May/June 2008 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/434/all en Burgers to Flip Over http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/burgers_to_flip_over <p>30 years of sausage making has left Bruce Aidells, author of 11 cookbooks, including The Complete Meat Cookbook, and a contributing editor here, with a solid understanding of how flavors work together. Bruce gave Associate Editor Carolyn Malcoun the lowdown on how to make the best possible burger. And we’re sharing his secrets with you.</p> <p>CM: What do you think the secrets are to a tasty burger?</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Carolyn Malcoun </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Top tips from meat expert and cookbook author Bruce Aidells. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/spanish_pork_burgers_0.jpg?1251911887" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> May/June 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 6 New Burgers from Bruce Aidells </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/spanish_pork_burgers.html">Spanish Pork Burgers</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/hanoi_style_tuna_patty_salad.html">Hanoi-Style Tuna Patty Salad</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/fajita_burgers.html">&quot;Fajita&quot; Burgers</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/turkish_lamb_pita_burgers.html">Turkish Lamb Pita Burgers</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/mozzarella_stuffed_turkey_burgers.html">Mozzarella-Stuffed Turkey Burgers</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/smoky_buffalo_burger.html">Smoky Buffalo Burger</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_burger_recipes">Healthy Burger Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Grilling Recipes, Tips and Guides </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_grilling_recipes">Healthy Grilling Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/healthy_burger_recipes">Healthy Burger Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/burgers_to_flip_over#comments Carolyn Malcoun May/June 2008 Healthy Cooking - Quick & Healthy Cooking Wed, 02 Sep 2009 17:17:20 +0000 Penelope Wall 14908 at http://www.eatingwell.com Pulling for Pollinators http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/local_heroes/pulling_for_pollinators <p>Last year, when David Yudkin, co-owner of HOTLIPS Pizza restaurants in Portland, Oregon, heard the buzz about the honeybee die-off caused by mysterious Colony Collapse Disorder (researchers still don’t understand its cause), he wanted to help. Yudkin was well aware that pollinators like bees, bats and butterflies contribute to every third mouthful of food we consume. After all, pizza toppings like onions wouldn’t exist without them. And when Yudkin contacted the Xerces Society, an insect conservation group based in Portland, he learned that most efforts were aimed at farmers.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rebecca Ragain </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How one Oregon businessman is working to create innovative bee habitats. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="224" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4423bee_block1.jpg?1251485441" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> May/June 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Honey Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/almond_power_bar.html">Almond-Honey Power Bar</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/honey_crunch_ice_cream.html">Honey-Crunch Ice Cream</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/honey_soy_salmon.html">Honey-Soy Broiled Salmon</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/honey_mustard_chicken.html">Honey-Mustard Chicken</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/honey_oat_quick_bread.html">Honey Oat Quick Bread</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/slow_cooker_honey_orange_chicken_drumsticks.html">Slow-Cooker Honey-Orange Chicken Drumsticks</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipes_slideshows/healthy_recipes_with_honey">Healthy Recipes with Honey</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Last year, when David Yudkin, co-owner of HOTLIPS Pizza restaurants in Portland, Oregon, heard the buzz about the honeybee die-off caused by mysterious Colony Collapse Disorder (researchers still don’t understand its cause), he wanted to help. Yudkin was well aware that pollinators like bees, bats and butterflies contribute to every third mouthful of food we consume. After all, pizza toppings like onions wouldn’t exist without them. And when Yudkin contacted the Xerces Society, an insect conservation group based in Portland, he learned that most efforts were aimed at farmers. Yudkin was already sourcing his ingredients from growers who avoided pesticides and enhanced insect habitats. But he thought he could do more to educate customers about the pollinator problem—and urge them to get involved.</p> <p>Knowing that bees often lack appropriate shelters for nesting, Yudkin had the idea of distributing HOTLIPS’s waste cardboard—rolled into tubes—to customers who could install the structures in their gardens as potential nesting spots. As it turned out, the bees weren’t interested in taking up residence in pizza boxes. But Yudkin isn’t giving up. His latest plan is to pass out prefabricated bee nesting blocks—wood structures drilled with holes where the insects can lay their eggs.</p> <p>Yudkin also plans to host seminars where pollinator-friendly producers and representatives from the Xerces Society give tips on making green spaces more hospitable to pollinators. Yudkin and his wife and business partner Jeana Edelman like that they’re able to spread helpful knowledge through their community. “We joke about being pollinators ourselves, about connecting initiatives that are already going on and making them more fruitful,” says Yudkin.</p> <p><strong>Bee Helpful</strong></p> <p>We wouldn’t enjoy blueberries, chocolate, melons (or honey!) without polli­nators like bees and butterflies. Celebrate ­National Pollinator Week, June 22 to 28, by nourishing pollinator habitats: plant colorful flowers that will bloom throughout the season. For other tips, visit pollinator.org.<br /> <em>By Rebecca Ragain</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/local_heroes/pulling_for_pollinators#comments Rebecca Ragain May/June 2008 Food News & Origins - People & Perspectives Fri, 21 Aug 2009 15:15:39 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10209 at http://www.eatingwell.com Is Your Health Food Really Healthy? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/is_your_health_food_really_healthy <p>My friend’s husband, Henry, recently bought a huge box of Yogos, confident that these “yogurty-covered, fruit-flavored bits” were a healthy choice for his kids.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 6 healthy-sounding foods that really aren’t. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4287orderoutsalad.jpg?1250702309" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> May/June 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_diet_recipes">Healthy Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_low_calorie_recipes_menus">Quick and Healthy Low-Calorie Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/eatingwell_taste_test_healthy_snack_bars">EatingWell Taste Test: Healthy Snack Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_salad_recipes">Healthy Salad Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_smoothie_recipes">Quick and Healthy Smoothie Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Alternatives </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/low_fat_granola_bars.html">Low-Fat Granola Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/new_generation_granola.html">New Generation Granola</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/apple_oat_granola.html">Apple &amp; Oat Granola</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/fennel_lemon_green_bean_salad.html">Fennel &amp; Lemon Green Bean Salad</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/snap_pea_salad_with_radish_lime.html">Snap Pea Salad with Radish &amp; Lime</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/peanut_energy_bars.html">Peanut Energy Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/fruit_salad_with_lime_yogurt.html">Fruit Salad with Lime Yogurt</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/breakfast_parfait.html">Breakfast Parfait</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/brown_rice_tofu_maki.html">Brown Rice &amp; Tofu Maki</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>My friend’s husband, Henry, recently bought a huge box of Yogos, confident that these “yogurty-covered, fruit-flavored bits” were a healthy choice for his kids.</p> <p>“Not exactly,” his wife, a nutritionist, said when he presented her with the box. Sure, Yogos are fortified with 100 percent of the daily recommended amount of vitamin C and some calcium. But the ingredient list begins with sugar and partially hydrogenated oils, and a small pouch (just shy of an ounce) of the pea-sized candies supplies 90 calories, two-thirds of which come from sugars. In fact, Yogos contain very little yogurt or fruit. How did this smart man get fooled into thinking this was health food?</p> <p>No doubt Henry was deceived by what Brian Wansink, Ph.D., executive director of the USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion and an EatingWell Advisory Board member, calls the “health halo” effect. Words like “yogurt” and “fruit” positively glow with such halos, since we consider these foods healthy in their natural state.</p> <p>In his “McSubway” studies, reported last October in the Journal of Consumer Research, Wansink showed how we let our general impressions of foods mislead us. He asked people who had finished eating at McDonald’s or Subway to estimate the calories in their meals, then compared their guesses to the actual counts. Participants estimated that a Subway meal contained 21 percent fewer calories than a McDonald’s meal with the same calories. Wansink concluded that Subway’s “healthier than fast food” image was biasing customers’ calorie estimations. Today, his advice is, “Take your best estimate of how many calories you think the food contains, and double it!”</p> <p>Don’t be fooled by health halos. See some of the worst offenders arrow </p> <p>Energy Bars</p> <p>Energy bars usually contain protein and fiber—nutrients that help you feel full—but also may be loaded with calories. That’s fine if you occasionally make one a meal, but most of us eat them as snacks. You might as well enjoy a Snickers, which at 280 calories is in the same range as many energy bars.</p> <p>Lesson learned: If you need something to tide you over until dinner, look for a calorie-controlled bar with about 5 grams of protein (e.g., Balance 100-calorie bar, Promax 70-calorie bar).</p> <p>Granola</p> <p>Granola sounds healthy. But it’s often high in fat, sugar and calories. Don’t be fooled by a seemingly reasonable calorie count; portion sizes are usually a skimpy 1⁄4 or 1⁄2 cup. Low-fat versions often just swap sugar for fat and pack as many calories as regular versions.</p> <p>Lesson learned: Read granola labels carefully and stick with recommended portion sizes (which are teeny), perhaps as a topping on fruit or yogurt. </p> <p>Salads</p> <p>“Salads trip up many of my clients,” says my friend Anne Daly, R.D., director of nutrition and diabetes education at the Springfield Diabetes &amp; Endocrine Center in Springfield, Illinois. Most of us could use more vegetables—so what’s not to love? In a word, toppings. The pecans and Gorgonzola cheese on Panera Bread’s Fuji Apple Chicken Salad (580 calories, 30 grams fat, 7 grams saturated fat) propel it into double-cheeseburger territory. A McDonald’s double cheeseburger has 440 calories, 23 grams fat, 11 grams saturated fat.</p> <p>Lesson learned: Before ordering a salad, check its nutrition information plus that of the dressing and all add-ons (often, they’re listed separately). </p> <p>Smoothies</p> <p>Smoothies may seem like a tasty way to help get your recommended fruit servings—but studies show that beverages are less filling per calorie than solid foods. And added sugars can make some the equivalent of drinking fruit pie filling: the smallest (16-ounce) serving of Jamba Juice’s Orange Dream Machine weighs in at 340 calories, with 69 grams of sugars that don’t all come from orange juice. You’re better off with fresh-squeezed juices; orange juice has 110 calories per cup.</p> <p>Lesson learned: Some smoothies pack as many calories as a milkshake. Look for those made with whole fruit, low-fat yogurt and no added sugars. </p> <p>Yogurts</p> <p>Yogurt is a great way to meet your calcium needs, but not all are created equally. Some premium whole-milk yogurts can give you a hefty dose of saturated fat. Shop around: many low-fat versions of these products are every bit as creamy. Enjoy a fruit-flavored low-fat yogurt, but understand that the “fruit” is really jam (i.e., mostly sugar). Or opt for low-fat plain and stir in fresh fruit or other sweetener to suit your taste; you’ll probably use less. My favorite, a tablespoon of Vermont maple syrup (52 calories), provides all the sweetness I need.</p> <p>Lesson learned: Although they are still good sources of calcium, some yogurts can be closer to dessert than to a healthy snack. Don’t let fat and added sugars spoil a good thing.</p> <p>Sushi rolls</p> <p>Sushi is big in my family. There is a wide variety of sushi rolls out there and in some the fried tidbits and mayonnaise can really tuck in the calories. The Southern Tsunami sushi bar company, which supplies sushi to supermarkets and restaurants, reports its 12-piece Dragon Roll (eel, crunchy cucumbers, avocado and “special eel sauce”) has ­almost 500 calories and 16 grams of fat (4 grams saturated).</p> <p>Lesson learned: Signature sushi rolls often come with a creamy “special sauce”; you should ask what’s in it. Or just order something simple: for example, a 12-piece California roll (imitation crabmeat, avocado and cucumber) or a vegetarian roll with cucumbers, carrots and avocado supplies around 350 calories and 6 or 7 grams of fat, and most of it is the heart-healthy mono­unsaturated type.</p> <p>Despite these precautions, I’m not trying to be a nutrition nanny. In truth, most of these foods can fit into a healthy diet if you know your limits. But do a reality check and read labels first. After all, as my friend told Henry, even if the Yogos package screams yogurt-­covered fruit, the ingredients list proves it’s still candy.</p> <p>—Rachel Johnson, EatingWell’s senior nutrition advisor, is dean of the University of Vermont College of Agriculture &amp; Life Sciences.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/is_your_health_food_really_healthy#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. May/June 2008 Weight Loss/Diet Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Wed, 19 Aug 2009 17:18:56 +0000 Nifer 9800 at http://www.eatingwell.com 3 Antidotes to Overeating http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/3_antidotes_to_overeating <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 3 Antidotes to Overeating </div> </div> </div> <p>We’re all guilty of overindulging sometimes—an extra helping of potatoes here, a wedge of key lime pie there. But loading up on calories forces your body into overdrive as it tries to deconstruct the damage. “Just metabolizing food—especially fatty and carbohydrate-rich fare—causes the body to produce free radicals, which attack cells and can promote the development of chronic conditions including heart disease, diabetes and cancer,” says Ronald L. Prior, Ph.D., research chemist and nutritionist with the USDA at Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> These 3 foods will help fix the damage of a rich meal. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="270" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/grapes_on_violet_nd07_630.jpg?1289494678" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/grapes_on_purple_310.jpg?1252590640" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/strawberries_bowl_310.jpg?1274306944" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/berries_310.jpg?1274287937" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/kiwi_310.jpg?1261503202" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/grapes_purple_310.jpg?1252590429" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4274key_lime_pie225.jpg?1250696407" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/strawberries_2010cal_310_0.jpg?1274306800" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> May/June 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Diet Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/7_foods_that_do_the_weight_loss_work_for_you">7 Foods That Do the Weight-Loss Work for You</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/8_tips_for_winning_the_food_fight">8 Tips for Winning the Food Fight</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/bad_foods_you_should_be_eating">Bad Foods You Should Be Eating</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/start_your_meal_with_soup_or_salad">Why You Should Start Your Meal with Soup or Salad</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/secrets_to_staying_slim_past_40">Secrets to Staying Slim Past 40</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/always_feeling_hungry_watch_out_for_these_foods_that_will_make_you_">Always feeling hungry? Watch out for these foods that will make you overeat</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_antioxidant_recipes">Healthy Antioxidant Rich Recipes and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_low_calorie_recipes_menus">Quick and Healthy Low-Calorie Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>We’re all guilty of overindulging sometimes—an extra helping of potatoes here, a wedge of key lime pie there. But loading up on calories forces your body into overdrive as it tries to deconstruct the damage. “Just metabolizing food—especially fatty and carbohydrate-rich fare—causes the body to produce free radicals, which attack cells and can promote the development of chronic conditions including heart disease, diabetes and cancer,” says Ronald L. Prior, Ph.D., research chemist and nutritionist with the USDA at Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center. The more you consume, the more free radicals you produce. In fact, that’s one theory why caloric restriction—a practice of cutting calories by 25 to 30 percent—may protect against some disease. But recent research suggests that there are two ways to reduce free radicals: eating fewer calories and consuming more nutrient-rich fare, such as the following. (We suggest you do both.)</p> <p>1. Drink Wine.</p> <p>Antioxidants in red wine, called polyphenols, may reduce the negative impact of high-fat foods, according to a study published in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology in January. In the study, people who ate a turkey cutlet cooked with wine had 75 percent lower levels of malondialdehyde (MDA)—a by-product of fat digestion linked with heart disease—than those who had the cutlet without wine. Other research shows that a compound called resveratrol in red wine mimics the effects of caloric restriction and ­improves health in mice. Cook with red wine or enjoy a glass with dinner. (But remember, moderation is key!)</p> <p>2. Drizzle Vinegar.</p> <p>Having a tablespoon of vinegar with your meal, perhaps drizzled on your salad, may temper the spike in blood sugar (a.k.a. glucose) that occurs after eating a big, carbohydrate-rich meal. This sugar surge is a problem particularly for people with diabetes, who can’t clear glucose effectively; over time, excess glucose in the blood damages tissues. (For the rest of us, a steep rise in glucose triggers an equally rapid drop—which stokes appetite.) But in a 2005 study published in the Journal of the American ­Dietetic Association, consuming about 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar along with a bagel and fruit juice slashed the postmeal rise in glucose in half. It also resulted in subjects eating 200 to 275 fewer calories through the day. “The acid in vinegar may inhibit the digestion of the starch, so the starch is rendered into something like fiber, which can’t be digested well,” says Carol Johnston, Ph.D., R.D., professor and chair of the department of nutrition at Arizona State University. Drizzle a tablespoon of vinegar on your salad.</p> <p>3. Eat Fruit.</p> <p>If you’ve indulged in a decadent meal, consider fruit for dessert. In the Journal of the American College of Nutrition last April, Prior and his colleagues showed that eating antioxidant-rich fruits—including berries, grapes, kiwi and cherries—helps minimize the free-radical damage that occurs after a meal. Eating caloric meals, without antioxidant-rich foods like fruits and vegetables, can have harmful ­effects over time, says Prior. Finish your meal with a generous portion of fruit.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/3_antidotes_to_overeating#comments Amy Paturel May/June 2008 Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Wed, 19 Aug 2009 15:42:10 +0000 Nifer 9769 at http://www.eatingwell.com Do You Need a Customized Multivitamin? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/do_you_need_a_customized_multivitamin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Pros and cons of condition-specific vitamins. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>“Silver” multivitamin formulas for seniors have been around for decades, and other blends (e.g., women’s, performance) have become increasingly popular. But the latest specialty supplements to hit markets are multivitamins made for people taking prescriptions, such as statins for high cholesterol and antidepressants, that can cause nutritional deficiencies. But are these customized multivitamins worth price tags roughly three times those of standard formulas?</p> <p><strong>Pros:</strong> There is some support for the idea of developing med-specific multivitamins. For example, studies suggest that up to 30 percent of people who take metformin, a common diabetes medication, have reduced absorption of vitamin B12. And science has documented that some people who suffer from depression have low blood levels of B vitamins, including folate.</p> <p><strong>Cons:</strong> Not everyone who takes a medication will experience the nutritional deficiencies sometimes associated with that drug. And for those who do, supplements aren’t always the answer, says John Buse, M.D., Ph.D., president for medicine and science at the American Diabetes Association: “Perhaps the more reasonable thing to do is to work toward replacing less nutritious foods with more nutritious ones.” What’s more, in cases where research suggests that supplementing a certain nutrient may be beneficial, the formulas ­being marketed aren’t always the same as those tested, says James Lake, M.D., chair of the American Psychiatric Association’s Caucus on Complementary, Alternative &amp; Integrative Care. For example, a new multivitamin targeted at people taking antidepressants, such as Prozac, includes folic acid (along with vitamins B6, B12 and D); however, most clinical trials showing benefits of supplementing folate in people with depression use folinic acid (another form of the nutrient) by itself.</p> <p><strong>Bottom line:</strong> Talk with your doctor about all possible side effects, ­including nutritional deficiencies, of your prescriptions. He or she can help you decide if you should supplement any nutrients and, if so, the best way to do that.<br /> <em>-Cheryl Sternman Rule</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/do_you_need_a_customized_multivitamin#comments May/June 2008 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:01:24 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9571 at http://www.eatingwell.com Greener Kitchen Tools Made with Recycled Materials http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/greener_kitchen_tools <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Greener Kitchen Tools </div> </div> </div> <p>We’re fans of the new line of everyday kitchen tools from Preserve Kitchen by Recycline. These practical items—colanders, food-storage containers and cutting boards—also have an environmental purpose. They’re made with 100 percent recycled materials (both plastic and paper), are BPA- and phthalate-free and can be recycled when their useful life is over. Even better, Recycline partnered with product designers Evo Design to make sure that items look great and help the designing process meet environmental standards.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Lindsey Tiberi-Warner </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Colorful 100 percent recycled products for everyday use. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/recycled_plastic_items_310.jpg?1272493384" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> May/June 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Kitchen Tools We Love </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/herb_savor">Herb Savor</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/color_coded_cutting_boards">Color-Coded Cutting Boards</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/programmable_slow_cookers">Programmable Slow Cookers</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/automatic_ice_cream_maker">Automatic Ice Cream Maker</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/healthy_cooking_blog/wacky_kitchen_tool_the_spurtle">Wacky kitchen tool: the spurtle</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/healthy_cooking_blog/5_kitchen_tools_you_didnt_know_you_needed">5 kitchen tools you didn&#039;t know you needed</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/tools_we_use_dutch_ovens">Tools We Use: Dutch Ovens</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>We’re fans of the new line of everyday kitchen tools from Preserve Kitchen by Recycline. These practical items—colanders, food-storage containers and cutting boards—also have an environmental purpose. They’re made with 100 percent recycled materials (both plastic and paper) and can be recycled when their useful life is over. Even better, Recycline partnered with product designers Evo Design to make sure that items look great and help the designing process meet environmental standards.</p> <p>Manufactured in the U.S. to minimize shipping, and designed with nature in mind, the red colander is strikingly similar to a strawberry and the storage containers sure do remind us of a tart green apple. Preserve Kitchen products can be found at Whole Foods Market or online at recycline.com; they range in price from $5.99 for two small storage containers to $24.99 for a large cutting board.<br /> <em>-Lindsey Tiberi-Warner, EatingWell Magazine</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/greener_kitchen_tools#comments Lindsey Tiberi-Warner May/June 2008 Healthy Cooking - Kitchen Product Reviews Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Fri, 14 Aug 2009 16:17:01 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9534 at http://www.eatingwell.com Can Drinking Seltzers, Sodas or Other Carbonated Drinks Harm Bones? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/bone_health/can_drinking_seltzers_sodas_or_other_carbonated_drinks_harm_bones <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/soda_cola_310_4.jpg?1262813882" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Can Drinking Seltzers, Sodas or Other Carbonated Drinks Harm Bones?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Perhaps. There’s research that links drinking certain types of soda with weaker bones—but carbonation doesn’t seem to be the problem. </p> <p>Nutrition experts once believed caffeine could be the culprit. In a 2001 study out of Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska, people lost measurable amounts of calcium after drinking caffeinated sodas. Drinking decaffeinated sodas didn’t appear to have the same effect. As it turned out, though, people tended to make up for the losses by excreting less calcium later in the day. The researchers concluded that if sodas harm bones it’s probably because people drink them in place of milk.</p> <p>But another study, reported in 2006 by researchers at Tufts University in Boston, suggests that colas, specifically, might be problematic. Among the 1,413 women whose dietary records and bone-density scans they reviewed, those who drank a diet or regular cola at least three times a week over five years had significantly lower bone densities than those who sipped cola once a month or less. No such effect occurred with other carbonated drinks, even after researchers factored in intake of calcium from foods.</p> <p>The likely cause? Phosphoric acid, which is unique to colas, says Katherine Tucker, Ph.D., lead author of the study. When the body breaks down this compound, the acidity (or concentration of free hydrogen ions) of the blood increases. To neutralize acidity, hydrogen ions bind with minerals, including calcium and magnesium. If they’re not available in the blood, says Tucker, “the body draws calcium from bones.” The occasional cola drinker probably needn’t worry. “The real risk is for those who drink cola every day,” says Tucker.</p> <p><strong>Bottom line:</strong> There are plenty of good reasons to quit a regular soda habit; carbonation isn’t one of them. In fact, sparkling mineral waters sometimes contain a little calcium and magnesium, says Tucker, “so they might even benefit bones.”</p> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/whats_so_bad_about_high_fructose_corn_syrup">What&#039;s So Bad About High Fructose Corn Syrup?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/food_news_blog/should_you_stop_drinking_soda_a_food_expert_weighs_in">Should you stop drinking soda? A food expert weighs in</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/food_news_blog/angry_mommy_responds_chocolate_milk_is_soda_in_drag_puh_lease">Chocolate milk is &quot;soda in drag&quot;? Puh-lease!</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/how_much_water_do_you_really_need">How much water do you really need?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/a_healthful_sugar_is_agave_nectar_healthier_than_sugar_o">A Healthful Sugar: Is Agave Nectar Healthier Than Sugar or Other Sweeteners?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/why_the_new_study_on_high_fructose_corn_syrup_and_weight_gain_is_flawed">Why the new study on high-fructose corn syrup and weight gain is flawed</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/is_high_fructose_corn_syrup_really_worse_than_sugar">Is high-fructose corn syrup really worse than sugar?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/is_high_fructose_corn_syrup_causing_your_tummy_troubles">Is high-fructose corn syrup causing your tummy troubles?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/is_high_fructose_corn_syrup_making_you_fat">Is high-fructose corn syrup making you fat?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/is_high_fructose_corn_syrup_making_you_hungrier">Is high-fructose corn syrup making you hungrier?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/is_high_fructose_corn_syrup_making_your_kid_hyper">Is high-fructose corn syrup making your kid hyper?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/bone_health_center">Bone Health Center</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/see_it_make_it_healthy_drinks">See It, Make It: Healthy Drinks</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/3_drinks_that_wont_bust_your_diet">3 drinks that won&#039;t bust your diet</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> May/June 2008 </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/bone_health/can_drinking_seltzers_sodas_or_other_carbonated_drinks_harm_bones#comments Joyce Hendley May/June 2008 Bone Health Diet, Nutrition & Health - Bone Health Thu, 13 Aug 2009 17:56:25 +0000 Penelope Wall 9497 at http://www.eatingwell.com Visiting Denmark http://www.eatingwell.com/visiting_denmark <p>Going There<br /> Copenhagen is a city of 1.7 million people with a vibrant cosmopolitan center, world-class ballet and opera, a fairy-tale castle (Rosenborg Slot), spectacular museums and, of course, some of the world’s coolest interior design and home furnishings. And it’s not hard to get there—just a 7-hour (or so) flight from New York.</p> <p>Hotels<br /> Copenhagen Admiral Hotel<br /> <a href="http://www.admiralhotel.dk" title="www.admiralhotel.dk">www.admiralhotel.dk</a><br /> Toldbodgade 24-28<br /> +45 3374 1414 (Fax +45 3374 1416)<br /> Double rooms from 1660-1750 DKK (about $325-$350); deals frequently available through travel websites</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Where to stay and eat in Denmark. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> May/June 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Article: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_travel/denmarks_fresh_simple_cuisine">Denmark&#039;s Fresh, Simple Cuisine</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Going There<br /> Copenhagen is a city of 1.7 million people with a vibrant cosmopolitan center, world-class ballet and opera, a fairy-tale castle (Rosenborg Slot), spectacular museums and, of course, some of the world’s coolest interior design and home furnishings. And it’s not hard to get there—just a 7-hour (or so) flight from New York.</p> <p>Hotels<br /> Copenhagen Admiral Hotel<br /> <a href="http://www.admiralhotel.dk" title="www.admiralhotel.dk">www.admiralhotel.dk</a><br /> Toldbodgade 24-28<br /> +45 3374 1414 (Fax +45 3374 1416)<br /> Double rooms from 1660-1750 DKK (about $325-$350); deals frequently available through travel websites</p> <p>Right on the waterfront and housed in a 220-year-old former warehouse, the Admiral is a grande dame with plenty of character. Thick wooden beams run through the rooms, many of which have harbor views, and the furnishings are classic Scandinavian modern. Best of all, the hotel is within walking distance to just about everything in the inner city.</p> <p>Bertrams Hotel Guldsmeden<br /> <a href="http://www.hotelguldsmeden.dk" title="www.hotelguldsmeden.dk">www.hotelguldsmeden.dk</a><br /> Vesterbrogade 107<br /> +45 3325 0405 (fax: +45 3325 0402)<br /> Double rooms from 1615-2000 DKK (about $320-$400).</p> <p>In the hip Vesterbro neighborhood (formerly the red-light district), this 47-room boutique hotel is near trendy fashion and design shops. Rooms epitomize Danish offhand chic, combining Balinese teak with modern Scandinavian furnishings, original art and spare elegance. There’s also a wonderful organic breakfast buffet included. </p> <p>Fine Dining<br /> Noma<br /> <a href="http://www.noma.dk" title="www.noma.dk">www.noma.dk</a><br /> 93 Strandgade, Christianshavn<br /> +45 3296 3297<br /> You’re guaranteed to experience something you’ve never had before in this birthplace of the new Nordic culinary movement—say, meaty oysters from nearby Limfjord sound; yogurt-like skyr from Iceland, reindeer and (unexpectedly tender and mild) musk ox from Greenland, tiny flavorful Faroe Island shrimp.</p> <p>Geranium<br /> <a href="http://www.restaurantgeranium.dk" title="www.restaurantgeranium.dk">www.restaurantgeranium.dk</a><br /> 13 Kronprinsessegade<br /> +45 3311 1304<br /> Located in a former palace garden, this jewel box of a restaurant features organic and biodynamic ingredients in sophisticated interpretations by rising chefs Rasmus Kofoed and Søren Ledet</p> <p>The Paul<br /> <a href="http://www.thepaul.dk" title="http://www.thepaul.dk">http://www.thepaul.dk</a><br /> 3 Vesterbrogade (Tivoli)<br /> +45 3375 0775<br /> You wouldn’t expect a world-class restaurant in an amusement park, but chef Paul Cunningham pulls it off with wit and verve (and a Michelin star). </p> <p>Delis &amp; Smørrebrød<br /> Try these for a casual (though not inexpensive) meal.</p> <p>Aamann’s<br /> <a href="http://www.aamanns.dk" title="www.aamanns.dk">www.aamanns.dk</a><br /> 10 Øster Farimagsgade, Østerbro<br /> +45 3555 3344</p> <p>Ida Davidsen<br /> <a href="http://www.idadavidsen.dk" title="www.idadavidsen.dk">www.idadavidsen.dk</a><br /> 70 Store Kongensgade<br /> +45 3391 3655</p> <p>Emmerys<br /> <a href="http://www.emmerys.dk" title="www.emmerys.dk">www.emmerys.dk</a><br /> Several branches throughout the city, including Nyhavn (below), Vesterbro and Nørrebro<br /> 21 Store Strandstraede<br /> +45-3393 0133</p> <p>Meyers Deli<br /> <a href="http://www.meyersdeli.dk" title="www.meyersdeli.dk">www.meyersdeli.dk</a><br /> 107 Gammel Kongevej, Frederiksberg<br /> Also in Magasin department store on Kongens Nytorv<br /> +45 3325 4595</p> <p>Slotskælderen hos Gitte Kik<br /> 4 Fortunstraede<br /> +45 3311 1537</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/visiting_denmark#comments Joyce Hendley May/June 2008 Wed, 12 Aug 2009 23:18:30 +0000 Paula Joslin 9465 at http://www.eatingwell.com Denmark's Fresh, Simple Cuisine http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_travel/denmarks_fresh_simple_cuisine <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Northern Light </div> </div> </div> <p>On a bright spring day I pushed my way past thickets of parked bicycles and well-dressed sun worshippers at café tables along Copenhagen's Gråbrødre­torv (Grey­friars' Square). I didn't need a phrasebook to understand what Danes were craving at the moment. At one café a young mother coaxed her daughter to sip some of her asparagus soup; at another, an older gentleman was eating an open-faced sandwich of asparagus topped with baby shrimp. Nearby a couple shared a plate of thick white asparagus stalks dusted with grated hard-cooked egg yolks.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Discover this country&#039;s flavorful, minimalist cuisine. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/denmark_cuisine.jpg?1332426554" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> May/June 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Danish Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/green_salad_with_asparagus_peas_salat_med_asparges_og_rter.html">Green Salad with Asparagus &amp; Peas (Salat med Asparges og Ærter)</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/pea_new_potato_salad_nye_kartofler_og_rte_salat.html">Pea &amp; New Potato Salad (Nye kartofler og Ærte Salat)</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/elderflower_sparklers_hyldeblomst_cocktails.html">Elderflower Sparklers (Hyldeblomst Cocktails)</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/grilled_pork_tenderloin_with_aquavit_seasonings_snapse_krydret_svine_m_rbrad.html">Grilled Pork Tenderloin with Aquavit Seasonings (Snapse Krydret Svine Mørbrad)</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/roasted_halibut_with_pickled_beets_stegte_helleflynder_med_r_dbeder.html">Roasted Halibut with Pickled Beets (Stegte Helleflynder med Rødbeder)</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/sweet_and_sour_fish_stegte_fisk_i_eddike.html">Sweet-and-Sour Fish (Stegte Fisk i Eddike)</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/sweet_and_sour_fish_mini_sm_rrebr_d_sm_rrebr_d_med_stegte_fisk_i_eddike.html">Sweet-and-Sour Fish Mini Smørrebrød (Smørrebrød med Stegte Fisk i Eddike)</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/berry_pudding_with_cream_r_dgr_d_med_fl_de.html">Berry Pudding with Cream (Rødgrød med Fløde)</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/visiting_denmark">Visiting Denmark</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>On a bright spring day I pushed my way past thickets of parked bicycles and well-dressed sun worshippers at café tables along Copenhagen’s Gråbrødre­torv (Grey­friars’ Square). I didn’t need a phrasebook to understand what Danes were craving at the moment. At one café a young mother coaxed her daughter to sip some of her asparagus soup; at another, an older gentleman was eating an open-faced sandwich of asparagus topped with baby shrimp. Nearby a couple shared a plate of thick white asparagus stalks dusted with grated hard-cooked egg yolks.</p> <p>“Danes are crazy about asparagus and we’re even crazier about new potatoes,” explained a waitress as she delivered a tray of Bloody Marys garnished with asparagus stalks. “We waited for this all winter. Besides,” she added, citing folk wisdom, “it’s supposed to be bad luck to eat asparagus after Saint John’s Eve [June 23], so we have to eat it all now.” </p> <p>Denmark is nearly as far north as Juneau, Alaska, so in June the sun is up by 5 a.m. and sets as late as 10 p.m. All this abundant sunlight is close to intoxicating for the Danes. It’s also the best time, I think, to experience Danish food at its most exuberant. Indeed, “seize the moment” might be the operative phrase to describe the intense Danish midsummer.</p> <p>Until I married into a Danish family, my knowledge of that country’s cuisine was limited to the buttery, flaky pastries called “Danish” everywhere but in Denmark (where they’re known as Wienerbrød, or “Vienna bread,” to honor their Austrian origins). After all, beyond ham, butter and a few cheeses like blue and havarti, few Danish specialties usually make it to American tables. But after many visits to my in-laws’ kitchens and gardens, I’ve discovered a sophisticated and varied cuisine with a healthier side that seems more Northern California than Northern Europe.</p> <p>Cooking and eating the Danish way is all about simplicity, with minimal seasoning and fuss. Danes have always been passionate about fresh produce at its peak of ripeness. When I ask for a recipe from my mother-in-law, Hanne Lumholdt, I’m always amazed at how brief the instructions are from this accomplished cook. “Brown it in a little vegetable oil,” she’ll say, “and when it’s done, sprinkle on a little salt and pepper.” But I’ve learned that this simplicity is a refined art in itself. It honors fine ingredients by doing little to them, letting pure flavors come through without heavy sauces or complicated cookery.</p> <p>A sense of place</p> <p>Denmark’s culinary traditions owe a lot to its geography. Though centuries ago their Viking ancestors ruled large swaths of the known world, the territory Danes now command is about the size of Switzerland and comprised of a peninsula and many islands. Lying south of Norway, Sweden and Finland and connected to northern Germany by its Jutland peninsula, Denmark is a crossroads between Scandinavia and continental Europe, with culinary roots in both places. And of course, you’re never far from the sea.</p> <p>In Denmark’s cold northern waters, omega-3-rich fatty fish like herring and salmon thrive. It’s an education just to browse the fish shops, where the selection is always huge and impeccably fresh. Best of all is the herring (sild) section, offering at least six or eight different ways to appreciate the heart-healthy little fish: sweet-sour pickled, smoked, dressed in curry or tomato sauce, or sprinkled with fresh dill and a little sour cream. Or my favorite way: sautéed and steeped in a spicy-sweet vinegar marinade, a technique that works beautifully with most firm-fleshed fish.</p> <p>According to Claus Meyer, the Danish host of PBS’s New Scandinavian Cooking series, the geography and intense sunlight of Denmark contribute to what he has dubbed “Nordic Terroir,” using a term usually applied to wine to describe the unique taste of place that climate, soil and sea contribute to foods produced here. “Nowhere else on earth do we find a temperate climate so far from the equator,” he explains. During the summer’s long days, plants get plenty of light but the cooler temperatures cause them to grow more slowly, he notes, allowing more time for a variety of flavors to arise. Apples and strawberries, he says, “develop an entirely different kind of freshness and aromatic intensity than do similar fruits grown further south.”</p> <p>Take potatoes, for example. “In June our potatoes are crisp like hazelnuts, juicy and tender,” sighs Meyer. His idea of a heavenly meal? Those potatoes, “with a little butter, fresh dill and salt from Læsø” (an island in northern Denmark). And Meyer’s not alone in his dedication to these potatoes. In Copenhagen, the arrival of the first crop of new potatoes each spring makes national headlines. Top chefs bid outrageous prices—the equivalent of hundreds of dollars per kilo—for the right to serve the first sack of prized specimens, and just about any Dane will pay top dollar for freshly dug pedigreed spuds from the island of Samsø to the west or from Sweden’s nearby Bjäre region. </p> <p>I used to wonder how such praise could be heaped on lowly potatoes until a few bites of last spring’s crop convinced me—in, of all things, a sandwich. Restaurant Ida Davidsen in north-central Copenhagen specializes in smørrebrød—open-faced sandwiches, Danish style. On mine, “asparagus” potatoes (named for their long, slim shape) were layered onto rye bread, then topped with tart apple and thyme-flecked onions. It struck me as a perfect combination of sweet and sour, softness and crunch, and it was just one of dozens of tempting choices I could have made from the 175-plus sandwiches on the menu.</p> <p>Great bread is the foundation of the centuries-old tradition of smørrebrød. No matter what the size or shape of the bread, whole-grain is the rule rather than the exception, so most Danes get a regular dose of the fiber, B vitamins, magnesium, zinc and other nutrients whole grains supply. Though no one knows the origins, smørrebrød (“buttered bread”) probably evolved from a custom of using bread rounds as edible plates so that no morsel of food or sauce was wasted. Today it’s as much art form as sandwich. The only constant is a single, thin slice of sturdy bread, spread with butter to keep the bread from getting soggy. </p> <p>The art comes in assembling what Danes call the pålæg, or “what is laid on top.” It can be as simple as last night’s leftovers, carefully assembled to complement flavors, colors and textures—or as elaborate and prescribed as the Stjerneskud (“shooting star”) topping: fried fish and cooked shrimp with caviar, lemon slices and dill. The toppings can be abundant, but never messy; “overstuffed,” thankfully, hasn’t made its way into the Danish sandwich lexicon. Though in Denmark they’re considered strictly lunch fare, in my own household smørrebrød often become tasty impromptu dinners and in smaller portions, spectacularly easy appetizers.</p> <p>Aamann’s, a casually elegant spot near the Danish National Gallery, is renowned for a fresh, modern approach to smørrebrød. There, I chose a smørrebrød with house-smoked eel, asparagus, pink grapefruit and a soft-boiled quail egg, with extra asparagus on the side. Though it was tempting to have a seat in the pretty, light-filled room, I thought about the green spaces of the nearby Botanic Garden, and in my best “Danglish” ordered til takeaway instead. It just wouldn’t be Danish to savor those first tastes of spring anywhere else but under the sun that gave them life.</p> <p>—Contributing editor Joyce Hendley is the author of The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook and co-author of The EatingWell Diet.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_travel/denmarks_fresh_simple_cuisine#comments Joyce Hendley May/June 2008 Food News & Origins - Food & Travel Wed, 12 Aug 2009 21:13:37 +0000 Paula Joslin 9454 at http://www.eatingwell.com One Doctor’s Prescription for a Healthy Heart http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/one_doctor_s_prescription_for_a_healthy_heart <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Marialisa Calta </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Reduce your risk for heart disease with 10 simple steps from Dr. Philip Ades, author of EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>It was the spring of 1969 and the phone in Philip Ades’s dorm hallway was ringing. He was a freshman pre-med student at the University of Maryland, 17 years old and, at the time, preoccupied with winning a spot as catcher on the varsity baseball team, passing organic chemistry, and girls. But there, on the phone, was a friend of the family’s, telling Phil that he had to hop a plane home to Brooklyn, that his father was ill. </p> <p>“I don’t think I really asked any questions,” says Ades (pronounced AY-diss), recalling the event. “But I must have known something was up.” For one, he never remembered his dad ever getting sick; he was a trim, active 50-year-old who worked six days a week in a warehouse to support his wife and two sons. He could not remember his dad ever missing a day of work. And the plane, well, that seemed like an unnecessary luxury; Ades usually traveled between home and school by Greyhound.</p> <p>As the cab from the airport pulled up to the house, the young Ades noticed a long line of cars parked outside. His brother and a close family friend emerged, embracing him and telling him the sad news: his father had died of a massive heart attack. </p> <p>That day, Ades was left with two profound thoughts. One was that he had not told his dad he loved him since he was about four years old. The other was that he was “programmed” to die at age 50. Recall that this was 40 years ago. Back then, most people believed that a family history of heart disease was a death sentence.</p> <p>Fast-forward to today. As a cardiologist and director of a cardiac rehabilitation clinic in South Burlington, Vermont—which Gary J. Balady, M.D., director of Preventive Cardiology at Boston Medical Center, calls “one of the best in the country”—Ades no longer believes that “programming” business. Modern research has shown that a healthy diet and active lifestyle can go a long way toward preventing cardiovascular disease—and conditions, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes, that predispose one to developing it. Even people who’ve already had one heart attack are not doomed to die of cardiovascular disease, says Ades. “I can look patients in the eye and say that they are going to live and live well—if they follow this advice.” (Start with Step #1, Know your numbers.) </p> <p>Heart disease affects about 9 million American adults, killing one every 37 seconds. Traditionally considered a “man’s disease,” heart disease is also the number-one cause of death in U.S. women. In fact, a 40-year-old woman is eight times more likely to die of heart disease than of breast cancer in her lifetime. </p> <p>But the good news—which Ades has made it his mission to spread—is that heart disease is mostly preventable. For example, according to the Nurses’ Health Study, an epidemiological study of more than 84,000 women, if all women were to follow five behaviors, they’d prevent over 80 percent of heart attacks. These behaviors include: 1) not smoking; 2) maintaining a healthy body weight; 3) exercising an average of 30 minutes each day; 4) eating a nutritious diet (high in fiber, fish, leafy vegetables, polyunsaturated fats and low in saturated fats and processed carbohydrates); and 5) drinking alcohol in moderation (about 3.5 drinks per week). </p> <p>Ades has helped about 10,000 heart patients implement these healthful habits. Now, in his new book EatingWell for a Healthy Heart, Ades extends his message and encouragement to the masses and shares his favorite EatingWell heart-healthy recipes. </p> <p>Physician in the kitchen</p> <p>At home on a weekend evening, Ades is bustling in the kitchen, cooking up a dish from a Sephardic cookbook written by a woman from his old Brooklyn neighborhood. His youngest child, Anika, a slim 15-year-old, and wife Deborah Rubin, M.D., a petite radiation oncologist, nibble on whole-grain crackers and hummus as Ades puts the finishing touches on the meal. The two older Ades children—22-year-old Jimmy and 24-year-old Rebecca—are away at college and working, respectively. </p> <p>Ades brings a plate of grape leaves stuffed with lamb and brown rice to the table, along with a skillet of simmering Israeli couscous and fattoush, a Middle Eastern salad made with chopped greens, tomatoes, onions and grilled flatbread. Dessert is a moist almond cake that Rubin has made, substituting almond oil for the butter the recipe called for. </p> <p>Ades admits that some people find him “extreme” about his diet—years ago he jettisoned butter from his home (he jokes that Anika doesn’t know what butter is) and stopped using mayo in his frequent tuna salad sandwiches. Butter and mayonnaise, Ades points out, are rich sources of the saturated fats that elevate levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL), a.k.a. “bad” cholesterol. These, in turn, contribute to plaque buildup and narrowing of the vessels to the heart. Ades favors fish, poultry and vegetables over red meats and full-fiber whole grains over refined (see Step #6: Fill Up on Fiber). “If I go to a meeting and lunch is served, I’m not above taking the sandwich apart, throwing away the cheese, ditching the piece of bread with the butter or mayo on it, and eating it like that,” he says. “Yeah, people look at me funny. Too bad.” He counsels his patients not to keep butter in the house. “I realize that a teaspoon or so can be used to finish a dish and add flavor,” he says. “But I think if you have heart disease you should avoid the temptation.”</p> <p>At the same time, Ades also firmly believes that “no one can lose weight if they are always hungry”; thus, it’s best to burn more calories with exercise. Ades runs almost daily. He also cycles and, in winter, cross-country skis. He took up running soon after his student days, when he quit organized sports (baseball and lacrosse) and began packing a few pounds onto his 5’7” frame. “I was up well over 150 pounds,” says Ades, now a trim 145. “And I thought, ‘How am I going to keep fit?’” Adding runs a few times a week to a background of squash, tennis and basketball was the answer. He frequently competes in 5Ks and 10Ks and, in a few years, hopes to commemorate his 60th birthday by running his sixth marathon. </p> <p>Ades is trim (which helps keep his LDL within healthy ranges), but he knows that his regular physical activity helps his heart in other ways as well. Research shows that regular physical activity also reduces triglycerides, another type of “bad” fat in the blood, and raises high-density lipoproteins (HDL), the so-called “good” cholesterol that scientists believe carries LDL back to the liver so the body can remove it from the blood. (And some scientists speculate that HDL may even extract LDL that’s already deposited into the plaque lining arteries.)</p> <p>On a rainy day, Ades can be seen putting in his miles on the treadmill. “Phil doesn’t preach, but when people look out the window and see him taking off on his run, or look over and see him on the treadmill, it sends a powerful message,” says Patrick Savage, M.S., the senior exercise physiologist at Ades’s clinic.</p> <p>Changing lives</p> <p>Richard Farnham hit his stride on the treadmill. Farnham, a former university athletic director, had had a career full of all-you-can-eat sports banquets and endless opportunities to snack. He wound up, at 50, “closer to 300 pounds than I would have liked,” with high blood pressure and a blockage in an artery that left him short of breath and required a stent.</p> <p>“It wasn’t very dramatic; I only missed a day of work,” he says of the cardiac procedure. Nevertheless, it changed his life—because he sought Ades’s help in changing his habits. On Ades’s recommendation, Farnham enlisted the aid of his wife, children and close friends and drastically modified his diet, going heavy on vegetables, poultry and fish and light on red meat. “My biggest realization was that I was eating too many refined carbohydrates,” said Farn­ham. (Consuming processed grains—white breads, pastas and the like—may contribute to heart risk by elevating triglycerides and blood glucose levels.) “Now, I know that I don’t need to have a sandwich on two pieces of white bread for lunch every day and I stay away from regular [white] pasta.” Farnham began exercising—every day, for a minimum of 30 to 45 minutes. In a little less than one year, he lost 50 pounds. Over the same period, he saw his total cholesterol drop nearly 40 percent, from a borderline-high 209 mg/dL to a healthy 131 mg/dL. He lowered his triglycerides from 178 mg/dL (considered borderline high) to 86 mg/dL (well below the 150 mg/dL threshold that defines the upper limit of healthy). </p> <p>Farnham reduced his blood glucose levels most dramatically. Before his lifestyle overhaul, his fasting blood glucose was 243 mg/dL—anything beyond 126 mg/dL is considered a diagnosis for diabetes. Now, it’s 109 mg/dL. “Making the changes hasn’t been easy,” he said, “but it’s been worthwhile.” </p> <p>When it comes to Ades’s patients, Farnham’s story is the norm, not the exception. For example, “ZR,” a 53-year-old woman Ades writes about in EatingWell for a Healthy Heart, lost 8 of the 10 pounds she gained after menopause by following his healthy eating and exercise plan for just three months. In that time, she also improved triglycerides from a high 250 mg/dL to a “borderline” high 199 mg/dL, boosted her “good cholesterol” 5 points and lowered her total cholesterol from 235 to 213. “I feel more in control of my own health than I have in years,” she said. “I keep thinking of one day enjoying grandchildren as<br /> my reward.”</p> <p>Living well</p> <p>Today, Phil Ades is where he wants to be. He combines research time with clinic time, and manages to spend nearly every evening with his family. He has held a number of national posts in cardiology, among them president of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, recently renamed—due to his efforts—the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention. He now calls a risk of heart disease a “call to arms,” rather than a “death sentence.” </p> <p>And, perhaps best of all, in April he celebrated his 57th birthday, in perfect health.</p> <p>Marialisa Calta, a nationally syndicated food columnist, is a contributing editor for EatingWell.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/heart_health/one_doctor_s_prescription_for_a_healthy_heart#comments Marialisa Calta May/June 2008 Heart Healthy Diet Philip Ades, M.D. Diet, Nutrition & Health - Heart Health Wed, 12 Aug 2009 14:54:02 +0000 Penelope Wall 9420 at http://www.eatingwell.com Black Bean & Hominy Succotash with Barbecued Portobello Mushrooms http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/black_bean_hominy_succotash_with_barbecued_portobello_mushrooms.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/black_bean_hominy_succotash_with_barbecued_portobello_mushrooms.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MV6518.JPG" alt="Black Bean &amp;amp; Hominy Succotash with Barbecued Portobello Mushrooms Recipe" title="Black Bean &amp;amp; Hominy Succotash with Barbecued Portobello Mushrooms Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/black_bean_hominy_succotash_with_barbecued_portobello_mushrooms.html" target="_blank">Black Bean &amp; Hominy Succotash with Barbecued Portobello Mushrooms</a></div> <div>Here smoky-flavored grilled mushrooms are served over a black-bean-and-hominy succotash. Serve with: Cornbread and an avocado-and-tomato salad.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/black_bean_hominy_succotash_with_barbecued_portobello_mushrooms.html#comments May/June 2008 Southwest Moderate Diabetes appropriate Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber High potassium Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health Father's Day July 4th Labor Day Recipes & Menus - Vegan Vegetables Beans/Legumes Dinner
 Grill/BBQ Fall Summer 6 Entertaining, casual Everyday favorites Vegan Vegetarian 45 minutes or less Main dish, vegetarian Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 7333 at http://www.eatingwell.com Broccoli & Goat Cheese Souffle http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/broccoli_cheese_souffle.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/broccoli_cheese_souffle.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MV6517.JPG" alt="Broccoli &amp;amp; Goat Cheese Souffle Recipe" title="Broccoli &amp;amp; Goat Cheese Souffle Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/broccoli_cheese_souffle.html" target="_blank">Broccoli &amp; Goat Cheese Souffle</a></div> <div>This elegant broccoli and goat cheese soufflé will wow your family and friends. Soufflés are surprisingly easy to make—the only trick is getting them on the table before they deflate. Serve with: A tomato-and-fennel salad and, for dessert, fresh strawberries drizzled with balsamic vinegar.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/broccoli_cheese_souffle.html#comments May/June 2008 American Easy Diabetes appropriate High calcium Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low sodium Bone Health Christmas Easter Father's Day Mother's Day New Year's Eve Thanksgiving Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Dairy Eggs Vegetables Wheat Brunch Dinner
 Bake Microwave Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Budget Entertaining, casual Kid-friendly Vegetarian 45 minutes or less Main dish, vegetarian Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 7331 at http://www.eatingwell.com Italian Roasted Snap Peas http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/italian_roasted_snap_peas.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/italian_roasted_snap_peas.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD6516.JPG" alt="Italian Roasted Snap Peas Recipe" title="Italian Roasted Snap Peas Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/italian_roasted_snap_peas.html" target="_blank">Italian Roasted Snap Peas</a></div> <div>Serve this Italian-inspired combination of sweet snap peas, leeks and tomatoes with roast chicken or garlic-rubbed grilled steaks.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/italian_roasted_snap_peas.html#comments May/June 2008 Italian Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Recipes & Menus - Antioxidants Recipes & Menus - Pompeian Recipes & Menus - Spices Tomatoes Vegetables Dinner
 Roast Fall Spring Summer 4 Entertaining, casual Everyday favorites Vegan Vegetarian 15 minutes or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 7330 at http://www.eatingwell.com Lemon-Mint Snap Peas & Lima Beans http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/lemon_mint_snap_peas_lima_beans.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/lemon_mint_snap_peas_lima_beans.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SD6515.JPG" alt="Lemon-Mint Snap Peas &amp;amp; Lima Beans Recipe" title="Lemon-Mint Snap Peas &amp;amp; Lima Beans Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/lemon_mint_snap_peas_lima_beans.html" target="_blank">Lemon-Mint Snap Peas &amp; Lima Beans</a></div> <div>Fresh-tasting lemon-mint vinaigrette dresses up snap peas and lima beans in a hurry. The creamy texture of limas is a perfect counterpart to the crunch of the sugar snap peas. Try this vinaigrette with asparagus and green beans too.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/lemon_mint_snap_peas_lima_beans.html#comments May/June 2008 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High fiber Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Recipes & Menus - Pompeian Beans/legumes Citrus Vegetables Dinner
 Steam Spring Summer 6 Entertaining, casual Everyday favorites Quick (total 30 min. or less) Vegan Vegetarian 15 minutes or less Side dish, vegetable Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 7329 at http://www.eatingwell.com Strawberry-Rhubarb Strudel http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/strawberry_rhubarb_strudel.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/strawberry_rhubarb_strudel.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/DS6514.JPG" alt="Strawberry-Rhubarb Strudel Recipe" title="Strawberry-Rhubarb Strudel Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/strawberry_rhubarb_strudel.html" target="_blank">Strawberry-Rhubarb Strudel</a></div> <div>Spring&#039;s best combo—strawberries and rhubarb—fill this simple strudel for two.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/strawberry_rhubarb_strudel.html#comments May/June 2008 American Easy Heart healthy High fiber Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Digestive Health Recipes & Menus - Strawberries Berries Fruit Nuts Wheat Dessert Bake Spring Summer 2 Cooking for 2 Entertaining, casual Kid-friendly Vegan Vegetarian 1 hour or less Desserts, fruit Desserts, other Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 7328 at http://www.eatingwell.com