Advertisement

Tuscan-Style Tuna Salad

April/May 2005, The EatingWell Healthy in a Hurry Cookbook (2006)

Your rating: None Average: 4.1 (320 votes)

This streamlined version of a northern Italian idea is perfect for a summer evening: no-fuss, no-cook and big taste. You can even make it ahead and store it, covered, in the refrigerator for several days. If you do, use it as a wrap filling for the next day's lunch.



READER'S COMMENT:
"This is also beautiful and tasty made with salmon and red kidney beans. Try using fresh fennel in the salad or minced tarragon for added flavor. "
Tuscan-Style Tuna Salad

37 Reviews for Tuscan-Style Tuna Salad

09/04/2010
Anonymous

I've not made this yet, but white beans/tuna is one of my most favorite combos. I love to throw them together with kale for a great pasta topping. I'll add dried rosemary and/or dried oregano when I make this yummy lunch!

Comments
09/02/2010
Anonymous

Love that this doesn't use fatning mayo. A great light lunch. Maybe even good on crackers!! What about Hummus as a spread on the bread before the tuna salad goes on. Surprised no one mentioned that yet!!

Comments
08/16/2010
Anonymous

Great recipe to make with the kids! I used albacore instead of chunk tuna, zested the lemon and used that along with the lemon juice it called for. I used 2 scallions instead of 4 and added a pinch of thyme and a bit more salt. It turned out great. We had it in wheat flatbreads with some romaine to add some crunch and had a few olives on the side. The only complaint was that the northern beans were a little mealy. Maybe cutting them back a bit or using the cannelini beans it suggested would help this. All-in-all, it was a great, quick summer meal!

Comments
08/02/2010
Anonymous

quite tasty!

Comments
07/26/2010
Anonymous

its very good one and we can add new item for people who love spicy food , this item is Chili "grean paper"

zeina

Comments

Fields marked with * are required

Rate This*

Review Title

Tip: Use adjectives to help get your point across.

Pros

Tip: Use commas to separate pros and cons.

Cons

Tip: Use commas to separate pros and cons.

Description*

Tip: Pretend you're on the debate team and make your point.

Attach a photo

Photo Caption

If you attach a photo, please enter a caption to go with it.

Would you recommend this recipe?

Get a full year of EatingWell magazine.
World Wide Web Health Award Winner Web Award Winner World Wide Web Health Award Winner Interactive Media Award Winner