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Whole-Wheat Irish Soda Bread

April/May 2005, The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005)

Your rating: None Average: 3.9 (101 votes)

Soda breads are hearty Irish staples - wholemeal flour with large flakes of bran and wheat germ, or white flour or a mixture leavened with baking soda and moistened with buttermilk. The acid in the buttermilk reacts with the baking soda, which is an alkali, creating bubbles of carbon dioxide which rise the bread. Soda breads have the heft of a yeast bread but are made in minutes and the dough can be shaped into scones or a round loaf, depending on the occasion. Originally it would have been baked in a bastible (pot oven) over the open fire.



READER'S COMMENT:
"I love this bread. I use it mostly for toast and with soup meals. It is easy to make, hearty and healthy. "
Whole-Wheat Irish Soda Bread

22 Reviews for Whole-Wheat Irish Soda Bread

09/28/2009
Anonymous

This recipes looks just about right for genuine Irish Brown Bread (not soda bread). There is a difference between brown bread and soda bread. Brown bread is a healthy dense bread, eaten with meals - most prominently breakfast. It is not supposed to have "flavour". Soda bread is usually made with white flour and when raisins are added, is eaten as a "sweet" or a dessert. Brown broad can have egg added to the mixture for added protein, and if used, less milk will be needed.

Maggie, Athlone, IR

Comments
09/28/2009
Anonymous

The recipe I use calls for 1 cup currants, 2 tsps. caraway seeds, and 2 tsps. orange rind, and 1/4 cup Irish whiskey. It is delicious. This one looks pretty bland.

amurphygirl, Sacramento, CA

Comments
09/28/2009
Anonymous

While not historically accurate, "traditionally," my Irish American family has always added raisins or currents or some other dried fruit to the batter. This tends to add some more flavor, and makes it more scone-like.

Anonymous, Boston, MA

Comments
09/28/2009
Anonymous

loved it! I thought it had all the components of Irish Soda Bread I've had in restaurants (this was my first venture actually making it myself): texture, mouth feel, flavor. It was great--and gave no indication that it was a healthier version of the original. However, I did not use all of the liquid as the dough was plenty moist after 1 3/4 cup buttermilk and only baked it for 35 minutes, not the full 50, even after reducing the heat.

Abbie, Peoria Heights, IL

Comments
09/28/2009
Anonymous

It was a bit floury tasting to me. I think it is really good otherwise - I just wish it had a bit more a flavor - but the texture is good and it is good toasted with butter and honey.

Ashley, Alabaster, AL

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