July/August 2008 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/433/food_news_origins en A Taste of Place http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/a_taste_of_place <p>Imagine America not as we see it today, a grid of states, but the way it might have appeared to settlers centuries ago. The landscape would have been delineated by ecological and agricultural regions and the foods that flourished there. Maple forests once covered the slopes of the Appalachians, salmon were plentiful in the rivers of the Northwest, bison roamed the central prairies. These emblematic foods helped define regional cuisines. Today, many of them are vanishing.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Saving and savoring America’s heritage foods. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="372" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/raft_map_630.gif?1251207920" /> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Learn About the Disappearing Foods in Your Area: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/acorn_nation">Acorn Nation</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/bison_nation">Bison Nation</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/chestnut_nation">Chestnut Nation</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/chile_pepper_nation">Chile Pepper Nation</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/clambake_nation">Clambake Nation</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/cornbread_nation">Cornbread Nation</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/crabcake_nation">Crabcake Nation</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/gumbo_nation">Gumbo Nation</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/maple_syrup_nation">Maple Syrup Nation</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/moose_nation">Moose Nation</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/pinyon_nut_nation">Pinyon Nut Nation</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/salmon_nation">Salmon Nation</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/wild_rice_nation">Wild Rice Nation</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/renewing_americas_food_traditions">Renewing America&#039;s Food Traditions</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_travel/a_vermont_picnic">A Vermont Picnic</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/a_taste_of_place#comments EatingWell Editors July/August 2008 Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Mon, 24 Aug 2009 21:20:58 +0000 Penelope Wall 10361 at http://www.eatingwell.com How can Americans learn—or relearn—to start cultivating that sense, a taste of place? http://www.eatingwell.com/how_can_americans_learn_or_relearn_to_start_cultivating_that_sense_a_taste_of_place <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>How can Americans learn—or relearn—to start cultivating that sense, a taste of place?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>You can actually see that happening right now. I think all the efforts to localize the food system and to support smaller-scale farming could be understood as embracing a taste of place; so could community supported agriculture (CSA), farmers’ markets and farm-to-table movements. Figure out one or two foods or drinks—like wine, cheese or bread—that are considered very particular to where you live and really investigate them. Find out more about the food’s history. Talk to the people who make it. Take the time to savor it and to really consider what it tastes like. Think while you’re eating it and have a conversation about it.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/how_can_americans_learn_or_relearn_to_start_cultivating_that_sense_a_taste_of_place#comments Michelle Edelbaum July/August 2008 Amy Trubek Mon, 24 Aug 2009 18:18:16 +0000 Penelope Wall 10341 at http://www.eatingwell.com Can you comment on the tradition of terroir in the United States? http://www.eatingwell.com/can_you_comment_on_the_tradition_of_terroir_in_the_united_states <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Can you comment on the tradition of terroir in the United States?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Maybe 200 years ago lots of people [in the U.S.] would have understood terroir. If you talk to old-time Vermonters, they understand the differences in the great flavor profiles of maple syrup and they understand the Green Mountain potato versus other potatoes. One of my ideas is that with the industrialization of the food system, the decline of diverse rural economies and a move toward a more integrated urban economy, this may be knowledge that we’ve lost but not necessarily knowledge we’ve never had. That’s a question I’m interested in but I don’t really have an answer.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/can_you_comment_on_the_tradition_of_terroir_in_the_united_states#comments Michelle Edelbaum July/August 2008 Amy Trubek Mon, 24 Aug 2009 18:16:50 +0000 Penelope Wall 10339 at http://www.eatingwell.com What’s an example of terroir? http://www.eatingwell.com/what_s_an_example_of_terroir <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>What’s an example of terroir?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>If you were talking about cheese, you would talk about the location, conditions and altitude at which the cows or sheep are grazing and the plants they’re eating. Those attributes would be found in the milk that would be ultimately translated into the taste of the cheese.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/what_s_an_example_of_terroir#comments Michelle Edelbaum July/August 2008 Amy Trubek Mon, 24 Aug 2009 18:16:11 +0000 Penelope Wall 10337 at http://www.eatingwell.com A Food Anthropologist http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/a_food_anthropologist <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Trubek redefines “terroir.” </div> </div> </div> <p>Terroir, the tastes that emerge from the natural environment where a food is cultivated, is most often associated with wine—at least here in the United States. But food anthropologist Amy Trubek further explores the connection in The Taste of Place: A Cultural Journey Into Terroir (University of California Press, May 2008). We recently caught up with Trubek, formerly the executive director of the Vermont Fresh Network and now an assistant professor at the University of Vermont.</p> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-label">Standard Image:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/amy_trubek_310.jpg?1251137367" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-q-and-a"> <div class="field-label">Q &amp; A:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what_s_an_example_of_terroir">What’s an example of terroir?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/can_you_comment_on_the_tradition_of_terroir_in_the_united_states">Can you comment on the tradition of terroir in the United States?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how_can_americans_learn_or_relearn_to_start_cultivating_that_sense_a_taste_of_place">How can Americans learn—or relearn—to start cultivating that sense, a taste of place? </a> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/a_food_anthropologist#comments Michelle Edelbaum July/August 2008 Amy Trubek Food News & Origins - Food News Mon, 24 Aug 2009 18:10:53 +0000 Penelope Wall 10336 at http://www.eatingwell.com Ten Pounds in 10 Days? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/ten_pounds_in_10_days <p>“Lose 10 pounds in 10 days!” As a nutrition professor, I know better than to believe the ultra-fast weight-loss claims that proliferate as bathing-suit season peaks. I admit, some of the ads sure sound compelling. I’ve long wondered if any of the products that promise to “zap fat like magic” might have a kernel of truth. My friend Jane nips weight gain in the bud with a once-a-year three-day juice fast; it seems to work for her—but what does the science say? Full of hopeful skepticism, I recently sorted through the more enticing claims.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Can you safely fast-track weight loss? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4797scale_225.jpg?1250866427" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/scale_for_person_310_0.jpg?1279133699" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_diet_recipes">Healthy Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_low_calorie_recipes_menus">Quick and Healthy Low-Calorie Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/fiber_rich_recipes_to_help_you_lose_weight">Fiber-Rich Recipes to Help You Lose Weight</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/breakfast_recipes_to_beat_weight_gain">Breakfast Recipes to Beat Weight Gain</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans/eatingwell_s_500_calorie_dinners">EatingWell&#039;s 500-Calorie Dinners</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans/weight_loss_diet_meal_plan">Weight-Loss Diet Meal Plan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More EatingWell Diet Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/eatingwell_diet_challenge">EatingWell Diet Challenge</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/boost_fiber_to_slim_down">Boost Fiber to Slim Down</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/6_secrets_to_losing_weight">6 Secrets to Losing Weight</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/the_eatingwell_diet/7_steps_to_permanent_weight_loss">7 Steps to Permanent Weight Loss</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/3_antidotes_to_overeating">3 Antidotes to Overeating</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/secrets_to_staying_slim_past_40">Secrets to Staying Slim Past 40</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>“Lose 10 pounds in 10 days!” As a nutrition professor, I know better than to believe the ultra-fast weight-loss claims that proliferate as bathing-suit season peaks. I admit, some of the ads sure sound compelling. I’ve long wondered if any of the products that promise to “zap fat like magic” might have a kernel of truth. My friend Jane nips weight gain in the bud with a once-a-year three-day juice fast; it seems to work for her—but what does the science say? Full of hopeful skepticism, I recently sorted through the more enticing claims.<br /> Fasting: “The perfect jump-start!”</p> <p>People have fasted for centuries, mostly for religious reasons. But these days, short-term fasting to lose weight is much more common.</p> <p>At first blush it sounds like a good strategy: in a 2002 study by ­scientists at the Rowett Research Institute in Aberdeen, Scotland, healthy adults lost 1 to 2 percent of their body weight during a 36-hour fast (during which they consumed nothing but water) and up to 5 percent in six days. The subjects’ feelings of hunger and fatigue increased with the length of the fast—contradicting the argument often heard that hunger fades with prolonged fasting. Most discouraging, though, was that the fasters lost mostly muscle, not fat.</p> <p>Juice fasts like Jane’s may be better at curbing hunger since they ­provide some calories: most juice fasts recommend four 12-ounce glasses of fruit and/or vegetable juice in addition to water—better but hardly a nutritious menu by any standard. You should only fast if you are otherwise healthy and any prolonged fast should be medically supervised.</p> <p>More "quick fixes." Plus: what really works arrow </p> <p>Fat Burners: “Rev up your metabolic rate to ‘burn’ stored fat!”</p> <p>We’ve all seen the claims that fat burners—which usually include some sort of stimulant—raise your metabolic rate so you burn fat faster. But when you stoke metabolism you also risk straining the heart—a lesson we learned in 2003 when studies found that ephedra, one of the most popular fat burners, has dangerous side effects including heart attacks, strokes and even death. The Food and Drug Administration subsequently prohibited its sale.</p> <p>Today’s fat burners usually contain milder stimulants. One, Citrus aurantium (bitter orange), is touted as a safer alternative to ephedra, but a recent review by researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine concluded that more and larger studies are needed to determine the herb’s effectiveness and safety. Caffeine, another common addition to fat-burner formulas, boosts metabolism only minimally. In a 2007 study, 50 mg of caffeine (the amount in 1⁄2 cup of coffee) increased subjects’ calorie-burning rate by about 6 percent. That comes to about 17 extra calories burned off during the four hours the subjects were tracked. But those ­results may be misleading, since the subjects’ usual intake of coffee was low. As any Starbucks regular can tell you, people with a regular caffeine habit are less stimulated by caffeine.</p> <p>Fucoxanthin, a compound found in brown seaweed, is reported to act differently from the stimulant-type fat burners, although its precise mechanism is still unclear. Animal research from Hokkaido University, Japan, found that abdominal fat was slightly reduced in rodents after they were fed fucoxanthin. Although this sounds promising, it’s too early to tell if humans will benefit too. </p> <p>Appetite Suppressants: "Trick the brain into thinking you’ve eaten!"</p> <p>Whether they claim to make you feel fuller or help you forget your hunger, many products promise to curb your urge to eat. One that’s getting a lot of attention is Hoodia gordonii, a milkweed relative native to South Africa and Namibia. African Bushmen reportedly chew on hoodia stalks to ward off hunger during long hunting trips. Preliminary clinical research is intriguing; mice given injections of P57, a steroid compound identified as hoodia’s active ingredient, suppressed their food intake significantly. But for us humans, hoodia’s weight-loss effects “are not strongly substantiated by significant large clinical trials,” says Roberta A. Lee, M.D., medical director at the Continuum Center for Health and Healing at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. “That makes the ­evidence weak for weight loss at this time.”<br /> The Bottom Line</p> <p>As I expected, none of the quick fixes had strong scientific backing. So I turned to my friend Jean Harvey-Berino, Ph.D., chair of the University of Vermont’s Nutrition &amp; Food Sciences Department and author of The EatingWell Diet (The Countryman Press, 2007). “The best way to give yourself a jump-start,” she said, “is to create rules that add structure to your diet.” Jean suggested dialing down calories but still eating a balanced diet of real foods. Normally she would say not to drop below 1,200 calories per day, but for a quick fix, you could shave off a few more—going absolutely no lower than 800—for up to 3 days (no longer). She also recommends getting enough protein to prevent muscle loss and curb hunger. (That’s easy: most adults need about a third of a gram of protein per pound of body weight each day. For a 150-pound person that’s 50 grams—the amount, roughly, in 10 ounces of chicken breast.)</p> <p>Now when I need to lose a few pounds, I cut my calorie intake to about 1,000, well below my usual. I also add a two-mile morning jog (in addition to my usual noontime exercise class). These changes help me feel more in control and, before I know it, the unwanted pounds come off. It ’s not “10 pounds in 10 days” but it does the trick for me.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/ten_pounds_in_10_days#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. July/August 2008 Weight Loss/Diet Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:54:47 +0000 Nifer 10198 at http://www.eatingwell.com Are Plastics Safe? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/are_plastics_safe <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/recycled_plastic_items_310_0.jpg?1272556762" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Are Plastics Safe?<br /> Can plastic containers transfer harmful chemicals to foods and drinks?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Likely you’re referring to the potential dangers of polycarbonate plastics—often used in reusable water bottles, clear plastic food-storage containers and some baby bottles. Polycarbonates contain bisphenol-A (BPA), an estrogenlike chemical also used in the linings of some food and drink cans. Studies link BPA to the development of precancerous lesions and abnormal development of reproductive systems in animals. While BPA can leach into food and drinks, whether it actually affects human health currently is not known.</p> <p>What is known is that we’re all exposed to plenty of the chemical. In a 2005 study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control, 95 percent of people screened tested positive for BPA.</p> <p>A study published in early 2008 in <em>Toxicology Letters</em> suggested that hot liquids and foods exacerbate leaching in BPA-containing plastics. When researchers poured boiling water into polycarbonate drinking bottles, it caused up to 55 times more BPA to seep out than room-temperature water had.</p> <p>Consumer concern peaked in April after the National Toxicology Program (part of the National Institutes of Health) issued a draft report noting that, given the current science, the possibility couldn’t be ruled out. In September 2008, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said that BPA is safe for adults and children at current exposure levels.</p> <p>Whether washing containers in hot water causes them to break down and release BPA the next time they’re used isn’t clear: only a handful of studies have been conducted, and results are conflicting. While heating these plastics in the microwave hasn’t been studied, it’s not recommended. “We assume there is increased leaching with any kind of heating,” says Anila Jacob, M.D., a senior scientist with the Environmental Working Group.</p> <p><strong>Bottom line:</strong> Manufacturers currently aren’t required to label BPA so there’s no way of knowing if it’s present in the plastics or cans you use. For now, the best way to reduce your exposure is to use stainless steel, glass or plastics labeled “BPA-free.” If you’re not sure about a product, recommends Jacob, call the manufacturer.</p> <p><strong>We&#8217;re fans of the BPA- and phthalate-free <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/greener_kitchen_tools">everyday kitchen tools from Preserve Kitchen by Recycline</a>, pictured above. </strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Also of Interest </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/organic_natural/7_simple_ways_to_detox_your_diet_and_your_home">7 Simple Ways to Detox Your Diet and Your Home</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/bpa_free_glass_water_bottles">BPA-Free Glass Water Bottles</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/kitchen_product_reviews/9_green_products_for_a_healthy_kitchen">9 Green Products for a Healthy Kitchen</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/organic_natural/what_chemicals_are_in_food_simple_solutions_to_avoid_harmful_toxins_in_food">What Chemicals Are in Food? Simple Solutions to Avoid Harmful Toxins in Food</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/bottled_water_vs_tap">Bottled Water vs. Tap</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/paper_or_plastic_bags">Paper or Plastic Bags?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/organic_natural/dirty_dozen_plus_14_foods_you_should_buy_organic">The Dirty Dozen Plus: 14 Foods You Should Buy Organic</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/green_up_kitchen_challenge">Green Up Your Kitchen Challenge</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Karen Ansel, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2008 </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/are_plastics_safe#comments Karen Ansel, M.S., R.D. July/August 2008 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:16:48 +0000 Nifer 10172 at http://www.eatingwell.com How to Pair Beer and Food http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/wine_beer_spirits_guide/how_to_pair_beer_and_food <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Carolyn Malcoun </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Malt, yeast and hops create food-friendly drinks. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the heat of summer, most of my evenings are spent tending the grill, cold beer in hand. It’s the perfect time to explore craft-brewed beers; those produced by independently-owned breweries making less than 2 million barrels annually. With endless flavors, aromas and textures, you can find a beer to pair with practically any food.</p> <p>Recently I drove down to one of my favorite local breweries, Otter Creek Brewery in Middlebury, Vermont (they also make Wolaver’s Certified Organic Ales) to talk to their president/owner Morgan Wolaver and brewmaster Steve Parkes about pairing beer with food. “The main thing to remember is synergy rather than conflict,” Steve says.</p> <p>The three main ingredients in beer—malt, hops and yeast—are the elements to consider when pairing.</p> <p> * <strong>Malt is sweet</strong>; it’s often roasted, which caramelizes its natural sugars. “Beers like stouts and porters have coffee and chocolate notes from the malt, which pair beautifully with chocolate desserts,” says Steve. And if you thought those beers are too dark for summer, their robust character also goes well with barbecued meats.<br /> * <strong>The wide variety of hops used to flavor beer</strong> are either spicy, bitter or floral and frequently fruity. “If you’re eating spicy food, there should be an element of spice in the beer you’re drinking, think Mexican food with a hoppy India Pale Ale,” Morgan suggests. Pale ales, less bitter than India Pale Ales (which were historically brewed with more hops to preserve them on long ocean voyages), are quite balanced and food-friendly.<br /> * <strong>Then there’s yeast</strong>, which is, well, yeasty. (Maybe that’s why beer and pizza go so well together.) American wheat beers, Belgian witbiers and German hefeweizens generally have stronger yeast flavors and are great with lighter foods, like salads and seafood.</p> <p>With more than 2 billion bottles of craft-brewed beer produced each year in the U.S., it can be overwhelming to know where to start. If you’ve only been drinking mass-produced beers and are looking to take a baby step, try a lighter beer, like a kölsch, lager or pilsner with a <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chicken_fruit_salad.html">Chicken &amp; Fruit Salad</a>. Or go to the opposite extreme: “When someone new to craft beers says they like coffee, I immediately reach for a stout or porter,” Morgan says. The rich flavors of both styles will be familiar to a coffee lover. Trying adding a scoop of <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/homemade_chocolate_ice_cream.html">homemade chocolate ice cream</a> to a glass for an adult float.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/wine_beer_spirits_guide/how_to_pair_beer_and_food#comments Carolyn Malcoun July/August 2008 Healthy Cooking - Wine, Beer & Spirits Guide Wed, 19 Aug 2009 14:37:31 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9757 at http://www.eatingwell.com How the Elite Eat http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_the_elite_eat <p>Four Olympic athletes talk about nutrition, calories and exercise tips to live by.</p> <h3>Erik Vendt</h3> <p>At 27, swimmer Erik Vendt is the first American to break 15 minutes in the mile and a two-time Olympic silver medalist in the 400 individual medley (2000, 2004). Recently coming out of retirement and with his sights now set on Beijing, Erik credits his speedy ­return, in part, to an organic diet.</p> <p><strong>Q: Describe your typical day of training.</strong></p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> <div class="field-item even"> Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Four top athletes share their winning secrets to healthy eating. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Erik Vendt</strong></p> <p>At 27, swimmer Erik Vendt is the first American to break 15 minutes in the mile and a two-time Olympic silver medalist in the 400 individual medley (2000, 2004). Recently coming out of retirement and with his sights now set on Beijing, Erik credits his speedy ­return, in part, to an organic diet.</p> <p><strong>Q: Describe your typical day of training.</strong><br /> A: A normal day consists of two swimming workouts—morning and afternoon, totaling 4 hours—and some sort of dry-land routine, alternating weights one day with running and Pilates on the other. In swimming, speed comes directly from the core so Pilates helps immensely.</p> <p><strong>Q: Favorite power breakfast?</strong><br /> A: Breakfast is my favorite meal of the day so picking a favorite is difficult, but after a hard morning workout I love cooking up a 4-egg omelet with Cheddar, peppers, onions and tomatoes.</p> <p><strong>Q: Favorite snack?</strong><br /> A: Definitely fruit! It’s hard to find fresh organic produce in the winter in Michigan, but Ann Arbor has a lot of co-ops.</p> <p><strong>Q: If you need to grab a quick bite to eat, what do you reach for first?</strong><br /> A: I’ll normally make a tuna sandwich to tide me over. It’s quick, easy and does the job.</p> <p><strong>Q: Is there anything you try to eat more of?</strong><br /> A: Ever since I was a kid I’ve been extremely low on iron so I try to pack my diet with as much of it as I can—red meat, oatmeal, cereal and beans. I normally add a vitamin C-rich food as well to help with iron ­absorption.</p> <p><strong>Q: Do you have an eating mantra you try to live by?</strong><br /> A: I think there’s a direct correlation between what you eat and how you feel. As soon as I began eating organic I felt better, more alive and healthier. </p> <p><strong>Dara Torres</strong><br /> Dara Torres is more than your average Olympic athlete: she has set three World records, holds 13 National titles and owns nine Olympic medals, four of which are gold. Torres is the first U.S. swimmer to compete in four Olympic games and now, at 41 and a mother of a 2-year-old, she’s concentrating on a fifth—in Beijing.</p> <p><strong>Q: Describe your typical day of training.</strong><br /> A: I spend two hours in the pool, five days a week, and I weight train four days a week—two days of lower-body and core and the other two days upper-body and core. I also do resistive stretching three days a week.</p> <p><strong>Q: How many calories would you say you consume in a day?</strong><br /> A: I have no idea. I had an eating disorder in college so I don’t count calories.</p> <p><strong>Q: Favorite power breakfast?</strong><br /> A: Berry-flavored Living Fuel shakes with some milk and fruit are the best!</p> <p><strong>Q: What’s changed—in terms of physical activity and eating—with age?</strong><br /> A: The biggest change is recovery. I don’t recover as quickly as I used to, so now I try to eat more foods—lean protein in particular—that help me recover quicker.</p> <p><strong>Q: Favorite dinner or recipe?</strong><br /> A: A mixed green salad, turkey-spinach lasagna, garlic bread and green beans. My favorite cookbook is one I got in college—Where’s Mom Now That I Need Her?</p> <p><strong>Q: Best piece of nutrition advice you’ve ever gotten?</strong><br /> A: It’s OK to have bites of food that probably aren’t the best for you because that way you won’t deprive yourself and then want more of that food.</p> <p><strong>Q: Do you have an eating mantra you try to live by?</strong><br /> A: I eat what I want, when I want, but I exercise so I can do that.</p> <p><strong>Mary Lou Retton</strong><br /> In 1984, gymnast Mary Lou Retton brought home five Olympic medals from the Summer Olympic Games—including the All Around Gold Medal, a first for an American woman. Now 40, this mother of four girls (ages 6, 8, 11 and 13) “eats just to be healthy.”</p> <p><strong>Q: Describe your exercise routine.</strong><br /> A: I do 45 minutes of cardio—the elliptical is my favorite—then 30 minutes of weights.</p> <p><strong>Q: How many calories would you say you consume in a day?</strong><br /> A: You know, I don’t count calories. I hate those charts because, at 4'9", I should probably weigh 37 pounds. I don’t weigh myself either. I go by my clothes, how they fit and feel and what I look like in the mirror. I hate to get targeted on a number, especially with four girls. We don’t use the words ‘skinny’ or ‘thin’ in the house. We use the words ‘healthy,’ ‘muscular’ and ‘strong’ and we discuss healthy eating.</p> <p><strong>Q: Favorite power breakfast?</strong><br /> A: Egg whites. If I eat protein, it holds me a little longer—egg whites and a whole-wheat bagel or toast hold me until lunch. And of course Wheaties. The breakfast of champions!</p> <p><strong>Q: What’s your typical dinner?</strong><br /> A: I really try to prepare balanced meals. We’ll do a lean piece of protein, a vegetable and a starch. I use a lot of EatingWell recipes; Poached Salmon with Creamy Piccata Sauce and Grilled Chicken Tenders with Cilantro Pesto are two of our favorites. But pasta is my staple food. I’m Italian and, growing up, every Sunday after church the whole, big, large, loud family would get together for a big pasta dinner. Now, I try to do whole-wheat pasta. There are some that look white now so I trick my kids.</p> <p><strong>Q: Best piece of nutrition advice you’ve ever gotten?</strong><br /> A: From my coach, Bela Karolyi: “Eat small portions, and everything in moderation.”</p> <p><strong>Apolo Anton Ohno</strong><br /> Apolo Anton Ohno, 26, has been the reigning U.S. short track speedskating champion since 2001 and has won the U.S. men’s title nine times. In 2007, Ohno gained a whole new fan base when he and dance partner Julianne Hough won season four of the hit ABC series Dancing with the Stars. Ohno’s stamina shows no signs of waning: he plans to compete in his third Olympics at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, Canada.</p> <p><strong>Q: Describe your typical day of training.</strong><br /> A: In the morning, I train on the ice from 7:00 to 11:30. Then from 3:00 to 6:00 in the evening, I lift weights, run and bike sprints, and do technique training on dry land (performing exercises that use the same muscles required to skate).</p> <p><strong>Q: How many calories would you say you consume in a day?</strong><br /> A: It all depends on my activity level. I’ve never really counted calories because when I’m in tune with my nutrition, I can feel when I need to add more grams of fat, protein or carbohydrates.</p> <p><strong>Q: If you need a quick bite, what do you reach for first?</strong><br /> A: An apple and salmon sticks (like beef jerky but made with salmon).</p> <p><strong>Q: Favorite snacks?</strong><br /> A: My “bad” snacks are multicolored Swedish fish and peanut M&amp;Ms. “Good” snacks are fruits and veggies.</p> <p><strong>Q: How has good nutrition made a difference for you?</strong><br /> A: I’m constantly working hard to improve my nutrition knowledge and it’s brought out abs and definition in my body that I’ve never seen before. I feel more energetic and healthy, and my mind is clear.</p> <p><strong>Q: Overall eating mantra?</strong><br /> A: “Not an almond more, not an almond less.” I’m hardcore about nutrition when it’s time to compete. My body needs to be clean—a well-oiled machine works best with top-grade fuel.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_the_elite_eat#comments Amy Paturel Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. July/August 2008 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Tue, 18 Aug 2009 14:26:53 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9667 at http://www.eatingwell.com 4 Natural Fuel Foods for Your Next Workout http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/4_natural_fuel_foods_for_your_next_workout <p>What foods can you count on to go the extra mile, and which foods fall short? See what recent studies reveal before your next workout.</p> <p><strong>1. A Spoonful of Honey</strong></p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Supercharge your workout and get a natural energy boost from foods you have in your kitchen right now. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/woman_jogging_so10_630.jpg?1280876381" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/honey_310_0.jpg?1259100303" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Recipes for a Better Workout </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/breakfasts_that_fight_fat">Breakfasts That Fight Fat</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_blueberry_recipes_for_a_better_workout">Healthy Blueberry Recipes for a Better Workout</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/foods_that_make_your_workout_easier">Foods that make your workout easier</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Exercise Tips </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/how_to_exercise_without_even_knowing_it">6 Ways to Exercise Without Even Knowing It</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/lazy_ways_to_burn_1000_calories">Lazy ways to burn 1,000 calories</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/what_s_the_best_after_workout_drink">What’s the best after-workout drink?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>1. A Spoonful of Honey</strong><br /> Recent research suggests that carb blends (foods containing fructose and glucose) may be superior to straight glucose for boosting energy during endurance activities. But before you reach for a sports drink, consider honey: like sugar, it naturally has equal parts fructose and glucose, but it also contains a handful of antioxidants and vitamins. <strong>Upshot:</strong> While not exactly a “super food,” honey has plenty going for it besides being sweet. The darker the honey, the more disease-fighting compounds it contains.</p> <p> * Health benefits of honey<br /> * Honey recipes</p> <p><strong>2. A Cup of Joe</strong><br /> Studies that demonstrate performance-enhancing benefits of caffeine often imply that drinking coffee will give you a boost. Not so, according to the latest research. Scientists put nine endurance runners through five trials after ingesting either a capsule (caffeine or placebo) or coffee (decaffeinated, decaffeinated with caffeine added or regular coffee). Only the caffeine capsule increased endurance. Researchers think that other compounds in coffee may counteract some of the benefits of caffeine. <strong>Upshot:</strong> Have your cup of coffee if you need it to get moving, and your stomach can tolerate it, but don’t expect it to keep you going through a long workout.</p> <p> * Health benefits of coffee<br /> * Coffee recipes</p> <p><strong>3. A Glass of Chocolate Milk</strong><br /> A small 2006 study (partially funded by the dairy industry) found that chocolate milk might help tired athletes refuel as well or better than popular sports drinks. In the study, nine cyclists rode until exhaustion, rested for four hours, then biked again. During the rest period, they drank either low-fat chocolate milk, Gatorade (a fluid/electrolyte-replacement drink) or Endurox (a carbohydrate-replacement drink). The cyclists who refueled with chocolate milk were able to bike about 50 percent longer during the second bout of exercise than those who drank Endurox and about as long as those who drank Gatorade. <strong>Upshot:</strong> You don’t need a “sports drink” to refuel after a workout. Regular or chocolate milk—both of which contain a mix of carbohydrate and protein—may work just as well. Before or during a workout, however, stick with Gatorade or a similar carb/electrolyte drink.</p> <p> * Got milk? Navigate the choices with this helpful buyer’s guide</p> <p><strong>4. A Bowl of Yogurt</strong><br /> Constant training takes a toll on your immune system, leaving athletes susceptible to upper respiratory tract infections, but new research suggests that probiotics—the live active cultures in yogurt—may help keep you healthy. A 2008 study of 20 endurance athletes (published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine) found that taking daily probiotic capsules enhanced the activity of the athletes’ immune-boosting T-cells and cut the length of time they experienced upper respiratory tract infection symptoms by more than half. Probiotics can also help calm a queasy stomach, which is great for nervous athletes. Upshot: You’d have to eat vats of yogurt to reach the levels of probiotics the athletes in these studies consumed. Still, yogurt has a balanced mix of carbs and protein, so it’s a great post-workout recovery fuel.</p> <p> * Health benefits of yogurt<br /> * Yogurt recipes to keep you young</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/4_natural_fuel_foods_for_your_next_workout#comments Amy Paturel July/August 2008 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Tue, 18 Aug 2009 14:10:14 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9663 at http://www.eatingwell.com Eat to Win http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/eat_to_win <p>Track and field Olympian Marion Jones was America’s darling during the 2000 Olympic games in Sydney, bringing home three gold medals and two bronzes. She ran like a lean, high-powered machine, and credited nutrition supplements—including flaxseed oil and iron—for her superstar performances. Later, she admitted to taking steroids.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Is food the ultimate performance enhancer? More and more, athletes, nutrition experts and fitness buffs are saying yes! </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/energy_bars.jpg?1262799858" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Also of Interest </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/breakfast_of_champions">Breakfast of Champions</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/4_natural_fuel_foods_for_your_next_workout">4 Natural Fuel Foods for Your Next Workout</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/can_exercise_override_bad_genes">Can Exercise Override Bad Genes?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/6_ways_to_sneak_in_your_exercise">6 ways to sneak in your exercise</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/exercise_because_it_feels_good">Exercise Because It Feels Good</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/breakfasts_that_fight_fat">Breakfasts That Fight Fat</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/quick_weeknight_dinners/5_easy_power_dinners_to_fuel_your_week">5 Easy Power Dinners to Fuel Your Week</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Track and field Olympian Marion Jones was America’s darling during the 2000 Olympic games in Sydney, bringing home three gold medals and two bronzes. She ran like a lean, high-powered machine, and credited nutrition supplements—including flaxseed oil and iron—for her superstar performances. Later, she admitted to taking steroids. Since then, accusations of using performance-enhancing drugs have become frequent among elite athletes such as baseball pitcher Roger Clemens (who still denies using steroids and human growth hormone) and American cyclist Floyd Landis (who was stripped of his title as the 2006 Tour de France winner after blood tests suggested he took synthetic testosterone). As a result, most sports nutritionists won’t recommend supplements—or even multivitamins in some cases. They’re afraid that a tainted pill could cause an athlete to fail a drug test.</p> <p>“The risk of product contamination can be as high as one in five or one in six,” says Martin Gibala, Ph.D., associate professor in the department of kinesiology at McMaster University in Canada. Besides, “athletes need to eat real foods to enhance performance—not supplements,” says Gibala. In fact, experts say, getting the right mix of carbohydrate, protein and fat can mean the difference between an Olympic gold medal in Beijing and going home empty-handed.</p> <p><strong>Carbohydrates for Going the Distance</strong></p> <p>Swimmer Erik Vendt took home silver medals in the 2000 and 2004 Olympics for the 400 meter individual medley and then retired, citing the stress of training. At the time, he loved junk food and would often have a midnight snack of candy or chips. Today he’s back, ranked among the top 5 in the world and training for Beijing. “Nutrition has helped me tremendously, mostly by elevating my training level—and that has a direct impact on how much time I drop during my races,” says the 27-year-old, who now eats an all-organic diet focused on whole foods. “Before a workout, I don’t like to stuff myself with a meal; instead, I eat enough to give me the energy I need to attack the workout properly. I eat a bagel, fruit or a bowl of oatmeal.”</p> <p>Like many athletes, Vendt starts with carbohydrates. Since the 1920s, researchers have known that eating carbohydrates enhances performance. “We’re still recommending carbohydrates to athletes and active individuals, but the amount depends on the sports, the individuals, and their weight and health goals,” says Melinda Manore, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Sciences at Oregon State University. Carbohydrates break down easily and quickly raise your blood sugar, which fuels your muscles and your brain.</p> <p>Trouble is, while the body can store large amounts of protein (as muscle) and fat, it has a limited capacity to store carbohydrate. “The typical athlete can store between 400 and 600 grams of carbohydrate [or 1,600 to 2,400 calories] in the muscle as glycogen,” says Nanna Meyer, Ph.D., R.D., a research associate at The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital (TOSH) who has worked with Apolo Anton Ohno and other members of the U.S. Olympic Speedskating Team as well as Olympic cycling champions. Because of this, endurance athletes, such as marathon runners, long-distance cyclists and cross-country skiers, can burn through their glycogen stores after about 90 to 120 minutes of exercise. Once glycogen is depleted, the body mobilizes fat, which muscles cannot burn at the same rate as carbohydrate. The resulting fatigue—also called “bonking” or “hitting the wall”—can be so debilitating, athletes can have difficulty moving.<br /> To prevent bonking, long-distance athletes supplement with carbohydrates during a workout—literally, they eat on the run or the ride. Many athletes go straight for specially formulated sports gels or drinks, which provide easily digested simple carbohydrates and electrolytes, such as sodium and potassium (which are lost through perspiration), minerals that help the body maintain a healthy fluid balance and keep the heart working properly. Gels generally are easier to carry than high-carb “real foods,” such as bananas or raisins (which contain potassium) or pretzels (which provide sodium). However, according to some nutrition experts, these specialized products aren’t necessarily better at maximizing performance. For example, according to a small San Diego State University study (funded by the California Raisin Marketing Board), eating raisins prior to a workout was just as effective as consuming the same number of carbs in a sports gel.</p> <p>That said, fueling up mid-workout is a science. The body can generally absorb only about 60 grams of carbohydrates, or 240 calories, an hour, says Gibala. If you eat too much, the carbohydrates aren’t absorbed into the bloodstream and sent to muscles; they just stay in the digestive tract—so you can end up with a lot of cramping.</p> <p>However, recently a lab in the UK found that a blend of fructose and glucose allows the body to burn up to 108 grams of carbs an hour (compared to 60 grams for straight glucose). Scientists found that when eight trained cyclists consumed glucose and fructose together throughout their workouts, they stored more energy in their muscles and, as a result, completed the course 8 percent faster than when they fueled up on straight glucose and 19 percent faster than when they sipped plain water.</p> <p>“Chemicals in our digestive systems transport sugars from the stomach into the intestines and then into the blood. And those transporters respond differently to different types of sugars,” says Gibala. “So giving multiple types of sugars allows the athlete to get more energy into their muscles to fuel the work.” It’s like having multiple doors to a stadium: with more doors, the stadium sections fill up faster.</p> <p>Historically, carbs were the only nutrient for fueling up, but new research suggests that athletes may benefit from eating protein during a workout too. In fact, the latest craze in sports nutrition is spiking energy drinks with protein. A couple of studies on trained cyclists reported that when athletes consumed a drink containing about 2 percent protein (and the rest carbohydrate) they were able to cycle up to 30 percent longer than when they consumed a sports drink containing only carbohydrates. Despite the promising results, experts claim the research isn’t conclusive, that the benefits may come simply from consuming more calories overall. “Basically they just added protein on top of carbohydrates,” says Gibala. “So is it an effect of protein, or is it the fact that you’re just giving people more calories?” No one knows for sure—and, from a biochemical standpoint, there’s no generally accepted explanation for why consuming protein during exercise would improve performance. </p> <p><strong>Protein For Rebuilding and Repairing</strong></p> <p>What researchers do know about protein is that it’s critical for recovery after intense exercise. Protein consists of 20 different amino acids—nine that are essential (meaning that we have to get them from food) and 11 that the body can produce. When athletes eat foods containing protein within a few hours of working out, their bodies make more protein than they break down. The result? They’re repairing muscles that get torn up during high-intensity exercise, which means that, at the end of the day, they’re maintaining—or even gaining—muscle.</p> <p>“We don’t know which amino acids are best, and there’s certainly no evidence that any one protein-based product is better [for recovery] than another,” says Gibala. “The message for athletes is that eating a food that provides some protein after a workout is going to be beneficial. Does it matter if you get it from a glass of chocolate milk or a tuna fish sandwich or a protein bar? Right now, we can’t say, so our advice is just to eat real food when you can.”</p> <p>Sports nutrition experts recommend spreading small protein meals throughout the day since frequently consuming small doses helps the body convert amino acids from food into protein it can use to build new muscle.</p> <p>“If you look at body builders, some of them intuitively eat every two to three hours to the point of waking up in the middle of the night to eat a small amount of protein,” says Gibala. How small? Benefits come with as little as 6 grams of protein—that’s what you’d get in an egg or a glass of milk. The recommended protein intake is 0.4 gram per pound of body weight for moderately active individuals and about 1 gram per pound if you lift like Arnold Schwarzenegger.</p> <p>“Some of the recovery shakes have 50 grams of protein,” says Meyer. “That’s overkill; the body will not profit from that.” In fact, the body will process excess protein as it does all extra calories: those not used will be stored as fat. Instead of overdoing it on protein, experts tell athletes to add complex carbs, such as vegetables and whole grains, to their post-workout meals. Scientists think that these healthful carbs may help the body absorb protein. Complex carbs also contain many essential vitamins and minerals that aid in recovery and muscle building, and they offer the body an alternate source of energy so it can reserve protein from the diet for muscle repair and growth.</p> <p>Speedskater Chris Needham follows this advice. “I love eating a big juicy steak after a workout,” he says, “But it’s not like I’m going to the Texas Roadhouse and having a 42-ounce slab of meat. I eat a balanced meal with lots of fresh vegetables and some potatoes—something that covers all of the bases.” Needham’s strategy not only prevents protein overkill, it also limits his intake of saturated fat. </p> <p>Healthy Fats to Curb Inflammation</p> <p>Fat was one nutrient João Correia, 33, loved, but when he decided to go back to professional cycling after an 11-year sabbatical, he knew he needed a dramatic lifestyle change. As the associate publisher of Bicycling magazine, Correia’s responsibilities frequently included entertaining clients. He was eating five- or six-course meals a few times a week and washing them down with several glasses of wine. “I come from a family of people in the restaurant business, and I love food. Some people take clients to games or sports events,” says Correia. “I took them to eat.”</p> <p>But when one of Correia’s clients suggested he drop his extra weight and get back into racing, Correia decided to give reaching the pro level a shot. It was a lofty goal, but it was just what Correia needed to get back into shape.</p> <p>“In cycling, the lighter you are and the more power you can produce, the faster you’re going to go,” says Correia, who once rode for Portugal’s national team. But at 5'9" and 185 pounds, he wasn’t going very fast. By working with Meyer, Correia was not only able to drop 40 pounds, but he also learned how to fuel his body for optimal performance.</p> <p>“Most cyclists don’t think about nutrition—they’re just focused on weight,” says Correia. “But I view food as a big part of my competitive advantage. I learned a completely different way of eating that still allowed me to enjoy the foods I like.”</p> <p>Fat itself wasn’t the problem. It was the type of fat Correia was eating. Loading up on steak with béarnaise sauce, fettuccine Alfredo and foie gras weighed him down and exacerbated the inflammation that accompanies high-intensity exercise. So Meyer revamped Correia’s diet to replace inflammation-stoking saturated fats with healthful unsaturated fats. Instead of pasta Bolognese with ground beef and heavy cream, she gave Correia a recipe that uses lean ground turkey and olive oil. He peppered his diet with omega-3s from fish, and heart-healthy fats from avocados, nuts and olive oil. As a result, he lowered his calorie intake and boosted his energy levels.</p> <p>When you measure how much fat and carbohydrates a person uses for energy, an elite-level athlete like Correia will always burn more fat than someone who exercises occasionally. The body naturally adapts to allow athletes to reserve carbohydrates for a quick energy boost at the end of a long workout, says Meyer: “The more trained an athlete becomes, the more fat they are able to store in the muscle and use for fuel. Part of that training adaptation allows them to store fat close to the muscle cell so it can be burned quickly.” These intramuscular triglycerides—or intramuscular fats—enable athletes to use fat for energy as seamlessly as carbohydrates.</p> <p>It worked for Correia. Healthful fats not only provided him with sustained energy in the form of intramuscular triglycerides but also made his food taste good and helped him feel satisfied on a lower-calorie diet. Correia claims his comeback at the pro level has been as much about nutrition as it is about training. Food can make or break your performance, he says—especially if you’re carrying around extra pounds.</p> <p>Correia’s next goal is to win a medal at the National Championships in Portugal this summer. Even though he is one of the very few professional riders who also hold down full-time jobs, Correia knows he has a chance. After all, he stopped racing at the age of 21 and made a comeback a decade later. Now he races for a U.S. professional team (Bissell). Some might say that was an impossible goal.</p> <p><em>—Amy Paturel, M.S., M.P.H., is a freelance writer in Seal Beach, California.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/eat_to_win#comments Amy Paturel July/August 2008 Recipes & Menus - Energy Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Mon, 17 Aug 2009 20:21:09 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9627 at http://www.eatingwell.com Breakfast of Champions http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/breakfast_of_champions <p>When Olympians plan what they’ll eat in the morning, they rarely call it breakfast. “They look at it as a pre-training meal or pre-competition meal,” explains Liz Applegate, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the University of California at Davis nutrition department and author of the Encyclopedia of Sports and Fitness Nutrition (Three Rivers Press, 2002). But elite or amateur, all athletes need to eat something, says Applegate.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 3 on-the-go power breakfast recipes to fuel your day. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/4605sports_smoothie225.jpg?1251406426" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/egg_salmon_sandwich.html">Egg &amp; Salmon Sandwich</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/peanut_energy_bars.html">Peanut Energy Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/citrus_berry_smoothie.html">Citrus Berry Smoothie</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Breakfast Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_breakfast_recipes">Healthy Breakfast Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/breakfast_recipes_to_beat_weight_gain">Breakfast Recipes to Beat Weight Gain</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/food_blog/15_minutes_to_a_healthy_breakfast">15 minutes to a healthy breakfast</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/food_blog/5_nohassle_grabandgo_breakfasts">5 no-hassle, grab-and-go breakfasts</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/5_breakfasts_that_burn_fat">5 breakfasts that burn fat</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When Olympians plan what they’ll eat in the morning, they rarely call it breakfast. “They look at it as a pre-training meal or pre-competition meal,” explains Liz Applegate, Ph.D., senior lecturer in the University of California at Davis nutrition department and author of the Encyclopedia of Sports and Fitness Nutrition (Three Rivers Press, 2002). But elite or amateur, all athletes need to eat something, says Applegate.</p> <p>In general, active people should have a breakfast that provides about 500 calories, provided you have two full hours to digest before your workout, says Nancy Clark, R.D., author of Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook (4th edition; Human Kinetics, 2008). If you’re eating en route to a workout, go for a pre-workout snack in the range of 100 to 150 calories.</p> <p>No matter what your sport or your fitness level, your morning meal should be rich in carbohydrates, such as whole grains and fruits. Carbohydrates raise your blood sugar, which fuels your muscles and brain, explains Monique Ryan, R.D., author of Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes (2nd edition; Velo Press, 2007). Eating carbs also helps to replenish glycogen, the form of carbohydrate that your body stores and, during extended exercise, breaks down into glucose. Including a bit of lean protein, which is important for building and repairing muscles, and healthy fats (like the monounsaturated kinds in peanut butter and the omega-3s in salmon) can help give the meal more staying power—but you don’t want to overdo it either, says Ryan. Too much can slow you down by shunting your energy into digestion. What’s more, notes Applegate: runners should avoid a big meal, big fiber loads or anything that can cause intestinal stress as it jostles around.</p> <p>Even if you are not in training, “consider breakfast a good opportunity to fit in some nutritious foods you might find harder to get later in the day,” says Clark. Our answer? Recipes for three on-the-go power breakfasts that can fuel your day.</p> <p><strong>1. <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/egg_salmon_sandwich.html">Egg &amp; Salmon Sandwich</a></strong><br /> Smoked salmon and egg whites on a toasted whole-wheat English muffin is the perfect power breakfast. For a more substantial meal, pair it with a piece of fruit or a glass of 100% juice.</p> <p><strong>2. <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/peanut_energy_bars.html">Peanut Energy Bars</a></strong><br /> This carbohydrate-rich bar, full of nuts, seeds, fruit and oats, was adapted from Amy Harrison’s prize-winning submission in the Plains (Georgia) Peanut Festival recipe competition. It includes a little protein, and is a great grab-and-go pre-workout snack on mornings when you don’t have time to digest a full meal.</p> <p><strong>3. <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/citrus_berry_smoothie.html">Citrus Berry Smoothie</a></strong><br /> This meal-in-a-glass smoothie is bursting with berries and orange juice, healthful sources of carbohydrate and powerful antioxidants. Getting plenty of antioxidant-rich foods makes sense for active people, since free radicals are produced any time the body’s cells process oxygen.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/breakfast_of_champions#comments Joyce Hendley July/August 2008 Recipes & Menus - Energy Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Mon, 17 Aug 2009 19:41:21 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9616 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Total-Body Benefits of Berries http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_total_body_benefits_of_berries <p>When it comes to health, berries have a fabulous reputation. Blueberries are packed with antioxidants, called anthocyanins, that may help keep memory sharp as you age, and raspberries contain ellagic acid, a compound with anti-cancer properties. All berries are great sources of fiber, a nutrient important for a healthy digestive system. But if you need more reasons to dig into summer’s sun-kissed little fruits, look no further than two new studies, which suggest that berries may be good for your heart and your bones as well.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Learn about the surprising ways berries boost health. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/berries_310_0.jpg?1276124987" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Berry Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_berry_recipes">Healthy Berry Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/sweet_strawberry_recipes">Sweet Strawberry Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/our_best_healthy_blueberry_recipes">Our Best Healthy Blueberry Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/food_blog/picnicperfect_raspberry_bars_more_fresh_raspberry_recipes">Picnic-perfect raspberry bars &amp; more fresh raspberry recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/7_foods_that_do_the_weight_loss_work_for_you">7 Foods That Do the Weight-Loss Work for You</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/8_secret_weapon_foods_for_weight_loss">8 Secret-Weapon Foods for Weight Loss</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When it comes to health, berries have a fabulous reputation. Blueberries are packed with antioxidants, called anthocyanins, that may help keep memory sharp as you age, and raspberries contain ellagic acid, a compound with anti-cancer properties. All berries are great sources of fiber, a nutrient important for a healthy digestive system. But if you need more reasons to dig into summer’s sun-kissed little fruits, look no further than two new studies, which suggest that berries may be good for your heart and your bones as well.</p> <p>In a study of 72 middle-age people published recently in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, eating just under a cup of mixed berries daily for eight weeks was associated with increased levels of “good” HDL cholesterol and lowered blood pressure, two positives when it comes to heart health. Included in the mix were strawberries, red raspberries and bilberries—similar to blueberries—as well as other berries more common in Finland (where the research was conducted): black currants, lingonberries and choke­berries.</p> <p>“At the moment we do not know which berry, or berries, could have been the most active,” says Iris Erlund, Ph.D., senior researcher at the National Public Health Institute in Helsinki and lead author of the study. But, in fact, the diverse range of polyphenols—a broad class of health-promoting plant compounds that includes anthocyanins and ellagic acid—provided by the mix of berries is likely responsible for the observed benefits. Polyphenols may increase levels of nitric oxide, a molecule that produces a number of heart-healthy effects. One is helping to relax blood vessels, which subsequently results in lowered blood pressure, says Erlund.</p> <p>Polyphenols may also help preserve bone density after menopause, according to new research in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. Our bones are constantly “turning over”—breaking down and building back up. After menopause, when estrogen levels plummet, bone breakdown outpaces bone formation, and the result is bone loss, a risk factor for osteoporosis. In the study, rats that had their ovaries removed (to mimic an estrogen-deprived postmenopausal state) and were fed blueberries every day for three months significantly increased their bone density, scientists at Florida Study University discovered. “We believe that polyphenols in the berries slowed the rate [of bone turnover], ultimately saving bone,” says Bahram Arjmandi, Ph.D., R.D., the study’s lead author and professor and chair of the department of nutrition, food and exercise sciences at FSU. More research is needed to know for sure whether the benefits translate to humans but, says Arjmandi, the data suggest that eating even a small amount of blueberries each day—perhaps as little as 1⁄4 cup—could be good for anyone’s bones.</p> <p><strong>Bottom line:</strong> Dig into a variety of berries regularly to reap the “total body” benefits of their polyphenols.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_total_body_benefits_of_berries#comments Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. July/August 2008 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Mon, 17 Aug 2009 16:17:11 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9567 at http://www.eatingwell.com Why Eating Yogurt May Help Your Gums http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/a_new_reason_to_smile_about_yogurt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A New Reason to Smile About Yogurt </div> </div> </div> <p>Yogurt lovers, rejoice! Not only does this nutrient-packed snack help keep your bones strong, new research shows it may also protect against gum disease. Researchers from Japan recently analyzed dietary intakes from nearly 1,000 adults and found those who consumed the highest levels of dairy—specifically yogurt and yogurt-type drinks—had the healthiest gums.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> D. Milton Stokes, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Yogurt&#039;s surprising health benefit. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/yogurt_310.jpg?1251472931" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy yogurt recipes to try: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_breakfasts_with_yogurt">Healthy Breakfasts with Yogurt</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/calcium_rich_recipes_with_yogurt">Calcium-Rich Recipes with Yogurt</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/low_calorie_ice_cream_and_frozen_yogurt_recipes">Low Calorie Ice Cream and Frozen Yogurt Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/bone_health_recipes">Healthy Recipes and Menus for Bone Health</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/heart_health/3_foods_for_healthy_gums_hearts">3 Foods for Healthy Gums &amp; Hearts</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/digestive_health/the_promise_of_probiotics">The Promise of Probiotics</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/will_these_foods_make_you_smarter">Will These Foods Make You Smarter?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/do_probiotics_really_work">Do probiotics really work?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Yogurt lovers, rejoice! Not only does this nutrient-packed snack help keep your bones strong, new research shows it may also protect against gum disease. Researchers from Japan recently analyzed dietary intakes from nearly 1,000 adults and found those who consumed the highest levels of dairy—specifically yogurt and yogurt-type drinks—had the healthiest gums.</p> <p>Their report, published earlier this year in the Journal of Periodontology, credits probiotics (a.k.a. “good bacteria”) as one possible champion of gum health. Probiotics are live active cultures used to ferment foods, such as yogurt and kefir (fermented milk), and studies suggest that they may improve digestion and boost immunity too. As for gum health, it’s not yet clear how much yogurt (or other fermented dairy foods) one needs to consume to reap the benefits, says Yoshihiro Shimazaki, D.D.S., Ph.D., of Kyushu University, the study’s lead author.</p> <p>What is clear, though, is that periodontal disease affects more than one in three American adults. Harmful bacteria accumulate on teeth (as plaque) and eventually harden into tartar, which causes gum tissue to become inflamed. Experts believe that probiotics may help to counter growth of the “unfriendly” bacteria in the mouth.</p> <p>Maintaining good oral health isn’t just an issue of aesthetics. Left unchecked, gum disease may elevate a person’s risk for heart attack and stroke, Shimazaki explains. One theory is that bacteria in the mouth infiltrate the bloodstream, causing inflammation in the arteries, which increases risk for heart disease.</p> <p><strong>Bottom line:</strong> Probiotic-rich yogurt may keep your gums—and therefore your heart—healthy. So raise that yogurt smoothie in a toast to good health.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/a_new_reason_to_smile_about_yogurt#comments D. Milton Stokes, M.P.H., R.D. July/August 2008 Recipes & Menus - Yogurt Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Mon, 17 Aug 2009 15:24:20 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9551 at http://www.eatingwell.com A Vermont Picnic http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_travel/a_vermont_picnic <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A Vermont Picnic </div> </div> </div> <p>In early spring, I stood in northern Vermont under a bright blue sky watching a teenager tap a sugar maple while his parents and grandparents looked on proudly. “Sugaring is just as much a part of me as the color of my hair,” the young fourth-generation sugarmaker said later over maple-crumb muffins in the farmhouse kitchen. “Every family has its own stories. For me, growing up sugaring is a big part of our story.”</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Melissa Pasanen </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A Meal to Celebrate Local Bounty. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/vermont_picnic_310.jpg?1278972888" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2008 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Recipes for a Vermont Picnic </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/haymakers_ginger_switchel.html">Haymaker&#039;s Ginger Switchel</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/bean_tomato_salad_with_honey_vinaigrette.html">Bean &amp; Tomato Salad with Honey Vinaigrette</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/country_potato_salad.html">Country Potato Salad</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/cheddar_cornmeal_biscuits_with_chives.html">Cheddar Cornmeal Biscuits with Chives</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/maple_mustard_baked_chicken.html">Maple-Mustard Baked Chicken</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/blueberry_tart_with_walnut_crust.html">Blueberry Tart with Walnut Crust</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Healthy Picnic Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/summer_bbq_picnic_foods_made_healthier">Summer BBQ Picnic Foods Made Healthier</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_potato_salad_and_pasta_salad_recipes">Healthy Potato Salad and Pasta Salad Recipes </a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/picnic_desserts">Picnic Desserts</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_picnic_coleslaws_and_salads">Healthy Coleslaws and Picnic Salads</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/potluck_side_dish_recipes">Potluck Side Dish Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In early spring, I stood in northern Vermont under a bright blue sky watching a teenager tap a sugar maple while his parents and grandparents looked on proudly. “Sugaring is just as much a part of me as the color of my hair,” the young fourth-generation sugarmaker said later over maple-crumb muffins in the farmhouse kitchen. “Every family has its own stories. For me, growing up sugaring is a big part of our story.”</p> <p>Maple syrup is part of many Vermonters’ stories but, like other longstanding food traditions across North America, it is threatened by both environmental and societal factors and has been labeled “at risk” by the Renewing America’s Food Traditions (RAFT) project. Maple Syrup nation—one of 13 “foodsheds” outlined by RAFT—stretches from eastern Quebec and inland Maine to the northwest corner of Indiana, with the entire state of Vermont and most of New York State and Pennsylvania at its heart. It is named in honor of the sugar maple, which has shared its sap since native peoples first discovered the lightly sweet, clear liquid and simmered it down into syrup and sugar. Unfortunately, climate change, acid rain, creeping development and invasive species have threatened the sugar maple. </p> <p>Veteran sugarmaker Burr Morse, 60, of East Montpelier, Vermont, has been sugaring since he was a boy. The last 20 years have been a struggle: “Weather just stopped happening right,” he explains. “If sugaring goes away, then I go away,” he says simply. “It’s not only important to the economy, it’s important to the temperament of the people here.”</p> <p>Most of Maple Syrup nation was settled by homesteaders who had to diversify to survive. They grew their own vegetables, dry beans and grains; planted fruit and nut trees; raised chickens, pigs and sheep for wool and meat; and always had a milking cow. They hunted game and gathered berries, grapes, dandelion leaves and fiddleheads. To sustain themselves through the long winters, they canned summer’s bounty and stored apples, potatoes and other root vegetables and cured pork in root cellars, attics and barns.</p> <p>The growing season was full of hard work, but dishes like some of the following recipes might well have been spread out for all to share at a community barn-raising or a church picnic. Picture a hearty bean and tomato salad made, perhaps, with Vermont Cranberry beans and sun-warmed orange Oxheart tomatoes. Or an earthenware bowl of freshly dug and boiled new Early Rose potatoes tossed with cob-smoked ham and the buttermilk left after butter-churning. You might find a platter of crisp-crumbed chicken and a basket of warm Cheddar-cornmeal biscuits made with stone-ground flint corn grown since the time of the Abenaki Indians, who lived in what is now northern New England and southern Quebec. There would be pie and giant jugs of ginger-spiked switchel—the preferred drink for hot, dusty summer work—chilling in a nearby stream.</p> <p>The heirloom varieties of beans, tomatoes, potatoes and corn that would have been on the table are among the foods RAFT has deemed worth reinvigorating for their unique contributions to both our culinary and broader cultural heritage. “We, as humans, have not been given roots as obvious as those of plants,” says RAFT founder Gary Paul Nabhan. “The surest way we have to lodge ourselves within this blessed earth is to know where our food comes from.”</p> <p>Anyone can play a role by searching out RAFT foods to grow or eat. Soon after Tom Stearns, 33, first started saving and growing heirloom seeds as a hobby in 1995, he was given some flint corn, which he named Roy’s Calais after the man and town from which it came. The next year his passion became his profession when Stearns established High Mowing Organic Seeds in northern Vermont, now a national mail-order organic seed company with over $1 million in annual sales. “Preservation is not just keeping something in a seed bank somewhere,” Stearns says. “Having someone actively farming it is the best way to preserve it.”</p> <p>Farther south in Rutland, Vermont, Donald Heleba, 69, still works the land his family has farmed since 1926, growing about 35 different potatoes on eight acres without herbicides or mechanical harvesting. “I handsort 10,000 potatoes by myself,” Heleba says with quiet pride. “I’m not bragging, but I’m very particular.” His stock changes each year, but includes varieties like Green Mountain and Makah Ozette. Some don’t sell too well, but “I keep growing them just so I don’t lose the seed,” he says. Back when his father grew potatoes, Heleba recalls, “People bought them by the bushel. Now they buy them by the pound.” But other things are different too. “When I was in school, people used to make fun of you if you were a farmer,” he says. “It’s changed. Now they treat you like you’re special.”</p> <p>—Melissa Pasanen is an award-winning freelance writer with a focus on food and farming. She co-authored Cooking with Shelburne Farms: Food and Stories from Vermont (Viking, 2007), a New York Times “notable cookbook.”</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_travel/a_vermont_picnic#comments Melissa Pasanen July/August 2008 Food News & Origins - Food & Travel Wed, 12 Aug 2009 21:32:31 +0000 Paula Joslin 9458 at http://www.eatingwell.com