Barbara Ganley http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/1179/all en It Might Be Snowing, But the Garden Stirs http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_08/it_might_be_snowing_but_the_garden_stirs <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_08/it_might_be_snowing_but_the_garden_stirs" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/salad_greens_3.jpg" alt="It Might Be Snowing, But the Garden Stirs Blog Post" title="It Might Be Snowing, But the Garden Stirs Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>It has something to do with the light, the quality of it, the height of the sun at midday, the edging toward the equinox, the headiness of spring-just-around-the-corner. Painters like Kate can finally work deep into the afternoon. Cyclists start tuning up their bicycles. Gardeners get itchy. They order their seeds; they prowl the local garden centers, perusing the new varieties and bringing home those lovely seed packets that will stare at them for a couple of months.</p></div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_08/it_might_be_snowing_but_the_garden_stirs#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Fri, 21 Oct 2011 14:57:20 +0000 Penelope Wall 18027 at http://www.eatingwell.com Celebrating Radicchio http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_21/celebrating_radicchio <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_21/celebrating_radicchio" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/radicchio_0.jpg" alt="Celebrating Radicchio Blog Post" title="Celebrating Radicchio Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>In the depths of winter, I'll succumb to temptation and buy a small burgundy head of chioggia radicchio at our local natural foods cooperative. I'm shocked at the price of a green that in my experience couldn't be easier to grow. Perhaps people think that because of its high price it must be challenging to grow. Or perhaps they don't think they like its slightly bitter note when served raw. Perhaps they've never tasted how delicious it is when picked young and <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/grilled_steak_with_beets_radicchio.html">grilled</a> or roasted or sautéed.</p></div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_21/celebrating_radicchio#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Thu, 20 Oct 2011 20:49:44 +0000 Penelope Wall 18024 at http://www.eatingwell.com Planting a Healthy Juice Bed http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_23/planting_a_healthy_juice_bed <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_23/planting_a_healthy_juice_bed" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/planting_juice_garden.jpg" alt="Planting a Healthy Juice Bed Blog Post" title="Planting a Healthy Juice Bed Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>March in Vermont this year has meant snow piling up and drifting, drifting and piling up. As Kate points out in yesterday's post, we've had one warm day the entire month thus far. But as she also says, the thick white blanket doesn't reveal what's happening beneath the skin of earth and tree, bush and branch. Sap runs in fits and bursts, buds stir in their pre-swelling-almost-out-of-dormancy state. Kate's maple syrup pan steams happily away on her woodstove. Both of our grow-lights shelter and warm new seedlings.</p></div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_23/planting_a_healthy_juice_bed#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Thu, 20 Oct 2011 16:31:09 +0000 Penelope Wall 18017 at http://www.eatingwell.com Garden Tunnels: Because I cannot wait... http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_25/garden_tunnels_because_i_cannot_wait <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_25/garden_tunnels_because_i_cannot_wait" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/garden_tunnels.jpg" alt="Garden Tunnels: Because I cannot wait... Blog Post" title="Garden Tunnels: Because I cannot wait... Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>The spring sure is taking its sweet time this year in Vermont. The birds are back, the light is lifting, yet the cold still sinks its teeth into the soil. I'm not one to be kept out of my garden, however, and I want to serve salads that I've grown as soon as possible. I have no greenhouse, but I do have inexpensive, make-it-myself tunnels thanks to my husband's wonderful ingenuity. Using electrical conduit and heavy-weight row covers, we have constructed our own little system of season extenders.</p> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_25/garden_tunnels_because_i_cannot_wait#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Thu, 20 Oct 2011 16:26:15 +0000 Penelope Wall 18016 at http://www.eatingwell.com It's Too Early to Hanker after Tomatoes http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_27/its_too_early_to_hanker_after_tomatoes <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_27/its_too_early_to_hanker_after_tomatoes" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/tomatoes_3.jpg" alt="It&amp;#039;s Too Early to Hanker after Tomatoes Blog Post" title="It&amp;#039;s Too Early to Hanker after Tomatoes Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>Blame it on EatingWell Magazine that I just ordered seeds for five more varieties of heirloom tomatoes. That’s on top of the four I already have–and considering that only two of us live here anymore, we’re in danger of serious tomato overload.</p> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_27/its_too_early_to_hanker_after_tomatoes#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Thu, 20 Oct 2011 14:52:10 +0000 Penelope Wall 18014 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Kale Question http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_29/the_kale_question <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_29/the_kale_question" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/kale_4.jpg" alt="The Kale Question Blog Post" title="The Kale Question Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>I just planted them in unmarked flats under the far, low grow-light, way out of the way. In another few weeks I’ll transplant the hardy, cool-loving seedlings into unobtrusive garden corners, keeping them undercover for as long as possible. It’s for their own good.</p> <p>But it’s inevitable. Sooner or later the kale will be discovered.</p> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_29/the_kale_question#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Wed, 19 Oct 2011 20:42:42 +0000 Penelope Wall 18012 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Onions Are Growing Fast! http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_31/the_onions_are_growing_fast <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_31/the_onions_are_growing_fast" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/onions_growing.jpg" alt="The Onions Are Growing Fast! Blog Post" title="The Onions Are Growing Fast! Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>You can never grow too many onions. No matter how many I grow–and I grow a lot–I always start running out of them by now. Indeed, I can mark the growing calendar by the number of onions hanging from my rafters, and now it’s telling me to plant some, a lot, many more than last year’s couple hundred!</p> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_03_31/the_onions_are_growing_fast#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Wed, 19 Oct 2011 13:42:20 +0000 Penelope Wall 18006 at http://www.eatingwell.com Growing Lemongrass http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_03/growing_lemongrass <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_03/growing_lemongrass" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/growing_lemongrass.jpg" alt="Growing Lemongrass Blog Post" title="Growing Lemongrass Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>I’m heading down into the basement to check on the lemongrass. A couple dozen seedlings, some started from seed, some by root divisions. And then I’ll come back up to the kitchen and make some delicious <a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/thai_chicken_coconut_soup.html">lemongrass-coconut chicken soup</a> using broth I made and froze last fall.</p> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_03/growing_lemongrass#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Wed, 19 Oct 2011 13:32:17 +0000 Penelope Wall 18004 at http://www.eatingwell.com Growing Artichokes http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_05/growing_artichokes <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_05/growing_artichokes" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/growing_artichokes.jpg" alt="Growing Artichokes Blog Post" title="Growing Artichokes Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>The first organic artichokes are in the market here in Vermont--from California. I was tempted to buy a couple, but they are expensive and look a little battered. Before I grew them myself, I was at the mercy of the the stores and the shipping system. Artichokes were usually disappointing unless I ate them in Italy or California--there they taste sublime. The past few years I have grown them and here in Vermont have the pleasure of the incomparable taste of one of these flower buds just picked.</p> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_05/growing_artichokes#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Wed, 19 Oct 2011 13:06:15 +0000 Penelope Wall 18001 at http://www.eatingwell.com The Appeal of the Season's Firsts: Time to Think, Time to Appreciate http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_08/the_appeal_of_the_seasons_firsts_time_to_think_time_to_appreciate <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_08/the_appeal_of_the_seasons_firsts_time_to_think_time_to_appreciate" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/seasons_firsts.jpg" alt="The Appeal of the Season&amp;#039;s Firsts: Time to Think, Time to Appreciate Blog Post" title="The Appeal of the Season&amp;#039;s Firsts: Time to Think, Time to Appreciate Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>I trust some of you are deep into spring by now. I sure hope so. We're not. Yet. This slow start to spring in Vermont tries a gardener's patience, but it 's not all bad. Really. The maple syrup makers have more time at their sweet art, and I have more time to plan the gardens, to put up the tunnels over the beds, clean up from winter's winds before the wild rumpus of late spring begins. I can get some more long-season planting done in the basement (right now I'm panting melons, squash, that great tomato Hilary told me about and flowers under the lights). That's good.</p> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_08/the_appeal_of_the_seasons_firsts_time_to_think_time_to_appreciate#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Tue, 18 Oct 2011 21:49:54 +0000 Penelope Wall 17999 at http://www.eatingwell.com Three Flowers to Grow for More Than Their Good Looks http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_14/three_flowers_to_grow_for_more_than_their_good_looks <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_14/three_flowers_to_grow_for_more_than_their_good_looks" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/edible_flowers2.jpg" alt="Three Flowers to Grow for More Than Their Good Looks Blog Post" title="Three Flowers to Grow for More Than Their Good Looks Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>Some people like to keep their flowers and veggies separate, each to its own garden--pretty here, useful there. Not me. I like to mix things up, interrupt all that lovely green of the productive vegetable bed with a burst of salmon poppies and old-fashioned hollyhocks. Who says a vegetable garden can't be as becoming as a flower bed?</p> <p>But there are more reasons to grow flowers in the vegetable garden. Some are highly nutritious in their blossom state, easy-to grow and good-looking! What's more, they bloom over the course of the full summer. What's not to love about that?</p> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_14/three_flowers_to_grow_for_more_than_their_good_looks#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Tue, 18 Oct 2011 21:41:39 +0000 Penelope Wall 17997 at http://www.eatingwell.com Got Garden Questions? Ask the Garden Coaches! http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_18/got_garden_questions_ask_the_garden_coaches <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_18/got_garden_questions_ask_the_garden_coaches" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/garden_coaches.jpg" alt="Got Garden Questions? Ask the Garden Coaches! Blog Post" title="Got Garden Questions? Ask the Garden Coaches! Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>Whether you're a dedicated container gardener, a first-timer or a serious gardener, we're here to be your Garden Coaches and answer your gardening questions. We're both long-time home gardeners--Kate on a small in-town lot and Barbara on 70 acres in the country. Kate, a painter, thinks about the beauty of her plot and the meditative aspect of tending to it as she walks through the garden every day on her way to her studio as well as the huge benefits her family receives from eating fresh vegetables straight from the garden.</p> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_18/got_garden_questions_ask_the_garden_coaches#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Tue, 18 Oct 2011 21:38:04 +0000 Penelope Wall 17996 at http://www.eatingwell.com Not All Broccoli Is Created Equal: How Do You Plan for Your Garden Vegetables' Nutrients? http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_20/not_all_broccoli_is_created_equal_how_do_you_plan_for_your_garden_ve <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_20/not_all_broccoli_is_created_equal_how_do_you_plan_for_your_garden_ve" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/raised_beds.jpg" alt="Not All Broccoli Is Created Equal: How Do You Plan for Your Garden Vegetables&amp;#039; Nutrients? Blog Post" title="Not All Broccoli Is Created Equal: How Do You Plan for Your Garden Vegetables&amp;#039; Nutrients? Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>And I thought raised beds were the way to go...</p> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_20/not_all_broccoli_is_created_equal_how_do_you_plan_for_your_garden_ve#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Tue, 18 Oct 2011 21:28:10 +0000 Penelope Wall 17995 at http://www.eatingwell.com What's growing in your garden at the end of April? http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_28/whats_growing_in_your_garden_at_the_end_of_april <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_28/whats_growing_in_your_garden_at_the_end_of_april" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/april_garden.jpg" alt="What&amp;#039;s growing in your garden at the end of April? Blog Post" title="What&amp;#039;s growing in your garden at the end of April? Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>In spite of this misery of rain that has battered us this month (the rainiest April on record here), I'm pleased to say that in addition to the perennials awakening out in the vegetable beds, and the transplants growing away under their snug tunnels, seeds I planted last week are up: peas and favas, spinach, arugula, calendula, mistincanza, chervil, and lettuce! This moment of the garden bursting with new green (through the mist and wind) fills me with joy more than even the sweet daffodils do (though they're wonderful, too).</p> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_04_28/whats_growing_in_your_garden_at_the_end_of_april#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Tue, 18 Oct 2011 21:08:39 +0000 Penelope Wall 17993 at http://www.eatingwell.com Surprises in the Spring Garden--Any to Report? http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_05_05/surprises_in_the_spring_garden_any_to_report <div><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_05_05/surprises_in_the_spring_garden_any_to_report" target="_blank"><img src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/148_148/cherry_tree.jpg" alt="Surprises in the Spring Garden--Any to Report? Blog Post" title="Surprises in the Spring Garden--Any to Report? Blog Post" border="0" width="148" height="148"/></a></div> <div><p>Thank goodness for the little surprises of the spring garden--with this relentless rain and the resulting muddy mess, especially in the potato bed,a gardener needs something to cheer about. Really, I'm a bit worried about the potatoes rotting out there before they break ground--they've had one dry, sunny day in the past week. I may have to replant them, something I've never had to do in all the years I've grown potatoes. But I've come to expect surprises--of the disappointing sort and, fortunately, of the happy sort, too.</p> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/blogs/barbara_ganley/2011_05_05/surprises_in_the_spring_garden_any_to_report#comments Barbara Ganley Gardening Tue, 18 Oct 2011 21:02:58 +0000 Penelope Wall 17991 at http://www.eatingwell.com