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Spiral Stuffed Turkey Breast with Cider Gravy

Fall 2003, The Essential EatingWell Cookbook (2004)

Your rating: None Average: 3.9 (30 votes)

When a whole bird is just too much--time and effort, as well as size--there is a quicker, simpler way: what's known in French cuisine as a roulade. Using a boneless turkey breast, butterflied and flattened, you can serve a beautiful spiral of juicy meat.


Spiral Stuffed Turkey Breast with Cider Gravy Recipe

3 Reviews for Spiral Stuffed Turkey Breast with Cider Gravy

01/01/2013
Delicious recipe for a streamlined turkey dinner

I've used this recipe a number of times, now, (sometimes changing up the stuffing or the braising liquid), and it has always been a winner. I don't oil the pan for searing/browning the roulade, I always oil the meat. Less chance of a smoke-filled kitchen that way.

I suspect that user kelley6452, who had temperature issues, may have been reading a celsius number (77 C) which is around 170 F. Some thermometers have dual settings, and you need to check which one you are using. I cannot imagine, if the above recipe was followed accurately (and the oven temperature was "true"), that an internal temp of only 77F is possible after an hour of cooking. Do please try it again!

healthy, 3 dishes-in-1
Comments
12/26/2010
Best Christmas Dinner Ever!

I made this for Christmas dinner. It was my husband and I and another couple. It was really pretty easy. I like that it was turkey, stuffing and gravy in one recipe. The oven temp and cooking times were right on. Turkey was not dry at all.

Multiple Dishes in One
Comments
12/25/2010
terrible...must be a mistake in the recipe

We made this exactly as printed for a holiday dinner - turkey registered about 77 degrees after recommended cooking time. We ended up having the microwave our expensive turkey breast and basically ruined it. Either the temp or the cooking time is WAY off. Do not attempt!

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