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Red Pepper & Goat Cheese Frittata

August/September 2006, The EatingWell Healthy in a Hurry Cookbook (2006)

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A frittata is a baked omelet, far easier because it lacks that pesky step of flipping it. Frittatas appeared on the Saturnia, a fashionable Italian cruise ship in the post-WWII years. The dish was an elegant lunch on transatlantic crossings and became a U.S. craze when The New York Times ran the first English-language recipe in 1952.



READER'S COMMENT:
"I love fritattas. I make them for breakfast quite often. They are delicious nutritious way of getting a whole lot of vitamins, vegetables and protein in one simple serving. "
Red Pepper & Goat Cheese Frittata

Makes: 6 servings

Active Time:

Total Time:

Ingredients

  • 8 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup sliced red bell pepper
  • 1 bunch scallions, trimmed and sliced
  • 1/2 cup crumbled goat cheese

Preparation

  1. Position rack in upper third of oven; preheat broiler.
  2. Whisk eggs, oregano, salt and pepper in a medium bowl. Heat oil in a large, ovenproof, nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add bell pepper and scallions and cook, stirring constantly, until the scallions are just wilted, 30 seconds to 1 minute.
  3. Pour the egg mixture over the vegetables and cook, lifting the edges of the frittata to allow the uncooked egg to flow underneath, until the bottom is light golden, 2 to 3 minutes. Dot the top of the frittata with cheese, transfer the pan to the oven and broil until puffy and lightly golden on top, 2 to 3 minutes. Let rest for about 3 minutes before serving. Serve hot or cold.

Tips & Notes

  • Make Ahead Tip: Let cool, cover and refrigerate for up to 1 day; serve cold.

Nutrition

Per serving: 179 calories; 13 g fat (4 g sat, 7 g mono); 286 mg cholesterol; 4 g carbohydrates; 11 g protein; 1 g fiber; 326 mg sodium; 200 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (60% daily value), Selenium (31% dv), Vitamin A (25% dv).

Exchanges: 1 vegetable, 1 1/2 medium fat meat, 1 1/2 fat


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