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Rolled Sugar Cookies

September/October 1996, The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005)

Your rating: None Average: 3.2 (55 votes)

These make great holiday cookies when cut into shapes and decorated, but they're also a fine addition to your everyday cookie jar. We've cut the butter from an entire stick to just 2 tablespoons, cooking it until it turns a nutty brown to maximize the rich flavor.



READER'S COMMENT:
"Luddekens/Anonymous, if you didn't find an answer yet, the dough will look like crumbs after it gets combined by the mixer. However, it comes together as you shape it into a ball/disk, and becomes super pliables as you roll it. If it's...
Rolled Sugar Cookies Recipe

9 Reviews for Rolled Sugar Cookies

09/20/2010
Anonymous

I always use this recipe for my rolled cookies! It rolls great, bakes awesomely, and tastes like heaven. I always double the recipe and freeze half of it (in 2 parts) for a quick dozen of cookies to make later. My daughter adores decorating them with colored sugar sprinkles.

They are also safe to take to the day-care, since they are totally nuts-free. A real winner!!!

Comments
07/23/2010
Anonymous

These are so tasty! I made a batch of larger sized cookies (15 instead of 30) and they ended up almost cake-like. I substituted 1/4 of a tsp of vanilla extract with almond and it give a nice buttery hint. Also, topped with cinnimon and sugar. Yum!

Comments
12/24/2009
Anonymous

These are really good, and they are just sweet enough to be really good without being sickeningly sweet. I added some sprinkles for one batch, a few dark chocolate chips for one, and made one just as directed. They were all a hit! Thanks!

Ruth Anne

Comments
11/24/2009
Anonymous

We taste tested this recipe against the fully buttered version and they were amazingly comparable considering the differing butter contents. Thanks for a healthier sugar cookie recipe that still tastes crispy and sweet like a sugar cookie should.

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