March/April 2009 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/429/node/8932 en Chinese Braised Mushrooms & Tofu http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chinese_braised_mushrooms_tofu.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chinese_braised_mushrooms_tofu.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://assets.eatingwell.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MV6822.JPG" alt="Chinese Braised Mushrooms &amp;amp; Tofu Recipe" title="Chinese Braised Mushrooms &amp;amp; Tofu Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148" /></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chinese_braised_mushrooms_tofu.html" target="_blank">Chinese Braised Mushrooms &amp; Tofu</a></div> <div>Ma Po Tofu, a classic dish from the Sichuan province of China, inspired this recipe. The original is made with soft tofu and ground pork or beef with plenty of heat from dried chile peppers and Sichuan peppercorns. Portobello mushrooms stand in for the meat in our vegetarian version and convenient jarred chile-garlic sauce gives it plenty of kick. Serve with brown rice.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chinese_braised_mushrooms_tofu.html#comments March/April 2009 Chinese Moderate Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy High calcium High potassium Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Bone Health Digestive Health Recipes - Individual Recipes Alcohol Soy Vegetables Vegetarian, soy Dinner
 Braise/Stew Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 4 Budget Everyday favorites One dish meals Vegan Vegetarian 45 minutes or less Main dish, vegetarian Fri, 08 Jan 2010 17:58:08 +0000 admin 7574 at http://www.eatingwell.com Safer Greens http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/safer_greens <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Safer Greens </div> </div> </div> <p>It seems that every month a foodborne-illness outbreak makes the six o’clock news. Leafy greens, such as lettuce and spinach, are some of the biggest culprits—perhaps because they’re usually eaten raw. (Cooking kills most of the bacteria that makes us sick.) From 1996 to 2005, outbreaks of illnesses associated with contaminated leafy greens increased nearly 40 percent (consumption during that period rose 9 percent) and in 2006 E. coli in spinach sickened 205 and caused three deaths.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Understanding irradiation of spinach and iceberg lettuce. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/greens_310.jpg?1251468183" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Food Safety </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/10_commandments_of_food_safety">10 Commandments of Food Safety</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/is_your_supper_safe">Is Your Supper Safe?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/how_do_we_make_our_food_supply_safer">How Do We Make Our Food Supply Safer?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/5_guests_you_never_want_to_have_for_dinner">5 Common Foodborne Bacteria to Avoid</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/food_safety_basics">Food Safety Basics</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/take_our_poll_how_well_do_you_follow_food_safety_rules">Take Our Poll: How Well Do You Follow Food Safety Rules?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/safer_greens#comments Amy Paturel March/April 2009 Food News & Origins - Food News Mon, 24 Aug 2009 19:20:19 +0000 Penelope Wall 10355 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Importance of Bees to Our Food Supply http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/the_importance_of_bees_to_our_food_supply <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> ...or Not to Bee </div> </div> </div> <p>One day early last spring, Ed Olson’s life got much harder. A few weeks earlier, Olson, a commercial beekeeper, had delivered 200 of his 500 hives of honeybees to an almond orchard in Arbuckle, California. There, the honeybees would do their part buzzing up and down rows of fragrant, flowering trees, helping to make California’s Central Valley the almond capital of the universe. Like more than 100 of our food crops, almond trees will set fruit only if their flowers are cross-pollinated between two different varieties.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rowan Jacobsen </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> If honeybees disappear, they’ll take some of our healthiest foods with them. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/honey_310_1.jpg?1272913105" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5897pork.jpg?1251484759" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5901cookie.jpg?1251484776" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5899salmon.jpg?1251484764" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5900cake.jpg?1251484771" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/almond_honey_butter_cookies.html">Almond &amp; Honey-Butter Cookies</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/almond_crusted_pork_with_honey_mustard_dipping_sauce.html">Almond-Crusted Pork with Honey-Mustard Dipping Sauce</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/menus/chicken_with_honey_orange_sauce">Chicken with Honey-Orange Sauce Menu</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/flourless_honey_almond_cake.html">Flourless Honey-Almond Cake</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/honey_soy_salmon.html">Honey-Soy Broiled Salmon</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/food_news_blog/where_have_all_our_bees_gone">How to eat to save our bees</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/healing_with_honey">Healing with Honey</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/building_a_healthy_food_system_in_rural_america">Building a Healthy Food System in Rural America</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/can_honey_make_you_healthier">Can honey make you healthier?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>One day early last spring, Ed Olson’s life got much harder. A few weeks earlier, Olson, a commercial beekeeper, had delivered 200 of his 500 hives of honeybees to an ­almond orchard in Arbuckle, California. There, the honeybees would do their part buzzing up and down rows of fragrant, flowering trees, helping to make California’s Central Valley the almond capital of the universe. Like more than 100 of our food crops, ­almond trees will set fruit only if their flowers are cross-pollinated between two different varieties. Like tiny farmworkers, honeybees carry the pollen from one tree to another as they forage. Corn, wheat, rice and other grains rely on wind to spread their pollen. But honeybees pollinate much of the other stuff that adds color to our plate and vitamins and antioxidants to our diet. They give us blueberries, apples, berries, cherries, melons, grapefruit, avocados, squash, broccoli, carrots, onions, and more. If it lowers cholesterol, improves eyesight or turbocharges the immune system, it was probably fertilized by a bee. A surprising amount of our well-being rests on those tiny striped backs—and on the beekeepers who haul 2 million hives from crop to crop every year, renting them out for pollination.</p> <p>When Olson had checked the Arbuckle hives the previous fall, they had been some of his strongest. The more bees in a hive, the more pollinating power it has and the more a farmer will pay to lease it. But now, as Olson, with the lanky frame and graying mustache of an Old West gunslinger, approached the first group of 24 colonies, he sensed something was off right away. There weren’t many bees flying. It was a shimmering spring day in northern California and sunshine was glazing the soft pink rows of budding ­almond trees: perfect flying weather for a honeybee. Olson cracked open the top of the first hive, looked inside, and immediately his stomach sank with disappointment: no bees. It was a “dink”—the beekeeping term for a colony that has died or dwindled. Just like that, he was out $200, the pollination fee for a strong hive.</p> <p>Every commercial beekeeper finds a few dinks each spring, and Olson hoped this first hive had been an anomaly. Then he opened the second hive and felt a little ill. Another dink. Then he opened the third and fourth and cursed to himself. By the time he had opened all 24 colonies, he was in shock. There was plenty of honey in the hives, but the strong colonies that had filled those boxes two months earlier had dwindled to almost nothing. In 25 years of professional beekeeping, he’d never seen anything like it.</p> <p>By anyone’s standards, Ed Olson is an excellent beekeeper (but he asked that his real name not be used). He feeds his bees specially formulated, high-protein patties to keep their strength up and carefully monitors his hives for the presence of diseases or parasites. He does everything right. Yet it seemed he had just been hit with the mysterious syndrome called Colony Collapse Disorder, or CCD. In the winter of 2006-2007, CCD killed 32 percent of America’s honeybees. The next winter, another 36 percent—more than a million hives—died.</p> <p>“At first I was in denial,” Olson recalled. “Then I just felt weak and had to lean against my truck. A year’s hard work for naught!” Olson wound up losing all 50 hives that had overwintered in one particular bee yard. That’s bad enough, but it pales next to some operations. Adee Honey Farms of South Dakota, the largest beekeeping business in the country, lost 28,000 of its 70,000 hives. That’s about a billion bees gone missing. “It’s off the charts,” said Bret Adee. “It’s not a sustainable thing, what’s happening now.”</p> <p>At first it looked as though the United States was the sole sufferer of CCD, but the rest of the world quickly reported losses also. “The situation for bees in Europe is no better than for bees in North America,” says Bernard Vaissière, a pollination specialist with the French National Institute for Agricultural Research. A report issued last August by the European Food Safety Authority estimates that the UK lost about 30 percent of its honeybees in 2007, while Italy lost 40 to 50 percent. Whatever is taking down bees has gone global.</p> <p><strong>A Sweet Deal</strong></p> <p>A hundred million years ago, as dinosaurs were cruising the savannahs and munching on ferns, pines and each other, bees and plants hammered out the details of a deal that has been benefiting the rest of Earth’s denizens ever since. Until that time, plants had used the wind to disseminate their pollen. But wind pollination is like Internet spam: you need to send a million packets to find one receptive target. So sometime in the Cretaceous Period, one group of plants decided to start MapQuesting each other instead. Why rely on the fickle wind when bugs could carry pollen directly between two plants? The trick was in getting the couriers’ attention.</p> <p>Until then, plants had spent several hundred million years trying to discourage animals from eating them. Toxins, spikes and bitter-tasting leaves were the order of the day. Now, in a startling about-face, these new plants decided to make themselves as appealing to animals as possible. They created beguiling shapes, colors and odors to snag passersby and offered up delicious nectar punches free to all. When the bugs—and, later, birds, bats and butterflies—dropped by for their morning sip, they’d get sticky pollen all over their hairy bodies and inadvertently deliver it to the next café. The flower was born. And fruit was soon to follow.</p> <p>Not many things out there want to be eaten. Talk to your basil all you want before you pick it; it’s still a bad day for the basil. And if you’ve ever watched a hare tuck its ears back and turn on the afterburners, you know that the name of the game of life is don’t get eaten. But not for the flowering plants: they eagerly offer nectar, pollen, fruits and nuts. They want to keep us healthy and enthusiastic so that we’ll keep spreading their seeds around the planet. (And when it comes to providing these services, we humans are the only species that’s been nearly as helpful as the bees.)</p> <p>In evolution, this arrangement, where two species cooperate to the benefit of both, is called mutualism. And if you’ve ever wondered why fruits and vegetables have so many compounds in them that keep us healthy, wonder no more. The plants that have prospered are the ones that give animals (including us) what they need—antioxidants, vitamins and fiber that are critical to our health. And the successful animals (including us) are the ones that thrive on what the plants have to offer.</p> <p>What a fantastically beautiful arrangement. And what a shame it would be if we blew it by forgetting that honeybees have always been a part of the team.</p> <p><strong>A Mystery Disease</strong></p> <p>We can’t say for certain that Olson’s bees had CCD, because we still don’t know what CCD is. We just know what it looks like, and it looks like Ed ­Olson’s experience in the almonds that spring: hives that had been in superb condition suddenly depopulate, with the adult bees disappearing from the hive until all that’s left is honeycomb filled with young bee larvae and honey.</p> <p>Theories abound about what is causing CCD. Cell phones were an early suspect, based on nothing more than the results of one mistranslated German study of cordless phones. Genetically modified crops were another rumored culprit, despite studies showing that bees thrived on GMO corn. Neither of these proved true. Other causes that do seem to be associated with collapsed colonies include pesticides, newly introduced viruses, fungi and poor colony nutrition. Congress has earmarked a few million dollars for research to get to the heart of the problem, but the money has yet to start trickling out, and results are years away. The bees might be able to wait that long, but we can’t.</p> <p>“That’s the crux of CCD,” says Olson. “The bee population can eventually recover from disease losses, but American agriculture depends upon gypsy beekeepers to provide the spark of pollination to start the engine of food production.” About 35 percent of the food we eat—$15 billion worth of produce in the United States and $215 billion worldwide—would not exist without pollinators. Once we had thousands of native insects that provided all our pollination needs, but habitat destruction and the ever-increasing size of industrial farms have put most of our crops out of reach of wild bugs. The only way to bring pollination to these plants is to truck it in, and the honeybee is the only pollinator that will endure such a domesticated lifestyle. Unfortunately, it remains to be seen how many beekeepers can endure their mounting economic losses. “Bees can be replaced relatively quickly,” says Olson; “out-of-business beekeepers can’t.”</p> <p><strong>Turning the Tide</strong></p> <p>Despite the dire situation, there are some encouraging signs that we are starting to head in the right direction. Many beekeepers believe pesticides known as neonicotinoids are responsible for CCD. In the United States, neonicotinoids are widely used for everything from crops and golf courses to flea and termite control. Last August, the Natural Resources Defense Council sued the EPA for refusing to disclose the studies done before approving a leading neonicotinoid in 2003. In September, Italy became the fourth European country to ban neonicotinoids. So far, the evidence against the neonicotinoids is mixed, but the fact that four countries would take such a radical step, simply to protect their honeybees, may mean that a paradigm shift is under way. Beekeepers themselves are becoming more leery of conventional agriculture and are favoring pollination contracts with organic farmers—a move that may encourage more farms to go organic.</p> <p>But the number-one source of pesticides in beehives is the beekeepers themselves, who add pesticides to their hives in an effort to control parasitic mites. That, too, is starting to change, as natural methods of mite treatment, as well as mite-resistant strains of bees, become available. For years, organic beekeeping was rare be­cause of the chemical mite treatments; now it’s starting to look like it will one day be the rule, at least among hobbyists.</p> <p>And oh the hobbyists! Beekeeping has been declining in popularity in the United States since World War II, but in the past year, thanks to the attention brought by CCD, the ranks of new beekeepers have swelled to the point that beekeeping schools have had to turn applicants away and beekeeping suppliers have run short of both gear and bees. “There is a tremendous increase in the sale of beekeeping equipment,” says Steve Forrest, owner of Brushy Mountain Bee Farm in North Carolina, one of the country’s leading suppliers. “It’s just staggering.” But that’s a good problem to have. It means that bees have regained a place in our collective psyche that they haven’t occupied for generations. They are no longer icky insects to be feared for their stingers (most stinging is done by yellow jackets) and are, once again, our ancient partners in the practice of growing good food.</p> <p>You could take Bee Movie as a sign that we’re starting to appreciate bees, but that movie didn’t even get the gender right. Sorry, Jerry, but 99 percent of the bees in a hive—and all of the workers—are female. One sign that we are on the right track came when Häagen-Dazs announced that because 40 percent of its ice cream flavors wouldn’t exist without bees it was donating $250,000 to honeybee research and launching a new flavor, Vanilla Honey Bee, to support the cause. The Almond Board of California, too, has been extremely supportive. When the other fruit, nut and vegetable companies are ready to pony up, we’ll know we’re on the road to ensuring the fertility of our farms and fields.</p> <p>In the end, Ed Olson managed to save his almond farmer from ruin. He desperately called his beekeeper friends and finally found one who had a few dozen hives that weren’t spoken for. Olson trucked these hives into the almond orchard. A stretch of warm, sunny weather arrived just in time, the bees flew all day every day, and the grower managed to set a record crop. The story was the same throughout the San Joaquin and Sacramento Valleys: the weather saved the almonds. There probably hadn’t been enough bees to cover the need, but perfect conditions gave the available bees extra flying hours and they managed to pollinate all the trees.</p> <p>As the pollination starts this spring, beekeepers and almond growers alike are holding their collective breath. They know that all it will take is a good storm or two to upset the balance and break the sweet deal.</p> <p><em>Rowan Jacobsen is the author of A Geography of Oysters (Bloomsbury USA, 2007), a 2008 James Beard Award winner, and Fruitless Fall: The Collapse of the Honey Bee and the Coming Agricultural Crisis (Bloomsbury USA, 2008).</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/the_importance_of_bees_to_our_food_supply#comments Rowan Jacobsen March/April 2009 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Fri, 21 Aug 2009 17:52:00 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10265 at http://www.eatingwell.com Healing with Honey http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/healing_with_honey <p>The ancient Egyptians, Chinese, Greeks and Romans all considered honey a basic component of any first-aid kit and today, we’re hearing more and more about honey’s healing power. We sort through the claims and the science.</p> <h3>A Diet Helper?</h3> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Nicci Micco </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sorting through the claims and science of the health benefits of honey. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/honey_310.jpg?1251148052" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/almond_crusted_pork_with_honey_mustard_dipping_sauce.html">Almond-Crusted Pork with Honey-Mustard Dipping Sauce</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/almond_honey_butter_cookies.html">Almond &amp; Honey-Butter Cookies</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/menus/chicken_with_honey_orange_sauce">Chicken with Honey-Orange Sauce Menu</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/flourless_honey_almond_cake.html">Flourless Honey-Almond Cake</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/honey_soy_salmon.html">Honey-Soy Broiled Salmon</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/the_importance_of_bees_to_our_food_supply">The Importance of Bees to Our Food Supply</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/a_healthful_sugar_is_agave_nectar_healthier_than_sugar_o">A Healthful Sugar: Is Agave Nectar Healthier Than Sugar or Other Sweeteners?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The ancient Egyptians, Chinese, Greeks and Romans all considered honey a basic component of any first-aid kit and today, we’re hearing more and more about honey’s healing power. We sort through the claims and the science.</p> <p><strong>A Diet Helper?</strong> In a 2008 study in the Journal of Food Science, scientists reported that rats that were fed a honey-sweetened diet gained 23 percent less weight than those that ate food spiked with refined sugar over one year. (One rat year equals about 20 human ones.) “The honey we used was high in antioxidants so it is possible that this led to greater fat burning,” says Lynne Chepulis, Ph.D., lead researcher and author of the book Healing Honey (Brown Walker Press, 2008). Chepulis points to research linking other antioxidant-rich foods (e.g., green tea) with speeding up your metabolism. But not all honeys are rich in antioxidants. Another study, published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, found that the most common type of honey—clover—doesn’t have many more antioxidants than refined sugar.</p> <p>Bottom line: Research linking honey with weight-loss benefits is preliminary at best. Adding any sweetener to your diet without subtracting another can lead to weight gain.</p> <p><strong>A Cough syrup?</strong> Researchers at Penn State University tested honey against dextromethorphan—the active ingredient in most cough medicines—as a cough suppressant in children and found honey to be more effective. Sweetness may be honey’s “active ingredient.” The brain part that registers sweet tastes and the part that causes coughing are located near each other so sensing sweetness may affect coughing, says author Ian M. Paul, M.D., who published the study in 2007 in the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine.</p> <p>Bottom line: If you’re trying to soothe a child’s cough, or yours, try honey. Don’t give it to a baby younger than one: honey may contain spores of a bacteria that causes botulism, which an infant’s immature immune system can’t handle.</p> <p><strong>Relief from Allergies?</strong> The theory is this: Honeybees gather pollen from the very plants that cause your itchy eyes, so consuming a small daily dose of the local honey—and subsequently these pollens—may stimulate your immune system and reduce allergies, explains Miguel P. Wolbert, an allergist and immunologist at the Allergy &amp; Asthma Care Center in Evansville, Indiana. But the pollens that cause sneezing and congestion—such as ragweed—are windborne, while the pollens bees collect are too heavy to fly in the breeze. Windborne pollens can fall onto flowers, get picked up by bees and end up in honey, says Wolbert, “but it’s likely to be a very, very small amount.” Not enough to make a difference. And, so far, no clinical evidence shows that honey alleviates allergy symptoms.</p> <p>Bottom line: It’s not likely that honey will help your allergies, says Wolbert, but, “I don’t tell my patients not to eat it.”</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/healing_with_honey#comments Nicci Micco March/April 2009 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Fri, 21 Aug 2009 17:46:30 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10263 at http://www.eatingwell.com Certified Naturally Grown (CNG) http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/certified_naturally_grown_cng <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> An alternative to organic. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Farmers in New York’s Mid-Hudson Valley developed the Certified Naturally Grown (CNG) label in 2002 as an alternative to the USDA’s National Organic Program, the cost of which often is prohibitive to small-scale farmers. Foods that carry the label have been grown according to organic standards, and other farmers in the network do annual inspections to ensure that standards are being met. (At these visits, farmers also share tips about how to handle challenges, such as pests.) About 600 farms in 46 states belong to the CNG network: you’ll likely find their food at farmers’ markets and in CSA boxes, as most members distribute only to local markets.</p> <p><em>By Jennifer Zeigler</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/certified_naturally_grown_cng#comments March/April 2009 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Fri, 21 Aug 2009 17:29:36 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10256 at http://www.eatingwell.com A Healthful Sugar: Is Agave Nectar Healthier Than Sugar or Other Sweeteners? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/a_healthful_sugar_is_agave_nectar_healthier_than_sugar_o <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Is agave nectar healthier than sugar or other sweeteners?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Agave syrup, produced from sap of a plant that’s been used medicinally in Mexico for generations, is gaining popularity in the U.S. In 2008, 29 new products with agave, including chocolate, energy bars, granola and soda, hit supermarket shelves, according to Mintel, a leading market research company.</p> <p>The natural sweetener is valued as a vegan alternative to honey and touted for its low glycemic index. Foods with a higher glycemic index (GI) tend to trigger a greater surge in blood sugar and insulin—the hormone that helps the sugar get into cells—just after eating. (These spikes can be particularly problematic for those with diabetes. High-GI foods also tend to make you hungry again sooner because they’re digested quickly.) According to a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, agave’s GI value is about five times lower than table sugar’s. Currently no studies compare how, relative to other sugars, agave may affect blood-sugar control. But based on the buzz agave’s been generating, we’ll likely see research in the near future.</p> <p>Agave packs 20 calories per teaspoon, five more than granulated sugar, but, like honey, it’s sweeter than sugar, so you need less to achieve the same level of sweetness. A general substitution is to use one-third less agave nectar than you would white sugar and reduce other liquids by one-fourth. (This may require experimentation when making some recipes, such as baked goods.)</p> <p>One final caveat: look for USDA-certified organic products. Nearly all agave sold in the U.S. is imported from Mexico and the FDA has refused some shipments due to excessive pesticide residues. Check for the USDA-certified organic seal or Quality Assurance International (QAI) certified-organic stamp, an independent, global organic certifier accredited by the USDA.</p> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_stevia_safe">Is Stevia Safe?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/whats_so_bad_about_high_fructose_corn_syrup">What&#039;s So Bad About High Fructose Corn Syrup?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/a_buyers_guide_to_sugar_substitutes">A Buyer&#039;s Guide to Sugar Substitutes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/3_ways_to_break_your_sugar_habit">3 ways to break your sugar habit</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/a_healthful_sugar_is_agave_nectar_healthier_than_sugar_o#comments Cynthia Sass, M.P.H., R.D. March/April 2009 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Fri, 21 Aug 2009 16:03:34 +0000 Nifer 10239 at http://www.eatingwell.com Which Broccoli Is Better: Raw or Cooked? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/which_broccoli_is_better_raw_or_cooked <p>Broccoli frequently earns a top spot on “superfoods” lists. This is partly because it delivers a healthy dose of sulforaphane, a compound thought to thwart cancer by helping to stimulate the body’s detoxifying enzymes. According to recent research in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, raw broccoli provides significantly more of this beneficial nutrient than cooked. (Cooking locks sulforaphane in, making it unavailable to your body.) In the small study, men were given about 1 cup of broccoli, raw or cooked.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Fiona Kenny, R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> We all know to eat our veggies—but does cooking do in the nutrients? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5957broccoli2_225.jpg?1250870271" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/broccoli_salad_with_creamy_feta_dressing.html">Broccoli Salad with Creamy Feta Dressing</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/ginger_broccoli.html">Ginger Broccoli</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/broccoli_bacon_salad.html">Broccoli-Bacon Salad</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Broccoli frequently earns a top spot on “superfoods” lists. This is partly because it delivers a healthy dose of sulforaphane, a compound thought to thwart cancer by helping to stimulate the body’s detoxifying enzymes. According to recent research in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, raw broccoli provides significantly more of this beneficial nutrient than cooked. (Cooking locks sulforaphane in, making it unavailable to your body.) In the small study, men were given about 1 cup of broccoli, raw or cooked. Those who ate the raw broccoli absorbed sulforaphane faster and in higher amounts compared to those who ate it cooked. The findings add to growing evidence that links diets rich in cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, kale and cauliflower, to lower rates of cancer. </p> <p>Bottom Line: If you like broccoli, eat it raw: it’s more nutritious. Or, if you prefer it cooked, Martijn Vermeulen, Ph.D., the study’s lead researcher, suggests steaming it until it’s cooked but still crunchy. Some research suggests this method may keep sulforaphane available.</p> <p>Don’t love broccoli raw or cooked? Other vegetables are super-nutritious as well. Get your 5 (or more) a day. Here are some healthy choices »</p> <p>By Fiona Kenny, R.D.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/which_broccoli_is_better_raw_or_cooked#comments Fiona Kenny, R.D. March/April 2009 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Fri, 21 Aug 2009 15:58:31 +0000 Nifer 10236 at http://www.eatingwell.com Are there any examples of GM crops promising health benefits? http://www.eatingwell.com/are_there_any_examples_of_gm_crops_promising_health_benefits <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Are there any examples of GM crops promising health benefits?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Golden rice is a strain of rice genetically engineered to contain beta carotene in the endosperm. (Your body converts beta carotene to vitamin A.) Golden rice was originally developed over 10 years ago with a humanitarian mission in mind to treat vitamin A deficiency, however regulatory and patent issues as well as consumer opposition in developing countries have kept it out of the food supply to date.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/are_there_any_examples_of_gm_crops_promising_health_benefits#comments Gretel Schueller March/April 2009 Lisa Weasel Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:59:13 +0000 Penelope Wall 10128 at http://www.eatingwell.com Are GM crops affecting the health of other plants and the environment? http://www.eatingwell.com/are_gm_crops_affecting_the_health_of_other_plants_and_the_environment <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Are GM crops affecting the health of other plants and the environment?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>If there are closely related species in the wild or in nearby crops, then pollen from a GM crop can pollinate another plant, thereby spreading its genetically engineered traits. There’s been research, for example, documenting the spread of transgenic corn genes into native corn species in Mexico. This is particularly troubling because many native and wild relatives of corn grow in Mexico and such cross-pollination could threaten the genetic biodiversity of corn, an important food crop around the world. Here in the U.S., organic farmers have filed a lawsuit against the USDA for allowing the planting of GM sugar beets, because the GM traits could potentially spread into closely related organic crops, such as chard and table beets, voiding their organic status. Another environmental issue is the increase in chemical use. Between 1994 and 2005 there was a 15-fold increase in the use of Roundup, an herbicide produced by Monsanto—which is also the world’s leading producer of GM seeds. About 80 percent of GM crops are herbicide-tolerant, so farmers can use far more herbicides on their crops and not kill them. If you’re going to engineer a crop to resist a weed-killer that just invites the use of herbicides.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/are_gm_crops_affecting_the_health_of_other_plants_and_the_environment#comments Gretel Schueller March/April 2009 Lisa Weasel Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:58:39 +0000 Penelope Wall 10127 at http://www.eatingwell.com What are your concerns about GM food crops and human health? http://www.eatingwell.com/what_are_your_concerns_about_gm_food_crops_and_human_health <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>What are your concerns about GM food crops and human health?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>There are too many unknowns. There aren’t enough studies really documenting that they are safe. The safety data is all generated by the companies and submitted to our government. We have lots of reasons as consumers to ask for independent safety studies. GM ingredients are largely found in processed food—except for papayas, which in this country tend to be GM varieties. The only way to be certain you are not eating GM foods is to buy certified organic, which must be 95 percent GM-free.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/what_are_your_concerns_about_gm_food_crops_and_human_health#comments Gretel Schueller March/April 2009 Lisa Weasel Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:57:23 +0000 Penelope Wall 10126 at http://www.eatingwell.com Nell Newman's Secrets to Eating In Season http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/eatingwell_in_season/nell_newmans_secrets_to_eating_in_season <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Your guide to rebuilding your connection to food and the earth. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>I can remember my first farmers’ market. It was 1989 and as I rode my bike through Santa Cruz, California, near where I live, I came upon a display of fruits and vegetables piled high and wide on card tables and the tailgates of pickup trucks—all jammed in an abandoned parking lot. There was a weathered-looking gentleman with a crumpled straw hat belting out folk songs on an old guitar and dozens of earthy-looking farmers, beaming and proud to speak of their work and their land, who encouraged me to sample a snap pea, a radish.</p> <p>The farmers’ market in Santa Cruz hasn’t changed that much in 20-plus years—but it has gotten bigger and it is no longer a rarity. Over the past decade the number of farmers’ markets across the United States has almost doubled.</p> <p>These markets are flourishing because they honor the basic premise that our land, food, health and happiness are inextricably linked. The simple act of shopping at local farmers’ markets is profound and one of the best things we can do for our own health and that of the planet. For me it’s my weekly (sometimes twice a week) way to get grounded, reconnect with great friends and get inspired to cook what is local and fresh that particular day.</p> <p>Take one of my favorite market discoveries, tomatillos. I’ve taken to roasting them on a baking sheet or firing them on a grill: split into halves then blended with jalapeño peppers, a little vinegar and a touch of salt, it’s a great salsa (try <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/tomatillo_sauce_salsa_verde.html">Tomatillo Sauce</a>). Or, I make <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/tomatillo_gazpacho.html">tomatillo gazpacho</a>.</p> <p>I’ve since started growing tomatillos in my garden; the job of picking, roasting and blending has become a seasonal ritual. The result is dozens of jars of salsa for friends and enough in the freezer to last throughout the year. Come to think of it, that’s sort of how my dad, Paul Newman, started bottling and selling his salad dressing, the one that launched Newman’s Own.</p> <p>I also try to keep a rotation of salad greens growing in my garden as well as tomatoes, basil, peaches and more. The chickens that run around my yard keep the bugs under control and help elevate the basic omelet to godly status. Between my garden and my farmers’ market, upwards of 70 percent of my diet is local.</p> <p>As our world has gotten more focused on quick, cheap and easy ways to feed ourselves—and we’ve started packaging and shipping food great distances—our connection to the land has been lost, and a certain social fragmentation has occurred. To me the farmers’ market is about closing the distance between people and places, a way to remember traditions and crafts. It’s a way to put down, quite literally, good roots.</p> <p>In much the way a seed is the beginning of something wonderful—of, say, a tree that will produce apples—so too is this book a seed to stir your imagination and passion for cooking with the fruits of the land. It’s also about connecting you to the place where you live, helping you to learn more about your neighboring farmers—their long days working the soil, and the choices they have to make to provide for not only their families but also their communities.</p> <p><strong>EatingWell in Season</strong> can be your guide to rebuilding your connection to food and the earth. After perusing these pages and making some recipes, you will want to seek out the local markets wherever you are, visit the farms and perhaps even plant your own seeds.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/eatingwell_in_season/nell_newmans_secrets_to_eating_in_season#comments March/April 2009 Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:52:22 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10125 at http://www.eatingwell.com Healthy Eating on a Budget http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/healthy_eating_on_a_budget <p>Most Americans are looking for ways to lower their grocery bill, so we asked Adam Drewnowski, Ph.D., director of the Nutritional Sciences Program at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine, to tell us what foods he thinks are affordable and nutritious. “Go back to the basics,” he recommends. “The things that we’ve always known but forgot as we were chasing after the latest baby vegetable or exotic fruit.” Here are six nutritious money savers to toss in your shopping cart.</p> <h3><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_bean_recipes">Beans: 52¢ per 1/2-cup serving</a></h3> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> EatingWell Editors </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Six nutritious low cost foods to toss in your shopping cart. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/banana_bunch_clean_310.jpg?1265732093" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/5771grocery_bag_STOCK225.jpg?1251406373" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Cheap Recipes for $3 or Less Per Serving </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/cheap_easy_quick_dinner_recipes">Easy &amp; Quick Cheap Dinner Recipes </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/cheap_easy_chicken_recipes">Cheap &amp; Easy Chicken Recipes </a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/cheap_ground_beef_recipes">Cheap and Easy Ground Beef Recipes </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_budget_friendly_recipes">Healthy Budget-Friendly Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/diet_dinners_for_less_than_3_serving">Diet dinners for less than $3 /serving</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/cheap_easy_chinese_recipes">Cheap Chinese Recipes </a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/cheap_mexican_recipes">Cheap Mexican Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/food_blog/4_cheap_boneless_pork_chop_dinners">4 cheap boneless pork chop dinners</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/food_blog/gourmet_recession_delicious_dinners_for_3_or_less">Gourmet recession: Delicious dinners for $3 or less</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/organic_or_not_is_organic_produce_healthier_than_conventional">Organic—or Not? Is Organic Produce Healthier Than Conventional?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/food_blog/why_smart_cooks_use_frozen_vegetables">Why smart cooks use frozen vegetables</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Most Americans are looking for ways to lower their grocery bill, so we asked Adam Drewnowski, Ph.D., director of the Nutritional Sciences Program at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine, to tell us what foods he thinks are affordable and nutritious. “Go back to the basics,” he recommends. “The things that we’ve always known but forgot as we were chasing after the latest baby vegetable or exotic fruit.” Here are six nutritious money savers to toss in your shopping cart.</p> <p>Beans: 52¢ per 1/2-cup serving<br /> One serving of beans has 7 grams of fiber, about a quarter the daily recommendation, and 7 grams of protein.</p> <p>Eggs: 23¢ per large egg<br /> A source of high-quality protein, eggs also contain the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, which help keep eyes healthy. </p> <p>Banana: 40¢ per banana<br /> A large banana fulfills one of your daily fruit servings (the recommendation is 1 1/2 to 2 servings a day). Plus, it’s a good source of potassium and fiber and a great source of vitamins C and B6.</p> <p>Potatoes: 31¢ per russet potato<br /> Potatoes are a good source of fiber, potassium and vitamin C.</p> <p>Yogurt: 49¢ per 8-ounce serving<br /> Yogurt is a great source of calcium and protein. You’ll pay more (and create more waste) if you buy it in single-serving containers. Save your change—buy it in bulk and dish out your own portions.</p> <p>Ground beef: $1.02 per 3-ounce serving of 93%-lean ground beef<br /> Lean beef is a low-fat source of protein and iron. Plus, it’s easy to cook so you can whip it up quicker than the time it takes for takeout delivery.</p> <p>SOURCE: safeway.com, Prices as of January 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/healthy_eating_on_a_budget#comments EatingWell Editors March/April 2009 Food News & Origins - Food News Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:28:44 +0000 Penelope Wall 9950 at http://www.eatingwell.com How We Savor the Seasons at EatingWell http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/eatingwell_in_season/how_we_savor_the_seasons_at_eatingwell <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Jessie Price </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> What’s fresh from the farm inspires our recipes all year long. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Here at EatingWell, staying in touch with the seasons is a way of life. Our office in Charlotte, Vermont, a rural town of about 3,500, is located in the midst of farm fields. We have dairy cows across the street and a flock of woolly sheep just down the road. The compost from our Test Kitchen feeds a pair of black pigs at a nearby farm. Each spring we plant big pots of herbs, chard and kale outside the front door. And all summer, we stop by the Charlotte Berry Farm after work to pick strawberries, raspberries and blueberries or head down to a local “secret spot” to forage for chanterelles.</p> <p>As the food editor at EatingWell, I am passionate about savoring seasonal produce. In May it’s asparagus seven nights a week, and then in October I give myself stomachaches from eating too many apples. In early July I rush to my mom’s house to pick sour cherries before the birds eat them. When those cherries are in season, it means weeks of cherry tarts, cherry preserves, cherry pie and even sour-cherry cocktails with dark rum.</p> <p>And I’m not the only one here who’s so crazy about seasonal produce. Test Kitchen Manager Stacy Fraser ran a small organic vegetable farm when she first moved to Charlotte. People around town still miss the amazing blend of salad greens she and her husband sold at their farmstand, back before you could find mesclun in plastic boxes at every supermarket. Now she puts her green thumb to work as the coordinator of the vegetable garden at her son’s school. Associate Editor Carolyn Malcoun is especially partial to dark leafy greens, which she tenderly refers to as “DLGs.” She gets DLGs from her CSA, grows them in her garden and one of her favorite stops on Saturday mornings is Pete’s Greens’ stand at her local farmers’ market. At Pete’s she picks up some of Vermont’s finest greens, from wild arugula to Italian dandelion</p> <p>This wealth of wonderful fresh fruits and vegetables surrounding us inspires and informs our recipes at EatingWell every day. When I’m looking for ideas for an easy summer recipe, the first place I turn is my backyard garden. I got the idea for <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/poblano_skirt_steak_fajitas.html">Poblano &amp; Skirt Steak Fajitas</a> when I was harvesting scallions and hot peppers from my garden. Carolyn had no problem coming up with <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_winter_greens_recipes">recipe ideas for dark leafy greens</a>. </p> <p>Besides the inspiration that these fabulous local ingredients provide, they also happen to synch perfectly with our mission—to help people make healthy eating a way of life. After all, there’s no more enjoyable and delicious way to eat healthfully than to cook and eat whatever produce is best at the moment. Of course we also pepper in lean meats, cheeses, whole grains and dairy products. But the tart Honeycrisp apples in October and the ripe tomatoes in July are what make cooking exciting and make our recipes taste great.</p> <p>And we strive to make these recipes as easy as possible so that eating well in season is a joy rather than a chore. In our Test Kitchen we test each recipe, on average, seven times to make sure that you get the same great results when you cook our recipes at home. Plus we stick with simple methods and easy-to-find ingredients to keep our recipes streamlined.</p> <p>EatingWell in Season, The Farmers' Market Cookbook is a collection of some of our favorite recipes that highlight the best produce of the year. We’ve organized the recipes by season so you’ll find, for example, that the dishes in the Summer chapter feature produce that “peaks” during the summer months. Our Seasonal Produce Chart shows how we’ve organized the produce by season.</p> <p>Of course, “peak” season is different depending on where you live. So what’s ripe around you locally at the moment is your best guide to what to cook next.</p> <p>You’ll find recipes for the most iconic seasonal vegetables, such as peas in spring or citrus in winter, in this collection. And we’ve also included some more underappreciated seasonal beauties (just the sort of thing you might pick up at your farmers’ market), such as dandelion greens in spring or celery root in winter. And of course, I wouldn’t leave out the sour cherries. You can enjoy our delicious <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/sour_cherry_fruit_slump.html">sour cherry slump</a>. Just thinking of it, I can hardly wait for July.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/eatingwell_in_season/how_we_savor_the_seasons_at_eatingwell#comments Jessie Price March/April 2009 Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:19:32 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9946 at http://www.eatingwell.com Eat for Your Eyes http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/eat_for_your_eyes <p><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/five_tips_for_eye_health">View slideshow of 5 foods for eye health »</a></p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Five foods to help you see more clearly. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/eyeglasses_produce_310.jpg?1266439370" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/eye_310.jpg?1266439379" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/five_tips_for_eye_health">Five Tips For Eye Health</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/dry_eyes_traced_to_oils_in_diet">Dry Eyes Traced to Oils in Diet</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>View slideshow of 5 foods for eye health »</p> <p>When I was 7, I longed for bright blue eyeglasses with wings like the ones my neighbor Sue wore. (She was 9, and ultra-cool.) Much to my disappointment at the time, my vision was perfect. With age, that’s changed: When I hit my forties I reluctantly purchased drugstore reading glasses. Now I need bifocals. Frankly, I’m lucky that, so far, that’s all I’ve had to deal with: more than 8 million Americans—including people I know—are facing a vision problem that can’t be corrected so easily: age-related macular degeneration (AMD).</p> <p>AMD begins when the macula—the center of the retina, and the part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail—starts to break down. This causes cloudy “blind spots” in the center of your vision, which, over time, grow in number and in size, making it difficult to read, drive a car or even recognize faces. AMD is a leading cause of blindness in people over age 60.</p> <p>Getting older is, in fact, the biggest risk factor for developing AMD; one study found that while the disease is relatively rare in middle age, risk jumps to around 30 percent by age 75. Being female, white or having a family history of AMD also boosts your risk. While some people seem to develop the condition no matter what they do, there are a few lifestyle choices that may help to protect against the disease. For example, smoking appears to increase risk fivefold, so quitting, if you’re a smoker, may reduce your risk. Wearing sunglasses can also help, as light rays from the sun can penetrate the retina and damage its cells—which may explain why a study published last fall found that people who live in sunny areas are more susceptible to AMD. But I’m most interested in the emerging research that suggests eating a nutrient-rich diet may help to prevent the development, or delay the progression, of AMD.</p> <p>While the signs of AMD may not show up until late in life, much of the damage occurs decades earlier. So what can I eat today to protect my eyes? I did some digging into the research, and here’s what I found. Five foods to help you see more clearly.</p> <p>1. Up your antioxidant intake.</p> <p>Studies show that people with low levels of antioxidants are more likely to develop AMD than those with higher levels. Antioxidants that seem to be especially protective against the disease include vitamin C (in citrus fruits, kiwi and broccoli), vitamin E (in vegetable oils, nuts and avocados) and lutein and zeaxanthin—nutrients that abound in dark leafy greens, such as spinach, kale and collards. While it’s not completely clear how these antioxidants protect your eyes, it seems that they accumulate in the retina where they can mop up free radicals, compounds that damage cells by starving them of oxygen. Lutein and zeaxanthin may also act like natural sunglasses, helping to form macular pigment that filters out some of the sun’s damaging rays. Get antioxidant rich recipes.</p> <p>2. Eat (whole) eggs.</p> <p>Egg yolks are also rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, but many of us avoid eggs because we’re worried about their cholesterol content. Research led by Thomas Wilson, Ph.D., associate professor with the Center for Health and Disease Research at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell, suggests that we shouldn’t be so concerned. He found that when people ate eggs regularly—as many as two daily—they significantly increased the levels of lutein and zeaxanthin circulating in their bodies without boosting LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels. Unless your doctor advises otherwise, go ahead and enjoy eggs regularly. (Just don’t go crazy: the American Heart Association still advises limiting cholesterol intake to less than 300 milligrams [mg] daily, and one large egg yolk has about 213 mg.) Take a tip from Dr. Wilson and scramble your eggs with spinach for an even bigger nutrient boost. Try some healthy egg recipes.</p> <p>3. Help yourself to more “see” food.</p> <p>A recent analysis of nine studies that included more than 88,000 participants suggested that people who ate at least two servings of fatty fish (such as salmon, sardines, mackerel, herring or trout) per week were about one-third less likely to develop advanced AMD than those who didn’t. Lead scientist Elaine Chong, Ph.D., a research fellow at the Centre for Eye Research at the University of Melbourne, Australia, explains that omega-3 fatty acids—particularly DHA—in fish are key components of the nerve cells in the retina. “DHA is found in much higher concentrations in the retina than in other parts of the body,” she notes, “thus, a deficiency may trigger AMD.” So commit to eating more fatty fish, and don’t stop there: shellfish, such as oysters and crab, provide good amounts of zinc, another nutrient that’s found in the retina and may also help protect against AMD. Get healthy fish recipes.</p> <p>4. Consider a supplement.</p> <p>Although it’s always best to get nutrients from food first, supplements are showing a lot of promise in combating AMD. Reports from large-scale clinical trials suggest that, in high-dose supplement form, several nutrients may help to reduce the risk of AMD significantly. If you have any AMD risk factors, talk with your eye-care professional about taking an “eye health formula” supplement. The current supplement formula being studied in major research trials includes 10 mg of lutein (the equivalent of about 3 cups of spinach), 2 milligrams of zeaxanthin and 1 gram total of EPA and DHA (approximately what you get in a 3-ounce serving of salmon). Until further research is in, there’s no advantage to exceeding those amounts. Remember to take it only under medical supervision; even though these supplements are available over the counter, taking megadoses of any nutrient should always be approached cautiously. </p> <p>5. Keep your blood pressure—and your weight—in check.</p> <p>People with high blood pressure are more likely to develop AMD, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The theory is that increased pressure damages blood vessels. This hinders blood flow to the eyes, making it harder for protective nutrients to reach the retina and for damaging free-radical debris to be carried away. Losing extra pounds if you’re overweight or obese might also help. Body fat is a major storage depot for fat-soluble nutrients, and excess fat tissue can act as a “sink” for some eye-protective nutrients, making them less available to the macula. Try some healthy recipes for high blood pressure.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/eat_for_your_eyes#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. March/April 2009 Healthy Aging Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D. Recipes & Menus - Antioxidants Diet, Nutrition & Health - Healthy Aging Thu, 20 Aug 2009 17:25:18 +0000 Nifer 9922 at http://www.eatingwell.com Fresh Salads and Salad Dressings http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/fresh_salads_and_salad_dressings <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Homegrown Salads </div> </div> </div> <p>When I planted my first garden in 1980, I marked the perimeter of the small plot with four sticks and string. With a sharp-edged spade I removed the layer of turf, dug up the remaining soil to loosen it, and then shoveled on some compost. I planted seeds of basil, lettuce, beets and arugula, sprinkled them with water and walked away. I was fresh out of art school, and money was tight, so I thought this might be a good way to cut down my food costs.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Ellen Ecker Ogden </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> No need to eat a boring salad night after night. Explore greens and dressings to spice up your dinner table. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> March/April 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Salads and Salad Dressings Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/m_che_chicken_salad_with_honey_tahini_dressing.html">Mâche &amp; Chicken Salad with Honey-Tahini Dressing</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/spicy_green_salad_with_soy_roasted_garlic_dressing.html">Spicy Green Salad with Soy &amp; Roasted Garlic Dressing</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/couscous_lentil_arugula_salad_with_garlic_dijon_vinaigrette.html">Couscous, Lentil &amp; Arugula Salad with Garlic-Dijon Vinaigrette</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/baby_beet_greens_with_spicy_mediterranean_vinaigrette.html">Baby Beet Greens with Spicy Mediterranean Vinaigrette</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/mixed_lettuce_salad_with_cucumber_herb_vinaigrette.html">Mixed Lettuce Salad with Cucumber Herb Vinaigrette</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When I planted my first garden in 1980, I marked the perimeter of the small plot with four sticks and string. With a sharp-edged spade I removed the layer of turf, dug up the remaining soil to loosen it, and then shoveled on some compost. I planted seeds of basil, lettuce, beets and arugula, sprinkled them with water and walked away. I was fresh out of art school, and money was tight, so I thought this might be a good way to cut down my food costs.</p> <p>I would be lying if I said the garden thrived. There was a constant battle with weeds, and the garden hose didn’t quite reach far enough, so the plants were frequently thirsty. Yet the thrill of dashing to the garden just before dinner to clip a few leaves of frilly Lolla Rossa lettuce or crimson Bull’s Blood beet greens for my salad kept me at it. And that thrill gave way to a feeling of pride in growing my own food. This set into motion a larger patch the following year, and by my third season the garden covered more than two acres.</p> <p>Since I could buy tomatoes, corn and cucumbers at the market I focused on growing those herbs and greens with a short shelf life that were hard to find. The garden took up more and more of my time, so eventually instead of making art on a canvas, I began to think of myself as a food artist. I built a collage of lettuces splashed with dabs of red orach, fronds of chervil and rosettes of claytonia. Seeds and plants were my paintbrush as I combined waves of bronze-tipped lettuce with swirls of magenta radicchio and spikes of blue-green kale, highlighting them with accents of brilliant orange nasturtiums. I built my salads with the same artist’s eye. I loved to layer the flavors and textures of earthy baby kale or spicy mizuna with dark green mustard leaves laced with red-purple veins, as in the Spicy Green Salad with Soy &amp; Roasted Garlic Dressing. And the flavors were incomparable. Fresh-picked, the tender greens from my garden were like nothing I had ever tasted.</p> <p>It wasn’t long before I was in search of chicories from Italy, mâche from Switzerland and heirloom lettuce from France. Along the way I discovered packaged seed mixes known as mesclun, derived from 18th-century recipes created by French and Italian gardeners. I couldn’t get enough; soon I was ordering seeds in kilo bags.</p> <p>In just four years, my garden project had progressed well beyond growing a few things to eat. So I co-founded a seed catalog called The Cook’s Garden to share my love of European and American heirloom lettuce and salad greens (as well as justify my buying habits). At first, it was just a seasonal business. During the winter, I packed seed envelopes on the kitchen counter. The catalog started as a two-page listing featuring close to 150 different types of exotic lettuce and fancy salad greens with wonderful names, such as Reine des Glaces (Ice Queen) and Osaka Purple Mustard. I quickly discovered that there were other gardeners who, just like me, were hungry for something out of the ordinary to plant in their gardens.</p> <p>Many of these greens were new to me and to our customers, so I began to develop recipes to include in the catalog. I experimented and learned that spicy greens, such as arugula and mustard, could be tamed with a creamy dressing, while milder greens, such as mâche or delicate butterhead lettuce, required a light dressing that wouldn’t overpower them. I also shared tips I learned along the way, like make sure your greens are completely dry before you dress them, or rub a wooden salad bowl with a pinch of salt and a clove of garlic to season it before tossing the greens with the dressing.</p> <p>Eventually I outgrew The Cook’s Garden and sold the catalog to W.A. Burpee Company. But today I still plant my garden full of lettuce and salad greens. The flavor of fresh greens will always beat anything I find at the market, and I still plant a patchwork quilt of red and green lettuce edged with a ferny border of parsley. Besides, growing a garden is the next logical step beyond eating locally grown foods and I like the responsibility of growing my own—it’s the ultimate celebration of fresh seasonal food.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/fresh_salads_and_salad_dressings#comments Ellen Ecker Ogden March/April 2009 Recipes & Menus - Pompeian Tue, 18 Aug 2009 20:23:04 +0000 Paula Joslin 9728 at http://www.eatingwell.com