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Pumpkin Cheesecake with Gingersnap-Walnut Crust

November/December 2011

Your rating: None Average: 3.9 (34 votes)

We pulled out a few of our favorite EatingWell tricks to achieve plenty of creaminess in our pumpkin cheesecake without all the saturated fat of a typical recipe: nutrient-packed canned pumpkin and pureed nonfat cottage cheese replace some of the cream cheese. A touch of pumpkin pie spice warms up the flavor. For the crust, shop the natural-foods section for gingersnaps without any hydrogenated oil. Simple toasted walnuts are an elegant garnish. Or try making candied walnuts. Just be careful not to eat all of them before they make it to the cake!


Pumpkin Cheesecake with Gingersnap-Walnut Crust Recipe

2 Reviews for Pumpkin Cheesecake with Gingersnap-Walnut Crust

11/26/2011
Anonymous
Delicious, light, creamy

Delicious, light cheesecake. Enjoyed even by someone who doesn't particularly like cheesecake or pumpkin. I used Mi-Del gingersnap cookies which contain whole wheat flour and the crust was a bit more heavy than it may have been with "traditional" gingersnaps. I also made the candied walnuts that decorated the cake for a lovely presentation. I don't have an electric mixer, so did it all by hand, so it probably wasn't as smooth as the recipe intended, but this recipe is a keeper and I will make it again.

Comments
11/23/2011
Anonymous
A Smooth Creamy Delight

Who knew non-fat cottage cheese could be so delicious and creamy? This cheesecake was easy to make and tasted just as sinful as a full-fat cheesecake. I did drain some of the liquid out of the cottage cheese before processing. I also used a fresh pumpkin that I baked in the oven (then measured out 15 oz on a kitchen scale) and the triple-ginger cookies from Trader Joes. In fact I bought ALL ingredients at TJs. My convection oven set at 325 degrees cooked the cheesecake in about 45 minutes, much shorter than the 1.5 hours in the recipe.

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