September/October 2009 http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/426/all en Quick Chicken Tikka Masala for Two http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/quick_chicken_tikka_masala_for_2.html <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/quick_chicken_tikka_masala_for_2.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/recipes/MP7399_0.JPG" alt="Quick Chicken Tikka Masala for Two Recipe" title="Quick Chicken Tikka Masala for Two Recipe" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/quick_chicken_tikka_masala_for_2.html" target="_blank">Quick Chicken Tikka Masala for Two</a></div> <div>One of the most popular Indian dishes in the U.S. and the U.K., chicken tikka masala usually involves several steps including marinating and grilling the chicken before simmering in a curried tomato cream sauce. We’ve simplified it to a one-skillet dish for two and lightened it by increasing the vegetables, omitting the butter and using less cream. Serve with brown basmati rice and, for dessert, dates.</div> http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/quick_chicken_tikka_masala_for_2.html#comments September/October 2009 Indian Easy Diabetes appropriate Healthy weight Heart healthy Low calorie Low cholesterol Low saturated fat Recipes - Individual Recipes Dairy Tomatoes Vegetables Wheat Chicken Dinner
 Saute Fall Spring Summer Winter 2 Budget Comfort foods Entertaining, casual Everyday favorites Kid-friendly Makeover One dish meals 45 minutes or less Main dish, poultry Tue, 17 Aug 2010 14:43:42 +0000 Erin McCormick 16261 at http://www.eatingwell.com Baking for Love http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/baking_for_love <p>Before I learned how to ride a bicycle, I had baked a cake. A lot of cakes. In my family, feelings were expressed via sugar, more specifically, baked goods. For birthdays, in lieu of presents, my mother would painstakingly assemble cakes shaped like dolls, molded to resemble a hoop skirt, hand-sculpted icing roses decorating the hem. The cakes required hours to complete and lasted only a few minutes, wrecked by the first cut. Breathtaking, but easily destroyed. Such, the lesson seemed, was the inevitable trajectory of love.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Allison Glock </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> A sweet meal to remember. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/gluten_free_cake.jpg?1266349174" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/pinepple_coconut_cake.JPG?1253280601" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Good Reads </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/inheritance">Inheritance</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/shopping_for_love">Shopping for Love</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/the_invitation">The Invitation</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Gluten Free Diet </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/gluten_free_diet/should_you_go_gluten_free">Should You Go Gluten-Free?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/gluten_free_desserts">Gluten-Free Desserts</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/gluten_free_snacks">Gluten-Free Snacks</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/gluten_free_recipes">Gluten-Free Diet Recipes, Menus and Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/good_reads/baking_for_love#comments Allison Glock September/October 2009 Food News & Origins - People & Perspectives Fri, 11 Sep 2009 18:28:13 +0000 Sarah Hoff 14948 at http://www.eatingwell.com Carrots with Charisma http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/quick_sides_desserts_more/carrots_with_charisma <p>When my mother told my brother that carrots were good for his eyes, he thought he had found the secret to seeing in the dark. He wasn’t the first to think that carrots had super powers. The Greeks thought carrots were the secret to great sex. And the vegetable’s amorous reputation followed it to Rome, where the emperor Caligula fed nothing but carrot dishes to the Roman Senate so he could watch them “rut like wild beasts.”</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Erika Freeman </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 4 fresh sides that are anything but rabbit food. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/carrots_630_0.jpg?1252685180" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/carrots.jpg?1252684990" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chili_roasted_carrots.html">Chili-Roasted Carrots</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/carrot_celeriac_salad.html">Carrot Salad with Honey-Lemon Dressing</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/carrot_potato_puree.html">Carrot Puree with Hazelnut Tapenade</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/hot_sour_carrots.html">Hot &amp; Sour Carrots</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/easy_carrot_recipes">Easy Carrot Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/root_vegetable_buyers_guide">Root Vegetable Buyer&#039;s Guide</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/quick_sides_desserts_more/carrots_with_charisma#comments Erika Freeman September/October 2009 Healthy Cooking - Quick & Healthy Cooking Fri, 11 Sep 2009 15:57:04 +0000 Penelope Wall 14947 at http://www.eatingwell.com Have Your Nutrients Expired? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/have_your_nutrients_expired <p>Sometimes there are clues when a food passes its prime: lettuce wilts, bananas turn brown. Other foods will look and smell OK long after their health punch has dramatically declined. “Certain nutrients are unstable when exposed to oxygen (from the air), heat (from cooking) and light,” says Carol Johnston, Ph.D., R.D., chair of the Department of Nutrition at Arizona State University. Keep track of how long you store the following nutrient-rich foods. </p> <p><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/green_tea_150.jpg" /></p> <h4>Green tea: 6 months</h4> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Amy Paturel </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The nutrition benefits of some foods may decrease with time. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrient_library">Nutrient Library</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/olive_oil_buyers_guide">Olive Oil Buyer&#039;s Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrient_library/vitamin_c_rich_recipes">Vitamin C-Rich Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_aging/can_vitamin_c_save_your_skin">Can Vitamin C Save Your Skin?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/healing_with_honey">Healing with Honey</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/can_honey_make_you_healthier">Can honey make you healthier?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/health_benefits_of_tea">Health Benefits of Tea</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/have_your_nutrients_expired#comments Amy Paturel September/October 2009 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Thu, 10 Sep 2009 21:42:07 +0000 Sarah Hoff 14944 at http://www.eatingwell.com Fight Fat with Calorie Counts? http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/fight_fat_with_calorie_counts <p>Calorie counts are already required on menus at chain restaurants in New York City and California. Similar legislation is pending in other states and cities. The U.S. Senate has proposed a federal menu-labeling law. But does knowing how many calories you’ll be eating change your order?</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Christine Boyd </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> The pros and cons of a proposed menu-labeling law. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/wendys_salad.jpg?1252617038" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipe Collections </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_low_calorie_recipes">Healthy Low-Calorie Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_low_fat_recipes">Healthy Low Fat Recipes and Menus</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_low_sodium_recipes">Healthy Low Sodium Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/10_fast_food_fallbacks">10 Fast-food Fallbacks</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/could_you_live_without_fast_food">Could you live without fast food?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/weight_loss_diet_plans/diet_exercise_tips/on_the_road_fast_food_survival_tips">On the Road: Fast Food Survival Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/fight_fat_with_calorie_counts#comments Christine Boyd September/October 2009 Food News & Origins - Food News Thu, 10 Sep 2009 21:06:39 +0000 Sarah Hoff 14943 at http://www.eatingwell.com Pushing Up Zucchini http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/local_heroes/pushing_up_zucchini <p>When ordinances passed in the early 1900s evicted all existing cemeteries from San Francisco’s city limits and banned the construction of new ones, the deceased were relocated about 10 miles south—and Colma, California, was born. Today this two-square-mile Bay Area town remains three-quarters cemetery—the dead outnumber the living 900 to one. It is also home to the largest local produce supplier for the San Francisco Food Bank.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Laura Kiniry </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> How one congregation in California is growing food for the hungry in their temple’s cemetery. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chocolate_zucchini_bread.html">Chocolate Zucchini Bread</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/gnocchi_with_zucchini_ribbons_parsley_brown_butter.html">Gnocchi with Zucchini Ribbons &amp; Parsley Brown Butter</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/gratin_of_zucchini_tomatoes.html">Gratin of Zucchini &amp; Tomatoes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/grilled_salmon_zucchini_with_red_pepper_sauce.html">Grilled Salmon &amp; Zucchini with Red Pepper Sauce</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_zucchini_recipes">Healthy Zucchini Recipes and Summer Squash Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/people_perspectives/local_heroes/pushing_up_zucchini#comments Laura Kiniry September/October 2009 Food News & Origins - People & Perspectives Thu, 10 Sep 2009 20:51:26 +0000 Sarah Hoff 14942 at http://www.eatingwell.com 5 Reasons We Love Cabbage http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/eatingwell_in_season/5_reasons_we_love_cabbage <p><strong>It's Hardy</strong><br /> 1. It’s hardy. Originating along the Mediterranean Sea, its thick and succulent leaves protected it from the sun and salt. But <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_food_guide/cabbage">cabbage</a> grows equally well in the cold, thriving at temperatures barely above freezing.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More healthy reasons to put cabbage in your diet. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="625" height="225" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/cabbage_0.jpg?1295547090" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/cabbage_310.jpg?1252614774" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> More Healthy Cabbage Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/easy_cabbage_recipes">Easy Cabbage Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_food_guide/cabbage">Cabbage Healthy Food Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/free_downloads/healthy_cabbage_recipe_cookbook">Download a FREE Healthy Cabbage Recipe Cookbook!</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_picnic_coleslaws_and_salads">Healthy Coleslaws and Picnic Salads</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/low_calorie_coleslaw_recipes_low_calorie_salad_recipes">Low-Calorie Coleslaw Recipes &amp; Low-Calorie Potluck Salad Recipes</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/eatingwell_in_season/5_reasons_we_love_cabbage#comments September/October 2009 Food News & Origins - Seasonal & Local Thu, 10 Sep 2009 20:39:29 +0000 Sarah Hoff 14941 at http://www.eatingwell.com Kitchen Cures http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/kitchen_cures <p>All my life I’ve been prone to motion sickness—not a good thing when your husband has a passion for sailing. </p> <p>My mother, a nurse, used to give me ginger ale to settle my belly when I complained of nausea. Now I use ginger to calm my churning stomach when I’m sailing rough waters or flying on a bumpy plane. </p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> 5 home remedies for common ailments—do they work? </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/kitchen_cures_310.jpg?1252517563" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/rachel_johnson_310_0.jpg?1260202859" /> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/juice_cranberry_so09_310.jpg?1285714252" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/immune_boosting_superfoods">Immune-Boosting Superfoods</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/feed_a_cold">Feed a Cold</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/healthy_immunity_center">Healthy Immunity Center</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/immunity/could_taking_iron_help_cure_your_cough">Could Taking Iron Help Cure Your Cough?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_food_guide/cranberries">Cranberries Healthy Food Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/calcium_rich_recipes_with_yogurt">Calcium-Rich Recipes with Yogurt</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/iron_rich_recipes">Iron Rich Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/3_of_the_simplest_ways_to_not_get_sick">3 of the simplest ways to not get sick</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/8_of_the_worlds_healthiest_spices">8 of the World&#039;s Healthiest Spices</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/immunity/kitchen_cures#comments Rachel Johnson, Ph.D, M.P.H., R.D. September/October 2009 Healthy Immune System Diet, Nutrition & Health - Arthritis Diet, Nutrition & Health - Immunity Wed, 09 Sep 2009 17:34:12 +0000 Penelope Wall 14931 at http://www.eatingwell.com Should You Buy Organic Apples? http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/organic_natural/should_you_buy_organic_apples <p>As a nutrition editor, I know the value of eating loads of fruits and vegetables. I prefer to buy local when I can, but I’ve never been a purist about eating only organic. Now that I’m a mom, there are some foods I feel more comfortable about buying organic. Apples are one of these foods. Twenty-five years ago, mothers had to worry about Alar, a spray used to redden apples and make them ripen at the same time. Luckily, I don’t have to: Alar’s manufacturer pulled it from the market in 1989 after reports linked the chemical to cancer.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Nicci Micco </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Plus, 4 ways to reduce your exposure to pesticide residues. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="230" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/apple_picking_2_so09_630.jpg?1285861111" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/apples_on_tree_310.jpg?1252515987" /> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/apples_2_310.jpg?1255381564" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Healthy Apple Recipes: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/easy_apple_recipes">Easy Apple Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_apple_desserts">Healthy Apple Desserts</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_apple_pie_and_more_fall_pie_recipes">Healthy Apple Pie and More Fall Pie Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/heart_healthy_apple_recipes">Heart-Healthy Apple Recipes</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/apple_buyers_guide">Apple Buyer&#039;s Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/the_family_tree_celebrate_fall_with_a_trip_to_th">The Family Tree: Celebrate Fall with a Trip to the Apple Orchard</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related2"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle2"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 2:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles and Guides: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks2"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/organic_natural/dirty_dozen_plus_14_foods_you_should_buy_organic">The Dirty Dozen Plus: 14 Foods You Should Buy Organic</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/organic_natural/15_foods_you_dont_need_to_buy_organic">15 Foods You Don&#039;t Need to Buy Organic</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/organic_natural/7_simple_ways_to_detox_your_diet_and_your_home">7 Simple Ways to Detox Your Diet and Your Home</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/organic_natural/what_chemicals_are_in_food_simple_solutions_to_avoid_harmful_toxins_in_food">What Chemicals Are in Food? Simple Solutions to Avoid Harmful Toxins in Food</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/food_news_blog/new_study_says_organic_food_is_not_healthier_is_that_really_true">New study says organic food is not healthier--is that really true?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/green_choices_produce_buyer_s_guide">Green Choices: Produce Buyer’s Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/green_up_kitchen_challenge">Green Up Your Kitchen Challenge</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/organic_natural/should_you_buy_organic_apples#comments Nicci Micco September/October 2009 Food News & Origins - Organic & Natural Wed, 09 Sep 2009 17:08:34 +0000 Penelope Wall 14927 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Family Tree: Celebrate Fall with a Trip to the Apple Orchard http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/the_family_tree_celebrate_fall_with_a_trip_to_th <p>Big fluffy clouds—the kind that morph into elephants and dragons, old-man faces and battleships—float across a cerulean sky. The air is crisp and scented with sweet fruit and fresh-cut hay. </p> <p>A wagon trundles by every 15 minutes or so, carrying a cargo of laughing kids and their parents. Honeybees buzz purposefully from tree to tree. Normally, stinging insects freak me out. But not when I’m picking apples. </p> <p>These are some of the most vivid images of my childhood.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Nicci Micco </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Bring home the bounty to enjoy in these savory and sweet apple recipes. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/family_tree_630.jpg?1252513257" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/apple_picking_310.jpg?1253551011" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Apple Recipes to Try </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/apple_cupcakes_cinnamon_frosting.html">Apple Cupcakes with Cinnamon-Marshmallow Frosting</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/maple_cinnamon_applesauce.html">Maple-Cinnamon Applesauce</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/apple_bacon_pancakes.html">Apple-Bacon Pancakes with Cider Syrup</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/apple_leek_stuffed_pork.html">Apple-&amp;-Leek-Stuffed Pork Tenderloin</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/cider_braised_lamb.html">Hard Cider-Braised Lamb Shanks</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/moms_apple_squares.html">Mom’s Apple Squares</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/chicken_apple_sausage.html">Chicken-Apple Sausage</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_apple_recipes">Healthy Apple Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/the_family_tree_celebrate_fall_with_a_trip_to_th#comments Nicci Micco September/October 2009 Healthy Cooking - Quick & Healthy Cooking Wed, 09 Sep 2009 16:20:25 +0000 Penelope Wall 14925 at http://www.eatingwell.com Trace Your Food http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/trace_your_food <p>It’s easy to know who grew your asparagus or picked your apples if you frequent the farmers’ market or are a CSA member. But when you shop at the supermarket, that connection is often lost.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Rachel Meltzer Warren, M.S. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> New technology makes it easier to trace food products from farm to table. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="413" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/tomatoes.jpg?1250889308" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/10_commandments_of_food_safety">10 Commandments of Food Safety</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/do_you_know_where_your_food_comes_from">Do You Know Where Your Food Comes From?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/food_safety_basics">Food Safety Basics</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/food_news_blog/how_safe_is_your_chicken_3_ways_to_eat_safe">How Safe Is Your Chicken? 3 Ways to Eat Safe</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/is_your_supper_safe">Is Your Supper Safe?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/green_choices_meat_poultry_buyer_s_guide">Green Choices: Meat &amp; Poultry Buyer’s Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/green_choices_produce_buyer_s_guide">Green Choices: Produce Buyer’s Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/green_choices_seafood_buyer_s_guide">Green Choices: Seafood Buyer’s Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/seasonal_local/farmers_markets/americas_top_farmers_markets">America&#039;s Top Farmers&#039; Markets</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/worried_about_tainted_food_3_ways_to_protect_yourself">Worried about tainted food? 3 ways to protect yourself</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>It’s easy to know who grew your asparagus or picked your apples if you frequent the farmers’ market or are a CSA member. But when you shop at the supermarket, that connection is often lost. </p> <p>Thanks to new technology, you can meet the farmers behind millions of food products on grocery store shelves—from Driscoll’s berries to Murray’s chickens to IKEA coffee. YottaMark is just one company offering an electronic tracking service—theirs is called HarvestMark—to food producers and suppliers. Here’s how it works: You pick up a tomato at the grocery store. When you get home to your computer, you can plug the unique code on the sticker into a website and—voilà!—everything you ever wanted to know about your tomato, shy of a new marinara recipe. You’ll learn when it was grown and who grew it (some brands even share photos and a farmer bio). If applicable, you’ll find information on organic certification and any food-safety recalls. </p> <p>These programs are potentially more than just a novel idea: they help to establish a national tracing system that could keep our food safer.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/green_sustainable/trace_your_food#comments Rachel Meltzer Warren, M.S. September/October 2009 Food News & Origins - Green & Sustainable Fri, 21 Aug 2009 21:15:42 +0000 Sarah Hoff 10290 at http://www.eatingwell.com Delish Catfish http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/delish_catfish <p>Joey Fonseca catches what are perhaps the sweetest, firmest, best-tasting catfish in America, catfish that have a creamy texture and a buttery flavor that begs not to be deep-fried. Known as the “wild catfisherman” of Bayou Des Allemands, Louisiana, Fonseca uses a technique developed by his father and uncles that is a more efficient way of harvesting catfish than traditional “noodling” (reaching underwater among cypress trees to hand-catch fish). He throws out a long line with buckets attached to it.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Kevin McCaffrey </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Environmentally friendly, inexpensive &amp; versatile, catfish is an easy choice for dinner any night. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="300" height="300" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/MF6985.JPG?1251470176" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/catfish_potato_hash.html">Catfish &amp; Potato Hash</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/black_bean_garlic_catfish.html">Black Bean-Garlic Catfish</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/catfish_etouff_e.html">Catfish Etouffée</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/louisiana_catfish_okra_corn.html">Louisiana Catfish with Okra &amp; Corn</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Joey fonseca catches what are perhaps the sweetest, firmest, best-tasting catfish in America, catfish that have a creamy texture and a buttery flavor that begs not to be deep-fried. Known as the “wild catfisherman” of Bayou Des Allemands, Louisiana, Fonseca uses a technique developed by his father and uncles that is a more efficient way of harvesting catfish than traditional “noodling” (reaching underwater among cypress trees to hand-catch fish). He throws out a long line with buckets attached to it. The female fish, which are attracted to small, tight spaces, lay eggs in the buckets and then swim away. The males go in to fertilize and guard the eggs, a natural technique Fonseca characterizes with a sly grin as “using sex for bait.” Then Fonseca hauls in the buckets and catches the males. Recently Fonseca was recognized by the Slow Food Ark of Taste because he’s part of a dying breed—one of the last wild catfishermen in the U.S.</p> <p>Chances are, if you’re not in New Orleans most of the catfish you’ll find at the supermarket is farmed. New catfish farming techniques have begun to produce milder-tasting catfish that has helped drive demand for the fish. Luckily U.S. farmed catfish is one of the most sustainable fish you can choose, according to the Monterey Bay Aquarium (mbayaq.org/cr/seafoodwatch.asp). Typically it’s farmed in closed ponds so there’s little chance the fish will escape and breed with or pass diseases on to native catfish populations. Plus they’re fed a mostly vegetarian diet, which means other fish populations aren’t being decimated in order to grow catfish.</p> <p>Fonseca’s favorite way to cook catfish? He dusts the fish with a pinch of Cajun spices, no flour. Then he heats a bit of olive oil in a skillet until it’s good and hot and he sizzles the fish until it’s golden-brown. We took inspiration from his simple preparation for our Cajun spiced catfish with roasted okra and corn. Once you try that you can move on to catfish étouffée, sautéed catfish with a black bean-garlic and scallion sauce or a quick catfish hash with grainy mustard and red peppers. Whether you head to the local supermarket for farmed catfish or maybe even catch one yourself, we can hook you up with great recipes. Just turn the page. </p> <p>Documentary filmmaker and James Beard Award finalist Kevin McCaffrey is working on a trilogy of films on Louisiana culinary culture.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/delish_catfish#comments Kevin McCaffrey September/October 2009 Healthy Cooking - Quick & Healthy Cooking Thu, 20 Aug 2009 20:38:31 +0000 Penelope Wall 10152 at http://www.eatingwell.com Is Your Supper Safe? http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/is_your_supper_safe <p>First, he goes onto the roof. It will be industrial: flat and expansive, likely covered in crushed gravel or a thin veneer of asphalt. The roofs he walks cap long, low, stolid buildings, often situated in the midst of vast expanses of near-nothingness. But that’s OK. He’s not here for the view. Indeed, he is looking toward the center of the roof, where a pair of huge, spiraling cones push into the sky. They are venting the air—and anything that rides in it—from the building’s interior. Sometimes, around bases of the vents, he’ll find detritus from the industry below.</p><div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Ben Hewitt </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> With recent outbreaks of E. coli in beef and salmonella in peanuts, sitting down to dinner may seem hazardous to your health. Can it really be so bad? EatingWell investigates. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="250" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/food_safety_630.jpg?1250800050" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/food_safety_310.jpg?1253024418" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Links: </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/10_commandments_of_food_safety">10 Commandments of Food Safety</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/how_do_we_make_our_food_supply_safer">How Do We Make Our Food Supply Safer?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/5_guests_you_never_want_to_have_for_dinner">5 Common Foodborne Bacteria to Avoid</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/food_news_origins/food_news/take_our_poll_how_well_do_you_follow_food_safety_rules">Take Our Poll: How Well Do You Follow Food Safety Rules?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>First, he goes onto the roof. It will be industrial: flat and expansive, likely covered in crushed gravel or a thin veneer of asphalt. The roofs he walks cap long, low, stolid buildings, often situated in the midst of vastexpanses of near-nothingness. But that’s OK. He’s not here for the view. Indeed, he is looking toward the center of the roof, where a pair of huge, spiraling cones push into the sky. They are venting the air—and anything that rides in it—from the building’s interior. Sometimes, around bases of the vents, he’ll find detritus from the industry below. At one facility where cheese was produced, it was powdered milk. Pigeons were gathered about, feeding on the bounty. Peck. Peck. Peckpeckpeckpeck. He knows birds carry salmonella and he is pretty certain he’s found the source of the bacteria he’s been called in to investigate. Once the contaminated milk powder gets kicked up by the wind, it will drift back down through the vents or, in a rainstorm, liquefy and drip through a leak in the roof. “In every factory, there’s a Bermuda Triangle, where everything comes together to create a source of contamination,” he tells me. “A lot of times, the Bermuda Triangle involves the roof.” </p> <p>Scott Donnelly is one of our country’s top experts in microbiological food operations. He is an independent contractor, hired by a privately owned company (which preferred not to be identified) that helps food manufacturers identify sources of contamination. From his home in Burlington, Vermont, Donnelly flies to Georgia, California, Texas, Louisiana. He inspects facilities that process peanuts, cereal, frozen pizza, cheese, ground beef and energy drinks. It is a job that, of late, has been particularly busy for him, as the industry grapples with the recent spotlight on food-related illnesses.</p> <h3>Good Food Gone Bad</h3> <p>Beef. Peanuts. Spinach. Pistachios. Cheese. Alfalfa sprouts. Bad news—and bacteria—seem to be lurking in every corner of our cupboards and refrigerators. And these are just the recalls that have made national headlines. In fact, a quick visit to recalls.gov, a federal website, reveals an alarming array of recalls: cheese tainted with listeria, curry spice contaminated with salmonella, ground beef infected with E. coli. Maybe that’s why, in a recent survey conducted by the American Society for Quality, 73 percent of respondents expressed concern over our country’s food-safety record. </p> <p>But should we all be concerned? According to the Centers for Disease Control, Americans suffer an estimated 76 million cases of foodborne illnesses every year, necessitating 325,000 hospitalizations and causing 5,000 deaths. Most experts agree that outbreaks are severely underreported. “For every one person counted, we’re probably missing nearly 40 others,” says Bill Marler, who describes himself as the “nation’s leading foodborne illness attorney.” This descriptor is probably fair: since 1993, when Marler represented victims of the nationwide E. coli outbreak that was traced to Jack-in-the-Box fast-food restaurants, the Seattle-based lawyer has secured over $500 million for his clients (and surely a pretty fair chunk for himself). “To be honest, I never thought I’d make a living out of this for this long. I assumed we’d catch on and fix the system. But even with all these outbreaks, nothing is structurally different. It’s like no one’s paying attention, except the people getting sick.” </p> <p>Fortunately, most people who eat contaminated food don’t become seriously ill. But the same contaminant that causes a stomachache in a healthy adult can be devastating to the elderly, anyone whose immune system is comprised by a condition like cancer, and the young. Elizabeth Armstrong is the mother of two sweet-faced daughters. Ashley is five; Isabella is seven. They live in Fishers, Indiana, a town of 66,000 just north of Indianapolis. Three years ago, in late August, the family sat down to a raw spinach salad that would change their lives forever. The spinach the Armstrongs ate looked and tasted like spinach is supposed to look and taste. But it carried Escherichia coli O157:H7, a tubular-shaped bacterium known to cause kidney failure, particularly in young children. Ashley and Isabella were about to become two of the first cases associated with the 2006 E. coli outbreak that would eventually be traced back to a 50-acre farm in San Benito County, California, where it’s now believed that wild pigs tracked contaminated manure from a nearby ranch to the spinach field. Before the outbreak was contained, three people would die, 31 would suffer kidney failure and at least 204 people in 26 states would be sickened.</p> <p>Within a week of eating that fateful salad, Isabella suffered a bout of diarrhea; as she began to recover, Ashley became sick. This time, there was blood in the stool. The Armstrongs didn’t know it yet, but their 2-year-old was in the early stages of hemolytic uremic syndrome: an interwoven mesh of blood platelets began clogging the latticework of capillaries in Ashley’s kidneys. A day later, she was hospitalized. Two days later, she started dialysis. Today, she survives on a severely restricted diet, six daily medications and weekly injections that coax her body into making red blood cells. In the next few years, likely before she becomes a teenager, she will require a kidney transplant. </p> <p>“Buying food in this country is truly just an act of faith,” says Elizabeth Armstrong. “People are naïve if they think the government is going to keep them safe.” In a sense, Armstrong is right, and to understand why, you need to understand how the safety of our food is ensured. Or how it is not ensured. </p> <h3>Who’s Responsible?</h3> <p>There are two governmental agencies tasked with monitoring and inspecting our food supply. The first is the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Through the agency’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), it oversees all domestic and imported meat, poultry and eggs. The other agency charged with keeping food safe is the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It’s responsible for the safety of our domestic and imported fruits, vegetables, seafood, dairy and grains, as well as processed foods. While the USDA puts an inspector in every single slaughterhouse, every single day, the FDA conducts inspections an average of every seven years. Only about 1 percent of the food showing up on our shores is examined for contaminants. That’s particularly alarming when you consider that 79 percent of our fish and shellfish is imported, along with 32 percent of our fruit and nuts and 13 percent of our vegetables. </p> <p>So, yes, buying food in the United States is an act of faith: faith in the grower, the processor, the wholesale distributor, the shipper and the retailer, because at each junction lies the potential for contamination, and at very, very few of these points are inspections happening. </p> <p>Yet most of our food is safe, and technology that kills E. coli, salmonella and other foodborne “bugs” is readily available. The USDA mandates pasteurization—the intense heat treatment that, back in the 1860s, French chemist Louis Pasteur discovered killed bacteria—for all milk that enters interstate commerce. Irradiation, or zapping food with tiny doses of radiation, is sometimes used to sterilize meals for hospital patients, and irradiated beef patties are available in supermarkets nationwide. In August 2008, the FDA ruled that iceberg lettuce and spinach could be irradiated too.</p> <p>If the spinach that Ashley Armstrong ate three years ago had been irradiated, would she have been spared the dialysis and intensive medical interventions that keep her alive today? Yes, says Douglas L. Archer, Ph.D., associate dean for research at the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences at the University of Florida in Gainesville. “But we don’t have the capacity to irradiate everything today. We just didn’t invest in those facilities.” Should our food industry be investing in the facilities? “Yes, but that’s me,” says Archer. “A lot of other people think it’s some kind of voodoo.” Indeed, many consumers view irradiation (and even pasteurization) with a great deal of skepticism, arguing that they are “unnatural” or, at the very least, unnecessary measures that compromise the taste and nutrition of farm-fresh foods. And even if irradiation might have prevented the illnesses and deaths associated with the E. coli-contaminated spinach, the technology doesn’t guarantee absolute immunity from foodborne illness. “We can’t just say, ‘OK, we’ll irradiate stuff and that will be the end of all problems,’” says Archer. “It just isn’t that simple.” No food is 100 percent safe. It was pasteurized milk—not “raw” milk—that carried the Listeria monocytogenes that was responsible for the three deaths and a stillbirth in Massachusetts in December 2007. (Health officials believe that the products were somehow contaminated after pasteurization.)</p> <h3>Multifarious Mishaps</h3> <p>Bill Marler believes there’s no single solution to the food-safety issue, because there’s no single cause. Is it a lack of good sanitation practices by the people who grow and pack your food? Yes. Is it a complex supply chain that creates numerous opportunities for bacteria to invade? Yes. (Even if slaughterhouses are pristine, can you trust the guy working the meat counter at the supermarket?) Is it, as the manufacturers of our foodstuffs would like to have us believe, our fault for improper handling of our dinner? Once in a while, perhaps, but usually not. Still, in Marler’s experience, one factor reigns supreme. “Ultimately, the problem with our food system is that it’s so industrialized, so centralized, that any little problem becomes amplified.” </p> <p>Consider the recall of 3,916 products containing peanuts sourced from the Peanut Corporation of America (PCA), which, before the largest food recall in American history forced it out of business last February, supplied peanuts to such food giants as Keebler and Trader Joe’s. It wasn’t just the nuts that had to be avoided; it was anything that contained even traces of the nuts. No surprise, then, that the salmonella-contaminated peanuts from PCA found their way to 46 states, sickening 714 (or, if Marler’s one-in-40 figure is correct, 28,560) and possibly contributing to nine deaths. The recall ultimately cost American peanut farmers and food manufacturers more than $1 billion in lost production and sales, as products were yanked from supermarket shelves and crops were allowed to wither in the fields. “This is going to sound kind of cold, but let’s forget about the human toll for a minute,” says Marler. “Wouldn’t you think that merely from an economic perspective, we’d be taking this more seriously?” </p> <p>Not everyone agrees that we’re not taking it seriously. “One of the reasons Americans are seeing so much coverage recently is because we are trying to get out in front of these problems,” says David Acheson, associate commissioner for foods at the FDA. “We are finding more because our monitoring is more sophisticated and our messages to the public are broad because the distribution system is so complex. We have to cast a wide net.” A recent study on food safety by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services shows why: only five of 40 products sampled could be traced to their raw-ingredient origins. The supply chain is simply too complex to know, with certainty, the genesis of most of our food, and this begets one of the principal hurdles in holding processors accountable. </p> <p>“The bottom line is that if you’re the CEO of a food company and you’re a betting person, you know the odds of an outbreak ever being conclusively linked to your company are minuscule,” says Marler. Too, the varying incubation periods of foodborne illnesses make it extremely difficult to pinpoint a particular meal. Think about how many different items you’ve eaten in the past two weeks, and then consider the hundreds, if not thousands, of ingredients, all funneling down the food-supply highway to your dinner table. Pinpointing which one of those is responsible for your upset tummy is needle-in-the-haystack work. </p> <p>Scott Donnelly agrees with Marler that some companies simply play the favorable odds: “The food industry runs on incredibly low margins. For most of these companies, it’s a struggle just to survive. Sure, some of them are truly committed to quality and they’re willing to do what it takes to keep their product safe. Others want to do the right thing, but may be constrained by what they can do, especially by the difficulty of properly training temporary workers. But still other manufacturers are saying, ‘Well, yeah, salmonella makes people sick, but most of them aren’t going to die.’ They’re either ignorant or unscrupulous, and I’m not sure which is worse.” </p> <h3>The Regulation Situation</h3> <p>In a sense, it doesn’t matter whether it’s ignorance or a lack of scruples on the behalf of the producer, because the truth is that in the current regulatory environment, both are allowed to persist and the end result is the same. </p> <p>“The FDA is basically asking the industry to ‘do a good job, please,’” explains Patty Lovera, assistant director at Food and Water Watch, a nonprofit consumer-advocacy organization that works to ensure safe, clean food and water in the U.S. “The FDA ends up doing a lot of recommending to the industry, when they should be doing enforcement.” It’s not really the agency’s fault, Lovera points out: “It’s just too easy to underfund the FDA’s efforts.” The funding that supports the FDA’s food-safety regulations is not written into law; it must be continually re-allocated. </p> <p>The USDA is somewhat better off, since the funding and policies that guide its food inspection have been cemented in law since the early 1900s. But times are changing, and Marler is quick to point out that the USDA isn’t changing with them. “Yes, it’s law that a USDA inspector has to visually inspect every carcass that comes through a slaughterhouse,” explains Marler. “But you have to ask yourself: does it do any good to be looking for things that can’t be seen with the human eye? This is a protocol that was implemented at a time when we weren’t even sure that germs caused disease. Maybe we should think about an upgrade.” In Marler’s view, this means changing the entire focus of the inspection process. “We shouldn’t be looking at the meat, but at the procedure,” he explains. “We have the technology and the thought process that allow us to create systems to reduce contamination. Our focus should be implementing and monitoring those systems, not staring at meat all day, looking for things that can’t be seen.” </p> <p>But inspectors do more than just look for invisible bacteria. The USDA requires every slaughterhouse and plant that produces raw, ground meat and poultry to design and implement a systematic risk-reduction procedure. These programs are called Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) systems. Basically, they are “structured thinking” about everything that might go wrong in the flow of production and what steps a plant will take to prevent these problems from actually occurring, says Douglas Archer. </p> <p>On top of HACCP, meat and poultry plants must conduct routine, random testing of their products for the presence of E. coli. “I think we know that getting a negative sample doesn’t necessarily make anything safe. There’s always another pound of meat coming on that might contain a ‘bug,’” says Archer. “But [the sampling yields] useful information because if things are horribly out of control, you do get to know that pretty quickly.”</p> <p>While HACCP-type plans currently are required on the federal level only for plants that produce meat, poultry, seafood and juice, some states and industry groups are establishing their own systems for keeping foods safer. For example, in 2007, California farmers, shippers and processors that handle leafy greens (including spinach, lettuce, kale and more) banded together to create the California Leafy Green Products Handler Marketing Agreement (LGMA). Operating with oversight from the California Department of Food and Agriculture, the LGMA is an audit program that ensures that its 118 member companies (which represent 99 percent of the California leafy greens on the market) are implementing science-based food-safety practices that protect against risks including animal intrusions (e.g., wild pigs), floods, keeping detailed records (of water use, soil testing, etc.) and enforcing safe sanitation practices. </p> <p>Similarly, Archer’s home state of Florida recently passed a rule requiring that tomato growers implement systematic risk-reduction practices. “I presume that the feds will be working on a similar one pretty quickly,” says Archer. He’s referring to the report that President Barack Obama’s newly established Food Safety Working Group released this past July. The Working Group’s recommendations call for improved handling procedures and enhanced monitoring efforts that will help to reduce salmonella in eggs and poultry and E. coli in beef and certain types of produce—leafy greens, melons and tomatoes. The group is also guiding the industry to establish product-tracing systems.</p> <p>Fundamentally changing such a large, politicized system will likely take years. Yet there’s one action that some people argue would immediately lead to safer food: a shift from the current model of centralized production, processing and distribution to localized food systems.</p> <h3>Is Local Food Safer?</h3> <p>The idea that eating closer to home can help make our food system safer isn’t just wishful locavore thinking. “Smaller-scale operations tend to provide a more direct producer-to-consumer relationship,” says Lovera of Food and Water Watch. “This makes traceback much shorter, and reduces the opportunities for the producer to shirk responsibility. And when outbreaks do happen, they affect fewer people.”</p> <p>Perhaps without realizing it, Lovera makes another important point: just because you can shake the hand of the farmer who raised your food doesn’t mean he won’t kill you. Buying local does not mean you’re automatically safe from salmonella or E. coli (a wild pig can do the same thing to a small farm as it can to a large one, says Archer). But it does assure a level of person-to-person accountability that’s absent from the industrial food chain. “The food industry is pretty much run by marketing people who’d just as soon sell you a pair of shoes or a carpet,” says Scott Donnelly. “They push for a reformulation that will appeal to consumers, but lack the technical knowledge to foresee the potential safety shortfalls. They don’t care if what you’re buying is safe or nutritious. They just care if you buy it.” </p> <p>That’s exactly why there’s been so much recent focus on legislation. President Obama has been urging Congress to modernize our food-safety laws and, indeed, the prevailing thinking on Capitol Hill seems to be if the food industry doesn’t care, we’ll pass the legislation that will force them to care. </p> <p>The first piece of food-safety legislation proposed in 2009 is the most ambitious. Introduced in February, H.R. 875: Food Safety Modernization Act of 2009 would unify the food inspection and regulation process under a single agency, called the Food Safety Administration. And it would mandate that administration to, among other things, enforce safety standards, establish an inspection program, strengthen and expand foodborne-illness surveillance systems, ensure that imported food meets the same standards as U.S. food and establish a traceability system.</p> <p>This all sounds well and good, but many people worry that increased regulation may threaten small-scale, regionalized producers. In other words, the very businesses we’re going to need to decentralize our food system. H.R. 875 seems to have lost momentum; most people are putting their chips on H.R. 2749: Food Safety Enhancement Act of 2009. </p> <p>The draft bill is 115 pages of nearly impenetrable legalese, but there’s little question it would place a burden on food producers and manufacturers, in the form of an annual registration fee ($500, to be adjusted for inflation), as well as increased record keeping. This is particularly problematic for small, low-margin producers, many of whom already operate on the fringe of profitability. “We’re going to need to decide where to draw the line between producers that need more regulation and those that would be unfairly burdened by it,” says Lovera, who sees pieces of the bill as a starting point and believes other pieces could use some refinement.</p> <p>Which begs the question: What else can we do? For one, we could start demanding that producers take responsibility for ensuring the safety of the foods they’re putting out into the marketplace. Under the current infrastructure, even if a company’s private testing reveals a problem, it is not required to alert, well, anyone. Will they do it voluntarily? The Peanut Corporation of America didn’t—and according to Marler, PCA isn’t the only company choosing to withhold such information. “I am personally aware of situations where companies are sitting on test results that show conclusively that they have contamination, even while there’s an inspector onsite who believes everything’s fine,” says Marler. “To say it’s crazy doesn’t really do it justice.” </p> <p>Perhaps cultivating honesty requires harsher repercussions for withholding information that can harm people. Not that anyone is calling for punishment on par with the death sentences handed down in China to the men who were implicated in last year’s melamine-in-milk scandal that killed at least six children and sickened another 300,000. In the United States, to date, no one has ever been jailed for contributing to death or illness related to contaminated foods.</p> <p>Or maybe the recent focus on the vulnerabilities of our food system is enough to spur some responsible companies to action: “Last year I was hired to do two risk assessments on a strictly proactive basis,” says Donnelly. “These companies weren’t required to do this, they simply wanted to be assured that they were doing everything they could to make their food products safe.”</p> <p>Regardless of what motivates it, change is likely to come slowly. And in the meantime, Ashley Armstrong waits patiently for the first kidney transplant of her young life. In the meantime, one-in-four Americans will suffer foodborne illness every year. In the meantime, you, the American food consumer, must bear the brunt of the responsibility for making your supper safe. And Scott Donnelly will still be walking around on rooftops, looking forward to the day he can come down. </p> <p>—Ben Hewitt is the author of The Town That Food Saved (Rodale), out next March.</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/food_news_origins/food_news/is_your_supper_safe#comments Ben Hewitt September/October 2009 Food News & Origins - Food News Thu, 20 Aug 2009 20:23:12 +0000 Penelope Wall 10149 at http://www.eatingwell.com Seeking Heirloom Beans http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/seeking_beans <div class="field field-type-text field-field-original-title"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Seeking Beans </div> </div> </div> <p>Rio zape was the first heirloom bean I tasted. Once it was cooked its dark purple zebra markings disappeared and it looked like a pinto bean, but its flavor was anything but ordinary. It tasted of earth, coffee and chocolate. The broth from cooking the beans, known as pot liquor, was even better: thick, rich and with the same hints of cocoa and café.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Steve Sando </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Come along in search of great heirloom beans and learn how to transform a pot of this humble ingredient into amazing meals. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-large"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_large" width="630" height="250" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/beans_dry_pile_630.jpg?1250796752" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-image-content"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><img alt="Steve Sando" src="/beta/sites/default/files/u6/steve_sando_310.jpg" align="left" border="0" hspace="" vspace="" /></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Tips and Bean Recipes </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/bean_cooking_guide">Bean Cooking Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/bean_broccoli_rabe_skillet_supper.html">One-Skillet Bean &amp; Broccoli Rabe Supper</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/bean_squash_tacos.html">Bean &amp; Butternut Tacos with Green Salsa</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/bean_guacamole_burgers.html">Bean Burgers with Spicy Guacamole</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/toasted_pita_bean_salad.html">Toasted Pita &amp; Bean Salad</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/zucchini_fennel_bean_pasta.html">Zucchini, Fennel &amp; White Bean Pasta</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes/bean_salmon_salad_with_anchovy_arugula_dressing.html">Bean &amp; Salmon Salad with Anchovy-Arugula Dressing</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/recipes/pot_of_beans.html">Pot of Beans</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_bean_recipes">Healthy Bean Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Rio zape was the first heirloom bean I tasted. Once it was cooked its dark purple zebra markings disappeared and it looked like a pinto bean, but its flavor was anything but ordinary. It tasted of earth, coffee and chocolate. The broth from cooking the beans, known as pot liquor, was even better: thick, rich and with the same hints of cocoa and café. </p> <p>That first bite of an heirloom bean tasted like something I knew, only better. Like my first taste of a Cherokee Purple or Brandywine tomato, this bean sent a flood of memory to my palate. Once I tasted a few more varieties of heirloom beans I was hooked, so I started seeking out rare varieties, growing them and saving the seeds. Now I travel all over the Americas looking for interesting and neglected beans to bring home and grow at my farm, Rancho Gordo in Napa. </p> <p><img alt="Steve Sando" src="/beta/sites/default/files/u6/steve_sando_310.jpg" class="left" border="0" hspace="" vspace="" />On a recent trip to Hidalgo in central Mexico, I met Maria. She’s typical of the growers I meet. “My father knew I wasn’t the prettiest of his daughters but I think I was his favorite. The other sisters married well but I got the beans!” Maria declared with a gleam in her eye. Her rebosero beans have been handed down from generation to generation. The bean, which has lacy lilac-colored markings reminiscent of a local rebozo, or shawl, hence the name rebosero, is rich and delicious. Maria has worked hard to cultivate her bean inheritance. Every year she hires a local tractor to till her field. After that, she does everything by hand, by herself. She sells this bean, along with some squash and dry field corn, at the local market, but she can only take 30 kilos with her because she makes the trip on foot. </p> <p>Soon after I met Maria she invited me for a meal. Maria’s home was simple and rustic, surrounded by a vegetable garden and a pen with her collection of turkeys, chickens and dogs. For lunch, she served a tripe stew, beans and tortillas. Since I was company, she also served a barbecued goat and brought out a bottle of cola. Normally she would simply eat beans, chiles, cactus paddles (nopales) and tortillas. I asked her about how she cooks beans and she said she always prepares them with just onions and garlic and perhaps a little oil. </p> <p>As I ate the beans in Maria’s kitchen, I kept thinking how odd it was that reboseros are barely known throughout the rest of Mexico and the world, let alone in Hidalgo, Maria’s home state. Beans are so ubiquitous in Mexico that they can be taken for granted. One of the foundations of the pre-Colombian diet along with chiles, corn and squash, beans are now coming from China and Michigan to Mexico. And the wonderful regional varieties are in danger of disappearing. </p> <p>When I visit Mexican markets looking for beans, vendors love to chime in when I ask questions about the more exotic ingredients like cactus paddles or greens that seem to be weeds. Oddly, when I start asking about what local beans they have, things go south. Usually it’s a dismissive, “We like pinto beans or sometimes black but mostly pintos.” Then I’ll spy an Indian farmer sitting on a mat with a large pile of some exotic beans and point to it. </p> <p>“What about this one? What bean is that?”</p> <p>“Oh, that’s just our local bean. You wouldn’t be interested in that!” she’ll respond.</p> <p>Of course it’s exactly what interests me. It’s hard for the Mexicans to understand why a chubby, middle-aged gringo would have any interest in beans. I tell them I’m looking for unusual beans and I get a blank stare back, but for just a moment. Then a flood of memories come out about how beloved this or that bean was and how grandmother lovingly made beans in a clay pot. </p> <p>When I get home from my bean hunts you might think I’d had enough. But no. I usually put a big pot of runner cannellinis or anasazis on to simmer (see page 81 for more on bean varieties). Once the beans are done I have enough for several meals and I use them in tacos or salads like the recipes on the following pages. But my favorite way to eat them may just be on their own. When the beans are first done I like to eat a bowlful with a little of the pot liquor, maybe with a bit of grated onion on top or a squeeze of lime stirred in. And I feel like the luckiest guy on the planet.</p> <p>Steve Sando lives and farms in Napa Valley, California. He is the co-author of Heirloom Beans (Chronicle Books, 2008).</p> <p>Photo Credit: Lassa Skinner</p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/quick_healthy_cooking/food_features/seeking_beans#comments Steve Sando September/October 2009 Healthy Cooking - Quick & Healthy Cooking Thu, 20 Aug 2009 19:30:14 +0000 Penelope Wall 10138 at http://www.eatingwell.com Is Stevia Safe? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_stevia_safe <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="310" height="310" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/stevia_310_0.jpg?1253629414" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Is Stevia Safe?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This year, a few noncaloric sweeteners made from an extract of the Stevia rebaudiana plant arrived on grocery-store shelves. The stevia plant has a long history of use as a sweetener in South America. These new sweeteners—sold under brand names like Truvia and PureVia—include a highly purified extract of stevia called Rebaudioside A (a.k.a. Rebiana or Reb A). Reb A is 200 times sweeter than sugar and does not raise blood sugar. </p> <p>Until December 2008, stevia and its derivatives could be sold in the U.S. only as dietary supplements, due to safety concerns. In the 1980s, animal studies linked stevia with adverse effects on fertility and reproductive development and possible genetic mutations. But in 2008, the makers of Truvia and PureVia submitted research to the Food and Drug Administration regarding Reb A’s safety and petitioned for it to become a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) ingredient. </p> <p>The FDA affirmed the GRAS status, but did not change the previous ruling on stevia. “Reb A is different than whole-leaf stevia or [other] stevia extracts, which can only be sold as dietary supplements,” says FDA spokesperson Michael Herndon. “Nobody has provided the FDA with evidence that whole-leaf stevia is safe.”</p> <p>The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), a consumer advocacy group, believes that the Reb A’s GRAS status was granted prematurely. “In the past, FDA protocol required repeated testing in two separate animal species prior to approval, but in this case it didn’t,” says David Schardt, nutrition expert with CSPI. “We are not warning people to avoid Reb A, but the public should be aware that the FDA did not follow all the usual safeguards.” </p> <p><strong>Bottom Line:</strong> The FDA considers Reb A a safe sugar substitute, but has not approved other forms of stevia. If you want to use stevia, we suggest sticking with Reb A (look for it on the ingredient label).</p> <h3><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/free_downloads/best_healthy_dessert_recipes">Download a Free Cookbook with Our Best Healthy Dessert Recipes!</a></h3> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/a_buyers_guide_to_sugar_substitutes">A Buyer&#039;s Guide to Sugar Substitutes</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/whats_so_bad_about_high_fructose_corn_syrup">What&#039;s So Bad About High Fructose Corn Syrup?</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/blogs/diet_blog/is_high_fructose_corn_syrup_making_you_fat">Is high-fructose corn syrup making you fat?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/blogs/health_blog/is_agave_nectar_healthier_than_sugar_or_other_sweeteners">Is agave nectar healthier than sugar or other sweeteners?</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> September/October 2009 </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_stevia_safe#comments Sylvia Geiger, M.S., R.D. September/October 2009 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Thu, 20 Aug 2009 16:34:21 +0000 Penelope Wall 9909 at http://www.eatingwell.com