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Saag Tofu

March/April 2007, EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook (2008)

Your rating: None Average: 3.8 (94 votes)

Also known as palak paneer, saag paneer is an Indian classic composed mostly of spinach and paneer—a cow's-milk cheese that is curdled then pressed until firm. Here, we substitute tofu for the cheese and incorporate low-fat yogurt and sliced onions for a healthier version that retains its authenticity.



READER'S COMMENT:
"This was delicious and fast and you could practically feel the nutrients soaking into your body. It probably isn't the *most* authentic Indian food in the world but it was a quick, delicious, healthy week night meal. "
Saag Tofu

16 Reviews for Saag Tofu

01/23/2011
Amazing!

This tasted pretty much like GREAT indian food! I had no problem with the yogurt and my husband adored this recipe. We only added red hot sauce because, unlike indian food, this was extremely mild. I highly recommend this recipe.

Easy and delicious
Comments
10/24/2010
Anonymous

It was terrible. When I added the yogurt it instantly curdled. WTF? All those ingredients and time wasted.

Comments
09/21/2010
Anonymous

This was delicious and fast and you could practically feel the nutrients soaking into your body. It probably isn't the *most* authentic Indian food in the world but it was a quick, delicious, healthy week night meal.

Comments
09/21/2010
Anonymous

We loved this recipe, but our yogurt curdled as soon as it was mixed int the spinach/tofu mixture. It tasted fine, but looked like scrambled eggs and wasn't creamy. Do you have any suggestions? We used fat-free yogurt made at home from organic milk.

Comments
08/23/2010
Anonymous

I have not made this, but just looking at the recipe makes me skeptical. Almost all indian cooks will tell you that you don't use curry powder. Its just not a spice used in Indian cooking, and while many of the same spices we do use ends up in curry powder, you can't control the amounts of the spices with curry powder. I'd suggest a different blend of spices including coriander, cumin (already in the recipe), tumeric, red chili powder (the indian one, not a mexican one), and garam masala, which is another spice blend that most indians to use (combination of warm spices such as cardamom, cinnamon, anise seed, and perhaps some others I can't recall right now). Lets not call this authentic with the curry powder addition!

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