January/February 2009 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/430/all en Spicy Butternut Squash Soup http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/baja_butternut_squash_soup_for_6.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/baja_butternut_squash_soup_for_6.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://assets.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/SP6747.JPG" alt="Spicy Butternut Squash Soup Recipe" title="Spicy Butternut Squash Soup Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148" /></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/baja_butternut_squash_soup_for_6.html" target="_blank">Spicy Butternut Squash Soup</a></div> <div>This silky-smooth butternut soup gets a hit of spice from chipotle, cloves and cumin. Adapted from Chef Jesús González, Chef of La Cocina Que Canta at Rancho La Puerta.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/baja_butternut_squash_soup_for_6.html#comments EatingWell 500 Calorie Dinners (2010) January/February 2009 Mexican Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Christmas Halloween New Year's Eve Recipes - Individual Recipes Vegetables Vegetarian, other Appetizers Dinner
 Lunch Roast Saute Fall Winter 6 Budget Entertaining, casual Make ahead instructions Vegetarian More than 1 hour Soups/stews Fri, 13 Dec 2013 22:53:42 +0000 280046 at http://www.eatingwell.com Super Snacks http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/super_snacks <p>Forget Thanksgiving or Christmas: Super Bowl Sunday is my favorite holiday. I’ve been watching football since I was a little kid and no matter who’s playing, the big game is cause for celebration every year. My husband and I have a houseful of friends and a huge spread of food. Chips and dips are always on the menu—they’re easy to make and they’re easy to huddle around. But this year I’ll make healthier versions of some of my favorites.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Carolyn Malcoun </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Be an MVP and serve these healthier chips and dips on game day. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/chile_con_queso.JPG?1253036979" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Dip Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chile_con_queso.html">Chile Con Queso</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/creamy_spinach_dip.html">Creamy Spinach Dip</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/french_onion_dip.html">French Onion Dip</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Chip Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chile_lime_tortilla_chips.html">Chile-Lime Tortilla Chips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/garlic_herb_pita_chips.html">Garlic &amp; Herb Pita Chips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/microwave_potato_chips.html">Microwave Potato Chips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/super_snacks#comments Carolyn Malcoun January/February 2009 Healthy Cooking - Quick & Healthy Cooking Tue, 15 Sep 2009 17:49:54 +0000 Paula Joslin 14956 at http://www.eatingwell.com Winter's Fruit http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/winters_fruit <p>The last time my boyfriend screamed at me, it was the last time. Just after, William went into his office and I went outside.</p> <p>It was winter in western Pennsylvania, cold but clear and sunny. William lived on land that had once been farmed. The property still held a barn, a milk house and a few fruit trees. On this late January day there remained a few dried leaves high on the trees and some frozen apples hanging on the bare branches. As I walked around the land, hugging myself to keep warm, it came to me that this would be my last visit to the farm.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Diane Goodman </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Author Diane Goodman’s essay on love and loss. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/winter_fruit_poached_pears.jpg?1266958620" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/riesling_baked_pears.html">Riesling Baked Pears</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/caramelized_pear_bread_pudding.html">Caramelized Pear Bread Pudding</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/pear_crumble.html">Pear Crumble</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/pear_tart_tatin.html">Pear Tart Tatin</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/rustic_pear_tart.html">Rustic Pear Tart</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_winter_recipes">Healthy Winter Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/our_top_10_most_popular_winter_recipes">Our Top 10 Most Popular Winter Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/food_for_the_heart">Food for the Heart</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/shopping_for_love">Shopping for Love</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/baking_for_love">Baking for Love </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/the_secret_ingredient">The Secret Ingredient</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The last time my boyfriend screamed at me, it was the last time. Just after, William went into his office and I went outside.</p> <p>It was winter in western Pennsylvania, cold but clear and sunny. William lived on land that had once been farmed. The property still held a barn, a milk house and a few fruit trees. On this late January day there remained a few dried leaves high on the trees and some frozen apples hanging on the bare branches. As I walked around the land, hugging myself to keep warm, it came to me that this would be my last visit to the farm.</p> <p>Down by the pond, the ground was covered with fruit that had fallen from two Seckel pear trees. The little pears were still green. They looked ripe but when I bent down to touch one, it was rock-hard. Still, I gathered as many as I could—almost 30—in the lap of my sweatshirt and headed back toward the house. I didn’t know what I was going to do with them but somehow, even though they were weighing me down, I wanted to turn them into something beautiful that I could leave behind.</p> <p>I passed William’s closed office door and went into the kitchen, where I set about peeling the tiny frozen pears. It was hard work but cooking—the peeling, mincing, stirring, even the cleaning up—has always been restorative for me. When the pile was done, I put the pears in water and added some white wine from the glass I was drinking and began to think about what to do.</p> <p>William didn’t cook and he didn’t like to keep anything he couldn’t use. But in one cupboard I had hidden some baking ingredients—cinnamon, sugar, vanilla, baking soda, baking powder, flour, cocoa powder—because he craved sweets and in the winter, I often baked. Into the poaching liquid I shook some cinnamon and some sugar, and then poured in some vanilla.</p> <p>The simmering released a smell that was irresistible and in a moment of weakness, I thought it might lure William out into the kitchen, into an apology, into my arms, but then I heard his footsteps and the front door slam. I took a deep breath of pear, of vanilla, and of resolve, and believed that all that mattered now was what I could do with these pears.</p> <p>So I went to the fridge. There was an old box of Godiva chocolates a client had given William. I melted them and drained the pears to cool. Then I sliced the pears as thinly as I could. I tasted one and it was the most marvelous thing: soft but not mushy, sweet and earthy and full with the hope that fruit surviving beyond its prime has earned. With sugar and water, I made caramel and stirred it with a focus and patience miraculously borne out of my resignation and loss.</p> <p>I laid the sliced pears into perfect concentric circles on a dinner plate and spooned on the caramel. Then I drizzled the melted chocolates on top. In the freezer, I found a box of gingersnaps from last Christmas and I sealed them in a plastic bag and spent too long stomping on them, over and over again, until they were pulverized beyond necessity. I sprinkled the crumbs over the pears and they sank gently into the caramel and warm chocolate. Then, painstakingly with a carrot peeler, I shaved two chocolates on top.</p> <p>The final product was stunning. By the time I was done, William had not returned. But I was done. And surprisingly happy. I had made something sweet and tender and lovely out of cast-off fruit that had seemed impenetrable. I knew William: when he got home, he would want to resist it but would not be able to. And I would be gone. For good.</p> <p>And both of those things were absolutely right.</p> <p><em>Diane Goodman, author of The Plated Heart and The Genius of Hunger, teaches creative writing and owns a catering service.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/winters_fruit#comments Diane Goodman January/February 2009 Food News & Origins - People & Perspectives Fri, 21 Aug 2009 17:59:38 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10269 at http://www.eatingwell.com Are Biodegradable Cups As Good As They Sound? http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/the_breakdown_on_biodegradable_cups <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The Breakdown on Biodegradable </div> </div> </div> <p>Americans toss billions of disposable cups into the trash each year, which then go to the landfill where they sit for years. So it sounded great when restaurants, such as Boloco burrito chain in the Northeast and Tully's Coffee on the West Coast, started offering smoothies and java, respectively, in biodegradable cups. But are biodegradable cups as good as they sound?</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Gretchen Roberts </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> What really happens to those “green” disposable cups? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2009 </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Americans toss billions of disposable cups into the trash each year, which then go to the landfill where they sit for years. So it sounded great when restaurants, such as Boloco burrito chain in the Northeast and Tully's Coffee on the West Coast, started offering smoothies and java, respectively, in biodegradable cups. But are biodegradable cups as good as they sound?</p> <p>Most paper cups have a waterproof inner lining to keep liquid from leaking through the paper. In traditional paper hot cups, this lining is made from petroleum, which doesn't break down and isn't a renewable resource. Biodegradable hot cups, on the other hand, have linings made from renewable resources, such as corn, potato or sugarcane. Biodegradable cold cups are made entirely from these bioplastics. These cups break down into earth-friendly compost that can be used to fortify soil. But here's the rub: "There's no real point in using [biodegradable cups] unless you're sending them to composting facilities," says Steven Mojo, executive director of the Biodegradable Products Institute. When biodegradable cups are tossed in the trash, they're sent to the landfill, where they sit alongside the rest of our garbage.</p> <p>Right now, many restaurants don't compost their biodegradable products because commercial composting isn't widely available. (Tully's is already working with composters and Boloco anticipates doing so in the future.) And taking your cup home to compost it won't help: the cups won't break down in home composters because the compost doesn't get hot enough, says Michael Oshman, executive director of the Green Restaurant Association.</p> <p>Bottom line: Restaurants that have switched from standard disposable cups to biodegradable cups are moving in the right direction because they're not contributing to the production of petroleum-containing products. But don't get too hung up on the biodegradable bandwagon—most of the cups aren't being composted. The greenest practice is to bring your own mug.</p> <p><strong>The History of the Disposable Cup:</strong></p> <p>c. 1900:<br /> "The common cup" is available at communal drinking-areas for people to share.</p> <p>1908:<br /> New ideas about sanitation inspire the first disposable paper cup, sealed with paraffin.</p> <p>1952:<br /> BASF The Chemical Company introduces the first polystyrene cup (commonly referred to as Styrofoam ®).</p> <p>1977:<br /> Nathaniel C. Wyeth, working for DuPont, invents the plastic soda bottle.</p> <p>2005:<br /> Disposable, biodegradable hot and cold cup patent is issued.</p> <p>By Gretchen Roberts</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/the_breakdown_on_biodegradable_cups#comments Gretchen Roberts January/February 2009 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Fri, 21 Aug 2009 17:49:32 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10264 at http://www.eatingwell.com Coffee for a Cause http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/coffee_for_a_cause <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Andres Calderon spends his workdays poring over computer code, but after hours, this Baton Rouge-based software engineer focuses on coffee. Four years ago, Calderon began importing beans from his native El Salvador, roasting them in nearby New Orleans and shipping them to customers nationwide from his living room—all to help orphans.</p> <p>Calderon started Giving Tree Coffee after a massive earthquake hit El Salvador in 2001. He flew down to volunteer at a church-run orphanage and found 35 homeless kids crammed into a small, run-down house. Calderon wanted to help these kids and others like them. An article in a Salvadoran newspaper about how the country was trying to revive its coffee industry sparked an idea. "El Salvador had been a leader in coffee production, but it had fallen off after years of civil war in the 1980s," recalls Calderon, 41. "I knew nothing about running a coffee company, but it’s one of the few things my country exports. Why not try to start one, and donate the profits [to help homeless children]?"</p> <p>Since 2003, Giving Tree has granted about $10,000 annually to a San Salvador nonprofit that provides housing and care to homeless children. Donations have helped pay for new shower facilities, bunk beds, appliances, school supplies and food. "My goal is to eradicate the problem [of homeless Salvadoran children]," he says.</p> <p>For more information, visit givingtreecoffee.com.</p> <p><em>By Maggie Heyn Richardson</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/coffee_for_a_cause#comments January/February 2009 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Fri, 21 Aug 2009 17:34:49 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10258 at http://www.eatingwell.com Are We Paying a Price for Seedless Clementines? http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/are_we_paying_a_price_for_seedless_clementines <p>There’s a storm brewing in the California citrus belt over clementines. People prefer seedless clementines—the smallest of the mandarins—so much so that farmers earn up to four times more for seedless varieties. As a result, growers try to keep bees out of their orchards because if a bee that’s been pollinating another citrus fruit (e.g., oranges) pollinates these "seedless" varieties, presto: seeds in your clementine. Which is why, in 2007, growers supported legislation that would forbid beekeepers from locating hives within two miles of designated clementine orchards.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The controversy over growing seedless fruit. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/clemtines_310.jpg?1251150838" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/tea_scented_mandarins.html">Tea-Scented Mandarins</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/cinnamon_oranges.html">Cinnamon Oranges</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/fennel_orange_salad_with_toasted_pistachios.html">Fennel &amp; Orange Salad with Toasted Pistachios</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/grilled_orange_chicken_fingers.html">Grilled Orange Chicken Fingers</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/citrus_salsa.html">Citrus Salsa</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/grapefruit_brulee.html">Grapefruit Brulee</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_citrus_recipes">Healthy Citrus Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Also of Interest </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/can_vitamin_c_save_your_skin">Can Vitamin C Save Your Skin?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/the_importance_of_bees_to_our_food_supply">The Importance of Bees to Our Food Supply</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/food_news_blog/should_you_join_the_fish_boycott">Should you join the fish boycott?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/fair_trade_fruit">Fair Trade Fruit</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>There’s a storm brewing in the California citrus belt over clementines. People prefer seedless clementines—the smallest of the mandarins—so much so that farmers earn up to four times more for seedless varieties. As a result, growers try to keep bees out of their orchards because if a bee that’s been pollinating another citrus fruit (e.g., oranges) pollinates these "seedless" varieties, presto: seeds in your clementine. Which is why, in 2007, growers supported legislation that would forbid beekeepers from locating hives within two miles of designated clementine orchards. But beekeepers argued that these "no-fly zones" would harm other agricultural crops, such as almonds and peaches. To come to a solution, the Seedless Mandarin and Honeybee Coexistence Working Group was formed. Stakeholders met last year and a resolution is expected in February 2009.</p> <p>Regardless of whether clementines have seeds, they’re a tasty, nutritious snack: in two you get a day’s worth of vitamin C, for only 70 calories.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/are_we_paying_a_price_for_seedless_clementines#comments EatingWell Editors January/February 2009 Food News & Origins - Food News Fri, 21 Aug 2009 17:32:06 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10257 at http://www.eatingwell.com Can Coconut Oil Help You Lose Weight? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/can_coconut_oil_help_you_lose_weight%20 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/coconut_spr03_310.jpg?1270674807" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/coconut_310.jpg?1270582782" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Can Coconut Oil Help You Lose Weight?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>There is science to suggest that the tropical oil may cause a slight (temporary) boost in your metabolism.</p> <p>Anytime you eat, the process of digesting food burns off about 10 percent of the calories you consume. For example, if you consume 500 calories in a meal, your body uses about 50 of those calories to transform food into the energy that fuels your body. But theoretically if you eat a 500-calorie meal and replace the fat from oils or butter with coconut oil, your metabolism will speed up and burn more like 15 percent, or 75 calories.</p> <p>It comes down to the molecular structure of the oil and how the body digests it. The fatty acids in coconut oil (called medium-chain triacylglycerols, or MCT) are shorter and more water-soluble than those in other oils, such as olive or canola. “So they’re more directly routed to the liver, where they’re readily burned for fuel,” explains Peter Jones, Ph.D., professor of food science and nutrition at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada. Therefore, they have less opportunity to be deposited in fat stores.</p> <p>But there is no scientific evidence to show that consuming coconut oil helps people lose weight. There is one recent study, however, using an MCT oil, which suggests coconut oil may work in the same way. In the study, 31 overweight men and women followed a low-calorie diet that included just over a tablespoon for women and just under two tablespoons for men each day of either an MCT oil or olive oil. After four months, the MCT-oil users lost an average of 7 pounds; the olive oil group just 3 pounds. The investigators suggested that the metabolic boost produced by the MCT oil likely played a role.</p> <p>Even if coconut oil does help people lose weight, few nutrition experts recommend it, since coconut oil is loaded with saturated fat: 12 grams in 1 tablespoon versus 7 grams in a tablespoon of butter.</p> <p><strong>Bottom Line: </strong>The extra calorie burn produced by coconut oil might give you a slight edge, but only if you make room by eating less of something else. A tablespoon of any oil sets you back around 120 calories. </p> <h3><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/free_downloads/1500_calorie_meal_plan_shopping_list">Download a FREE 5-Day 1,500-Calorie Meal Plan to Lose Weight!</a></h3> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Also of Interest </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_healthy_is_canola_oil_really">How Healthy Is Canola Oil Really? </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/olive_oil_buyers_guide">Olive Oil Buyer&#039;s Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_low_fat_recipes">Healthy Low Fat Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/can_you_zap_fat_with_fat">Can you zap fat with fat?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/can_honey_make_you_healthier">Can honey make you healthier?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/why_the_new_study_on_high_fructose_corn_syrup_and_weight_gain_is_flawed">Why the new study on high-fructose corn syrup and weight gain is flawed</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/video_how_to_lose_weight_with_a_diet_meal_plan">Video: How to Lose Weight with a Diet Meal Plan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-2"><legend>Related Content Group 2</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Diet Tips &amp; Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/6_secrets_to_losing_weight">6 Secrets to Losing Weight</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/3_antidotes_to_overeating">3 Antidotes to Overeating</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_low_calorie_recipes_menus">Quick and Healthy Low-Calorie Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/breakfasts_that_fight_fat">Breakfasts That Fight Fat</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/5_bad_foods_you_should_be_eating">5 “bad” foods you should be eating</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans/weight_loss_diet_meal_plan">Weight-Loss Diet Meal Plan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2009 </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/can_coconut_oil_help_you_lose_weight%20#comments Joyce Hendley January/February 2009 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Fri, 21 Aug 2009 16:07:01 +0000 Nifer 10242 at http://www.eatingwell.com Walnuts Ward Off Cancer? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/walnuts_ward_off_cancer <p>Walnuts are often called a “superfood”—studies link them with glucose control, strong bones and heart health. Now new research in the journal Nutrition and Cancer suggests walnuts may thwart the growth of breast cancer. In a study out of Marshall University School of Medicine in West Virginia, researchers substituted 18.5 percent of the diet of one group of mice with walnuts (equivalent to a human eating two ounces per day); the other group was fed a calorically equivalent, but walnut-free, diet.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A preliminary study shows promise for reducing cancer risk. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5632walnut225.jpg?1250869597" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Healthy Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/apricot_walnut_cereal_bars.html">Apricot-Walnut Cereal Bars</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/brussels_sprouts_with_walnut_lemon_vinaigrette.html">Brussels Sprouts with Walnut-Lemon Vinaigrette</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chard_with_shallots_pancetta_walnuts.html">Chard with Shallots, Pancetta &amp; Walnuts</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/rustic_plum_walnut_tart.html">Rustic Plum-Walnut Tart</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/warm_green_bean_salad_with_toasted_walnuts.html">Warm Green Bean Salad with Toasted Walnuts</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_walnut_recipes">Healthy Walnut Recipes &amp; Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Breast Health </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/does_eating_red_meat_increase_a_woman_s_risk_of_breast_cancer">Does Eating Red Meat Increase a Woman’s Risk of Breast Cancer?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/eat_to_beat_the_odds_of_breast_cancer">Eat to Beat the Odds of Breast Cancer</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/when_it_comes_to_breast_cancer_is_soy_safe">When it comes to breast cancer: is soy safe?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/what_to_eat_right_now_for_better_breast_health">What to eat right now for better breast health</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Healthy Walnut Recipes | Related Article</p> <p>Walnuts are often called a “superfood”—studies link them with glucose control, strong bones and heart health. Now new research in the journal Nutrition and Cancer suggests walnuts may thwart the growth of breast cancer. In a study out of Marshall University School of Medicine in West Virginia, researchers substituted 18.5 percent of the diet of one group of mice with walnuts (equivalent to a human eating two ounces per day); the other group was fed a calorically equivalent, but walnut-free, diet. After 34 days, the growth rate of tumors in the walnut eaters was half that of the mice who ate no walnuts.</p> <p>Experts think all types of cancer are linked to inflammation. Walnuts’ anti-inflammatory properties—which could come from the omega-3 fat alpha-linolenic acid, phytosterols or antioxidants—may give them their tumor-fighting potential. “Individually all three have been shown to suppress tumors—it could be just one or it could be all three working synergistically,” explains Elaine Hardman, Ph.D., lead researcher and associate professor of biochemistry and microbiology at Marshall.</p> <p>While the study results are promising, the research is preliminary. Plus, eating the study dose of two ounces supplies 370 calories, which is equivalent to what you’d get in 11⁄2 cups of whole-grain cereal, a cup of low-fat yogurt and an orange. Still, “walnuts can be part of a healthy diet that can reduce your risk for cancer,” says Hardman.<br /> Healthy Walnut Recipes</p> <p> * Warm Green Bean Salad with Toasted Walnuts<br /> * Rustic Plum-Walnut Tart<br /> * Apricot-Walnut Cereal Bars<br /> * Healthy Walnut Recipes &amp; Tips</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/walnuts_ward_off_cancer#comments Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D. January/February 2009 Recipes & Menus - Cancer Recipes & Menus - Walnuts Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Fri, 21 Aug 2009 15:46:56 +0000 Nifer 10232 at http://www.eatingwell.com Reset Your Appetite Alarm http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/reset_your_appetite_alarm <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Reset Your Appetite Alarm </div> </div> </div> <p>Does flying across time zones or working the night shift have you mixing up your days and nights? A new study suggests there may be an easy fix: a food fast. By taking a long break from eating, you may be able to "trick" your body into acclimating to the new schedule—immediately—explains Clifford Saper, M.D., Ph.D., study researcher and a neurologist at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Emily Sohn </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Traveling across time zones? New work schedule? Research suggests you can &quot;trick&quot; your body to get acclimated faster. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5697reset_alarm225.jpg?1250869380" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2009 </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Does flying across time zones or working the night shift have you mixing up your days and nights? A new study suggests there may be an easy fix: a food fast. By taking a long break from eating, you may be able to "trick" your body into acclimating to the new schedule—immediately—explains Clifford Saper, M.D., Ph.D., study researcher and a neurologist at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.</p> <p>Our bodies rely on external cues—sunlight, darkness—to regulate internal patterns (called circadian rhythms) that tell us when to feel tired or when to wake up. This sort of "clock" can only change in small increments each day, which presents a problem for shift workers and frequent travelers. As a result, it can take days for your brain to get the message that your "hours of operation" have changed significantly. For travelers, it's about a day for every time zone crossed.</p> <p>Since the 1920s, scientists have known that mice have a secondary "clock" that responds not to light, but to food: when food is available, they are alert and awake. Switching from "light-dependent clock" to "food clock" occurs when mice are re-introduced to food after a long period of deprivation. Eating causes a cascade of signals in the brain that activates the switch. And the transition happens immediately.</p> <p> In this latest study, published in Science, Saper and his colleagues were able to pinpoint the "food clock" location in the mouse brain (an area called the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus). And as it turns out, people have brain circuitry similar to mice's, so even though scientists have yet to find evidence of a food clock in humans, Saper says, it's possible that playing with our eating schedules could help us adjust to new time zones and shift work. He, for one, plans to give it a shot on his next trip. "I think it's worth trying and it's not that hard to do," says Saper.</p> <p>Reset your clock. Don't eat for about 16 hours. If you're traveling, it's easiest to fast on your trip (you might need to start before you leave) and eat when you get to your new destination to help set your clock to the new time zone. If you're transitioning from one work shift to another, adjust your eating schedule so that you can break your 16-hour fast before you start your next shift.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/reset_your_appetite_alarm#comments Emily Sohn January/February 2009 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Fri, 21 Aug 2009 15:44:36 +0000 Nifer 10230 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Fast Food Ban http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/the_fast_food_ban <p>Last summer, Los Angeles lawmakers banned fast-food chains from opening new outlets in South L.A., which has the city’s highest concentration of fast-food restaurants and a 30 percent higher rate of obesity than the rest of Los Angeles County. The long-term goals of the one-year ban are to reduce obesity, encourage more healthy food choices in existing fast-food restaurants and promote new, healthier food outlets in an area that lacks eateries and grocery stores.</p> <p>We wondered if a ban on new fast-food restaurants would be effective at accomplishing these goals, so we asked three experts:</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Michelle Edelbaum </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> We ask 3 experts to weight in. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/551921611_fastfood225.jpg?1251406171" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/fixing_americas_food_system">Fixing America&#039;s Food System</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/on_the_road_fast_food_survival_tips">On the Road: Fast Food Survival Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/cheap_easy_quick_dinner_recipes">Easy &amp; Quick Cheap Dinner Recipes </a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Last summer, Los Angeles lawmakers banned fast-food chains from opening new outlets in South L.A., which has the city’s highest concentration of fast-food restaurants and a 30 percent higher rate of obesity than the rest of Los Angeles County. The long-term goals of the one-year ban are to reduce obesity, encourage more healthy food choices in existing fast-food restaurants and promote new, healthier food outlets in an area that lacks eateries and grocery stores.</p> <p>We wondered if a ban on new fast-food restaurants would be effective at accomplishing these goals, so we asked three experts: </p> <h3>Do you support the ban on new fast-food restaurants?</h3> <p><strong>Michael F. Jacobson, Ph.D.</strong><br /> Executive Director, Center for Science in the Public Interest</p> <p>South Los Angeles is already so saturated with fast-food restaurants that a ban on new ones might not have much of an effect. It would be far more productive for the city to provide incentives for supermarkets and farmers’ markets to make healthy food accessible to local residents.</p> <p><strong>Aviva Must, Ph.D.</strong><br /> Professor and Chair of the Department of Public Health and Family Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine </p> <p>It represents an important first step in environmental approaches to eating well. The ban alone will not likely have an immediate impact on eating habits in the community because there are plenty of existing quick-serve restaurants, but in my view it is responsive to community calls for such change. Plus, it puts the fast-food restaurants on notice that they need to continue to make healthy options available at an affordable price. It may also empower other communities to advocate for similar changes in their locales.</p> <p><strong>Stephen Joseph, J.D.</strong><br /> Lawyer who fought successfully to eliminate trans fat from Oreo cookies. </p> <p>I don’t think [the ban is] a good thing. I am in favor of calorie labeling for every item on the menu boards in every fast-food restaurant. It’s very influential. Fast-food companies will change their menus and add on lower calorie items.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/the_fast_food_ban#comments Michelle Edelbaum January/February 2009 Food News & Origins - Food News Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:37:22 +0000 Penelope Wall 9956 at http://www.eatingwell.com Is Calcium the Sixth Taste? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_calcium_the_sixth_taste <p>Perhaps. It turns out our tongues may actually be able to detect calcium in foods, according to research presented at the annual National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Philadelphia last August.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Ana Mantica </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The bitter proof for why getting enough calcium can be difficult. Can science help? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5633yogurt2_225.jpg?1250793072" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/calcium_rich_recipes_with_yogurt">Calcium-Rich Recipes with Yogurt</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/calcium_rich_recipes_with_milk">Calcium-Rich Milk Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/recipes_for_umami_foods">Recipes for Umami Foods</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/retrain_your_taste_buds">Retrain Your Taste Buds</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/calcium_rich_ice_cream_and_frozen_desserts">Ice Cream and Frozen Dessert Recipes That Are Calcium-Rich</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/do_all_women_need_a_calcium_supplement">Do all women need a calcium supplement?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Perhaps. It turns out our tongues may actually be able to detect calcium in foods, according to research presented at the annual National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Philadelphia last August.</p> <p>Taste buds have receptors for at least five known specific tastes—salty, sweet, bitter, sour and savory (or umami). Researchers pinpointed two of these taste receptors—sweet and umami—as being involved in tasting a sixth, calcium. What’s surprising is that calcium doesn’t taste sweet or savory. “It is bitter, sometimes sour,” says lead study author Michael Tordoff, Ph.D., a biologist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia.</p> <p>But the usefulness of the findings goes beyond taste. Ultimately researchers are trying to help Americans meet recommended intakes for calcium. “We know from studies that animals with increased needs for calcium find the mineral more palatable,” explains Tordoff, “for example, pregnant and lactating mammals and birds laying eggs.” But humans tend to dislike the taste of calcium, which is found naturally in dairy products (the fat and protein in these foods bind to the calcium, which is why they’re not so bitter) and dark leafy greens, such as broccoli and spinach. So now that researchers have discovered what receptors are involved in tasting calcium, they’re looking for ways to block these receptors to make calcium-rich foods more palatable.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_calcium_the_sixth_taste#comments Ana Mantica January/February 2009 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:32:03 +0000 Nifer 9953 at http://www.eatingwell.com Good Fats, Bad Fats http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/good_fats_bad_fats <p>When it comes to breaking science, I try to keep an open mind. But when I read statements like “It’s become clear that natural saturated fats are good for you” (in a major food magazine last year), I blink. In the professional groups I’m involved with—including the American Heart Association—the idea that saturated fats increase the risk of heart disease is an unquestioned, fundamental principle.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Exposing the myths—and truths—about saturated fat. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/avocado_half310.jpg?1256763314" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5557avocado_half_225.jpg?1250791375" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="239" height="239" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5558salmon_steak225.jpg?1250791407" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-image-content"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><strong>Fast Fat Swaps</strong> Cut back on saturated fat with these easy switches.</p> <p> <img src="/upload/photos/5558salmon_steak.jpg" alt=" salmon for steak" border="0" width="165" /><br /> <strong> Salmon for Steak</strong> 1.1 g sat fat (3 oz) vs 9.1 g (3 oz)</p> <p> <img src="/upload/photos/5558avocado_brie.jpg" alt=" avocado for brie" border="0" width="165" /><br /> <strong>Avocado for Brie</strong> 1.1 g sat fat (1⁄4 avocado) vs 4.9 g (1 oz)</p> <p> <img src="/upload/photos/5558oil_butter.jpg" alt=" oil for butter" border="0" width="165" /><br /> <strong>Olive Oil for Butter</strong> 1.9 g sat fat (1 Tbsp) vs 7.3 g (1 Tbsp)<strong>Fast Fat Swaps</strong> Cut back on saturated fat with these easy switches. <img src="/upload/photos/5558salmon_steak.jpg" alt=" salmon for steak" border="0" width="165" /> <strong> Salmon for Steak</strong> 1.1 g sat fat (3 oz) vs 9.1 g (3 oz) <img src="/upload/photos/5558avocado_brie.jpg" alt=" avocado for brie" border="0" width="165" /> <strong>Avocado for Brie</strong> 1.1 g sat fat (1⁄4 avocado) vs 4.9 g (1 oz) <img src="/upload/photos/5558oil_butter.jpg" alt=" oil for butter" border="0" width="165" /> <strong>Olive Oil for Butter</strong> 1.9 g sat fat (1 Tbsp) vs 7.3 g (1 Tbsp)</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/creamy_avocado_white_bean_wrap.html">Creamy Avocado &amp; White Bean Wrap</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/avocado_grapefruit_relish.html">Avocado-Grapefruit Relish</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/blackened_salmon_sandwich.html">Blackened Salmon Sandwich</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/honey_soy_salmon.html">Honey-Soy Broiled Salmon</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/herbed_extra_virgin_olive_oil.html">Herbed Extra-Virgin Olive Oil</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/citrus_ginger_cake_with_spiced_orange_compote.html">Citrus Ginger Cake with Spiced Orange Compote</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_low_fat_recipes">Healthy Low Fat Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Healthy Fats </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/videos/getting_good_fats_video">Getting Good Fats Video</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/are_all_fats_bad_for_you">Are all fats bad for you?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/omega_3_fats_and_adhd">Omega-3 Fats and ADHD</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When it comes to breaking science, I try to keep an open mind. But when I read statements like “It’s become clear that natural saturated fats are good for you” (in a major food magazine last year), I blink. In the professional groups I’m involved with—including the American Heart Association—the idea that saturated fats increase the risk of heart disease is an unquestioned, fundamental principle.</p> <p>Saturated fats—found mainly in fatty meats, butter, cheese and whole milk—are “saturated” with hydrogen atoms, which gives them a rigid structure and makes them solid at room temperature. (Unsaturated fats—those in nuts, olives, fish and vegetable oils—are fluid at room temperature.) Most experts agree that saturated fats raise levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol in the blood. That’s damaging to the heart and arteries, we believe, since excessive LDL accumulates in artery walls and can trigger inflammation, eventually leading to a heart attack or stroke. That would seem to be the end of the story—or is it? I decided to evaluate some common assumptions.<br /> “All saturated fats are bad.”</p> <p>It’s easy just to lump all saturated fats into one “heart-threatening” group, but the reality is that there are many different kinds of saturated fats in foods. Some research suggests that certain types are more harmful than others. For example, a handful of studies show that while coconut oil, rich in lauric acid, raises blood levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, it also raises HDL (“good”) cholesterol slightly. Stearic acid, a type of saturated fat that makes up about half the fat in dark chocolate and accounts for 15 percent of the fat in beef, doesn’t raise LDL at all. Experts consider stearic acid “neutral” when it comes to cardiovascular risk: it doesn’t help, but it doesn’t hurt either.</p> <p>On the flip side, some saturated fats appear more likely than others to cause the buildup of fatty plaque in arteries. Palmitic acid, which is the main fat in palm oil and another saturated fat present in beef, is one such fat. But the fact that beef contains both “bad” palmitic acid and “neutral” stearic acid underscores the point that foods rich in saturated fats contain a mixture of different types.</p> <p>And, of course, despite a widespread trend to eliminate trans fats from our food supply, many packaged snacks still contain these man-made fats that act like saturated fats. And trans fats, or “partially hydrogenated” fats, are the unhealthiest of all: they increase (“bad”) LDL and decrease (“good”) HDL.</p> <p>Bottom Line: Saturated fats are not all created equal. Foods contain a variety of saturated fats, and a “neutral” one won’t negate the impact of a “bad” one. To minimize intake of “bad” saturated fats, choose lean sources of protein and low-fat or nonfat dairy products. Read labels on packaged foods, such as cookies, crackers and microwave popcorn, to avoid palm and coconut oils and trans fats. (While coconut oil may be marginally better than palm, you’re still better off avoiding both.)<br /> “Saturated fats are the worst offenders in our diets.”</p> <p>As more research uncovers the role diet plays in cardiovascular disease, it’s becoming obvious that fats aren’t the only villains in the picture. Increasingly, scientists are recognizing that you should also watch out for some carbohydrates—specifically, sugars and refined grains. “I believe that a diet containing moderate amounts of saturated fat is OK, and possibly better, than a low-saturated-fat diet that is rich in sugars and refined carbohydrates,” says Ronald Krauss, M.D., director of atherosclerosis research at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute and a past chair of the American Heart Association’s Nutrition Committee. “Although saturated fats raise [“bad”] LDL cholesterol, sugars decrease [“good”] HDL cholesterol and raise triglycerides [another harmful fat in the blood],” he explains. Those findings are confirmed by studies conducted at Harvard in more than 80,000 women.</p> <p>Bottom Line: Refined carbohydrates, such as white bread and sugary sweets, may be just as bad for your heart and arteries as cream and butter—one more reason to limit them.</p> <p>“A low-carb diet is always bad for your heart.”</p> <p>When most people hear “low-carb diet,” they usually think of an eating plan that virtually eliminates carbohydrates and allows unlimited amounts of high-protein, high-saturated-fat foods, such as bacon. But today’s low-carb diets have evolved from those popular in the 1970s. Plans like South Beach and even Atkins do not promote marbled steaks and other saturated-fat-laden foods; instead, they emphasize eating fewer refined carbohydrates, such as white bread. A low-carb diet that emphasizes lean proteins, such as fish and beans, and vegetables, as well as “good” carbohydrates (e.g., brown rice), can actually look pretty good to a cardiologist. In fact, last summer an Israeli study published in the New England Journal of Medicine reported that people following a low-carb (Atkins) diet lost more weight and ended up with bigger improvements in blood-cholesterol numbers than those who followed a reduced-calorie, low-fat diet. </p> <p>In this study, subjects were told to select vegetarian sources of fat and protein, which means it was likely that they were eating more unsaturated fats than saturated ones. In some ways they were following the current guidelines of the American Heart Association, which no longer advocates strictly limiting total fat but rather advises people to replace saturated fats with healthier unsaturated ones (e.g., olive oil for butter).</p> <p>Bottom Line: A “low-carb” diet based on lean sources of protein, vegetables, unsaturated fats and a judicious amount of whole grains is heart-healthy.</p> <p>So what now?</p> <p>I doubt we’ll ever have all the facts about saturated fat. But I’m not going to start eating a half-pound of bacon for breakfast anytime soon. We know that when it comes to heart health, unsaturated fats, such as those in oils and salmon, nuts and avocados, are better choices than the saturated fats in fatty meats and butter. I’ll also continue to choose whole grains over refined carbohydrates as much as I can—and exercise most days of the week. That incorporates most of the heart-healthy thinking I need.</p> <p>Rachel K. Johnson, EatingWell’s senior nutrition advisor, is a professor of nutrition at the University of Vermont.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/good_fats_bad_fats#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. January/February 2009 Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:05:10 +0000 Nifer 9942 at http://www.eatingwell.com Visit Rancho La Puerta http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_travel/visit_rancho_la_puerta <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Jessie Price </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A Stay at the Rancho La Puerta </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Rancho La Puerta opened its cooking school, La Cocina Que Canta (The Kitchen That Sings), in 2007, right next to a six-acre organic garden that supplies much of the fresh produce for the Ranch and the school. School director Antonia Allegra said the plan from the start was “to teach guests the connection between the garden, cooking and eating.” Learn more about Rancho La Puerta.</p> <p>Getting there: Rancho La Puerta is located in Tecate, Mexico, which is about an hour’s drive from the San Diego airport.</p> <p>Staying there: Ranch visits are typically from Saturday to Saturday. Rooms are spread over the 3,000-acre campus and are in “casitas,” small cottages nestled among the gardens. | cost: Rates range from $2,795 to $4,380 a week per person, depending on type of room and time of year.</p> <p>Rates include accommodations, all meals, fitness classes, hikes and lectures.</p> <p>Cooking school: Book a hands-on cooking class at La Cocina Que Canta to learn how to make the signature, mostly vegetarian, Mexican-Mediterranean cuisine of the Ranch. Classes cost an additional $75 each.</p> <p>For more information visit rancholapuerta.com.</p> <p>Bringing Healthy Home</p> <p>Here are some of the innovative ways other spas around the country are helping guests bring healthy lessons home with them:</p> <ul> <li>Miraval in Tucson and Canyon Ranch (Tucson and western Massachusetts) offer personalized nutrition consultations. The first session with a nutritionist determines what a guest’s personal goals are, anything from meal planning or maximizing metabolism to providing help on how to make 30-minute meals.</li> <li>Lake Austin Spa Resort in Texas offers guided trips through the local Whole Foods Market with their staff dietitian to learn about organic produce and making smart choices at the market.</li> <li>Nutritionists at Fitness Ridge in Utah teach guests about portion control, eating mindfully and reading labels. On the last day of a weeklong stay, the nutritionists accompany guests to a ­local restaurant where they weigh in on the meals that guests select from a buffet.</li> <li>Green Mountain at Fox Run in Vermont makes sure guests have support after they leave the spa. Staff dietitians follow up with guests over the phone. They also offer online bulletin boards where spa alumnae share tips and support.</li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_travel/visit_rancho_la_puerta#comments Jessie Price January/February 2009 Food News & Origins - Food & Travel Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:20:12 +0000 Paula Joslin 9577 at http://www.eatingwell.com Mexican Makeover http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_travel/mexican_makeover <p>"Time for wind sprints," our model-perfect instructor, Haley, yelled. I had a flashback to high school tennis team practices—a combination of feeling dread and wanting to kick the butt of the tall skinny girl next to me. I ran as fast as I could. And then as we zigged and zagged between the lines, Haley yelled at us, “Come on guys. If you finish this you can eat two salads at lunch…and maybe a little dressing.”</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Jessie Price </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How one spa gives a fresh, light twist to south-of-the-border favorites. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5619rancho_la_puerta225.jpg?1251410935" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5620rancho_la_puerta_2_225.jpg?1251410937" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Mexican Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/baja_butternut_squash_soup.html">Baja Butternut Squash Soup</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/roasted_pear_arugula_salad_with_pomegranate_chipotle_vinaigrette.html">Roasted Pear &amp; Arugula Salad with Pomegranate-Chipotle Vinaigrette</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/shrimp_tamale_casserole_with_three_sisters_black_mole.html">Shrimp Tamale Casserole with Three Sisters Black Mole</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/ranch_chiles_rellenos_with_ancho_chile_salsa.html">Ranch Chiles Rellenos with Ancho Chile Salsa</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/vanilla_bean_flans_with_agave_syrup_caramelized_walnuts.html">Vanilla Bean Flans with Agave Syrup &amp; Caramelized Walnuts</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_mexican_recipes">Healthy Mexican Recipes and Menus </a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/cheap_mexican_recipes">Cheap Mexican Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More in Food &amp; Travel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_travel/the_flavors_of_puerto_rico">The Flavors of Puerto Rico</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_travel/jamaican_spice">Jamaican Spice</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_travel/a_taste_of_morocco">A Taste of Morocco</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_travel/island_fresh_greece">Island-Fresh Greece</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>"Time for wind sprints," our model-perfect instructor, Haley, yelled. I had a flashback to high school tennis team practices—a combination of feeling dread and wanting to kick the butt of the tall skinny girl next to me. I ran as fast as I could. And then as we zigged and zagged between the lines, Haley yelled at us, “Come on guys. If you finish this you can eat two salads at lunch…and maybe a little dressing.”</p> <p>When I arrived at the health spa Rancho La Puerta in northern Baja Mexico, I had some expectations: hours of tranquil pampering, as much exercise as I could pack into a day and tiny portions of spare-looking food. I wasn’t disappointed by the daily schedule of massages, salt rubs and soaks in hot baths. Plus the Ranch has other ways to help guests relax, from guided meditation and crafts to plenty of hammocks strategically placed around the campus. And the spa, which started in 1940 as a sort of boot camp-style retreat, is serious about exercise. I started every day with a 6 a.m. group hike onto the flanks of Mt. Kuchumaa (which rises 2,000 feet above the back gates of the Ranch), followed by swimming laps or exercise classes. But when it came to the food I wasn’t sure what to expect. Was I going to starve?</p> <p>When I walked into the dining room after class with Haley, I was relieved. There was a tangy cactus salad cupped in radicchio leaves and guacamole-topped tostadas with cabbage, cucumber and jícama slaw. And there was a zesty pureed bean soup with an array of fresh homemade salsas to garnish it. A big bowl of chia and flaxseeds stood near the salsas to top your meal. “They’re high in fiber and omega-3s,” Nutrition Director Yvonne Nienstadt explained. There was no meat. The food at the Ranch is mostly vegetarian; fish is served occasionally. “We encourage our guests to eat more plant-based foods with emphasis on vegetables and fruits,” she said. Serving sizes were small, but the servers happily dished up more when asked. Lunch was delicious and I got plenty to eat. </p> <p>The next day I headed to a hands-on cooking class to learn how to make some of the food I had enjoyed at the Ranch. When our class arrived, our instructor, Chef Jesús González, turned us over to Salvador Tinajero, the head gardener. With twinkling eyes and a huge grin, Salvador led us into the garden to pick what we needed for class. We weaved through rows of red-leafed Boston lettuce, bok choy, purple opal basil and giant artichokes. After picking juicy cherry tomatoes and a few jalapeños, Salvador ripped out a handful of fresh basil and handed it all to me. “Taste them all together. It’s like eating salsa straight out of the garden.” I took bites of each and I knew why I had been blown away by the salsa they served at every meal.</p> <p>Rancho La Puerta opened its cooking school, La Cocina Que Canta (The Kitchen That Sings), in 2007, right next to a six-acre organic garden that supplies much of the fresh produce for the Ranch and the school. School director Antonia Allegra said the plan from the start was “to teach guests the connection between the garden, cooking and eating.”</p> <p>Back in the kitchen we got down to the cooking and eating part of class. Chef Jesús talked us through the nine dishes we were going to cook, which blended Mediterranean influences with the traditions of his native Mexican cuisine. When we got to our cooking stations the ingredients were laid out, including bundles of fresh herbs everywhere. Part of the key to the Ranch’s high-flavor, healthy food, as in EatingWell recipes, is to use plenty of fresh herbs so you can cut back on salt and fat without sacrificing flavor. I made a tamale pie (basically tamales, casserole-style) and loaded up the dough with fresh oregano from the garden. Two other women prepared a magically quick mole to top the tamale pie. “Everything we make here should be delicious and healthy and easy to make too,” Chef Jesús told us. And it was. About an hour after we started, we sat down to enjoy our feast.</p> <p>Packing up at the end of the week, I was determined to bring home some of my Ranch bliss. OK, maybe I couldn’t recreate all of it. My boss wouldn’t appreciate me spending every afternoon on a massage table. And I wouldn’t have Haley to spur on any wind sprints. But Chef Jesús’ simple, healthy recipes are easy to recreate anywhere. Following are some of my favorites, from that tamale pie I made to a creamy-silky vanilla flan topped with candied walnuts. Here’s to a taste of the Ranch in your kitchen and mine.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_travel/mexican_makeover#comments Jessie Price January/February 2009 Food News & Origins - Food & Travel Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:11:41 +0000 Paula Joslin 9574 at http://www.eatingwell.com A Delicious Way to Diet http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/a_delicious_way_to_diet <p>Monica Walsh had tried pretty much every diet on the planet, including a three-week fast that worked—but made her feel “really unhealthy.” But after having a heart attack, the 47-year-old salesperson from Orlando, Florida, swore off fad diets and started looking for a more sensible solution. Jenn Moore, 35, an attorney who lives in Arlington, Vermont, was in the best shape of her life before she got pregnant, but six months after her son was born she was still carrying 20 pounds of “baby weight.” Mark Catalana, 43, a teacher in St.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Nicci Micco </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Learn how nine readers lost weight on the EatingWell Diet and how you can too. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/delicious_way_to_diet310.jpg?1248906211" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> January/February 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_diet_recipes">Healthy Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/eatingwell_diet_challenge_recipes">EatingWell Diet Challenge Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans">Diet Meal Plans</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More from The EatingWell Diet </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/eatingwell_diet_challenge">EatingWell Diet Challenge</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/the_eatingwell_diet">The EatingWell Diet</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/the_eatingwell_diet/7_steps_to_permanent_weight_loss">7 Steps to Permanent Weight Loss</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Monica Walsh had tried pretty much every diet on the planet, including a three-week fast that worked—but made her feel “really unhealthy.” But after having a heart attack, the 47-year-old salesperson from Orlando, Florida, swore off fad diets and started looking for a more sensible solution. Jenn Moore, 35, an attorney who lives in Arlington, Vermont, was in the best shape of her life before she got pregnant, but six months after her son was born she was still carrying 20 pounds of “baby weight.” Mark Catalana, 43, a teacher in St. Louis, Missouri, has always loved cooking, but too much of a good thing, and too little exercise, left him 50 pounds above his “healthy” weight. </p> <p>What do all these people have in common? Answer: They all wanted a better way to lose weight—and they’re not alone. When we issued a call for volunteers to participate in our three-month EatingWell Diet Challenge last summer, we got an overwhelming response: in just one week, we received more than 1,000 e-mails from people telling us why they were excited to try our diet. </p> <p>After careful selection, we invited nine men and women (including Monica, Jenn and Mark) to join our Challenge. In return, we asked that they share their experiences in this issue.</p> <p>For 12 weeks, the participants followed the principles and recipes of our cookbook, The EatingWell Diet: 7 Steps to a Healthy, Trimmer You (The Countryman Press). They tracked their calories and exercised. We offered them feedback on what they were eating and helped them troubleshoot their challenges. </p> <p>“Losing weight isn’t rocket science. If you eat less and exercise more, you’ll lose,” says Jean Harvey-Berino, Ph.D., R.D., chair of the University of Vermont’s Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences and co-author of The EatingWell Diet. “But the hardest part of losing weight is figuring out how to engineer your life so that you’re able to do this.” Harvey-Berino has made a career of teaching people to lose weight by making small daily changes. Through her research, she has helped more than 1,000 people lose an average of 21 pounds in six months. Based on Harvey-Berino’s clinically tested weight-loss principles, the EatingWell Diet has the potential to help you and thousands of others lose weight too. </p> <p>It’s already helped our Challenge participants. Collectively, over the three months, they lost a total of 112 pounds. Eager to get started? Here’s how: </p> <p>[header = Step #1: Be Ready]<br /> Step #1: Be Ready</p> <p>Most diet plans encourage you to start yesterday—or at least right this very minute. Never mind that your company is going through layoffs and right now, quite honestly, may not be the best time to overhaul your lifestyle. But you heed their calls and you begin. Then you...fail. Again. In contrast, the very first step of the EatingWell Diet is deciding whether you’re actually ready to make a lifelong commitment to eating better and exercising regularly. </p> <p>One year ago would not have been a good time for Marie Morrissey, 44, to start a diet. The Houston mother of two was entrenched in law school and her days were a blur of classes, mock trials and caring for her family. Marie knew she needed to lose weight but she also knew that she couldn’t commit to making meaningful changes until her life became less busy. Serendipitously, just as she was wrapping up her degree last July, we announced our Diet Challenge. “The timing was perfect,” says Morrissey. “Having just graduated law school, I felt I owed it to myself and my kids to find a sensible way to live.” </p> <p>When she weighed in the first week of the diet, Marie, who is 5'5", registered 170 pounds—which was both sobering and motivating. “The number on the scale depressed me at first. I haven’t had this much weight to lose since right after I delivered my kids,” she told us. “But the only thing I can do is to work on it.” </p> <p>And that she did. Because the timing was right, Marie was able to commit fully and lost 13 pounds in 12 weeks. She still has eight pounds to lose to bring her body mass index, or BMI (an estimate of a person’s body composition calculated from height and weight) into the “healthy” range—but having resolved to continue her new healthy habits, she is confident that she’ll reach her ultimate goal in the next few months. “I have given up too many times in the past,” Marie says. “I promised myself that I would take this journey one last time. It may take me longer than 12 weeks but I know this will be the last time I lose the same 20 pounds.”</p> <p>[header = Step #2: Set Goals]<br /> Step #2: Set Goals</p> <p>Ramona Chavez, 29, has struggled with her weight and body image her whole life. Over the years, she has tried all sorts of strategies—from low-carb “fad” diets to strict vegan regimes. Some helped her to lose weight—but eventually the pounds crept back. In the months just before the EatingWell Diet, nothing seemed to be working. “I had become so frustrated. I wasn’t losing weight. I was actually gaining,” she says. Before starting the diet, Ramona’s weight was an all-time high of 165 pounds—a weight that, for her height (5'2"), corresponded with a BMI in the “obese” range. </p> <p>To bring her weight into the healthy BMI range, she needed to lose 30 pounds. </p> <p>In the past, Ramona would have set her sights on this number and simply started completely cutting out certain foods, such as meat, fried foods and dairy—a tactic that she says, “just made me want to eat them more.” Eventually she’d become frustrated and give up altogether. It’s a common weight-loss mistake: setting your goals—and expectations—too high. Then, when you eat an “off-limits” food, you feel like you’ve failed and give up completely. </p> <p>No one can eat perfectly all the time: we wanted to help Ramona lose her “all-or-nothing” eating mindset and, instead, focus on setting realistic short-term goals, each of which would bring her one step closer to achieving her long-term goal of losing 30 pounds. We helped by giving her a simple formula:</p> <p>Calculate Your Calorie Goal<br /> Your current weight x 12 = calories needed to maintain your current weight<br /> To lose 1 pound/week: Cut 500 calories/day<br /> To lose 2 pounds/week: Cut 1,000 calories/day</p> <p>Using our formula, Ramona calculated that, to maintain her current weight of 165 pounds, she was consuming 1,980 calories per day. By subtracting 500 calories from this number, she arrived at a daily calorie goal of 1,480 calories. Achieving this calorie target each day would enable her to lose one pound per week. (If your goal is to lose two pounds per week, you would subtract 1,000 from your “maintenance” calorie level. Note: For healthy weight loss, we don’t advise losing more than two pounds per week. Also, if you calculate a daily calorie goal that’s less than 1,200, set your calorie goal at 1,200 calories. Below that, it’s hard to meet your nutrient needs—or feel satisfied enough to stick with a plan.)</p> <p>Finally, Ramona set “sub-goals” to help her meet her calorie goal, such as limiting snack foods at night—and buying single-serving snack foods. </p> <p>“Breaking up the goals was a nice way to remind myself of the little habits I need to practice every day to reach my overall goal of losing 30 pounds,” says Ramona, who got down to 156 pounds by the end of the Challenge. “It also makes even small achievements feel like victories.” Her next milestone is to hit 148 pounds, which is 10 percent less than her starting weight. (Research shows that, if you’re overweight, losing just 5 to 10 percent of your body weight can improve blood pressure, lower cholesterol and provide better blood-sugar control.)</p> <p>[header = Step #3: Keep Track]<br /> Step #3: Keep Track</p> <p>Once you establish a calorie goal, record everything you consume—and the number of calories in these foods and drinks. “Writing down every single morsel that goes into my mouth forces me to reflect on portions and food choices,” says Lynn Fowler, 43, of Newtown, Connecticut. “Sometimes the idea of writing something down stops me from putting it in my mouth.” </p> <p>Use a tracking system that suits you. If you’re always on the run, you might carry a small notebook or make entries on your PDA. If you have all-day access to a computer, you could design a spreadsheet, like Lynn did, or use an online tracker. Whatever method you use, be sure to tally the calories as you go. If you wait until the end of the day, you’re more likely to exceed your target.</p> <p>To help ensure that your calorie counts are as accurate as they can be, measure or weigh your portions, at least for the first week or two. Most people tend to significantly underestimate the calories they consume. In one study, people underestimated the calorie content of restaurant dinners by as much as 956 calories! In fact, if you are eating out, look up the calorie counts before you go to help you to make better choices. For example, at McDonald’s a Premium Southwest Salad with Crispy Chicken and ranch dressing has 600 calories. The same salad with grilled chicken and low-fat vinaigrette has only 360 calories. </p> <p>[header = Step #4: Be Aware]<br /> Step #4: Be Aware</p> <p>Write down not only what you eat but where, how and with whom. “Journaling” this information can help you identify situations and foods that trigger you to overeat. “Once I looked at my journal and saw where the problems were, they were much easier to fix,” says Rebecca Oechsner, 34. Rebecca realized that she had a habit of munching on cookies and potato chips late at night, after her 4-year-old daughter went to bed. Since Rebecca tended to unwind at the end of the day with a snack, she learned to keep healthier ones—such as popcorn—at the ready and to budget for those calories so she could enjoy a late-night snack and still meet her daily calorie goal. Rebecca also noticed that her usual coffee drink contained 240 calories, and this inspired her to switch to a (smaller) “skinny” latte, which satisfied her craving at about half the calories.</p> <p>On a positive note, when Rebecca reviewed her journals, she saw that making truly satisfying low-calorie meals helped her reach her goals without feeling deprived.</p> <p>[header = Step #5: Move More]<br /> Step #5: Move More</p> <p>“Calories in” is only one half of the weight-loss equation. Exercise is equally important. We recommended that, each week, our dieters set a goal to burn 1,000 calories through “programmed” aerobic exercise—such as brisk walking or jogging, cycling or rowing. In addition, we also suggested that they amp up activity in their everyday routines—taking the stairs instead of the elevator, for example.</p> <p>When it comes to burning calories, what matters most is going the distance. It makes no difference whether you run two miles in 16 minutes or walk them in a half hour. You can assume that you burn about 100 calories for each mile you walk or run—which means that our participants were aiming to put in two miles a day, five days a week. (For cycling, estimate 100 calories for every three miles you ride.) Of course, indoor exercise equipment, such as treadmills, elliptical trainers and rowers, can help track calories for you. Models that ask you to enter your weight are the most accurate but even these machines are only estimating your calorie burn, as everyone’s metabolism is different. </p> <p>It’s important to keep your “calories in” (eating) and “calories out” (exercise) goals totally separate. Using longer workouts to “buy” brownies will sabotage your success because most people tend to underestimate the calories they consume and overestimate the calories they burn through exercise. Consider this: You can polish off two cookies in just a few minutes but you’d have to run or walk four miles to burn off the 400 calories they contained. </p> <p>[header = Step #6: Get Support]<br /> Step #6: Get Support</p> <p>It used to be that if Jenn Moore was having ice cream, so was her husband, Troy Hermansky. “I would fill up a giant coffee mug and hand it to him—because I wanted a giant mug myself and it made me feel better if he was having one too,” says Jenn. “He’d say he didn’t want it, but then, since it was there, he’d eat it anyway.” Now if Jenn wants ice cream, she portions out a small dish for herself. “I may ask Troy if he wants some but I don’t automatically bring him a big cup anymore,” she says. “I know he’s trying hard to lose weight, too, and I don’t want to sabotage him.” </p> <p>Recognizing that losing weight is easier if you have someone to support you, Jenn and Troy decided to do our Diet Challenge together. Jenn still had to lose 19 of the 54 pounds she’d gained while pregnant with their son Jude, now 1. Troy was eager to shed the 30 pounds he’d gained after a career change and divorce a few years earlier. “My blood pressure is already high. I don’t want to set myself up for the host of [other] health problems that come with being overweight,” he told us at the start of the diet. By the end of the three months, Jenn and Troy had each lost 17 pounds. Doing the diet together was helpful for many reasons. They conquered and divided when it came to planning healthy meals (Jenn shopped; Troy cooked). They exercised as a family. They split entrees when they went out to dinner. “When you have a partner, that person can be an enabler in a lot of ways,” says Troy. “Just being on the same page really was the secret to our success.”</p> <p>But not everyone has support at home. In fact, a few diet participants—we won’t name names!—mentioned that, at times, their partners were “diet saboteurs,” suggesting caloric cocktails or hearty breakfasts at moments of weakness. The participants eventually figured out ways to outsmart these situations: they’d sip one glass of wine then switch to seltzer or they’d decide what to order at breakfast before they got to the café so they wouldn’t be enticed by the aromas of bacon and baked goods. And, luckily, friends stepped in as supporters. Rebecca, for example, turned to a co-worker for exercise motivation. “We work in a building that has nine flights of steep stairs,” she says. “We decided to climb up and down all nine flights at least once a day, sometimes twice a day.” </p> <p>[header = Step #7: Get a Life (Plan)]<br /> Step #7: Get a Life (Plan)!</p> <p>Weight management is a lifelong journey, not something you do for a few months and then move on. And if anyone knows this, it’s Bryan West, 40, who owns a food-service management company in Columbus, Ohio. “Every day is difficult for me—truly,” says Bryan. “I work in the food industry so there are options—distractions—around me all the time. Additionally, I have a very active social schedule. Food is always at the center of these events.” About five years ago, Bryan’s weight hit 245 pounds. It was a real wake-up call, says Bryan, and since then he’s been steadily working toward a healthy weight. But after losing 35 pounds, he hit a plateau at 210 last summer and wanted to re-energize his efforts. So he decided to try the EatingWell Diet. He lost six pounds and dropped a pants size, despite a hectic work schedule that included travel nearly every week. </p> <p>His ultimate goal is to get down to about 180 pounds. “I actually find it hard to believe that my final weight goal is in reach,” he says. But Bryan knows that to achieve this—and even to keep the weight he’s lost from creeping back—he’ll need to remain vigilant. To that end, he’s outlined a plan, which includes tracking calories daily, scheduling exercise into his calendar at the start of each week and revisiting his goals each month. He’ll also rely on some of the specific strategies that have helped him in the past with his biggest challenge, eating out. In his own words:</p> <p>• “I will take more time reading the menu and consider combinations like a side salad plus an appetizer instead of a full meal.”<br /> • “I will ask how dishes are prepared. I’ve been surprised several times by fried items on salads.”<br /> • “I will ask for salad dressings to be served on the side.”<br /> • “I will end my meals with a cup of fresh coffee while others are enjoying dessert. I don’t drink much coffee so I enjoy a good cup—especially in nice restaurants.”</p> <p>[header = Secret Weapon: Delicious Recipes]<br /> Secret Weapon: Delicious Recipes</p> <p>So often, weight-loss programs call for prepackaged meals or, at best, bland dishes like plain baked chicken and steamed vegetables. But once you learn the right tricks (replace fat with flavor from spices and herbs) and realize that a little butter can taste as good as a lot, you can enjoy delicious, flavorful recipes and still shed pounds. For Monica Walsh, who lost 16 pounds during our diet, incorporating new recipes that were low in calories and high on flavor was the easiest part of the entire Challenge. “I love to cook,” says Monica. She pulled her boyfriend, Jim, into the diet, too, and he also lost about 15 pounds. (Next, she plans to help her 70-year-old mother follow the diet’s principles.) “We knew whatever EatingWell recipe we made, it would be a nice meal. Of course, we did like some recipes more than others.” The recipes in The EatingWell Diet emphasize lean sources of protein, low-fat dairy and vegetables—all foods that, research suggests, may help you feel full on fewer calories. Many meet the criteria for our healthy-weight icon: they contain 350 calories or less, and have less than 20 grams of total fat and less than 5 grams of saturated fat.</p> <p>In the end, the nine people who took our EatingWell Diet Challenge lost well over 100 pounds simply by eating delicious, healthy recipes, getting regular exercise and connecting with their supportive families and friends. Making time for cooking and exercising took commitment, prioritizing and a little bit of problem-solving but all our dieters agreed that such efforts yielded big returns: health, happiness, a smaller number on the scale—and the confidence to keep it all going.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_reports_information/a_delicious_way_to_diet#comments Nicci Micco January/February 2009 Weight Loss/Diet Diet, Nutrition & Health - Weight Loss & Diet Plans Wed, 29 Jul 2009 22:26:09 +0000 Penelope Wall 8756 at http://www.eatingwell.com