At Nashville’s Cheekwood Harvest, you don’t just pick pumpkins—you go inside a house made of them.

September 17, 2019
Alison Miksch

This story originally appeared on southernliving.com by Maggie Burch.

Fall has been a bit slow to arrive for most of us in the South, but now that it’s finally here, we are in full autumnal celebration mode. Something about the crisp mornings and changing leaves just makes us feel the need to put on our favorite fall boots, find some pumpkins, and drink a cup of hot cider. If you happen to be near Nashville, there’s no better place to do that than at Cheekwood Estate and Gardens’ annual fall festival, Cheekwood Harvest.

Related: This Haunted Winery Tour Is Sure to Put You in the Fall Spirit

The star of this year’s Cheekwood Harvest is undoubtedly the new pumpkin house—an adorable house made of pumpkins that you can walk through. The beautiful structure is an impressive 11 feet tall and contains 800 pumpkins. Here’s how they brought it to life:

Alison Miksch

Cheekwood’s team enlisted a local craftsman to construct the frame of the house, and then each pumpkin was placed on a basketball hoop-like slot. The entire assembly process took 10 garden technicians 12 hours to complete. Take a look at a time lapse video of the process below:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BoMbd4ZA9Da/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

Alison Miksch

The pumpkin house has been a super popular attraction at the festival this year, giving visitors the perfect backdrop for photos.

Alison Miksch

The impressive pumpkin house and patch is far from the only display of fall colors at Cheekwood right now. The gardens are accented with over 5,000 mums in rich autumn hues and creative scarecrows designed by members of the community have been placed around the grounds. On the weekends, there’s a beer garden with food and drinks to enjoy.

Alison Miksch

Cheekwood Harvest has been happening since the end of September, and they just announced that it would be extended to continue through the end of October. So hurry this weekend to see the impressive pumpkin house one last time before Halloween.

This article originally appeared on southernliving.com

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