Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D. http://www.eatingwell.com/taxonomy/term/1052/all en Is Canned Tuna Safe? http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_canned_tuna_safe <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-image-standard"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <img class="imagefield imagefield-field_image_standard" width="308" height="308" alt="" src="http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/canned_tuna_308.jpg?1265996221" /> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-question"> <div class="field-label">Question:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>I heard a report that canned light tuna isn’t safe. Is this true?</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-answer"> <div class="field-label">Answer:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>When Consumer Reports found recently that 6% of the canned light tuna samples it analyzed had as much mercury as the average can of albacore, some people were concerned. What many didn’t take into account was that most of the light tuna tested had one-third of the mercury content of the average can of albacore, and also that the dose of mercury in most fish is too small to harm anyone but a young child or a fetus.</p> <p><strong><em><a href="http://www.eatingwell.com/node/10176?section=comments#tabs">Join the conversation: Do You Eat Canned Tuna?</a></em></strong></p> <p>In 2004, the FDA recommended that young children and women of childbearing age eat up to 12 ounces of lower-mercury fish a week (including canned light tuna, shrimp and scallops), limit their consumption of higher-mercury albacore tuna to 6 ounces per week and totally avoid high-mercury shark, swordfish, king mackerel and tile fish. The intent was to help them maximize intake of omega-3 fatty acids (which are critical to a baby’s brain development) and minimize exposure to mercury (which may thwart healthy growth of the nervous system).</p> <p>Emily Oken, M.D., M.P.H., has studied both sides of this issue. Her 2005 study in Environmental Health Perspectives linked lower infant cognition with both higher levels of mercury and a lower intake of fish during pregnancy. Oken emphasizes that if a pregnant woman chooses to avoid tuna, she should replace it with other sources of omega-3 fats (salmon, sardines, anchovies, DHA-fortified eggs). Oken, who currently is breastfeeding a seven-month-old, continues to eat light tuna—and to feed it to her 2 1/2-year-old.</p> <p>Our bottom Line: There’s no scientific evidence that mercury in the fish we eat causes any adverse effects in adults. In fact, not eating fish is a far bigger gamble: “Fish protects against stroke and heart disease—two really big killers,” says Josh Cohen, Ph.D., instructor at The Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies at Tufts New England Medical Center.</p> </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related-group-1"><legend>Related Content Group 1</legend><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Related Articles </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-label">Related Links 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/nutrition_health/heart_health/are_all_fish_good_for_your_heart">Are All Fish Good for Your Heart?</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101/shopping_cooking_guides/green_choices_seafood_buyer_s_guide">Green Choices: Seafood Buyer’s Guide</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_seafood_recipes">Healthy Seafood Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> October/November 2006 </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/is_canned_tuna_safe#comments Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D. October/November 2006 Recipes & Menus - Seafood Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Fri, 21 Aug 2009 14:23:30 +0000 Nifer 10176 at http://www.eatingwell.com Take a Pass on Gas http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/take_a_pass_on_gas <p>It’s true. Beans, beans, are good for the heart. The rest of that silly childhood poem is unfortunately true too. And not just with beans, but also cabbage, onions, apples, and many other fruits and vegetables loaded with the vitamins, minerals, fibers and phytochemicals we’re all urged to get more of. So what can we do to bypass the gas, short of giving up some of nature’s most nourishing foods? A few cooking and lifestyle changes can go a long way, say experts.</p> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-author"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-subtitle"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Avoiding the embarrassing side of healthy eating. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-content-taxonomy field-field-publication"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> December 2005/January 2006 </div> </div> </div> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-related1"><div class="field field-type-text field-field-relatedtitle1"> <div class="field-label">Related Content Title 1:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Also of Interest </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-relatedlinks1"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/healthy_bean_recipes">Healthy Bean Recipes and Cooking Tips</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/averting_a_gas_crisis">Averting a Gas Crisis</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/recipes_menus/collections/digestive_health_recipes">Digestive Health Recipes and Menus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-body"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>It’s true. Beans, beans, are good for the heart. The rest of that silly childhood poem is unfortunately true too. And not just with beans, but also cabbage, onions, apples, and many other fruits and vegetables loaded with the vitamins, minerals, fibers and phytochemicals we’re all urged to get more of. So what can we do to bypass the gas, short of giving up some of nature’s most nourishing foods? A few cooking and lifestyle changes can go a long way, say experts.</p> <p>According to Karen Collins, R.D., nutrition advisor for the American Institute for Cancer Research, many people suffer gas because their digestive tracts aren’t used to a high-fiber diet—and avoiding fibrous foods like beans, broccoli and salads just worsens the problem. Rather than steering clear of the offending foods, advises Collins, gradually add them in, giving the body time to adapt. “It’s important not to make the jump overnight. The body can’t handle a dramatic makeover.” Add one daily serving of high-fiber foods each week, she advises, aiming for a goal of 7 to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables daily and several servings of beans weekly.</p> <p>What causes the noxious vapors, anyway? It begins when carbohydrate is not completely digested by the army of enzymes in the small intestine. Once the undigested sugars, starches and fibers reach the large intestine, friendly bacteria break down and ferment them—giving off gas in the process.</p> <p>Increasing your fiber intake not only helps your intestinal bacteria adapt, but it also moves food and waste through your intestines faster. The quicker the transit, the better, says Collins. “The longer food sits there, the longer the bacteria act on it,” she explains—which translates to more gas production.</p> <p>To help speed foods through your GI tract, stay regularly active and drink plenty of fluids, adds Collins. That’s good advice to heed, no matter what’s in the air.<br /> <em>—Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D., C.D.E.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/take_a_pass_on_gas#comments Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D. December 2005/January 2006 Diet, Nutrition & Health - Nutrition News & Information Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:39:05 +0000 Sarah Hoff 9588 at http://www.eatingwell.com