofu_salad.html">Asian Tofu Salad</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/broccoli_cannellini_bean_cheddar_soup.html">Broccoli, Cannellini Bean &amp; Cheddar Soup</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/creamy_chopped_cauliflower_salad.html">Creamy Chopped Cauliflower Salad</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/fattoush.html">Fattoush</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/garden_fresh_asparagus_soup.html">Garden-Fresh Asparagus Soup</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/ginger_melon_soup.html">Ginger-Melon Soup</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/roasted_tomato_soup.html_0">Roasted Tomato Soup</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/smoked_trout_salad_with_herb_horseradish_dressing.html">Smoked Trout Salad with Herb &amp; Horseradish Dressing</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/spinach_grapefruit_salad.html">Spinach &amp; Grapefruit Salad</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/spinach_soup_with_rosemary_croutons.html">Spinach Soup with Rosemary Croutons</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/the_wedge.html">The Wedge</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Filling up on fiber- and water-rich foods first can help prevent you from overdoing high-calorie fare later. Research out of Penn State shows that eating a first-course salad can reduce overall calorie intake at a meal by up to 12 percent. And in a study in Appetite last November, people who started lunch with vegetable soup ended up eating 20 percent less than those who skipped the soup.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/start_your_meal_with_soup_or_salad#comments EatingWell Editors March/April 2008 Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Wed, 19 Aug 2009 15:45:15 +0000 Nifer 9770 at http://www.eatingwell.com Earth-friendly Wines http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/wine_beer_spirits_guide/earth_friendly_wines <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Biodynamics: good stewardship yields great flavor </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Read More </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/wine_beer_spirits_guide/6_biodynamic_wines_to_try">6 Biodynamic Wines to Try</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In a ceremony on Sonoma Mountain in spring, the Benziger family buries a cow horn packed with a homeopathic paste of silica (a pale pink compound found in sand and quartz), vineyard soil and water. They unearth the cow horn in the fall, mix the silica from the horn with water, then mist the air at sunrise to enhance photosynthesis.</p> <p>This is just one ritual in the exacting art of biodynamic agriculture. Based on a series of lectures in 1924 by Austrian philosopher Rudolf Steiner, founder of the Waldorf schools, the practice of biodynamics views the vineyard (or farm) as a whole, with the soil, vines, plants, animals—and even the cosmos—all interconnected. Like organic farmers, biodynamic growers avoid artificial fertilizers and pesticides. But biodynamic agriculture goes further, requiring farmers to plant, prune and harvest according to celestial activity, taking advantage of the natural rhythms of the Earth and cosmos, with a final goal of healing their land.</p> <p>While anyone can practice this style of farming, winemakers cannot label their wines “biodynamic” unless they are certified by Demeter, the main association for biodynamic growers. “Biodynamic agriculture had significant recognition as early as 1928 in Europe, when the Demeter certification first appeared,” says Jim Fullmer, director of Demeter. The number of U.S. farms practicing biodynamics has tripled during the past 10 years, and now there are 34 vineyards in the U.S. that are Demeter-certified. “Wine has really been an ambassador for biodynamic agriculture,” he says. “It’s a wonderful fit because wine is a quality-oriented product and biodynamic is a quality-oriented approach to agriculture.”</p> <p>Biodynamic certification requires that farms be free of synthetic pesticides and fertilizers for at least three years and generate at least 80 percent of their fertilizer from the farm itself. So instead of bringing in organic fertilizers and other materials, vineyard waste, such as grape seeds and skins and landscape cuttings, is recycled back into the land through composting, which helps farmers maintain nutrient-rich soil. “This practice involves creating an ecosystem and it requires serious commitment on the part of the producer,” says Fullmer. “It isn’t something that can happen overnight.”</p> <p>“Prior to using this method of farming, we put down chemical fertilizers and fed grapes from the top—without consideration for the vineyard as a whole,” says Chris Benziger, one of the founders of Benziger Family Winery, which was nominated in 2005 for American Winery of the Year by Wine Enthusiast for its pioneering efforts in biodynamic farming. </p> <p>Indeed, before Benziger embraced biodynamics, it was aiming more toward production, not quality—and its wines reflected that. Mike Benziger, another founder and winemaker, began studying biodynamic agriculture in 1994, hoping it might offer a better way of operating the vineyard. “We were putting scars in the land that we weren’t healing, and our wines were far from interesting. With biodynamics, we feed grapes from the soil, so the roots are forced to grow down deep. The deeper the roots go, the more minerals they pick up, giving the wine a certain authenticity and sense of place.”</p> <p>Today 10,000 of the 150,000 cases of wine that Benziger produces annually are certified biodynamic, and they are working toward certification of other vineyards as well. They also provide ongoing natural farming seminars to all growers in their community. And “green” practices, such as water and energy conservation, also protect community resources. Though Benziger has been making wines on the Sonoma Mountain property for 27 years, Chris Benziger says, “It’s only in the last 7 or 8 years that we’ve been able to make wines with the taste of Sonoma Mountain—and it’s all because of biodynamics.”</p> <p><em>—Amy Paturel, M.S., M.P.H., is a freelance writer in Seal Beach, California.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/wine_beer_spirits_guide/earth_friendly_wines#comments Amy Paturel March/April 2008 Healthy Cooking - Wine, Beer & Spirits Guide Wed, 19 Aug 2009 15:00:25 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9759 at http://www.eatingwell.com 6 Remedies for Sleep Problems—Do They Work? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/mind_body_spirit/6_remedies_for_sleep_problems <p>Unrelenting insomnia has become a part of my life. Colleagues joke about my 3 a.m. e-mails; my husband groans at my late-night online shopping. (He knows I’ve had a bad stretch when packages pile up at the door.) There are weeks when I’d give just about anything for a good night’s sleep. I also know that I’m not alone.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Can anything we eat or drink help? Here’s what the science says. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/tea_hot_nd07_310.jpg?1263941682" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Also of Interest </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/mind_body_spirit/mood_boosting_foods">Mood Boosting Foods</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/health_benefits_of_tea">Health Benefits of Tea</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/health_perks_of_coffee">Health Perks of Drinking Coffee</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/try_this_drink_to_cure_a_headache_4_more_home_remedies_for_common">Try this drink to cure a headache &amp; 4 more home remedies for common ailments</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/a_natural_solution_for_hot_flashes">A Natural Solution for Hot Flashes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/mind_body_spirit_recipes">Healthy Recipes for Mind, Body &amp; Spirit</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/mind_body_spirit_center">Mind, Body &amp; Spirit Center</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Unrelenting insomnia has become a part of my life. Colleagues joke about my 3 a.m. e-mails; my husband groans at my late-night online shopping. (He knows I’ve had a bad stretch when packages pile up at the door.) There are weeks when I’d give just about anything for a good night’s sleep. I also know that I’m not alone.</p> <p>Fifty to 70 million Americans suffer from insomnia. It’s more common among women (I know the hot flashes keeping me awake are caused by declining estrogen and hopefully will pass as my hormones even out). It is also common among people who are obese or have high blood pressure, anxiety or depression. And more and more studies are linking weight gain with sleep loss. A new study in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine suggests that adults should sleep eight to nine hours per night to help maintain a healthy weight. One theory is that lack of sleep disrupts hormones, such as leptin and insulin, which regulate appetite and body weight. Another explanation is that sleep deprivation leaves us too tired for exercise. And since losing sleep can also make us moody, we may turn to food to cheer us up.</p> <p>I could take one of the many sleep medications touted on TV, but I’d rather not; their long-term use can lead to headaches and possible dependency. Instead, I’m channeling my late-night energy into researching the science behind some common advice.</p> <p><strong>Drink some warm milk before bedtime</strong><br /> Decades ago, scientists looked into this folk remedy and posited that tryptophan, an amino acid in milk (and turkey), might be responsible for its supposed sleep-inducing effects. Earlier research had shown that when tryptophan is released into the brain, it produces serotonin—a serenity-boosting neurotransmitter. But when milk (and other tryptophan-rich foods) were tested, they failed to affect sleep patterns. “Tryptophan-containing foods don’t produce the hypnotic effects pure tryptophan does, because other amino acids in those foods compete to get into the brain,” explains Art Spielman, M.D., an insomnia expert and professor of psychology at the City University of New York. Warm milk at bedtime may be comforting, but it won’t boost sleep-promoting serotonin. </p> <p><strong>Have a bedtime snack</strong><br /> A light bedtime snack can stave off hunger, a known sleep robber. But eating high-glycemic-index (GI) carbohydrates—hours earlier at dinner—might also help. (High-GI foods cause a greater rise in blood sugar and insulin than do lower-GI foods.) A recent paper in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that when healthy sleepers ate carbohydrate-rich suppers of veggies and tomato sauce over rice, they fell asleep significantly faster at bedtime if the meal included high-GI jasmine rice rather than lower-GI long-grain rice. While the authors aren’t sure how it happened, they speculated that the greater amounts of insulin triggered by the high-GI meals increased the ratio of tryptophan relative to other amino acids in the blood, allowing proportionately more to get into the brain. Save high-GI carbs for dinnertime, when their side effect—drowsiness—is a plus.</p> <p><strong>Drink herbal tea</strong><br /> Chamomile, lemon balm, hops and passionflower are all touted for their sleep-promoting properties. You’ll often find them in “sleep-formula” tea blends, but unfortunately their effectiveness hasn’t been proven in clinical studies, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. “I don’t doubt these teas work for some. A warm liquid before bed may produce sleepiness by generating body heat,” speculates Spielman. Beware: drinking liquids close to bedtime can mean nocturnal trips to the bathroom. A cup of “sleep-time” tea might be worth a try…if you have a strong bladder.</p> <p><strong>Take a ‘sleep supplement’</strong><br /> Shelves in supplement stores are stacked with sleep formulas. According to one NIH survey conducted in 2002, 1.6 million people tried complementary or alternative therapies like these, and over half of them reported their insomnia improved “a great deal.” However, those glowing anecdotes haven’t been backed up by rigorous scientific study; evaluations of most nutritional supplements haven’t shown any effects whatsoever. The one exception is valerian root, which seemed to help improve sleep with rare, and mild, side effects, such as stomach upset. But finding an effective formulation of valerian root is tricky, since the FDA doesn’t regulate herbal supplements. Don’t waste your money on sleep supplements; hold off on using valerian until standardized formulations become available.</p> <p><strong>Have a nightcap.</strong><br /> Though a glass of wine may help you fall asleep, excessive alcohol use can make you wake up in the night. One theory is that alcohol suppresses the REM (rapid eye movement) sleep state that’s critical to a good night’s sleep, says Spielman. “One of my insomnia patients became remarkably better when he reduced his alcohol intake from 20 to three drinks per week.” Drink moderately, if at all; avoid drinking within a few hours of bedtime.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/mind_body_spirit/6_remedies_for_sleep_problems#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. March/April 2008 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Mind, Body & Spirit Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Diet, Nutrition & Health - Sleep Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:52:53 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9599 at http://www.eatingwell.com New Waves of Grain http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/new_waves_of_grain <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bruce Weinstein &amp; Mark Scarbrough </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How the Lundberg family farm went organic and helped change the rice America eats. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Harvest was in full swing when I arrived last fall at the Lundbergs’ rice fields north of Sacramento. Everyone was preoccupied: quotas, yields, organic checks. They wanted to keep me busy, and out of the way.</p> <p>The 17,000-acre Lundberg Family Farms is one of the largest producers of organic rice in the country and an innovator in developing many of the new whole-grain varieties available across the U.S. today. It started back in 1937 with a 40-acre plot Albert and Frances Lundberg bought as they fled the Dust Bowl in Nebraska. In the late ’50s, the farm was passed to their sons—Eldon, Wendell, Homer and Harlan—who bought up more land in the valley.</p> <p>Today, this successful operation has passed to the third generation, overseen by Jessica Lundberg, the soft-spoken, pragmatic board chair and nursery manager, and her more untamed, Aristotle-spouting cousin, Grant, the CEO.</p> <p>“Would you like to see the fields from the air?” Jessica asked me. “We have an experienced pilot.”</p> <p>I should have asked, “How experienced?” as she was referring to her father, affable but laconic Wendell Lundberg, age 77, one of those four brothers.</p> <p>Wendell taxied the plane onto a potholed runway with threshing machines going full-tilt alongside us. As we banked into the throb of afternoon light, I saw what modern rice production does to the land. It wasn’t the traditional paddies, wetlands or idyllic bit of fairy-tale Asia that I had expected.</p> <p>Instead, the valley all around the Lundbergs’ fields was on fire. At harvest, the threshers strip the rice stalks of their seeds, leaving the stalks (the chaff) behind in the field. After harvest, most farmers burn a portion of the chaff. On this clear October day, it looked like the Tuesday after Armageddon, heavy clouds of gray smoke rising off the valley floor.</p> <p>But down the center of the valley in the midst of the burning landscape were clear green patches, amazingly free of smoke: the Lundbergs’ fields. I pointed to them. “No burning?” I asked into the roar of my headset.</p> <p>Wendell eyed me a moment. “Why waste mulch?” he asked back.</p> <p>Most farmers see the chaff as a source of disease. The easiest and cheapest way to get rid of it and help protect next year’s crop from disease: burning. In response to air-quality concerns, California passed a law in 1991 limiting the amount of chaff rice farmers can burn to no more than about 25 percent of their crop. That legislation has decreased air pollution from burning rice fields, but in a valley with as much rice production as the Sacramento, it’s still enough to create the heavy clouds I saw all around us.</p> <p>The Lundbergs take a different route, and see chaff as fertilizer for next year, an organic source of nutrients that also helps, by its decomposition, keep the top layer of soil from turning into cement in the California sun. So rather than burning, after harvest they turn that chaff right back into the soil and then plant cover crops for the winter.</p> <p>Wendell banked the Cessna again. “Had enough?” he asked.</p> <p>I nodded.</p> <p>After landing—no, I didn’t keep my eyes open—we pushed the plane into its hangar and I had a chance to ask Wendell about what had changed in the 50 years he and his brothers have farmed this land.</p> <p>“Organic,” he said, dusting off his hands.</p> <p>Back in the ’30s Dust Bowl, his parents, Albert and Frances Lundberg had been lured to California by unscrupulous salesmen who offered free tickets out west and promised Eden in a valley of poor clay. The soil was poor and, for the roots of trees and most vegetables, virtually impenetrable. After several false starts, they did as so many others were doing around them: they planted the only thing that would work—rice. Today, the valley weighs in at over 2 million tons of rice production a year. The Lundbergs account for roughly 2 percent of that, with 40,000 tons of rice a year.</p> <p>Originally the Lundbergs didn’t grow organically. That had to wait for the ’60s, until some progressive, hippie types from Chico came down and asked Wendell and his brothers if they’d be willing to grow something called “pesticide-free” rice. The brothers obliged and soon realized that these hippies were tie-dyed entrepreneurs: they were selling that stuff for a profit back in town.</p> <p>“My Dad thought, maybe these guys from up in Chico were onto something,” Jessica later told me, the business always first and foremost in her mind. </p> <p>But it wasn’t easy figuring out how to grow rice on a large scale without herbicides to control weeds. Weeds are a particular problem in rice farming not only because they can choke a crop but also because when left in the field, weed seeds can end up in the harvest along with rice seeds. And no one wants bitter weed seeds in their pot of rice.</p> <p>So eventually the Lundbergs developed a risky game of letting water control the weeds. Yes, rice flourishes in a wet environment. But it must also dry out to create healthy grains. That’s where the Lundbergs’ game lies. After planting, they flood the fields for about three weeks so the grass weeds die off. Problem is, the rice plants will die if submerged over 25 days. In other words, it’s a matter of timing—release the water too soon and the weeds won’t die; release it too late and the rice will die. And to complicate matters, they only get one harvest a year in the northern Sacramento Valley.</p> <p>Once they mastered the complicated rhythm of letting the water take care of the weeds there still was the issue of distribution networks: the Lundbergs, like all rice farmers, sold their crop to big cooperatives, which mixed it with all the other rice from the region. There was no point in growing organic if the rice was to be mixed with conventional rice. And so the brothers took the unthinkable step of cutting themselves off from the distribution networks and stepping out on their own.</p> <p>It worked beautifully. Years later, the Lundbergs have gone whole hog into organic farming. There are about 11,000 acres in organic production and another 6,000 that are “eco-farmed”: treated to a combination of organic and conventional methods. There are now solar panels in the fields near the storage facilities to produce energy. And the family has invested in wind energy, enough to offset their own electrical use on the farm.</p> <p>In addition, the Lundbergs started a program called Egg Aid to get elementary school children involved in helping rescue bird eggs. Rice fields are attractive natural nesting grounds for all sorts of aquatic birds, especially in the spring when the fields are green with cover crops. When it comes time to turn those cover crops into the soil, the Lundbergs take it upon themselves to rescue the birds’ eggs, delivering them to state hatcheries. No wonder they have received numerous awards including the first-ever “Greenie” from California State University, Chico, at last year’s “This Way to Sustainability” conference and were recognized by the Conservation Security Program which was developed by the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service to promote stewardship of the land.</p> <p>As we headed for the car, Wendell offered another answer, out of the blue. “Brown,” he said. “That’s changed too.”</p> <p>He meant brown rice, the whole-grain version of rice itself and almost unknown back in the ’50s when Wendell and his brothers were first planting. Brown rice has become the core of their business, so much so that the family has developed its own proprietary brands, including Wehani (named as a pseudo-acronym for the four brothers plus their father: Wendell, Eldon, Homer, Albert, Harlan), a red rice that’s nutty and a little crunchy. Today, Jessica Lundberg leads the efforts at the seed nursery where they work to develop new varieties that will stand up to organic production without depleting the soil and damaging their most important resource.</p> <p>The next day, I flew back to Connecticut to meet Bruce, my partner, full of inspiration. I was convinced that we could get more whole-grain rice into our diets. All rice grains have four basic components: the protective outer hull (which must be removed), the bran and the germ (both of which are removed to create white rice), and the creamy endosperm. With the bran and germ intact, high-fiber brown rice has good amounts of vitamins, minerals and beneficial phytochemicals. Plus it counts toward the three 1⁄2-cup servings of whole grains we’re supposed to eat each day according to the USDA.</p> <p>We got to work on some delicious new rice recipes, starting with meatloaf that blends Black Japonica and aromatic curry into the meat. Then we moved on to croquettes made with medium-grain brown rice complemented by creamy goat cheese. We were on a roll, rounding out our batch of recipes using earthy Wehani instead of white rice to update dirty rice, a New Orleans favorite. In the end we discovered there are tons of tasty ways to get whole-grain rice into our diet.</p> <p>We can only imagine that Wendell would be proud of our efforts. If he could work himself up to say it, of course.</p> <p><em>—Contributing editors Mark Scarbrough and Bruce Weinstein’s most recent book is The Ultimate Cook Book (William Morrow, 2007).<em></em></em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/new_waves_of_grain#comments Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough March/April 2008 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:57:32 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9484 at http://www.eatingwell.com Greener Pastures: When It Comes to Beef, Is Grass-Fed Better? http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/greener_pastures_when_it_comes_to_beef_is_grass_fed_better <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Greener Pastures </div> </div> </div> <p>Cresting a steep, rutted dirt road that runs through the hills of Huntington, Vermont, I’m greeted by the sight of vigorously churning wind turbines and a dozen black cows lazily grazing on the rolling pasture. In an effort to eat locally and more sustainably, I’ve driven the 25 miles from my home in Burlington to Maple Wind Farm to pick up an order of grass-fed beef, assured by the farmers that the cows had spent their entire lives consuming only their mother’s milk and grass.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Patsy Jamieson </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4026patsy_cows_225.jpg?1251483752" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="224" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4027cherry_burger.jpg?1251483756" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4028neapolitan_meatballs_225.jpg?1251483768" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4030grilled_steaks_balsamico_225.jpg?1251483772" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Beef Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/neapolitan_meatballs.html">Neapolitan Meatballs</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/cherry_burgers.html">Cherry Burgers</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chile_beer_braised_brisket.html">Chile &amp; Beer Braised Brisket</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/grilled_steaks_balsamico.html">Grilled Steaks Balsamico</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/skillet_roasted_strip_steaks_with_pebre_sauce_avocado.html">Skillet-Roasted Strip Steaks with Pebre Sauce &amp; Avocado</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_ground_beef_recipes">Healthy Ground Beef Recipes and Shopping Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_steak_recipes">Healthy Steak Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Learn more: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/green_choices_meat_poultry_buyer_s_guide">Green Choices: Meat &amp; Poultry Buyer’s Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_and_techniques/how_to_cook_grass_fed_beef">How to Cook Grass-Fed Beef</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/is_the_cost_of_grass_fed_vs_grain_fed_beef_worth_it">Is the Cost of Grass-Fed vs. Grain-Fed Beef Worth It?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/tips/clamor_for_cla">Clamor for CLA?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Cresting a steep, rutted dirt road that runs through the hills of Huntington, Vermont, I’m greeted by the sight of vigorously churning wind turbines and a dozen black cows lazily grazing on the rolling pasture. In an effort to eat locally and more sustainably, I’ve driven the 25 miles from my home in Burlington to Maple Wind Farm to pick up an order of grass-fed beef, assured by the farmers that the cows had spent their entire lives consuming only their mother’s milk and grass.</p> <p>Young and energetic, farmers Bruce Hennessey and Beth Whiting manage this diversified livestock and vegetable operation. A former teacher and mountain guide, Bruce got into farming serendipitously. In 1999 he and Beth bought this beautiful patch of the Green Mountains and an old dairy farm that had lain fallow for several years. It was an impulse purchase that changed their lives.</p> <p>After a discouraging attempt to clear the overgrown brush from the land, the couple started grazing 13 cows. That herd has grown to about 90 Angus-Devon-Hereford-cross cattle, which share the pastures with sheep, pigs, chickens and turkeys.</p> <p>Ironically, as a young man Bruce had been a vegetarian for seven years. He had elected to give up meat because of his concerns about the unsustainable land and energy resources cattle farming required and the negative health effects of fatty meat. “But the more I read about grass-fed beef and learned about the benefits—both environmental and health—of cattle raised on carefully managed pastures, I realized that this is something I could eat,” he explains. “Now we produce meat for recovering vegetarians.”</p> <p>The grazing land at Maple Wind Farm is divided into a number of large paddocks, each contained by an electric fence (partially powered by those wind turbines). During the grazing season, the cows are moved to fresh pastures every day, following an agricultural system called Management Intensive Grazing. The model for this practice are wild buffalo, which roam in close groupings and are pressured into moving on to fresh grazing land by predators. After a paddock has been used for grazing, it is allowed to recover for two to four weeks, thus restoring the grass and eliminating erosion through a cycle of fertilization (manure) and recovery. This rotational grazing protects the roots of the grass and boosts fertility of the soil.</p> <p>It takes commitment to choose grass-fed beef from a local farm over what you conveniently pick up in the supermarket meat case. Cuts of Maple Wind Farm beef are instead sold at local farmers’ markets, natural-foodsstores and restaurants. The beef is also sold in bulk and included in community supported agriculture shares. And it is expensive. A pound of ground beef costs more than twice as much as its conventional counterpart at my nearby supermarket. So, why would I go out of my way to pay more for local grass-fed beef?</p> <p>My primary concern is finding an alternative to conventional beef, which is finished (i.e., fattened) on grain, primarily corn, at off-site, specialized feedlots. Industrial feedlots deposit high concentrations of manure onto the land, polluting the air and nearby water sources. At many feedlots, cattle are given growth-promoting hormones to stimulate muscle development and antibiotics to prevent diseases caused by crowding and an unnatural diet of grain. Cattle that eat grass their entire lives are generally healthier and have no need for drugs.</p> <p>The typically lower fat and calorie content of grass-fed beef is another compelling reason to choose it. As a mother of two young children, Beth takes pleasure in the fact that the meat she feeds her kids is produced on her own farm and is as good for them as possible. “I know that the ground beef I use in my spaghetti sauce is just a much healthier product,” she says. “I know the value of the grass-fed diet and that my children are not exposed to antibiotics from grain-fed cattle.”</p> <p><strong>Healthier How?</strong></p> <p>Grass-fed beef advocates—like Ridge Shinn, founder of Hardwick Beef, a distributor of grass-fed beef produced by a small group of New England farms—will also tell you about grass-fed beef’s nutritional boons. Ridge points out that grass-fed beef is richer in beneficial fatty acids. While it does not compare with the omega-3 content of wild salmon, some research suggests that grass-fed beef has more omega-3s—according to some studies, significantly more—than conventional beef.</p> <p>Another type of “good” fat found in meat and dairy products from ruminant animals is conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Research on the benefits of CLA to humans is in the early stages, but a few animal studies have shown a relationship between CLA and an improved immune system, as well as a reduced risk of cancer and heart disease. CLA is present in all beef, but one 1999 study in the Journal of Dairy Science found that grass-fed beef had 500 percent more CLA than cows fed a conventional grain-based diet.</p> <p>Another type of “good” fat found in meat and dairy products from ruminant animals is conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Research on the benefits of CLA to humans is in the early stages, but a few animal studies have shown a relationship between CLA and an improved immune system, as well as a reduced risk of cancer and heart disease. CLA is present in all beef, but one 1999 study in the Journal of Dairy Science found that grass-fed beef had 500 percent more CLA than cows fed a conventional grain-based diet.</p> <p>Take note that the nutrition advantages of grass-fed beef diminish when grain is introduced to the diet. Ridge likens it to being “a little bit pregnant.” He says, “It is 100 percent grass-fed or it is not. Any time spent in a feedlot negates the added benefits of grass-fed.” Look for the label “100% grass-fed and finished” or ask the farmer or rancher who raised the animal how the beef was finished.</p> <p>As I write, there is yet another ground beef recall in the news. So it is reassuring to learn that grass-fed beef provides a “cleaner” alternative to its industrially produced counterpart. Levels of E. coli have been found to be significantly lower in grass-fed than in grain-finished beef. The grain-based feedlot diet creates an environment favorable to the growth of acid-resistant E. coli (the kind that makes you sick). In contrast, the E. coli found in cattle that have been fed grass or hay is acid-sensitive and therefore unlikely to survive the acidic environment of the human stomach. Ground meat is the most susceptible to bacterial contamination. That said, it’s still important to exercise all the same food-safety precautions with grass-fed beef as you would with conventional beef.</p> <p>But however significant the health advantages of grass-fed beef may turn out to be (currently, research on this topic is still too sparse to say), they are not an excuse to load up on red meat, which is a major source of saturated fat in Americans’ diets. For Kate Clancy, Ph.D., a food system consultant and author of “Greener Pastures: How grass-fed beef and milk contribute to healthy eating,” a report of the nonprofit environmental group Union of Concerned Scientists, the main reasons for choosing grass-fed beef are “the environmental benefits and the lack of antibiotics.”</p> <p>Presently, grass-fed beef comprises a tiny proportion of overall beef consumption in the U.S. But what if conventional production were to shift toward raising cattle entirely on pastures? Wouldn’t this lead to overgrazing, which could contribute to soil erosion and water-quality problems? Dr. Clancy acknowledges that badly managed grazing has created significant ecological damage, particularly in the arid West. However, she explains that “the key to sustainable beef production would be to use rotational grazing methods. Well-managed grazing actually improves the quality of the soil because the manure going into the soil acts as a fertilizer. The cattle don’t damage the soil, because they are rotated.” Rotational grazing can also play a role in fighting climate change. Healthy grass in well-managed pastures absorbs carbon and helps offset fossil-fuel emissions. Clancy also notes, “When cattle graze on pasture, rather than standing on a feedlot, significantly more methane can be absorbed into the soil.</p> <p><strong>A Matter of Taste</strong></p> <p>But what about taste? The feedlot system has succeeded in producing tender, succulent beef that consumers love. Grass-fed beef is definitely a different product. I found adapting ground beef recipes like my mother-in-law’s meatballs and my healthy hamburgers to grass-fed beef to be a pretty seamless transition. I also had success with beef stews and braises. Simmering a grass-fed brisket in a heady chile sauce resulted in tender, succulent meat that tasted great, especially shredded and mixed with pinto beans.</p> <p>As long as I took care not to overcook high-end grass-fed steaks like New York strip and tenderloin, the result was excellent. However, when I first attempted to cook some of the more economical steaks like flat-iron, London broil and round, the results were tough. My son commented that he needed to develop Paleolithic incisors to get through dinner. To adapt Grilled Steaks Balsamico to grass-fed beef, I used the slightly more expensive cut of sirloin and marinated it for at least 6 hours.</p> <p>Now that I have mastered the basics of grass-fed-beef cookery, I’ve decided the trip to Maple Wind Farm is worth it.</p> <p><em>—Contributing editor Patsy Jamieson is a cookbook author, recipe developer, food stylist and former food editor of EatingWell.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/greener_pastures_when_it_comes_to_beef_is_grass_fed_better#comments Patsy Jamieson March/April 2008 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:01:05 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9475 at http://www.eatingwell.com Food as Fuel http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/food_as_fuel <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Four promising bio-fuels from everyday foods. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Mention the topic of turning food into fuel (think: corn into ethanol, soybeans into biodiesel) and you’ll likely land in a heated debate. Yes, Americans burn through 388.6 million gallons of gasoline each day—but many say that biofuel production isn’t sustainable and it takes agricultural land away from growing food. So why not use leftovers? Meet four pioneers who are doing just that.</p> <p><strong>Whey into Ethanol</strong></p> <p> * How it works: Whey permeate, a by-product of cheesemaking, consists mostly of the sugar lactose, which is fermented into ethanol and blended with regular gasoline.<br /> * Who’s trying it: Joe Van Groll, owner of Grand Meadow Energy in Stratford, Wisconsin, and a few plants in Europe.<br /> * Comparative cost: 80¢-$1.00 to produce one gallon versus $1.50-$2.00 to produce ethanol from corn.<br /> * The numbers: Van Groll produces 26,000 gallons of ethanol per year now (from 260,000 gallons of cheese whey). That’s enough to power 52 Americans’ cars for a year.<br /> * Timeline: Ethanol made from whey is on the market now, and it is indistinguishable from other types of ethanol-based gasoline.</p> <p><strong>Eggshells into Hydrogen Fuel</strong></p> <p> * How it works: Eggshells release and absorb carbon dioxide repeatedly, in a reaction that produces hydrogen fuel, an emission-free source of power and heat.<br /> * Who’s trying it: Liang-Shih Fan, Ph.D., distinguished university professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at Ohio State.<br /> * Comparative Cost: The patented technology isn’t being developed commercially yet.<br /> * The numbers: The U.S. produces 450,000 tons of eggshells yearly, which could generate enough energy to sustain 168,000 American drivers for a year.<br /> * Timeline: “As soon as we have an investor,” Fan says.</p> <p><strong>Corncobs into Ethanol</strong></p> <p> * How it works: Cellulose, the main component of corncobs, is more difficult to break down and ferment than corn, but POET Energy is developing a process to do it efficiently.<br /> * Who’s trying it: POET, the world’s largest ethanol producer, is converting an existing biorefinery in Emmetsburg, Iowa.<br /> * Comparative Cost: POET is still in the research phase, assisted by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy.<br /> * The numbers: Using the cobs will produce 27 percent more ethanol per acre of corn. To produce the goal of 25 million gallons of ethanol from cobs (which would power 50,000 Americans’ cars for a year), POET would need to use the cobs from about 275,000 acres’ worth of corn.<br /> * Timeline: Operation of the converted biorefinery will begin in 2011.</p> <p><strong>Animal Fat into Synthetic Fuel</strong></p> <p> * How it works: Animal by-products (and vegetable oil) are converted into diesel fuels, including one product chemically equivalent to jet diesel.<br /> * Who’s trying it: Dynamic Fuels, a partnership between Tyson Foods, Inc. and Syntroleum Corporation.<br /> * Comparative Cost: The fuel has enhanced performance characteristics and is renewable, so will likely carry a premium.<br /> * The numbers: The first plant will produce 75 million gallons each year—enough to power a 757 jet on a round trip from New York to Los Angeles more than 10,000 times.<br /> * Timeline: A new plant near Baton Rouge will be operational in 2010, with plans for more plants in the works.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/food_as_fuel#comments March/April 2008 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Thu, 13 Aug 2009 13:48:05 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9474 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Wild Salmon Debate http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/the_wild_salmon_debate <p>About 10 years ago my friend Charles Johnson, the Vermont state naturalist, called me with a question about salmon. I was surprised and flattered to have Charles ask me about anything natural, for Charles holds an encyclopedic knowledge about the natural world and a deep but nonpedantic environmental ethic. Usually I call him. When I was writing a book about New England’s forests, I called Charles, and he made bog ecology, which is as complicated as calculus, seem as plain as pancakes.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> David Dobbs </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A fresh look at farmed vs. wild. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/best_salmon_to_buy_0.jpg?1416498757" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes To Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/easy_salmon_recipes">Easy Salmon Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/delicious_canned_wild_salmon_recipes">Delicious Canned Wild Salmon Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_grilled_salmon_recipes">Healthy Grilled Salmon Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Information </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/fish_and_shellfish_6_to_eat_6_to_avoid">Fish and Shellfish: 6 to Eat, 6 to Avoid</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/how_to_make_sustainable_seafood_choices_at_the_fish_market">How to Make Sustainable Seafood Choices at the Fish Market</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/green_choices_seafood_buyer_s_guide">Green Choices: Seafood Buyer’s Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/top_sources_of_omega_3s">Top Sources of Omega-3s</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/farm_raised_salmon_goes_vegetarian">Farm-Raised Salmon Goes Vegetarian</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/new_science_links_food_and_happiness">New Science Links Food and Happiness</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/do_you_need_an_omega_3_supplement">Do You Need An Omega-3 Supplement?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>About 10 years ago my friend Charles Johnson, the Vermont state naturalist, called me with a question about salmon. I was surprised and flattered to have Charles ask me about anything natural, for Charles holds an encyclopedic knowledge about the natural world and a deep but nonpedantic environmental ethic. Usually I call him. When I was writing a book about New England’s forests, I called Charles, and he made bog ecology, which is as complicated as calculus, seem as plain as pancakes. And when a woman I’d fallen in love with told me she had always wanted to see moose, I called Charles and asked him where to find moose. “Victory Bog,” he said. At Victory Bog my love and I found moose, and three years later we married. </p> <p>Now Charles was calling me. “Got a question,” he said. “We’ve got some people over for dinner”—from the background came a rowdy banter—“and we were having this discussion. We’re wondering is it OK to eat salmon?”</p> <p>This explained the call. As Charles knew, I am an avid salmon angler, and I had just written a book called The Great Gulf, about decimated ocean fisheries, and several articles about salmon. This made me a sort of salmon-expert-for-the-day. Charles, meanwhile, was as confused as most eco-conscious people are about the shifting fates and statuses of the world’s saltwater fish. </p> <p>“How do you mean ‘OK’?” I asked.</p> <p>“Well, you know—ecologically,” said Charles. “Are salmon fisheries sustainable?”</p> <p>“Depends,” I said. “What kind of salmon?” </p> <p>“Atlantic.”</p> <p>“I was afraid of that,” I said. “Atlantics are lovely fish. But any Atlantic salmon you buy in a store came from a farm.”</p> <p>“Oh,” said Charles. “Is farmed salmon not so good?”</p> <p>“Did you already eat this fish?” I asked.</p> <p>He laughed. “That bad, huh?” </p> <p>A little while later, when I had explained it all, he said, “I’m embarrassed that I didn’t know this.” </p> <p>I assured him—this was 10 years ago—that few people did. “Probably even most state naturalists don’t know this.”</p> <p>“Maybe,” he said. “I better go. Dessert’s ready. And I gotta hide a salmon carcass.</p> <p>“But do me a favor, will you?” he asked. “Don’t tell anybody about this.”</p> <p><strong>The “Is It Ok?” Algorithm</strong></p> <p>Now, 10 years later, many people, both foodies and greenies, still struggle to answer Charles Johnson’s question: Is it OK to eat farmed salmon? If the answer seems elusive, it’s partly because things change—ecosystems change, the fishing and aquaculture industries change (or not), and we learn more about how those industries affect fish populations, ecology and economies. But the answer is slippery mainly because it depends so heavily on what the meaning of the word “OK” is. OK is personal. The most satisfying answer comes from what you might call your own Is-That-Food-OK Algorithm—a weighting of variables that will be as simple or complex as the criteria you bring to it. </p> <p>For some, taste trumps all. Others give weight to price or health or local economic or environmental impact. There are plenty of good reasons to eat salmon: It tastes good. It’s easy, fast and aesthetically pleasing to prepare. It’s incredibly healthy; no common fish delivers more of the omega-3 fatty acids that help keep arteries clear and hearts strong. The past decade has shown that these fatty acids may also strengthen the immune system and eyesight, and even improve mental health. These pluses have helped inspire Americans to more than triple their consumption of fresh and frozen salmon in the last 15 years, from 50,000 metric tons in 1990 to 180,000 in 2004.# The only fish we eat more of are shrimp and canned tuna.</p> <p>But the main reason we’re eating more salmon is because a burgeoning worldwide salmon-farming industry has almost quadrupled the supply of salmon in the last two decades, making farmed salmon obtainable almost anywhere, anytime, for under $8 a pound. These farmed salmon make up about 80 percent of the huge increase in U.S. consumption since the late ’80s. The “Is Farmed Salmon OK?” question therefore relies at least partly on the impact of that expanding salmon aquaculture industry. </p> <p>How does one sort this out? We’re talking about food here, and values, so I won’t presume to tell you how to weigh things. But I do know that the variables in the salmon equation have changed since Charles Johnson phoned me a decade ago. In particular, we know a lot more now than we did then about salmon’s health benefits—and a lot more about how salmon farms affect the environment and wild fisheries. Time to recalibrate the algorithm.</p> <p><strong>Life Stories </strong></p> <p>The algorithm starts with the fish’s rhythm—the arc of its life. Imagine before you a salmon steak freshly plated: orange, warm, aromatic. You ordered wild tonight, so your fish is one of the five species of Pacific salmons, genus Oncorhynchus; it must be Pacific because the fishery for wild Atlantics (Salmo salar, a different genus altogether) is long kaput. (More on that shortly.) </p> <p>The Pacifics most commonly caught—chum, coho and sockeye, chinooks and pinks (the pinks mostly for canning)—occupy huge ranges. Chum and sockeye run up rivers and off coasts from California to Kyoto. Cohos run thick from British Columbia up through Alaska. And the magnificent chinook, three feet long and sandbag heavy—also known as king, tyee, blackmouth—swim sparse in San Francisco, profusely in the Columbia River and Puget Sound, and in Alaska run abundant, climbing as far as 2,000 miles up the Yukon to spawn. All Pacific salmon are anadramous, spending their youngest days in rivers and their youths and adult lives at sea. When it comes time to spawn, most Pacific Northwest salmon will do so only in their natal streams, making each watershed’s population distinct and vulnerable to extinction if a dam or other insult wipes them out. In the Pacific Northwest and western Canada, where dams have knocked down some populations, the fisheries are faring poorly. In Alaska, the wild-salmon fishery is one of the world’s best-managed and populations are robust. </p> <p>Let’s say you ordered an Alaskan king. Imagine, on an autumn day a few years go, this fish’s mother, three feet long, greenish with a red snout and almost brutally muscular, surging up the Yukon River. She swims for 60 days up the Yukon, then finds a gravelly spot, swishes out with her tail a shallow depression (called a redd), and with a splash and a thrash lays as many as ten thousand orange-red roe. Presently an attending male, perhaps several attending males, thrash and splash too, releasing skeins of milt over the roe. </p> <p>The eggs hatch three to five months later. The fry, louse-sized at first, stick close to the bottom of the river. Their mottled stripes make them all but invisible from above, so that you can look right at them (as I have many times) and not see them till you’ve spooked them. Leisurely, the fry gobble larvae and small crustacea on the bottom; sometimes they flash to the surface, cobra-quick, to grab a bug or an emerging nymph. Most are themselves gobbled.</p> <p>Yours is one of the few—1 in 500, 1 in 1,000—that makes it. He lives a year or two, grows large enough to move downstream. After a couple weeks he reaches a brackish estuary where he remains for a few days acclimating to saltwater. Then he enters the North Pacific. He eats with an open mind—other fish, mollusks, and lots and lots of krill and other planktonic crustacea that have feasted on red algae. This diet turns his flesh pink and rich in omega-3 fatty acids. When he is six or seven years old—as young as two in some species—he will need this fat to fuel his swim upriver to spawn. Once he enters the river he will not eat, and he may have to swim for days. Some fish swim only a dozen or a few score miles to spawn; others will swim hundreds. Alaska’s Copper River salmon, an exceptionally fatty and tasty fish, swims only 300 miles, but in doing so climbs 4,000 vertical feet. Your fish might swim 1,200 miles before it finds its spawning site, wiggles over its redd, and then dies. Or, it would have had it not been caught off the coast a few days ago, iced, boxed and shipped to the restaurant where it now greets you.</p> <p>But perhaps you ordered a farmed salmon—that is to say, an Atlantic species. Virtually all Atlantic salmon sold in North America come from farms. They could hardly do otherwise, for overfishing and the damming and pollution of rivers in Europe and North America have destroyed the once-great wild fishery for Salmo salar, native to the North Atlantic and all its shores. Wild Atlantic salmon are now on the Endangered Species List. Because they grow faster than most of the Pacific species and better tolerate the crowding of the net pens, farmed Atlantics account for about 85 percent of all farmed salmon worldwide. (Some farms raise Pacific chinooks because they sell for upward of $20 a pound.) </p> <p>The fish before you, then, represents the union of egg and sperm surgically extracted, quite possibly at different facilities, and shipped separately to its birthplace, which is likely a hatchery and fish farm in British Columbia or Washington, or possibly Scotland or Japan, or perhaps Chile or New Brunswick or New Zealand. </p> <p>No matter where it’s hatched and raised, this salmon is still an Atlantic salmon. Once fertilized, the egg is incubated and hatched. The fry spends a year or so in freshwater tanks gradually made salty. Then your fish, some 8 to 10 inches long, is vaccinated against an array of infectious diseases, which are a constant threat in the crowded net pen into which the fish is now placed. The pen—a bowl-shaped net, essentially, with its rim at sea level—is about 30 to 100 meters across. It holds tens of thousands of fish. Instead of roaming the seas and swimming hundreds of miles to spawn, these fish never travel more than a few yards. Here in its pen your salmon fattens up on fish pellets. The pellets contain fish meal, fish oil, perhaps grains, and invariably an additive to pinken the fish’s flesh—usually astaxanthin, a carotenoid derived from commercially grown red yeast or algae. Given bountiful food and little work, your fish grows apace. When it’s<br /> a couple of years old and a couple of feet long and weighs 8 or 10 pounds it is netted, killed and packaged, iced and shipped.</p> <p><strong>Weighing the Many Variables</strong></p> <p>From these life histories devolve all variables relevant to the “OK?” question. How much does the fish cost? How easily can I get it? How do farmed and wild fish differ in taste, chemical load and nutrition value? What is the fish’s relation to local, regional and global environments and economies? </p> <p>Over the last 20 years these questions have been asked in many different forums—papers in scholarly journals like Aquaculture and Fisheries Research; government reports; articles in Audubon, The Economist and EatingWell; at fish markets and dinner parties; in puzzled phone calls. Some of the answers change little. For instance, wild Atlantic salmon populations, despite millions spent on dam removal and habitat improvement, remain deeply in trouble. Every year only a few hundred return to the New England rivers that once had millions, and in Canada thousands swim where tens of millions once teemed. Pacific species are doing better, and in fact are increasing in some areas. They’re doing splendidly in Alaska, with record catches and population estimates.</p> <p>As for taste: flavor varies more in wild fish than in farmed, for wild Pacific fish differ more in their life histories and physiology and fat content than do Atlantics, which are genetically more alike and which all eat similar diets heavy on fish oil. Young Pacific chum, for instance, generally aren’t as fatty and tasty as Atlantics, while sockeye and chinooks with long or arduous spawning runs offer extraordinary flavor.</p> <p>The markets, meanwhile, remain steady. For nearly a decade, wild Pacific salmon, for instance, have cost about two to three times the $6 or $7 a pound that Atlantic costs. You can pay well north of $20 for wild Pacific, too, if you want your salmon overnighted from Alaska. </p> <p>Availability is similarly plain. While you can get Atlantics anywhere year-round, wild fish availability is more exacting. For starters, wild salmon are seasonal, with the huge majority of fresh fish available between May and October, when fishermen can capitalize on the predictable concentration of fish as they move toward the coast to spawn. A few online sites offer it later in the season, and many offer frozen throughout the winter months. But in general, eating a fresh wild salmon means eating it in summer or fall. </p> <p>In most big stores you can confirm the fish is wild—and where it’s from— from the country-of-origin labels (or COOL) now required for all fish. The label, either on the package or on hand for whole fish, will tell you its origin and whether the fish is farmed or wild. </p> <p>Small fish and specialty shops, however, aren’t required to carry COOL labels, so in those cases it’s caveat emptor. A depressing New York Times story in 2005 found that for six of the eight fish and specialty shops visited, salmon sold as wild were actually farmed, according to a lab that the Times paid to analyze the fish for tell-tale levels of the commercially grown carotenoids added to pinken the meat. Such substitution seems most likely during the off-season, when “wild” salmon, though rare on fishing boats, seems uncannily abundant in stores. Then, in particular, insist on a label or ask your local shop specifically where the “wild” fish came from and phone the supposed source to confirm. </p> <p>Though I’m chemophobic, I’m ready to declare the health concerns about farmed salmon too insignificant to fret about, or at least too close to fight about. Farmed salmon hold about 2 to 10 times the levels of PCBs, DDT, dioxins, pesticides, mercury and other suspected carcinogens that most wild salmon do, apparently because the rich meal they eat contains bits of oily fish in which these contaminants tend to concentrate. Yet the levels of those chemicals are still so low, as Harvard Medical School nutrition specialist George Blackburn, M.D., Ph.D., noted in a recent article in the Journal of the American Medical Association, “that it’s not going to cause harm.” Meanwhile, numerous studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids reduce heart attack risk; in one study, consuming 700 mg of omega-3 fatty acids a day (the equivalent of eating 10 ounces of salmon once a week) cut mortality in Italians with coronary artery disease by 20 percent.</p> <p>Keep in mind, the generally higher levels of mercury often found in farmed salmon should swing the scale toward wild fish if you’re pregnant, nursing, young or particularly brain-protective. That aside, however, the tremendous omega-3 benefits—reduced heart attack risk, better immunological, neurological and even psychological health—easily outweigh the tenuous risks. </p> <p><strong>The Bigger Picture</strong></p> <p>Farmed salmon’s environmental effects are less flattering. I wish it were otherwise. I love the idea of sustainable farm-raised fish. That’s why I cook a lot of catfish—it’s splendid just oiled and floured, better yet grilled with some Southwestern or Asian seasoning, and my pleasure is enhanced because I know it is raised in sustainable closed systems that emit little pollution.</p> <p>The news on salmon farms, however, gets worse by the year. The industry’s expansion since 1980 has put hundreds of salmon farms on cold-water coasts in Europe, Asia and North and South America, raising hundreds of millions of fish. About 85 percent of these are Atlantic salmon. A decade ago, we knew that Atlantics sometimes escaped from pens, but it was not clear how many escaped or whether they messed with wild salmon or wild-salmon habitat. Now we know that millions escape, that they disrupt feeding and spawning behavior of wild salmon in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, that they enter and even colonize streams, and that they directly compete with both native Atlantic and Pacific salmon. Though they don’t crossbreed with Pacifics, they can disrupt their spawning. Confirmed too are suspicions that farms spread disease and parasites to wild salmon stocks. All this adds to the tremendous pressure already on wild salmon stocks from habitat loss and overfishing.</p> <p>This, then is the part of the formula that has changed for the worse: the environmental variables associated with farmed salmon look far less attractive than they did a decade ago, even as the industry has almost tripled in size.</p> <p>An emphatic illustration of this emerged as I was writing this article. This one involved sea lice. Sea lice routinely parasitize wild adult salmon without killing them. But because the lice can’t live in fresh water, they die as the wild fish move upstream to spawn, leaving juvenile salmon unmolested during their early growth periods in the stream. Even after they enter the sea, young salmon usually run into sea lice only occasionally, at exposures they can handle. </p> <p>But sea lice infest salmon farms heavily, thriving in the crowded conditions. We knew this 20 years ago, but were told they wouldn’t spread to wild populations. By 10 years ago research had proven that the lice did spread to wild populations, and by five years ago we knew that high concentrations of lice from fish farms were killing some wild fish.</p> <p>But did they kill enough salmon to harm whole populations? The industry said “No.” But a paper in the journal Science published last December demonstrated convincingly that sea lice from salmon farms in British Columbia’s Broughton archipelago, a collection of islands and channels between North Vancouver Island and the mainland, are exterminating entire native runs of pink salmon.</p> <p>The salmon industry at Broughton mirrors the industry’s worldwide development. Broughton got its first farms in the late 1980s, and by 2005 it had over 20 farms holding millions of Atlantics. These farms were releasing tens of millions of sea lice. Over the past five years these sea lice, floating in great density in the channels in which the salmon farms float, have forced virtually every pink salmon leaving the Broughton archipelago to swim through an infested gauntlet to try to reach the ocean. The wild pink fingerlings, their skin still unscaled, pick up two, three, a half-dozen lice apiece—tolerable to adults, perhaps, but not to these finger-sized smolts. “They are not equipped to survive this,” says Alexandra Morton, director of the Salmon Coast Field Station and a co-author of the paper, “and they don’t.” This infestation is wiping out the wild pink salmon runs whose rivers flow from the mainland into the Broughton archipelago. Analysis of returns and comparisons to nearby rivers without farms show the lice are killing 80 percent of the pinks that run the sea-lice gauntlet. At that rate, and with the pinks’ two-year-long life cycle, the several river populations of pink salmon that must run the Broughton gauntlet could be 99 percent extinct by 2011. </p> <p>Maybe this is not so bad. This is only one river basin, and the salmon are pinks, which, being low-fat and lacking that salmony taste, mostly get smoked, salted or canned. And the pink-salmon populations in other rivers will be unaffected, at least as long as no one builds salmon farms in their river mouths. Yet the either-or nature of this disaster deeply disturbs me. It could hardly be more clear: we must either close those farms or kiss those runs of wild salmon goodbye.</p> <p>I’m increasingly convinced that the larger issue of farmed versus wild salmon poses a similar choice. The withering array of injuries that salmon farms inflict on wild salmon forces a sort of long-range consumer decision. This is not like deciding whether you want free-range versus conventional chicken for tonight’s dinner; that’s a decision with limited echo. To decide that you may as well eat farmed Atlantic tonight, however, is to decide, in a very real sense, that you may as well eat farmed salmon, and farmed salmon only, forever. You may feel differently. But that just doesn’t sit well with me. For now, anyway, I’ve eaten my last farmed salmon. </p> <p>The promising part—there is hope here—is that forsaking farmed salmon for wild might actually press the salmon aquaculture industry to change. The technology exists now to raise farmed salmon in floating, solid-sided tanks—a container more floating aquarium than net—that avoid almost all the drawbacks of net pens. The fish can’t escape; pests can’t enter or escape; water can be filtered and cleaned of waste. </p> <p>This low-impact solution would realize aquaculture’s true potential, just as good catfish operations do. Companies in British Columbia, Iceland and Norway are testing prototypes. The catch is that even if they work, they’ll be costly, producing fish pricier than other farmed fish (though possibly cheaper than wild), and it’s not clear whether consumers will pay the premium. Yet investors might find the necessary courage if enough consumers stop buying conventionally farmed salmon. </p> <p>The consumers, of course: that would be you and me. Holding out for lower-impact farmed salmon—and eating only wild salmon in the meantime—is a sacrifice of sorts. It means eating fresh salmon seasonally and paying more for it when you do. It means eating fish that, because they come from various places and live varying lives, will be less consistent in flavor than farmed salmon are; sometimes they’ll taste better, sometimes not. But in the realm of things, that set of trade-offs sounds pretty good to me. I’d even say it sounds OK. </p> <p>David Dobbs writes on science, culture and the environment for The New York Times Magazine, Audubon and other publications.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/the_wild_salmon_debate#comments David Dobbs March/April 2008 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Wed, 12 Aug 2009 23:39:31 +0000 Paula Joslin 9471 at http://www.eatingwell.com Inspiration and Recipes from an Irish Garden http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_travel/inspiration_and_recipes_from_an_irish_garden <p>For Allen, the “garden” can mean her family’s 400-acre estate, hotel, “cookery school” (as the Irish call it) and rolling green farmland outside of Cork. It can mean the formal rectangles of gardens hidden behind ancient hedges, some 20 feet high, where globe artichokes, fennel, rosemary and lettuces are arranged as neatly and beautifully as tulips and daffodils. It can mean the greenhouses lined with fragrant sweet peas and delicate baby arugula or the pots full of lavender, basil, rosemary and other herbs that grow near stucco walls covered in climbing roses.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Lisa Gosselin </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> At Ballymaloe, the Allen family inspires new generations to make soups, salads and more from what grows out back. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4077ireland_collage.jpg?1251410731" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4082ireland_farmland.jpg?1251410736" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4084spinachsoup.jpg?1251410756" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/ballymaloe_ireland_310.jpg?1267486097" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Irish-Inspired Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/warm_dandelion_greens_with_roasted_garlic_dressing.html">Warm Dandelion Greens with Roasted Garlic Dressing</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/fragrant_fish_soup.html">Fragrant Fish Soup</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/spring_chicken_blue_cheese_salad.html">Spring Chicken &amp; Blue Cheese Salad</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/garden_fresh_asparagus_soup.html">Garden-Fresh Asparagus Soup</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/spinach_soup_with_rosemary_croutons.html">Spinach Soup with Rosemary Croutons</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/smoked_trout_salad_with_herb_horseradish_dressing.html">Smoked Trout Salad with Herb &amp; Horseradish Dressing</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_travel/visiting_ballymaloe">Visiting Ballymaloe</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>For Allen, the “garden” can mean her family’s 400-acre estate, hotel, “cookery school” (as the Irish call it) and rolling green farmland outside of Cork. It can mean the formal rectangles of gardens hidden behind ancient hedges, some 20 feet high, where globe artichokes, fennel, rosemary and lettuces are arranged as neatly and beautifully as tulips and daffodils. It can mean the greenhouses lined with fragrant sweet peas and delicate baby arugula or the pots full of lavender, basil, rosemary and other herbs that grow near stucco walls covered in climbing roses. But in this case, Darina Allen means a small two-foot-by-ten-foot plot of earth where students are digging. It’s where the cooking lessons at Ballymaloe’s 12-week program start.</p> <p>“If you teach people to grow their own food, they appreciate it more,” Allen explains matter-of-factly as she tucks a lock of blond hair behind one ear and peers at some speckled eggs in the incubator she uses to teach students to raise chickens. “They start to understand the value of eating seasonally, eating locally and organically. I try to explain that if you pick food at the right time, it should taste perfect—it shouldn’t need a lot of other flavors.”</p> <p>It is spring in Ireland and for lunch the 35 or so students are preparing soups and salads with not just what’s in the garden but what some might call weeds: nettles and dandelions. There’s also a roast duck (the subject of today’s cooking demonstration), an asparagus soup with lemon zest and lovely gooseberry and rhubarb tarts. Blue-checked tablecloths cover the outdoor tables where family-style meals are served on large platters and in big bowls. Not a speck of food is wasted—in an afternoon cooking demonstration, leftover gravy from the duck becomes the base of soup. All other scraps are composted or fed to the livestock.</p> <p>The food that is coming from Ballymaloe might seem a long way from the corned beef and boiled cabbage we traditionally associate with Irish cooking, but thanks to the Allens, and a rocketing economy, the Emerald Isle’s new cuisine has prompted the creation of a number of world-class restaurants and hotels. “Our country had to live without ample food for so long, we learned to appreciate it and where it comes from all the more,” explains Darina Allen, referring to the potato famine that decimated Ireland’s population in the mid-19th century. </p> <p>It hasn’t been this way for long. In 1948, when Myrtle Allen and her husband, Ivan, a Quaker fruit farmer, bought Ballymaloe at an auction, the country was still largely on a meat-and-potatoes diet. “It was hard to find really good fresh food in markets,” Myrtle explains, “and my husband was a farmer and gourmet so we began growing our food and preparing it ourselves or buying directly from other farmers.” To help pay the bills, the Allens began serving dinner to guests, then putting them up overnight, and the hotel was born.</p> <p>Myrtle Allen managed to grow the farm and her family of six children at the same time. One son, Tim, a farmer, married one of the chefs, Darina. Together, along with Darina’s brother Rory O’Connell, they run the 25-year-old cooking school. Another Allen son, also named Rory, manages the estate and plays traditional Irish music in the elegant sitting room in the evening. Granddaughter Lydia brings pickled vegetables and marmalades to the local farmers’ market the family helped to start in 1996. Grandson Cullen launched Cully and Sully, one of Great Britain’s leading manufacturers of prepared, locally sourced meals. Another grandson, Darren, is making boilers that use woodchips as an alternative fuel source. Perhaps the best-known member of the family is Darina’s daughter-in-law Rachel Allen, the Martha Stewart of Ireland with her own TV show, line of cookbooks and cookware. </p> <p>It seems none of the Allens stray far from the two places that have made them: the garden or the kitchen. One morning I come across Tim, hands dirty, hair disheveled, pulling garlic from the earth. Myrtle is there, along with the chef from Ballymaloe, and a discussion ensues about what to put on the menu that evening. “We grow organically, of course,” explains Tim, gesturing toward the rows of produce. “And because we don’t have the transport issues, we can pick everything at its absolute ripest—that’s how we determine what’s on the menu each night, by what is picked that day.”</p> <p>That evening at the five-course dinner in Ballymaloe’s formal dining room, the light filters through the tall windows. A field of rapeseed (to be used for biofuel, Rory Allen explained) is rustling outside. Course after course arrives: a thyme-infused onion soup, pan-fried scallops with Jerusalem artichokes and beurre blanc, guinea fowl with fresh herb stuffing, and a decadent raw-milk crème brûlée with shards of caramel. Darina and Tim mop their plates; Myrtle, now in her eighties and still ever-vigilant, comes by to find out how the meal is. “Tomorrow,” she adds to Tim, “we must do something with all of that arugula we have—it is the season.” At Ballymaloe, it is always the season for something.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_travel/inspiration_and_recipes_from_an_irish_garden#comments Lisa Gosselin March/April 2008 Food News & Origins - Food & Travel Wed, 12 Aug 2009 21:38:42 +0000 Paula Joslin 9459 at http://www.eatingwell.com Beans, Beans, Good for Your Heart? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/beans_beans_good_for_your_heart <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Recent studies show that adding a small serving of beans can make a difference. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The bean song we loved to sing as kids may be silly but it’s true. Eating beans regularly is good for your heart, and you don’t need to eat a hill of them to benefit. A study published last November in the Journal of Nutrition suggests having just 1⁄2 cup of cooked pinto beans daily might lower cholesterol. </p> <p>Researchers from the Brainerd Veterans Administration Clinic in Brainerd, Minnesota, and the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) in Grand Forks, North Dakota, recruited 40 adults with a cluster of conditions—including low HDL cholesterol, a high waist-to-hip ratio and high triglycerides, blood pressure and blood sugar levels—all symptoms associated with increased risk for heart disease. They randomly assigned them, and a similar group of 40 healthy adults, to include either 1⁄2 cup of pinto beans (served up in soup or bean salad) or a small bowl of chicken noodle soup in their daily diets. After 12 weeks, the bean eaters in both groups showed improved cholesterol levels: for the healthy controls, total cholesterol dropped by 8 percent and for those with several risk factors for heart disease it dropped by 4 percent.</p> <p>This supports other research that demonstrates that beans of various types have heart-healthy benefits. A 19-year analysis of the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the nation’s premier health census, found that people who ate beans four or more times a week were 22 percent less likely to develop heart disease than those who ate them less than once weekly. Soluble fiber is a key reason why, says Philip Ades, M.D., author of the new EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (The Countryman Press, 2008). “Like all foods that contain a lot of soluble fiber, beans help bind cholesterol and keep it from being absorbed in the gut,” he explains. And, as the fiber is fermented, it produces changes in short-chain fatty acids that can inhibit cholesterol formation. (By-products of this same fermentation process are what cause the gas so often associated with eating beans.)</p> <p>But unlike previous research, this most recent study didn’t find significant differences in fermentation patterns, which led its co-author Philip Reeves, Ph.D., an ARS research chemist, to speculate that other components in beans also may be responsible for the cholesterol-lowering effect. He points out that beans contain a variety of heart-protective chemicals, including flavanoids, compounds also found in wine, berries and chocolate that inhibit the adhesion of platelets in the blood, which can help lower risk for heart attack and strokes.</p> <p>Though Americans notoriously shun beans, getting only about 61⁄2 pounds a year, on average, Reeves is hopeful that studies like his will encourage more of us to dig in regularly. Don’t let the flatulence factor be a turnoff, since the more you eat, the more your GI tract will adapt.</p> <p>Bottom line: Getting 1⁄2 cup of beans a day is heart-healthy—and easy. Add rinsed canned beans to soups, stews and salads and make entrees like chili, bean enchiladas or pasta e fagiole part of your weekly repertoire.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/beans_beans_good_for_your_heart#comments Joyce Hendley March/April 2008 Heart Healthy Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Heart Health Wed, 12 Aug 2009 14:51:20 +0000 Penelope Wall 9419 at http://www.eatingwell.com Can Vitamin C Save Your Skin? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/can_vitamin_c_save_your_skin <p>Searching for a way to look young for your age? Hit the produce aisle, suggests new research in the <em>American Journal of Clinical Nutrition</em>. Analyzing data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I (NHANES I)—a survey that asks people to quantify how often they eat various foods—researchers from Unilever linked consuming plenty of <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrient_library/vitamin_c">vitamin C-rich foods</a> (such as oranges, tomatoes and strawberries) with youthful skin.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Eating more vitamin-C rich foods may be a secret to smoother skin. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/strawberry_cover_mj09_310_0.jpg?1271703718" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/orange_half_310_0.jpg?1257779474" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/tomatoes_310.jpg?1248992030" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrient_library/vitamin_c_rich_recipes">Vitamin C-Rich Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_tomato_recipes">Healthy Tomato Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_aging_recipes">Healthy Aging Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Tips for a Healthy Body </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/can_salmon_save_your_skin">Can Salmon Save Your Skin?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/7_foods_to_keep_young">7 Foods to Keep You Young</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_total_body_benefits_of_berries">The Total-Body Benefits of Berries</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/eat_for_a_sharper_mind_5_brain_boosting_foods">Eat for a Sharper Mind: 5 Brain-Boosting Foods</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/5_foods_you_should_be_eating_for_your_best_body_inside_and_out">5 foods you should be eating for your best body—inside and out</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/eat_for_your_eyes_5_foods_to_help_you_see_more_clearly">Eat for your eyes: 5 foods to help you see more clearly</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Searching for a way to look young for your age? Hit the produce aisle, suggests new research in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Analyzing data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I (NHANES I)—a survey that asks people to quantify how often they eat various foods—researchers from Unilever linked consuming plenty of vitamin C-rich foods (such as oranges, tomatoes and strawberries) with youthful skin. “Our findings suggest that a higher intake of vitamin C from foods is associated with a lower risk of having wrinkled skin and age-related skin dryness in [middle-aged] women,” says Maeve Cosgrove, Ph.D., who led the research.</p> <p>Vitamin C’s youthful effects on skin may be due to its antioxidant properties, which help protect against ultraviolet rays, and its role in keeping skin firm via collagen synthesis, say the researchers.</p> <p><strong>Bottom line:</strong> Eating more vitamin-C rich foods, such as oranges, tomatoes, strawberries and broccoli, may be a secret to smoother skin.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/can_vitamin_c_save_your_skin#comments Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. March/April 2008 Healthy Aging Diet, Nutrition & Health - Healthy Aging Thu, 30 Jul 2009 22:14:40 +0000 Penelope Wall 8774 at http://www.eatingwell.com