July/August 2009 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/427/all en Curbside Composting http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/curbside_composting <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The trend to let you “recycle” your food scraps. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>“One of the simplest ways to combat climate change is to keep our food scraps out of the landfill,” says Deanna Simon, a zero-waste specialist for the San Francisco Department of the Environment. Food and yard waste comprises at least a quarter of our nation’s landfills, where it decomposes, releasing methane gas. Methane contributes to global warming about 70 times more than the carbon dioxide generated by burning fossil fuels.</p> <p>Composting is one way to keep food waste out of landfills. But according to the Environmental Protection Agency, only about 3 percent of food scraps are composted. It takes some effort. And space.</p> <p>But what if you could put your food scraps out on the curb—just like you do with your recyclables—and your community would pick them up and compost them for you? You can—in a few municipalities nationwide. (A handful of others are starting pilot programs.) Since 2004, San Francisco has provided weekly curbside food-waste collection. The program trucks 300 tons of food waste a day to a nearby compost facility, which then sells the fertilizer produced to nearby farms and vineyards. “This is a perfect example of how we can close the loop in just a few months,” Simon says. Seattle provides weekly pickup for 150,000 single-family homes. Curbside composting isn’t just in big cities: in Hutchinson, Minnesota (pop. 13,300), residents who use the pickup service and recycle have helped to reduce the city’s landfill waste by 75 percent.</p> <p>So why aren’t more communities doing it? A new program takes time and money. But setting up a food-waste composting facility actually costs less than building a new landfill, says Brett Stav, senior planning and development specialist with Seattle Public Utilities. Plus compost can be sold to offset expenses.</p> <p>If you’re not lucky enough to have access to one of these programs yet, consider composting at home. You’ll find the basics of getting started at epa.gov/waste.</p> <p>By Tracy Frisch</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/curbside_composting#comments July/August 2009 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Fri, 21 Aug 2009 17:39:47 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10260 at http://www.eatingwell.com 6 Reasons to Eat Less Meat http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/6_reasons_to_eat_less_meat <p>Three in 100 American adults call themselves vegetarians. Try it part-time by going meat-free one or two days a week. (Below, stats to inspire you.) With <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_summer_recipes">bountiful summer produce</a>, it’s easy!</p> <p> <strong>1.</strong> 20% of the world’s population could be fed with the grain and soybeans used to feed U.S. cattle.</p> <p><strong>2. </strong>5,000: gallons of water it takes to produce 1 pound of meat.</p> <p><strong>3.</strong> 25: gallons of water it takes to produce 1 pound of wheat.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Carrie Pratt </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Going vegetarian may benefit everyone, including you! </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/6421yellow_veggies_basket_alt.jpg?1250874789" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Must-Have Meatless Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_vegetarian_recipes">Healthy Vegetarian Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_meal_plans/vegetarian_meal_plan">Vegetarian Meal Plan</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_tofu_recipes">Healthy Tofu Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/guide_to_cooking_20_vegetables">Guide to Cooking 20 Vegetables</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/vegetarian_recipes_you_must_try">Meatless Monday: Healthy Vegetarian Recipes You Must Try</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Also of Interest </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/what_is_your_water_footprint">What Is Your “Water Footprint”?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/mexico_s_sustainable_avocado_mecca">Mexico&#039;s Sustainable Avocado Mecca</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/fast_food_the_real_cost_of_a_hamburger">Fast Food: The Real Cost of a Hamburger</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Three in 100 American adults call themselves vegetarians. Try it part-time by going meat-free one or two days a week. (Below, stats to inspire you.) With bountiful summer produce, it’s easy!</p> <p> * 20% of the world’s population could be fed with the grain and soybeans used to feed U.S. cattle.<br /> * 5,000: gallons of water it takes to ­produce 1 pound of meat.<br /> * 25: gallons of water it takes to ­produce 1 pound of wheat.<br /> * 30% of the world’s land is involved in livestock production.<br /> * 4.5% more greenhouse gases are produced worldwide by animal farming than by transportation.<br /> * 20% reduction in meat consumption would have the same impact as switching from a standard sedan (e.g., Camry) to an ultra-efficient vehicle (e.g., Prius).</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/6_reasons_to_eat_less_meat#comments Carrie Pratt July/August 2009 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Fri, 21 Aug 2009 17:14:07 +0000 Nifer 10251 at http://www.eatingwell.com Good Eats & Hard Work in Hardwick, Vermont http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/good_eats_hard_work_in_hardwick_vermont <p>Here, in a tiny corner of northern Vermont where cattle seem to outnumber people, farms and food businesses are blossoming and garnering both national and international attention. Their secret? Collaboration. Here’s how it works.</p> <p>(1) Claire’s Restaurant—Two years ago, more than 100 locals bought shares to help start a “locavore” restaurant in Hardwick, recently named one of the top “up and coming” restaurants in the U.S. Down the road in Morrisville, locals loved “their” restaurant so much they chipped in to support (2) The Bee’s Knees when it needed a cash infusion.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> David Goodman </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> An illustrated map of one rural foodie town. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/hardwick_map_310.jpg?1250794142" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/building_a_healthy_food_system_in_rural_america">Building a Healthy Food System in Rural America</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/meet_the_farmer_vermont_greens_grower_pete_johnson">Meet the farmer: Vermont greens grower Pete Johnson</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/renewing_americas_food_traditions">Renewing America&#039;s Food Traditions</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Here, in a tiny corner of northern Vermont where cattle seem to outnumber people, farms and food businesses are blossoming and garnering both national and international attention. Their secret? Collaboration. Here’s how it works.</p> <p>(1) Claire’s Restaurant—Two years ago, more than 100 locals bought shares to help start a “locavore” restaurant in Hardwick, recently named one of the top “up and coming” restaurants in the U.S. Down the road in Morrisville, locals loved “their” restaurant so much they chipped in to support (2) The Bee’s Knees when it needed a cash infusion. </p> <p>Both restaurants source most of their ingredients locally, including cornmeal and other grains from (3) Butterworks Farms, which also produces yogurt and is part of (4) Pete’s Greens CSA. Though Pete’s Greens is best known for the organic baby greens it once sold to trendy restaurants in Boston and New York, today half its business comes from its Good Eats CSA, which bundles everything—from its own greens to bread and bacon made by other local producers—and delivers it to some 250 neighboring members. </p> <p>When (5) High Mowing Organic Seeds, one of the country’s largest purveyors of organic seeds, had a surplus of pumpkin, it went to the Pete’s Greens kitchen to be made into pies that were given to the local food bank. High Mowing Organic Seeds founder Tom Stearns is the president of the (6) Center for an Agricultural Economy, a not-for-profit founded by (7) Vermont Soy entrepreneur Andrew Meyer with the goal of building a sustainable community around food and agriculture. </p> <p>You can find the best products of the region—ranging from seeds to soy—at the (8) Buffalo Mountain Co-op, one of the oldest in the country. It’s also a good place to pick up lamb and sheep’s-milk cheeses from (9) Bonnieview Farms and other cheeses from (10) Ploughgate Creamery, (11) Cabot Creamery and (12) Jasper Hill Farm, whose 22,000-square-foot cave (said to be the finest in the U.S.) ages many of the region’s award-winning cheeses. </p> <p>Two agricultural-education centers complete the circle, with (13) Sterling College sending many of its students to work on farms and (14) Highfields Institute focusing on composting and providing sustainable solutions for many of the neighboring farms and businesses. </p> <p>So, a squash grown from High Mowing Organic seeds in the greenhouses at Pete’s Greens might be harvested by a Sterling College student and then served at Claire’s. Claire’s leftovers might be composted at Highfields Institute, then returned to fertilize High Mowing Organic Seeds’s land.</p> <h3>Spotlight: Claire’s Restaurant</h3> <p>For a town of 3,200, just south of the Canadian border and one of the poorest ­rural regions in America, Hardwick has become an unlikely food mecca. Named to Conde Nast Traveler’s 2009 “Hot List,” Claire’s Restaurant (see above) is an outpost of food culture there. Co-owner, lawyer and maître d’ Kristina Michelsen seats and sometimes sings for the largely local clientele, many of whom chipped in to help start the place. The food is pretty much all local, too, much of it produced within 45 miles, including the beans and greens, which come from farmer Pete Johnson of Pete’s Greens, and several world-class, award-winning cheeses, which are aged at Jasper Hill Farm’s new cave.</p> <p>For a copy of Kristina Michelsen's CD, Pixie Dust, visit <a href="http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/kristinamichelsen" title="www.cdbaby.com/cd/kristinamichelsen">www.cdbaby.com/cd/kristinamichelsen</a>.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/good_eats_hard_work_in_hardwick_vermont#comments David Goodman July/August 2009 Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:47:43 +0000 Penelope Wall 9960 at http://www.eatingwell.com Building a Healthy Food System in Rural America http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/building_a_healthy_food_system_in_rural_america <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Foodtopia </div> </div> </div> <p>The future of food, I’ve been told, may be found in a hardscrabble town of 3,200 in northern Vermont. But as I walk down the main street of Hardwick, a former granite-quarrying town, there is nothing that would indicate this is the new food utopia heralded by The New York Times. I pass the Chinese take-out joint, catch the charred whiff of a burned-out building and finally stop catty-corner from the laundromat and police station. Then I spot it: a cheery pumpkin-colored building with floor-to-ceiling windows and etched on the glass: “Claire’s: Local ingredients.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> David Goodman </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How a handful of organic farmers, world-class cheesemakers and a locavore restaurant transformed Hardwick, Vermont—a poor, rural town—into a foodie mecca. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="309" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/hardwick_2_630.jpg?1253110429" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/6361hardwick_vermont225.jpg?1251406491" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/6361claires_restaurant2_225.jpg?1251406520" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/6361jasper_hill_cheese225.jpg?1251406528" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/6361petes_greens2_225.jpg?1251406536" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/good_eats_hard_work_in_hardwick_vermont">Good Eats &amp; Hard Work in Hardwick, Vermont</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/meet_the_farmer_vermont_greens_grower_pete_johnson">Meet the farmer: Vermont greens grower Pete Johnson</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/renewing_americas_food_traditions/renewing_americas_food_traditions">Renewing America&#039;s Food Traditions</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Garden Fresh Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/claires_mixed_green_salad_with_feta_vinaigrette.html">Claire&#039;s Mixed Green Salad with Feta Vinaigrette</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/beet_carpaccio.html">Beet Carpaccio</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/parsley_smashed_new_potatoes.html">Parsley Smashed New Potatoes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/quick_chile_dilly_beans.html">Quick Chile Dilly Beans</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/tomato_herb_marinated_flank_steak.html">Tomato-Herb Marinated Flank Steak</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/raspberry_spoonbread.html">Raspberry Spoonbread</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The future of food, I’ve been told, may be found in a hardscrabble town of 3,200 in northern Vermont. But as I walk down the main street of Hardwick, a former granite-quarrying town, there is nothing that would indicate this is the new food utopia heralded by The New York Times. I pass the Chinese take-out joint, catch the charred whiff of a burned-out building and finally stop catty-corner from the laundromat and police station. Then I spot it: a cheery pumpkin-colored building with floor-to-ceiling windows and etched on the glass: “Claire’s: Local ingredients. Open to the world.” I step through the restaurant door, and I am immediately transported.</p> <p>This locavore haven in an otherwise struggling outpost of rural America is hopping. Young people in jeans hobnob comfortably alongside a clutch of stylish older women and a few men in jackets and ties. A waitress struts purposefully across the bright maple floor balancing a Moroccan vegetable tagine that trails heady scents of cumin and garlic. My head snaps sideways as an aromatic curried soup of sunchokes, carrots and pistachios is ferried to an expectant patron. </p> <p>Kristina Michelsen, tonight’s casually dressed maître d’ (and a co-owner), motions for me to sit on a bench seat; my wife, Sue, takes a chair across the square cherry table. Our server pours water into small Mason-jar glasses. The place has the folksy feel of a diner, and it seems only natural to greet the people around me. And so I do: the man in the suit at the next table drives a snowplow and owns the gas station in town. Two tables down, an author visiting from Boston is here with his girlfriend. At another table sits Linda Ramsdell, owner of Hardwick’s Galaxy Bookshop and also a co-owner of the restaurant. </p> <p>Our waitress returns with a delicious appetizer of baked Hartwell cheese with cranberry chutney and sprout slaw. The cheese has a soft texture like Brie, and it melts in my mouth. Kristina explains that the cheese, made in small batches by artisan cheesemakers at Ploughgate Creamery, a few minutes up the road, is typical for Claire’s: much of Claire’s food is grown or produced within 45 miles of the restaurant. In northeastern Vermont, where winter lasts six months, that’s saying something. Underscoring her point, she gestures to two young women who have just walked in, one in a soiled Carhartt jacket. “There are your cheesemakers, Princess and Marisa, owners of Ploughgate,” she says. “And over there is Pete Johnson, one of the farmers who grew your salad,” she adds, pointing to a blond man several tables away. “Here,” she says with a proud smile, “the celebrities are the farmers.”</p> <p>Claire’s might be just another trendy restaurant—and in fact it made Conde Nast Traveler’s 2009 “Hot List.” What sets it apart is its emphatically untrendy location: a rural community 45 miles from the Canadian border where the median household income is $42,000. Yet more than 100 local residents banded together to buy 50 certificates, worth $1,000 each, in this community-supported place (think CSA, the restaurant version) that opened in the spring of 2008. Prices for this “new Vermont cuisine” are relatively modest: appetizers average around $6 and entrees range from $9 for the vegetable tagine to $24 for certain cuts of grass-fed steak from a farm two miles away. </p> <p>To fans of local food and sustainable agriculture, Claire’s and Hardwick are the sun around which planets are aligning—the planets in this case being a network of innovative food entrepreneurs and organic farmers who are working together to build a new food infrastructure and breathe life into the struggling economy. They want to save the town, and the world, through good food. Community, in all its manifestations, is at once the clientele, beneficiary and by-product of what Claire’s serves.</p> <p>I didn’t initially come to Hardwick in search of a great restaurant. I came to find a place that offered a glimmer of hope for farmers. I had just spent several months chronicling the lives of the last three dairy farmers in my community, Waterbury, Vermont, just an hour’s drive south. These farmers are putting in 100-hour weeks but are barely staying afloat. Rosina Wallace, a fifth-generation farmer, worries that she may be the last steward of her family’s 143-year-old farm, now teetering on the brink. Third-generation farmer Mark Davis has told me how he lost $15,000 in one recent winter when the price of milk dropped below his costs of producing it. The precarious viability of dairy farming helps explain why the number of dairy farmers in Vermont alone has fallen 90 percent in the last six decades. </p> <p>Yet 40 miles north of Waterbury, the story is very different. In 1998, the year Jasper Hill Farm opened its cheesemaking operation just north of Hardwick, five local dairy farms had gone under. Today, the local demand for milk—from Jasper Hill, Cabot Creamery, Bonnieview and a half-dozen other local cheesemakers—is helping dairy farms to prosper. Artisanal cheeses from Jasper Hill and Cabot Creamery sell for upwards of $20 a pound and have been named among the top 100 cheeses in the world. And the success story seems to be the same with other local businesses: here in the northeast corner of Vermont—one of the poorest rural regions in America—farmers, cheesemakers, a tofu maker, a composting operation, Claire’s Restaurant and regular townsfolk are all working together to revolutionize the way food is produced and delivered. </p> <p>Leading the revolution is the Center for an Agricultural Economy, which was launched in 2004 by Andrew Meyer, a 38-year-old former staffer to retired Vermont Senator Jim Jeffords. Meyer’s family owns a dairy farm in Hardwick and when he returned from Washington, D.C., Meyer founded Vermont Soy, which produces small-batch tofu, and Vermont Natural Coatings, which makes nontoxic wood finishes derived from dairy whey. He conceived of the nonprofit Center as a way for businesses to lead the charge in forging a locally based healthy food system, in Hardwick and beyond.</p> <p>If Meyer is the mild-mannered brains behind the movement, Tom Stearns, president of the Center, is its evangelist. With his bushy red beard, wool vest and muck boots, Stearns looks the part of the hippie farmers who began quietly migrating into the poor, rural Northeast Kingdom of Vermont as part of the back-to-the-land counterculture of the 1970s. But Stearns, the son of classical musicians, is no laid-back flower child. He dreams big, and has a track record of success. He fashioned his college hobby of growing and selling organic seeds into a multimillion-dollar business that now employs 30 people.</p> <p>In the cavernous warehouse of High Mowing Organic Seeds, four miles from downtown Hardwick, Stearns holds forth like a hellfire preacher. He swears that the solution to the woes of Hardwick, and the country, is healthy food, in all its dimensions: “In a thriving food system, there is healthy food available to all, so it’s not a class issue. Second, food is produced, processed and distributed in ways that enhance rather than degrade the environment. There must be appreciation for local food traditions. And food must be fair—from the standpoint of those who are growing and processing the food, all the way to those who are purchasing it.”</p> <p>Stearns landed in the Northeast Kingdom in the mid-1990s in part because there was already a community of farmers and a sustainable food ethic. The Buffalo Mountain Co-op on Main Street in Hardwick, one of the oldest food co-ops in the country, has more than 1,000 members (in a town of 3,200!). “There’s been an amazing community here for a long time,” observes Annie Gaillard, who has worked at the co-op for 24 years. “So the infrastructure was here. These guys,” she says of Stearns and the Center, “are taking it to the next level.”</p> <p>The Center was born out of the sharing and collaboration that had been going on informally among food-based businesses. For several years, Stearns had been going out for beers with Andrew Meyer and Pete Johnson, the namesake of Pete’s Greens, an organic farm in nearby Craftsbury. The three young, idealistic and ambitious entrepreneurs began sharing ideas about how to run their new businesses, and this quickly evolved into sharing employees, equipment and even loaning each other money. The collaboration kept taking on new dimensions, new participants and spawning new business ventures.</p> <p>For example, High Mowing Organic Seeds was growing organic squash and pumpkins to extract seeds, but it had no use for thousands of pounds of pumpkin meat. So Johnson, who had just set up an industrial kitchen to offer prepared food as part of his growing farm CSA, took a half-ton of free pumpkin puree, got Cabot Creamery to provide butter, a local farmer to provide eggs and a local baker to help out. Thus was born “Pies for the People,” a project that donated hundreds of pies to the local food shelf last fall and looks to become an annual event. Unused crops from the various businesses get composted at the Highfields Institute in Hardwick, which promotes community-based composting as a way of improving soils, and that compost is then used to fertilize fields at High Mowing, Pete’s Greens and other area farms.</p> <p>Ultimately, it may be the cross-fertilization of ideas that has been one of the most fruitful by-products of the collaborations. “The sheer number of organic and sustainable farms in our area is higher per capita than anywhere else in the U.S.,” says Stearns. “And all this is happening in a region that has some of the highest unemployment in the state, the lowest incomes, where over half the local students qualify for free school lunch. People are hungry for opportunity. And the opportunity is in agriculture.”</p> <p>The Center for an Agricultural Economy is now generating projects faster than a summer garden produces zucchini. The Center recently acquired Atkins Field, 15 acres of land and a former granite shed in downtown Hardwick, which the Center hopes to transform into an education and resource center, a year-round farmers’ market, plots for new farmers and community garden plots for townspeople, all within walking distance of the elementary school. In addition, the Vermont Food Venture Center—an incubator for small food-based businesses—will soon relocate its industrial kitchens to Hardwick. The picture starts to come into focus: healthy food takes its place in the center of the community, local farming is strengthened, the local economy is revitalized and the seeds for future businesses are sown.</p> <p>These ventures are beginning to yield results. Hardwick Town Manager Rob Lewis estimates that the “hippies who became yuppies” and their businesses have, so far, generated about 100 decent-paying jobs in town. “It’s an exciting thing for us to be looking at opportunities for growth, rather than stagnation,” Lewis told me as he sat in his cluttered Town Hall office, noting with amusement that he has gotten calls from around North America inquiring about “the Hardwick model.” </p> <p>Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma, has called Hardwick “an important national test-case of the possibilities of relocalizing an economy, a real-world, real-time exploration of the challenges.” Author and activist Bill McKibben says, “Hardwick has all the pieces of a healthy food system connected and ready to fall into place, and is as far ahead in sustainable agriculture as any place in the country. Deep and transformative things are happening here.”</p> <p>Though there is little data to show whether this model can be replicated, this past spring, researchers from MIT and Columbia University visited to see how the Hardwick experiment was progressing and last year, the University of Vermont signed on to provide technical support to the Center. Stearns and Meyer hope to tap the university’s marketing and agricultural expertise and get its help on issues such as childhood obesity and diabetes. Plans are also moving forward to build an eco-industrial park where many of the food businesses might co-locate so that they can more easily share resources. In April, Honey Gardens Apiaries, a Vermont distiller, announced it was moving its operation for making honey wine to Hardwick. Todd Hardie, founder of Honey Gardens, compared Hardwick to “Amish communities where they build a barn and everyone has a role in it and gathers around to give input and support. We want to be part of that collaborative spirit.”</p> <p>Local. Healthy. Community-based. Delicious. These themes are at the heart of the Hardwick food community. I am reminded of that as I arrive at Jasper Hill Farm’s gleaming new $2 million cheese cave in Greensboro, eight miles away. The jaw-dropping 22,000-square-foot cave—said to be the finest of its kind in North America—is the labor of love of brothers and farmers Andy and Mateo Kehler. As I walk through the seven vaults, I crane my neck to look at tall racks of aging cheeses that are stacked to the arched ceiling and turned by hand each day. Jasper Hill’s own cheeses are here—they make a mouthwatering slow-ripened soft cheese they call Constant Bliss, as well as Bayley Hazen Blue, a spectacular natural-rinded blue cheese that landed the brothers on the NBC Today show. Wine Spectator recently named two of Jasper Hill’s cheeses among the top 100 cheeses in the world. Also making that list were Cabot Creamery’s Clothbound Cheddar, Vermont Ayr and Grafton Clothbound, which are all aged at Jasper Hill. </p> <p>The Kehlers intend their cheese cellar to be a center for a budding artisanal cheese industry that serves the whole region, providing opportunities for local dairy farmers to become cheesemakers. For those new to cheesemaking, Jasper Hill will provide technical expertise as well as cave space to get them started. I mention to Andy Kehler the plight of the dairy farmers in my community, noting how dairy farmer Rosina Wallace bemoaned how she must ship her milk hundreds of miles away to be processed. Andy listened and replied, “That’s exactly the kind of farmer we need. Have her call me.”</p> <p>Just up the road in the rolling hills of Craftsbury, I find Pete Johnson of Pete’s Greens and his girlfriend, Meg Gardner. They are inside one of four movable greenhouses, hunched over trays of bright green sprouts, delicately slicing shoots with a razor knife. Pete’s Greens is a four-season organic farm that until six years ago provided food to fancy restaurants in Boston and New York. But Pete, a raffishly handsome man with a shaggy crop of blond hair and five-o’clock shadow, tells me he no longer wants to send his food far away. In the past three years he has flipped from selling three-fourths of his produce out of state to selling that same amount in state. Most of his business now is his Good Eats CSA, which combines offerings from his farm with those from a number of different farms and food producers. Good Eats has about 250 local members. A 17-week share of vegetables and locally produced goods, such as yogurt, milk, tofu, bread and fruit, costs $44 per week. Is there interest? Good Eats makes up half the farm’s business, and Pete says his farm and most other local producers can barely keep up with the demand for local food.</p> <p>“It’s gratifying to know and please the people who are eating our food,” he says as he slices off a pinch of radish sprouts and hands them to me. “Try it,” he urges. A spicy, zingy sensation lights up my tongue. Pete chuckles as I pucker in pleasant surprise. His farm is renowned for its specialty and heirloom vegetables, from numerous varieties of kale and fingerling potatoes to dandelion greens and garlic scapes. Claire’s Restaurant chef and co-owner Steven Obranovich is a regular customer.</p> <p>Pete insists that thinking local is thinking big. “I think we are just at the beginning of what I hope will be a revolution in how we feed ourselves,” he tells me from among his sprout beds. “My vision is of a village- or multi-village-based food system where most of what the people here eat is from here, with some key local trading. I think it has the potential to be really efficient, create a lot of good jobs and small businesses, and create incredible community, which is something we’ve lost.”</p> <p>How will Hardwick measure success? Andrew Meyer, who still looks the part of a preppy Senate staffer, considers my question as we stand next to a vat of soy curd that is being slowly and rhythmically stirred by a bearded young man with a giant paddle. Meyer suddenly pipes up, saying, “Success will be determined by the number of jobs we create in this area, the increased awareness of where your food comes from, the amount of land that’s being productively worked, and also the trail of your local dollar. The more times that money can stay within the community, the more it supports the local food system.”</p> <p>It is a midweek night and Claire’s is packed. Some of it can be chalked up to Chef Steven Obranovich’s “New Vermont Cooking”: “It’s what the farmers want to grow and what I want to cook and what people want to eat,” the wiry, bespectacled chef tells me. </p> <p>But the Hardwick story is bigger than food. It’s about how a struggling town has helped to launch a restaurant that has become a local gathering place. It’s about how townsfolk showed up at the new restaurant last summer with fresh-picked blueberries for Steven to put up, so that Claire’s—their place—would have what it needed. It’s about community, vision and perseverance, something this gritty town knows plenty about. The blueberry upside-down cake I savor tonight is its sweet reward.</p> <p>Jenifer Vaughan, a local salon owner, recently made a point of stopping by Claire’s to thank them “for what they’re doing and what they’ve brought into town. They’ve generated a buzz. It’s not just another cool restaurant. There’s genuineness. There’s love there.”</p> <p>Fixing the food system is a daunting task. And Hardwick, with its quirky character and history, may or may not be a model that is readily exported. There are numerous obstacles: the tanking economy, tensions within the community between the new haves and the old have-nots. But the bold vision and efforts of these farmers, thinkers and entrepreneurs has generated momentum.</p> <p>Tom Stearns is convinced that the farmers of Hardwick can change the world. “People can be inspired by what they see here. Then they do things like this in their own community, and it could crescendo,” he flings his arms wide, “into a wave of food-system change around the country.”<br /> With that, another dinner at Claire’s is served, a celebration of great possibility renewed with each course. </p> <p>Vermonter David Goodman’s most recent book is Standing Up to the Madness: Ordinary Heroes in Extraordinary Times (Hyperion, 2008).</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/building_a_healthy_food_system_in_rural_america#comments David Goodman July/August 2009 Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:40:21 +0000 Penelope Wall 9959 at http://www.eatingwell.com Is Alcohol Good or Bad for Your Health? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_alcohol_good_or_bad_for_your_health <p>If you enjoy a glass of wine or beer with dinner, you’ve probably already heard the good news (it might boost your good “HDL” cholesterol)—as well as the bad (it could also elevate your blood pressure). Two new studies give more health reasons to sip—or skip—that alcoholic drink.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Ana Mantica </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Two new studies give more health reasons to sip—or skip—that alcoholic drink. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/6318wine_half_full.jpg?1250792978" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/wine_red_mj09_310.jpg?1259017729" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More on Alcohol and Your Health </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/eatingwells_guide_to_alcohol_and_your_health">EatingWell&#039;s Guide to Alcohol and Your Health</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_the_party_over_the_latest_research_on_the_pros_and_cons_o">Is the Party Over? The Latest Research on the Pros and Cons of Drinking Alcohol</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_alcohol_affects_your_body">How Alcohol Affects Your Body </a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/hangover_cures_do_they_work">Hangover Cures—Do They Work?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/see_jane_drink">See Jane Drink</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/content/how_much_do_you_know_about_hangovers">How much do you know about hangovers?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/poll/when_you_re_at_a_party_how_many_alcoholic_drinks_beer_wine_cocktails_etc_do_you_typically_cons">When you’re at a party, how many alcoholic drinks (beer, wine, cocktails, etc.) do you typically consume?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/are_you_drinking_too_much">Are you drinking too much?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Also of Interest </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/bone_health_recipes">Healthy Recipes and Menus for Bone Health</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/bone_health/can_drinking_seltzers_sodas_or_other_carbonated_drinks_harm_bones">Can Drinking Seltzers, Sodas or Other Carbonated Drinks Harm Bones?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/see_it_make_it_cocktails_mocktails">See It, Make It: Cocktails &amp; Mocktails</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/wine_beer_spirits_guide/holiday_wines_to_pour_and_present">Holiday Wines to Pour and Present</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>If you enjoy a glass of wine or beer with dinner, you’ve probably already heard the good news (it might boost your good “HDL” cholesterol)—as well as the bad (it could also elevate your blood pressure). Two new studies give more health reasons to sip—or skip—that alcoholic drink.</p> <p>Glass Half Empty: Women who drink even one alcoholic beverage a day have an increased risk of some cancers (especially breast cancer), according to new research done at Oxford on nearly 1.3 million women. Says lead author Naomi Allen, Ph.D., “There is mounting evidence that even drinking alcohol in moderation can increase estrogen, which in turn directly raises the risk of breast cancer.”</p> <p>Glass Half Full: Cheers to stronger bones! According to a new study out of Tufts University, drinking alcohol in moderation might help keep bones strong—in men and postmenopausal women, who have lower levels of estrogen (which helps to maintain bone mass). The study found a stronger association between bone density and drinking beer and wine, compared to liquor, indicating that it’s more than just alcohol that boosts bone health. Beer and wine contain silicon, a mineral that promotes bone formation. Wine also contains polyphenols that may stimulate bone-building, explains lead study author Katherine L. Tucker, Ph.D.</p> <p>Bottom Line: Alcohol, in moderation, can be part of a healthy lifestyle, Tucker says. But you have to weigh your personal risks: for example, if you have a strong family history of cancer, you may want to opt for mocktails more often.</p> <p>Remember: A glass of wine or a bottle of beer contains calories—and maybe more than you think.</p> <p>5 oz. wine = 125 calories<br /> 12 oz. beer = 150 calories<br /> 1 Mixed drink (piña colada, margarita) = 300+ calories</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_alcohol_good_or_bad_for_your_health#comments Ana Mantica July/August 2009 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:29:38 +0000 Nifer 9951 at http://www.eatingwell.com Can Salmon Save Your Skin? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/can_salmon_save_your_skin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Can Salmon Save Your Skin? </div> </div> </div> <p>If you spend your summer vacation soaking up the sun, your best defense (second to sunscreen, of course) may be what you order for dinner. </p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Fiona Kenny, R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Omega-3 fatty acids may boost your skin&#039;s defenses against UV damage. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/can_salmon_save_skin.jpg?1273685065" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/6319salmon_skin_cancer.jpg?1250792804" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_omega_3_recipes">Healthy Omega-3 Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_salmon_recipes">Healthy Salmon Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/black_bean_salmon_tostadas.html">Black Bean &amp; Salmon Tostadas</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/honey_soy_salmon.html">Honey-Soy Broiled Salmon</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/salmon_chowder.html">Salmon Chowder</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/cashew_salmon_with_apricot_couscous.html">Cashew Salmon with Apricot Couscous</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/salmon_burgers_with_green_goddess_sauce.html">Salmon Burgers with Green Goddess Sauce</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_salmon_recipes">Healthy Salmon Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/skillet_tuna_noodle_casserole.html">Skillet Tuna Noodle Casserole</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/pistachio_crusted_tuna_steaks.html">Pistachio-Crusted Tuna Steaks</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/mediterranean_tuna_antipasto_salad.html">Mediterranean Tuna Antipasto Salad</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/hanoi_style_tuna_patty_salad.html">Hanoi-Style Tuna Patty Salad</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/essential_eatingwell_seafood_guide">Essential EatingWell Seafood Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/the_wild_salmon_debate">The Wild Salmon Debate</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/what_are_food_sources_of_omega_3s">What are food sources of omega-3s?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/can_vitamin_c_save_your_skin">Can Vitamin C Save Your Skin?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/new_science_links_food_and_happiness">New Science Links Food and Happiness</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/do_you_need_an_omega_3_supplement">Do You Need An Omega-3 Supplement?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/5_ways_to_get_in_omega_balance">5 Ways to Get in Omega Balance</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>By Fiona Kenny, R.D.</p> <p>If you spend your summer vacation soaking up the sun, your best defense (second to sunscreen, of course) may be what you order for dinner. Healthy omega-3 fatty acids in oily fish can boost your skin’s defenses against UV damage, explains epidemiologist Adèle Green, Ph.D. In a study published in the April 2009 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers followed the eating habits of more than 1,100 Australian adults for approximately five years and found that those who ate a little more than 5 ounces of omega-3-rich fish—such as salmon and tuna—each week decreased the development of precancerous skin lesions by almost 30 percent. The lesions, called actinic keratoses, are a common sign of chronic sun damage and can develop into skin cancer if left untreated. Scientists think the omega-3s act as a shield, protecting cell walls from free-radical damage. So next time you head to the beach remember your sunscreen and hat, and make reservations at a restaurant that serves great seafood. </p> <p>**Photo Caption: Featured Recipe: Honey-Soy Broiled Salmon |<br /> More Healthy Salmon Recipes</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/can_salmon_save_your_skin#comments Fiona Kenny, R.D. July/August 2009 Recipes & Menus - Seafood Recipes & Menus - Wrinkles Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:27:24 +0000 Nifer 9949 at http://www.eatingwell.com Should You Go Gluten-Free? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/gluten_free_diet/should_you_go_gluten_free <p>Everyone at my book club peered at the fancy gluten-free cupcake someone had brought. It was for Anne, who recently had given up all forms of wheat, rye and barley because they contain gluten. (Gluten, as most bakers know, is the protein that gives dough its elastic quality.) I remember wondering why this slender, yoga-teaching, opera-singing woman was on this very restrictive diet—and whether I should try it too.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Kristin Ohlson </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Whole grains are good for you. So why are so many Americans giving up wheat, rye and barley? Should you? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="276" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/bread_fade_630.jpg?1254940347" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/63624782bread_faded225.jpg?1250791620" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Gluten-Free Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_gluten_free_breakfast_recipes">Healthy Gluten-Free Breakfast Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_gluten_free_lunch_recipes">Healthy Gluten-Free Lunch Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/gluten_free_snacks">Gluten-Free Snacks</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_gluten_free_dinner_recipes">Healthy Gluten-Free Dinner Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/quick_and_healthy_gluten_free_dinner_recipes">Quick and Healthy Gluten-Free Dinner Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/gluten_free_desserts">Gluten-Free Desserts</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/gluten_free_diet_center">Gluten-Free Diet Center</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/how_to_cook_for_people_with_special_diets">How to Cook for People with Special Diets</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/gluten_free_diet/can_baked_goods_taste_good_without_gluten">Can Baked Goods Taste Good without Gluten?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>By Kristin Ohlson</p> <p>Gluten-Free Recipes | More on Eating Gluten-Free</p> <p>Kristin Ohlson writes about food, science and travel, among other things, from her home in Cleveland Heights, Ohio.</p> <p>Everyone at my book club peered at the fancy gluten-free cupcake someone had brought. It was for Anne, who recently had given up all forms of wheat, rye and barley because they contain gluten. (Gluten, as most bakers know, is the protein that gives dough its elastic quality.) I remember wondering why this slender, yoga-teaching, opera-singing woman was on this very restrictive diet—and whether I should try it too.</p> <p>As the gluten-free bandwagon rolls along, it’s easy to feel like you’re missing something. Last year, Oprah Winfrey went on a 21-day cleanse that was free of gluten as well as caffeine, sugar, alcohol and animal products. Grains that are naturally gluten-free—such as quinoa, millet and teff—are becoming increasingly popular. And the rush of new gluten-free products into the marketplace is staggering: according to market research publisher Packaged Facts, 1,182 new gluten-free foods and beverages were introduced in 2008, continuing an average 33 percent annual increase since 2004. Books and websites claim that a gluten-free diet can help with weight loss, autism and dozens of other conditions.</p> <p>Should we all be avoiding gluten? For most people, a gluten-free diet offers no benefits; in fact, it may even bring unwanted results, such as weight gain and nutritional deficiencies. Experts concur that gluten-free eating performs wonders for one group of people: those, like my friend Anne, who have celiac disease.</p> <p>Moreover, the list of symptoms has ballooned. Celiac disease is now implicated in a huge list of symptoms beyond digestive problems, including arthritis, anemia, infertility, a rash on the elbows and knees often mistaken for psoriasis, improper formation of tooth enamel and osteoporosis.</p> <p>To complicate matters further, some people with celiac disease are completely asymptomatic. Doctors who are savvy about risk factors spot the red flags in a patient’s medical history and recommend the proper screens: an initial blood test that detects the antibodies created when a person with celiac disease consumes gluten and then a biopsy of the small intestine to confirm damage to intestinal villi. Anyone with a relative who has celiac disease should be tested. So should people with other autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes or thyroid disease: having one autoimmune condition increases your risk for developing others. (My friend Anne, who had suffered gastrointestinal problems for years, was diagnosed shortly after discovering she had a thyroid disorder.)</p> <p>But some doctors may miss the signs. That’s because even though celiac disease has been around for centuries—possibly since the domestication of wild grains 10,000 years ago—the medical establishment in the U.S. has lagged behind in its attention to the disease.</p> <p>“The rate of celiac diagnosis depends on which country you live in,” says Peter Green, M.D., director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University and author of Celiac Disease: A Hidden Epidemic. “It’s commonly recognized in the Scandinavian countries, Holland, Italy, Australia and Canada. In the United Kingdom, people diagnosed with the disease get gluten-free products from the national health plan as a pharmaceutical benefit. In Australia, there are gluten-free products on most menus. In Brazil, everything in a package is marked gluten-free or not. But in the United States, there wasn’t much interest in the disease for a long time, probably related to the fact that there was no pharmaceutical-industry involvement.”<br /> What’s That About Wheat?</p> <p>Toward the end of World War II, the Netherlands suffered a “Winter of Starvation.” With shipments of staple foods, such as bread and cereal, disrupted, the Dutch ate tulip bulbs and whatever they could scavenge from the great outdoors. But while most people grew thinner under this harsh regimen, a pediatrician named Willem-Karel Dicke watched with interest as one group of his patients actually gained weight.</p> <p>Eventually, Allied planes dropped bread to the hungry Dutch people. Most of the population began to regain the weight they had lost, but Dicke noticed that the children who had started thriving during the famine were sickly once again. These kids previously had been diagnosed with celiac disease, a condition marked by chronic intestinal troubles and malnutrition. Although celiac disease was named by a Greek physician in the first century B.C. (its name is derived from the Greek word for abdomen), the condition was still something of a medical mystery. Dicke and other experts had suspected that celiac symptoms stemmed from some sort of intolerance to wheat; the children’s dramatic health improvements during the time when grains were unavailable provided the proof. A few years later, Dicke and two colleagues published papers showing that it is specifically the gluten in wheat (and barley and rye) that causes people with celiac disease such distress. Today, experts concur that people with celiac disease carry at least two genes that predispose their small intestines to greet incoming gluten as an alien invader, not a nutrient.</p> <p>“For celiacs, there’s a battle in your gut between your immune system and the gluten, which it considers an enemy,” says Joseph Murray, M.D., a gastroenterologist and professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. This immunological warfare winds up damaging the small, fingerlike projections called villi that line the gut. Under normal circumstances, the villi expand the surface area of the small intestine and allow it to absorb nutrients. But when doctors biopsy the small intestine of someone with celiac disease, they find that many of the villi have atrophied and flattened. The damage prevents proper absorption of nutrients, causes a variety of problems throughout the body and, left untreated, can even lead to cancers in the intestine.</p> <p>When Dicke and his colleagues wrote their landmark paper, most people thought celiac disease affected only children—patients were often counseled that they would “grow out of it.” Now, it is widely recognized as an autoimmune disease that persists for a lifetime and can develop at any age. It sometimes becomes active after surgery, pregnancy, a viral infection or emotional stress, for reasons that remain unclear.<br /> A Surge In Celiac Awareness</p> <p>The last decade has seen a surge of interest in celiac disease. One boost came in 2002 from a five-year study of more than 13,000 people led by Alessio Fasano, M.D., medical director of the University of Maryland’s Center for Celiac Research. Prior to this research, it was assumed that celiac disease was very rare in the United States. However, Dr. Fasano’s study found a prevalence more consistent with the higher numbers in Europe, India and the rest of the Americas. Celiac disease was found in one out of every 68 adults with any celiac-related symptoms and in one of every 22 people who had first-degree relatives with the disorder. Of study participants not considered at-risk, one in 133 had the disease.</p> <p>Two years later, the National Institutes of Health held a national conference on celiac disease. The resulting recommendations included increased education of medical professionals and the public about the disease and setting U.S. standards for labeling gluten-free foods. As a result, celiac diagnosis is increasing. Research suggests that it doubles every three years. (Gluten-free standards have been proposed, but the Food and Drug Administration has not yet finalized them.)</p> <p>Experts estimate that as many as 3 million Americans (about 1 percent of the population) have celiac disease, but only 10 percent have been diagnosed. And like asthma and other autoimmune diseases, celiac seems to be on the rise. Research in the July 2009 issue of Gastroenterology underlines this increase. The study was based on blood samples taken from more than 9,000 Air Force recruits between 1948 and 1954. Led by the Mayo Clinic’s Joseph Murray, researchers tested the 50-year-old blood for antibodies generated by celiac disease. They found that 0.2 percent of the samples had them.</p> <p>The researchers then drew blood from young men who were roughly the same age as the recruits had been when their blood was drawn and from older men who were born around the same time as the recruits. When they checked these new samples, 0.9 percent of the young men and 0.8 percent of the older men had the antibodies, suggesting that celiac disease may be four to four and a half times as common today as it was in the 1950s.</p> <p>“It’s not just that we’re diagnosing celiac disease more,” Murray says. “There’s a lot more of it around. That tells us that something in our environment has dramatically changed the rate of celiac disease.” But experts don’t know what has changed. Some experts subscribe to the “hygiene theory,” which holds that our modern environment is so excessively sanitized that our immune systems don’t get a chance to develop properly during childhood. Others suspect that the prevalence of gluten in the modern diet is to blame.</p> <p>Gluten’s ubiquitousness is precisely why celiac disease is difficult to manage. Breads, cakes, pastas and cereals may be the most obvious sources of gluten, but the protein also finds its way into many ingredients commonly used in processed foods as stabilizers, emulsifiers and thickeners. Canned soups and stews often contain modified wheat starch and so do some medications. Beer and whiskey are distilled from wheat and other grains. Some brands of vinegar, soy sauce and even salad dressings contain gluten, so it’s important to read ingredient lists closely. “Studies show that it only takes 50 milligrams of gluten [about 1⁄8 teaspoon of bread] to damage the villi, but many people get sick way before that,” says Cheryl Wilson, president of the Southern Arizona Celiac Support Group. “For instance, even the tiny crumbs that remain if I take croutons off a salad will make me sick.”<br /> Gluten-Free Truths and Myths</p> <p>When people with celiac disease eliminate gluten entirely, they alleviate immediate symptoms (e.g., GI distress) and prevent damage to their small intestine—that’s absolutely clear. As to the other claims made for gluten-free diets, there is far less scientific consensus.</p> <p>Perhaps the most hotly debated question is whether gluten-free diets help people with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The publication of Karyn Seroussi’s Unraveling the Mystery of Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorder: A Mother’s Story of Research and Recovery in 2000, and actress Jenny McCarthy’s books and activism, prompted many parents of autistic children to try a diet free of gluten and casein, a protein in milk. As some parents reported success with the diet, scientists devised studies to try to pin down the diet’s impact on behavior. So far, however, these studies haven’t convinced scientists of the diet’s effectiveness.</p> <p>In the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2008, researchers reviewed studies that had been published on the effect of a gluten-free, casein-free diet on the behavior and cognitive and social functioning in people with autism. They only found two randomized, controlled trials (the gold standard of scientific research), both small, with a combined total of 35 participants. The review deemed the evidence inconclusive.</p> <p>While only people with celiac disease react to gluten in ways that damage the body, others can have sensitivities to gluten or wheat allergies. These people may feel better avoiding gluten, especially if they’ve been getting it in fatty, sugary processed foods that offer little nutrition. And there’s no evidence that a gluten-free diet leads to weight loss—or even a plausible theory for why it would. In fact, moving from “regular” processed foods to gluten-free ones may result in weight gain. “Lots of gluten-free products are higher in fat,” says Tricia Thompson, M.S., R.D., author of The Gluten-Free Nutrition Guide. “Pretzels, for instance--manufacturers add fat to give them better mouthfeel.” (Plus, these pretzels cost four times as much as “regular” ones.)</p> <p>Of all the misconceptions about gluten-free diets, the most dangerous is that you can self-diagnose celiac disease. If you go gluten-free, the antibodies that doctors screen for in the blood disappear. You may need to go back to eating gluten for several months to be properly tested.</p> <p>“If [people] walk into their doctor’s office after being on a gluten-free diet, we can’t diagnose,” says Lori Mahajan, M.D., a pediatric gastroenterologist at the Cleveland Clinic. “If they’re off doing the diet on their own, they might not do it properly. They’ll keep increasing their risk of malignancy.”</p> <p>So, if you think you might have celiac disease, schedule a visit with your doctor but keep eating bread and pasta until she tells you to stop. If you don’t have celiac disease, continue to enjoy your wheat, barley and rye—and maybe try a few of the lesser-known grains that people with celiac disease can enjoy. Many are great sources of fiber, protein and trace minerals. Teff, anyone?<br /> Gluten Free Recipes to Try:</p> <p> * Artichoke-Scrambled Eggs Benedict<br /> * Beef &amp; Bean Chile Verde<br /> * Chicken Breasts with Mushroom Cream Sauce<br /> * Cheesy Broccoli-Potato Mash<br /> * Corn with Bacon &amp; Mushrooms<br /> * Cucumber &amp; Black-Eyed Pea Salad<br /> * Chocolate Fondue<br /> * Grilled Apples with Cheese &amp; Honey<br /> * Marsala-Poached Figs over Ricotta<br /> * More Gluten-Free Recipes</p> <p>Gluten Free Articles and Tips:</p> <p> * Gluten Free Diet Center<br /> * Gluten Free Diet Quiz<br /> * How to Cook for People with Special Diets<br /> * Can Baked Goods Taste Good without Gluten</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/gluten_free_diet/should_you_go_gluten_free#comments Kristin Ohlson July/August 2009 Gluten Free Diet glutfree Recipes & Menus - Gluten Free Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:12:24 +0000 Nifer 9943 at http://www.eatingwell.com How can public policy make a difference? http://www.eatingwell.com/how_can_public_policy_make_a_difference <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>How can public policy make a difference?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Restaurants should list the calorie counts of all foods they serve. Food products should convey prominently on their labels the ­percentage of added sugars, refined carbohydrates and fats they contain. People also need to hear repeatedly that selling, serving and eating food layered and loaded with sugar, fat and salt has unhealthy consequences. And food marketing should be monitored and exposed.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/how_can_public_policy_make_a_difference#comments Amy Ahlberg July/August 2009 David A. Kessler, M.D. Thu, 20 Aug 2009 17:50:05 +0000 Penelope Wall 9933 at http://www.eatingwell.com Can you give a personal example? http://www.eatingwell.com/can_you_give_a_personal_example <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Can you give a personal example?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>It used to be that if you put a huge plate of fries in front of me, I would eat it. Now I look at that huge plate of fries and say, “I don’t want that.” Sure, it will taste good, but in 20 minutes I’m going to feel lousy. For me, food has to be rewarding, it has to be pleasureable. But it also has to be nutritious, it has to satiate. It can’t just be fat on sugar on fat—that’s stimulating, but isn’t going to satiate.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/can_you_give_a_personal_example#comments Amy Ahlberg July/August 2009 David A. Kessler, M.D. Thu, 20 Aug 2009 17:49:25 +0000 Penelope Wall 9932 at http://www.eatingwell.com How can we break this cycle? http://www.eatingwell.com/how_can_we_break_this_cycle <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>How can we break this cycle?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Changing how people look at food is essential. Look at the public-health success with tobacco. We didn’t change the product. But we changed how people perceive it. Now people look at tobacco and say, “That’s really disgusting.” Tobacco is easy because you can live without it, but you can’t live without food. So you have to cool down the stimulus. You have to retrain yourself to respond to food differently.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/how_can_we_break_this_cycle#comments Amy Ahlberg July/August 2009 David A. Kessler, M.D. Thu, 20 Aug 2009 17:48:40 +0000 Penelope Wall 9931 at http://www.eatingwell.com What contributes to Americans’ overeating? http://www.eatingwell.com/what_contributes_to_americans_overeating <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>What contributes to Americans’ overeating?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The food industry creates foods that hijack our brains. They have fat, sugar and salt, which are highly stimulating. They condition us so that even the sights and smells associated with them activate your brain [in ways that make you want food]. In controlled individuals the brain activity stops when they start ingesting the food, but in some people it doesn’t shut off when the food is gone.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/what_contributes_to_americans_overeating#comments Amy Ahlberg July/August 2009 David A. Kessler, M.D. Thu, 20 Aug 2009 17:47:51 +0000 Penelope Wall 9928 at http://www.eatingwell.com A Nation Addicted to Food http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/a_nation_addicted_to_food <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 4 questions for David A. Kessler, M.D., author of The End of Overeating </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2009 </div> </div> </div> <p>As someone who has struggled with weight his entire life, David A. Kessler, M.D., wanted to know why chocolate chip cookies had such power over him, why he ate when he wasn’t hungry—and what he could do about it. So seven years ago the physician and former FDA commissioner set out to discover what drives us to eat too much. He talked to neurobiologists, psychologists and food-industry insiders. In a new book, The End of Overeating (Rodale), Kessler shares what he found.</p> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-label">Standard Image:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/david_kessler_310.jpg?1250791080" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-q-and-a"> <div class="field-label">Q &amp; A:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what_contributes_to_americans_overeating">What contributes to Americans’ overeating?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/how_can_we_break_this_cycle">How can we break this cycle?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/can_you_give_a_personal_example">Can you give a personal example?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/how_can_public_policy_make_a_difference">How can public policy make a difference?</a> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/fight_fat_with_a_soft_drink_tax">Fight Fat with a Soft-Drink Tax?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/the_fast_food_ban">The Fast Food Ban</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_kids_diet_center">Healthy Kids Diet Center</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/the_future_of_food_predictions_from_michael_pollan">The Future of Food: Predictions from Michael Pollan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/a_nation_addicted_to_food#comments Amy Ahlberg July/August 2009 David A. Kessler, M.D. Food News & Origins - Food News Thu, 20 Aug 2009 17:46:00 +0000 Penelope Wall 9927 at http://www.eatingwell.com How to Maximize the Flavor and Health Benefits of Tea http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/quick_sides_desserts_more/tea_time <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Tea Time </div> </div> </div> <p>Sure, a tall glass of iced tea on a hot day is refreshing, but did you know it might also do your body good? Studies show if you drink tea regularly, you may reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s and diabetes, plus have healthier teeth and gums and stronger bones. How? Tea is rich in a class of antioxidants called flavonoids.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Joyce Hendley </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> What to add to your tea to make it healthier, how to make your own iced tea, plus 5 tips from a tea expert. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/tea_310.jpg?1251494443" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_iced_tea_recipes">Healthy Iced Tea Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/green_jasmine_mint_iced_tea_with_lemon.html">Green Jasmine-Mint Iced Tea with Lemon</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/hibiscus_pomegranate_iced_tea.html">Hibiscus-Pomegranate Iced Tea</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/orange_earl_grey_iced_tea.html">Orange-Earl Grey Iced Tea</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/tea_buyers_guide_and_steeping_tips">Tea Buyer&#039;s Guide and Steeping Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/health_benefits_of_tea">Health Benefits of Tea</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/red_tea_for_health">Red Tea for Health</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Sure, a tall glass of iced tea on a hot day is refreshing, but did you know it might also do your body good? Studies show if you drink tea regularly, you may reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s and diabetes, plus have healthier teeth and gums and stronger bones. How? Tea is rich in a class of antioxidants called flavonoids.</p> <p>“True teas,” such as black, green, oolong and white teas, come from the leaves of the tea plant, Camellia sinensis. What many of us call herbal teas, such as chamomile and rooibos, are actually tisanes or infusions. The differences in true teas result from how the tea plant’s leaves are processed: black teas are oxidized (exposed to oxygen) a few hours before rolling and drying, deepening their color, while white teas and green teas are simply steamed, rolled and dried. Think of oolongs as hybrids; their leaves are partially oxidized before drying.</p> <p>Regardless of the variety, maximize the power of its flavonoids by drinking it freshly brewed. If you want to keep a batch of cold tea in your refrigerator, “add a little lemon juice,” recommends Jeffrey Blumberg, Ph.D., director of the Antioxidants Research Laboratory at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. The citric acid and vitamin C in that squeeze of lemon—or lime, or orange—help preserve the flavonoids.</p> <p><strong>How To Make Iced Tea</strong></p> <p>Making your own iced tea is easy—and much cheaper than buying the bottled or powdered-mix stuff. It can also be healthier: while iced tea is generally lower in antioxidants than hot tea because it’s diluted with ice and water, you can counteract that tendency by starting with an extra-strong brew. But best of all, when you do the steeping, you get to choose the varieties and flavorings, to create a brew that’s—well, just your cup of tea. Our three iced-tea blends will get you started.</p> <p> * <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/hibiscus_pomegranate_iced_tea.html">Hibiscus-Pomegranate Iced Tea</a><br /> * <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/orange_earl_grey_iced_tea.html">Orange-Earl Grey Iced Tea</a><br /> * <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/green_jasmine_mint_iced_tea_with_lemon.html">Green Jasmine-Mint Iced Tea with Lemon</a></p> <p><strong>5 Tips from a Tea Expert</strong></p> <p>As co-owner and tea sommelier at Tavalon, a New York City-based purveyor of teas, Chris Cason’s mission is to “help create a new American tea tradition.” Here’s what he recommends.</p> <p><strong>1. Look for fresh tea at a tearoom or a market with high turnover,</strong> because the oils that give teas their flavor break down over time. Opt for loose tea rather than tea bags. “Loose tea just tastes better,” says Cason. “Tea leaves need room to expand, in order to release their flavors.” A typical square tea bag is too small, he explains, but larger ones shaped like pyramids give the leaves more room to bloom. Look for brands that list the region where the tea comes from, says Cason, “so at least you know you’re not getting everything but the kitchen sink.”</p> <p><strong>2. Start with spring or filtered tap water,</strong> which “have an ideal mineral content,” says Cason. Mineral water contains too many minerals that can create off-flavors when they come in contact with compounds in the tea leaves, and mineral-free distilled water produces a flat-tasting brew.</p> <p><strong>3. Turn up (or down) the heat.</strong> Use boiling water (212°F) to brew black, herbal and darker-colored oolong teas. But use cooler water (170° to 180°F) to brew green, white and lighter oolongs teas. “The water should be steaming with little bubbles forming at the bottom of the kettle,” says Cason. Brewing them with boiling water can release too many compounds that give color and complexity to the tea but in high doses produce astringent flavors, says Cason.</p> <p><strong>4. Use just enough tea.</strong> Use 1 1/2 to 2 teaspoons per cup of water when brewing teas with bigger leaves or flowers, like green tea or chamomile, and 1 teaspoon per cup for teas with denser, compact leaves such as most black teas.</p> <p><strong>5. Steep long enough to release flavors,</strong> but not so long that tannins and other bitter-tasting compounds dominate. “Generally, black teas and darker oolongs should steep for 3 to 5 minutes,” says Cason. “Green, white and lighter oolong teas are much more delicate, so you’ll only need 2 to 3 minutes.” Herbal tisanes and infusions have fewer tannins, so there’s less risk of oversteeping.</p> <p><strong>Tea Glossary</strong></p> <p><strong>True Teas</strong><br /> <strong>Black Tea</strong><br /> Just like wine, tea’s complex flavors vary widely with the region and processing. Darjeeling (India) is slightly spicy, with grape and almond overtones, while Chinese types, such as smoke-dried Lapsang Souchong, tend to be earthier.<br /> Where it’s from: China, India, Sri Lanka, Africa, Vietnam, Indonesia, Nepal, the Caucasus regions, Turkey.<br /> Health benefits: People who drink black tea regularly (3-5 cups/day) tend to have fewer heart attacks and strokes, as well as lower rates of colon and lung cancer. Drinking black tea also may reduce risks of diabetes and osteoporosis and inhibit bacteria that causes tooth decay.<br /> Water temp/steeping time: Boiling water for 3-5 minutes.</p> <p><strong>Green Tea</strong><br /> Green tea has a vegetal, mildly grassy flavor, with a slightly astringent mouthfeel. Oversteeped brews can be bitter. Chinese types include Dragonwell, prized for its trace of chestnut flavors, and Jasmine (fragrant with added jasmine flowers). Try Japan’s smooth Sencha or toasty Genmaicha, blended with toasted rice grains.<br /> Where it’s from: China, Japan, Sri Lanka.<br /> Health benefits: Drinking green tea is associated with lower rates of colon and pancreatic cancers and reduced risk of Alzheimer’s.<br /> Water temp/steeping time: Steaming water for 2-3 minutes.</p> <p><strong>White Tea</strong><br /> White teas are relatively rare and expensive because they’re only produced from new leaves and buds. They have a light body and golden color plus a pure “tea” flavor without astringency and a hint of sweetness. The leaves of White Peony open up and look like a peony when steeped, while Ceylon White (Sri Lanka) has pine and honey notes.<br /> Where it’s from: China, India, Sri Lanka.<br /> Health benefits: Compared to other true teas, white tea contains more of a flavonoid called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which may help prevent heart disease and fight cancer.<br /> Water temp/steeping time: Steaming water for 2-3 minutes.</p> <p><strong>Oolong Tea</strong><br /> The flavor and color of oolong tea can vary widely, depending on source and length of oxidation. Lighter oolongs, such as Pouchong, are similar to green tea, while darker versions like Formosa have characteristics more like black tea.<br /> Where it’s from: Taiwan, China.<br /> Health benefits: Studies suggest that oolongs provide health benefits similar to green and black teas. A type of flavonoid in oolongs called chafuroside may fight inflammation and help inhibit the development of intestinal cancers.<br /> Water temp/ steeping time: Darker oolongs: same as black tea. Lighter oolongs: same as green tea.</p> <p><strong>Tisanes/Infusions</strong></p> <p><strong>Herbal Teas (e.g., chamomile, hibiscus)</strong><br /> Their aromas and flavors echo the flowers, leaves, seeds or roots from which they’re derived. Chamomile has flowery, applelike notes; hibiscus has sour, berrylike fruit flavors.<br /> Where it’s from: All over the world.<br /> Health benefits: Chamomile tea has a long history of use as a sleep aid; it may also help soothe an upset stomach and help calm colicky babies. Hibiscus tea is rich in vitamin C and may help reduce blood pressure.<br /> Water temp/steeping time: Boiling water for 3-5 minutes.</p> <p><strong>Rooibos (Red Bush Tea)</strong><br /> This earthy dark red brew is favored by black-tea drinkers looking for caffeine-free alternatives.<br /> Where it’s from: South Africa.<br /> Health benefits: Rooibos contains a fair amount of flavonoids—quer­cetin, luteolin and aspala­thin—that are associated with reducing the risk of heart disease and cancer.<br /> Water temp/steeping time: Boiling water for 3-5 minutes.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/quick_sides_desserts_more/tea_time#comments Joyce Hendley July/August 2009 Recipes & Menus - Tea Healthy Cooking - Quick & Healthy Cooking Thu, 20 Aug 2009 17:35:07 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9923 at http://www.eatingwell.com Cutting Back on Salt http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/cutting_back_on_salt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sayonara, Salt? </div> </div> </div> <p>The New York City Health Department has a plan that could save 150,000 lives nationwide—every year. In January 2009 it launched an initiative to encourage manufacturers to cut sodium in packaged foods in half. Most Americans consume more than twice the recommended daily sodium limit. (The limit is 2,300 milligrams—the amount in just 1 teaspoon of table salt.) That may not be a problem for some people, but it’s a major health concern for the two-thirds of U.S. adults who are “salt sensitive”: when they increase their salt consumption they see a steep rise in blood pressure.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Meltzer Warren, M.S. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Could a plan to reduce sodium in packaged foods save lives? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="225" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/6326sea_salt225.jpg?1250788379" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> July/August 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes and Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_low_sodium_recipes">Healthy Low Sodium Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/blood_pressure/is_salt_the_next_health_focus">Is Salt the Next Health Focus?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/blood_pressure/easy_ways_to_cut_sodium">6 Easy Ways to Cut Sodium</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/videos/high_blood_pressure_tips_for_reducing_sodium_in_cooking_video">High Blood Pressure: Tips for Reducing Sodium in Cooking Video</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>The New York City Health Department has a plan that could save 150,000 lives nationwide—every year. In January 2009 it launched an initiative to encourage manufacturers to cut sodium in packaged foods in half. Most Americans consume more than twice the recommended daily sodium limit. (The limit is 2,300 milligrams—the amount in just 1 teaspoon of table salt.) That may not be a problem for some people, but it’s a major health concern for the two-thirds of U.S. adults who are “salt sensitive”: when they increase their salt consumption they see a steep rise in blood pressure. In fact, experts advise individuals at risk for “salt sensitivity” (anyone older than 40, black or who already has high blood pressure) to cap their daily sodium intake at 1,500 milligrams (2/3 teaspoon salt).</p> <p>An industry-wide reduction in sodium in packaged foods could have a huge effect on health. “The majority of the sodium we eat is in packaged and prepared foods,” says Darwin R. Labarthe, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., director of the CDC’s Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention. This may explain why the New York City initiative has gained the support of other state health departments and health authorities, including the American Heart Association and American Medical Association. Food manufacturers are getting the message. Campbell’s is debuting a lower-sodium version of its famous tomato soup with 32 percent less sodium than the original (dropping from 710 to 480 milligrams per serving). Campbell’s isn’t alone: the number of products touting their “lower sodium” status has more than doubled over the last five years, with other major brands, such as Del Monte, General Mills and Kraft, also bringing out lines.</p> <p>But beware: a can of soup or broth, or any food really, with a “reduced sodium” label may actually have as much sodium as a “regular” version of another brand. The term “reduced sodium”—also called “lower sodium”—is regulated by the FDA and means only that the product contains at least 25 percent less than its original version. If you’re really watching your intake, look for “low sodium” on the label: that product can’t have more than 140 milligrams of sodium per 100 grams (about 336 milligrams per cup).</p> <p>Bottom Line: Pay less attention to callouts on the front of packages and instead home in on the sodium information on Nutrition Facts panels. In the EatingWell Test Kitchen, we try to limit the amount of sodium in our recipes and use reduced-sodium products, such as broths and stocks (with 440 to 580 milligrams of sodium per cup), whenever possible. If you have hypertension or are salt-sensitive, you may want to use low-sodium versions instead.<br /> Is Sea Salt Healthier?</p> <p>Even if you’re watching your sodium intake, you can enjoy sea salts. While gram for gram sea salts contain as much sodium as table salt, their larger crystals and unique flavors, derived from various sources, may result in your using less salt overall, says Chef Kyle Shadix, M.S., R.D., director at Nutrition + Culinary Consultants in New York City. Sel Gris de Í’lle de Ré gets its color from gray clay; Maldon has a distinct fine-flake crystal structure; and Himalayan Pink is named for the mountains where it’s mined. Another way to minimize sodium: don’t salt while you’re cooking and instead simply sprinkle a pinch of coarse sea salt on your finished dish before serving. Find interesting sea salts at gourmet shops or online at atthemeadow.com.</p> <p>Learn More:</p> <p>* Low Sodium Recipes<br /> * Is Salt the Next Health Focus?<br /> * Easy Ways to Cut Sodium<br /> * High Blood Pressure Diet Center<br /> * EatingWell Video Video: 3 Quick Tips for Cooking with Less Salt</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/cutting_back_on_salt#comments Rachel Meltzer Warren, M.S. July/August 2009 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Thu, 20 Aug 2009 17:16:04 +0000 Nifer 9921 at http://www.eatingwell.com Chocolate-Raspberry Frozen Yogurt Pops http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chocolate_raspberry_ice_pops.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chocolate_raspberry_ice_pops.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/DF6934.JPG" alt="Chocolate-Raspberry Frozen Yogurt Pops Recipe" title="Chocolate-Raspberry Frozen Yogurt Pops Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chocolate_raspberry_ice_pops.html" target="_blank">Chocolate-Raspberry Frozen Yogurt Pops</a></div> <div>Chocolate chips add a sweet counterpoint to these tangy bright-pink raspberry pops. Strawberries would work equally well.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chocolate_raspberry_ice_pops.html#comments July/August 2009 American Easy Diabetes appropriate Gluten free Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low carbohydrate Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Low sodium Digestive Health Father's Day glutfree July 4th Labor Day Memorial Day Mother's Day Recipes & Menus - Diabetic Desserts Recipes & Menus - Vegetarian Recipes & Menus - Yogurt Berries Chocolate Fruit Vegetarian, other Dessert Snack Freeze Summer Birthday Entertaining, casual Everyday favorites Freezing instructions Kid-friendly Make ahead instructions Vegetarian Desserts, frozen Tue, 26 May 2009 17:58:08 +0000 admin 7658 at http://www.eatingwell.com