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Okra & Chickpea Tagine

September/October 2008

Your rating: None Average: 4.2 (52 votes)

This quick and easy okra and chickpea stew is full of Moroccan flavors. The name “tagine” refers to the two-part, cone-shaped casserole dish in which countless slow-cooked Moroccan dishes are prepared. You don't need to prepare this in a tagine dish—it works well in a large saucepan—but if you have one, here's a chance to use it.



READER'S COMMENT:
"I omitted the bell peppers - and I used turmeric and garam masala as spices. Pretty good - an Indian touch to this Moroccan dish...... "
Okra & Chickpea Tagine

15 Reviews for Okra & Chickpea Tagine

10/12/2009

I've made this twice and it was terrific both times. I love spicy food, but found that a full teaspoon of harissa was a bit much. My boyfriend who likes his food much spicier than I thought it was perfect. One warning: when you blanch the okra, it will turn very slimy. The water will thicken and also look slimy. Don't worry, once you drain the okra and add it to the rest of the ingredients it loses its sliminess. I'll make this dish again -- it is the perfect way to use okra, tomatoes and peppers in my CSA share!

Comments
09/23/2009
Anonymous

One of the better vegetarian recipes that I have tried, added extra hot sauce, no harissa available

dolores crespo, Centerville, OH

Comments
09/23/2009
Anonymous

I have made this twice and everyone has loved it. I served it on Whole wheat couscous with grilled lamb leg slices.

Harriet Wise, Frederick, MD

Comments
09/23/2009
Anonymous

This was excellent! The only modification we made was to double the garlic-chile sauce (no harissa for us!) So good. It probably took a tad over an hour too, as an FYI.

Emily, Castro Valley, CA

Comments
09/23/2009
Anonymous

I made this for dinner tonight. Everyone liked it. Next time I will use more chili garlic sauce.

Julie, Littleton, CO

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