Advertisement

Sweet & Savory Beef Stew

September/October 2008

Your rating: None Average: 4.3 (50 votes)

This beef stew for two replicates the flavors in tzimmes, a sweet stew traditionally served at Rosh Hashanah to start the New Year. This version gets natural sweetness from cherries and butternut squash.



READER'S COMMENT:
"This was a great recipe. There was no butternut squash at my market, so I used yellow squash. I also used dried cranberries because they were cheaper. The result was delicious!! I loved it so much that I am probably going to make it again...
Sweet & Savory Beef Stew

9 Reviews for Sweet & Savory Beef Stew

10/21/2011
Really Easy & Tasty!

This was a really easy recipe. I dont like dried fruit (cranberries or cherries) in my food so I left that out. It was still an excellent dish. I did add garlic, potatoes and a little more beef broth which made it nice and thick. Will cook this again!

Simple, Filling, Healthy
Comments
11/20/2010

This was a great recipe. There was no butternut squash at my market, so I used yellow squash. I also used dried cranberries because they were cheaper. The result was delicious!! I loved it so much that I am probably going to make it again for my boyfriend.

The only thing is that it does take two hours to make, so this is a perfect recipe for the weekend and not during the week.

Comments
11/08/2010

This seemed like a good idea, but was a little sweet for me. I think in the future I might substitute half the squash for diced potato, and I think cranberries would definitely be better than cherries.
The beef turned out really well though, and the spice was great - I didn't have thyme so I used 1 teaspoon Sage and a dash of oregano instead.

Comments
03/26/2010
Anonymous

Didn't have sage, so I used an Herbes de Provence blend (rosemary, fennel, thyme, savory, tarragon...), and I also substituted dried cranberries for the cherries. It was great!

Comments

Fields marked with * are required

Rate This*

Review Title

Tip: Use adjectives to help get your point across.

Pros

Tip: Use commas to separate pros and cons.

Cons

Tip: Use commas to separate pros and cons.

Description*

Tip: Pretend you're on the debate team and make your point.

Attach a photo

Photo Caption

If you attach a photo, please enter a caption to go with it.

Would you recommend this recipe?

Get a full year of EatingWell magazine.
World Wide Web Health Award Winner Web Award Winner World Wide Web Health Award Winner Interactive Media Award Winner